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HomeMy WebLinkAbout010918 CC AgendaIn compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the office of the City Clerk (951) 694-6444. Notification 48 hours prior to a meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to that meeting [28 CFR 35.102.35.104 ADA Title II] AGENDA TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 41000 MAIN STREET TEMECULA, CALIFORNIA JANUARY 9, 2018 — 7:00 PM At approximately 9:45 P.M., the City Council will determine which of the remaining agenda items can be considered and acted upon prior to 10:00 RM. and may continue all other items on which additional time is required until a future meeting. All meetings are scheduled to end at 10:00 P.M. 6:00 PM - The City Council will convene in Closed Session in the Canyons Conference Room on the third floor of the Temecula City Hall concerning the following matters: 1. Conference with Legal Counsel — Potential Litigation. The City Council will meet in closed session with the City Attorney pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9(d)(4) with respect to one matter of potential litigation. A point has been reached where, in the opinion of the City Attorney, based on existing facts and circumstances, there is a significant exposure to litigation involving the City. Based on existing facts and circumstances, the City Council will decide whether to initiate litigation. 2. Conference with Real Property Negotiators. The City Council will meet in closed session pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8 regarding the potential lease of real property owned by the City of Temecula, located at the northeast corner of Temecula Parkway and La Paz Road in the City of Temecula (APN No. 922-190-035). The parties to the negotiations for the potential lease of the property are: Neal Wichard — SAWS, LLC and the City of Temecula. Negotiators for the City of Temecula are: Aaron Adams, Peter Thorson, Greg Butler, and Pat Thomas. Under negotiation are price and terms for the City's lease of the property. 3. Conference with Real Property Negotiators. The City Council will meet in closed session pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8 regarding the potential sale of a portion of the real property owned by the City of Temecula, located at southwest corner of Old Town Front Street and Temecula Parkway in the City of Temecula (APN Nos. 922-210-057, 922-210-059, 922-210-060). The parties to the negotiations for the potential sale of a portion of the property are: State of California and the City of Temecula Negotiators for the City of Temecula are: Aaron Adams, Peter Thorson, Greg Butler, and Pat Thomas. Under negotiation are price and terms for the City's sale of the property. Next in Order: Ordinance: 18-01 Resolution: 18-01 1 CALL TO ORDER: Mayor Matt Rahn Prelude Music: Noah Stevens Invocation: Pastor William Rench of Calvary Baptist Church Flag Salute: Mayor Pro Tem Mike Naggar ROLL CALL: Comerchero, Edwards, Naggar, Stewart, Rahn PRESENTATIONS/PROCLAMATIONS Presentation to Incoming/Outgoing Mayor and TCSD President Presentation of Certificate of Appreciation to Susan Miyamoto Presentation of 15 -Year Service Pin to Maryann Edwards and 20 -Year Service Pins to Albert Blair and John Telesio PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 30 minutes is provided for members of the public to address the City Council on items that appear within the Consent Calendar or a matter not listed on the agenda. Each speaker is limited to three minutes. If the speaker chooses to address the City Council on an item listed on the Consent Calendar or a matter not listed on the agenda, a Request to Speak form may be filled out and filed with the City Clerk prior to the City Council addressing Public Comments and the Consent Calendar. Once the speaker is called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. For all Public Hearing or Council Business items on the agenda, a Request to Speak form may be filed with the City Clerk prior to the City Council addressing that item. Each speaker is limited to five minutes. CITY COUNCIL REPORTS Reports by the members of the City Council on matters not on the agenda will be made at this time. A total, not to exceed, 10 minutes will be devoted to these reports. CONSENT CALENDAR NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC All matters listed under Consent Calendar are considered to be routine and all will be enacted by one roll call vote. There will be no discussion of these items unless Members of the City Council request specific items be removed from the Consent Calendar for separate action. 2 1 Waive Reading of Standard Ordinances and Resolutions RECOMMENDATION: 1.1 That the City Council waive the reading of the text of all standard ordinances and resolutions included in the agenda except as specifically required by the Government Code. 2 Approve the Action Minutes of December 12, 2017 RECOMMENDATION: 2.1 That the City Council approve the action minutes and the Joint Meeting of the City Council/Temecula Community Services District action minutes of December 12, 2017. 3 Approve the List of Demands RECOMMENDATION: 3.1 That the City Council adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 18- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A 4 Approve the City Treasurer's Report as of November 30, 2017 RECOMMENDATION: 4.1 That the City Council approve and file the City Treasurer's Report as of November 30, 2017. 5 Approve Financial Statements for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 RECOMMENDATION: 5.1 Receive and file the Financial Statements for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017; 5.2 Approve an increase in appropriation in Fund 135 Business Incubator in Transfer Out and Transfer In to the General Fund to close out this fund; 5.3 Approve a transfer of $3,000 from Overtime Wages 001.165.999.5121 to Salaries and Wages 001,163.999.5100. 6 Adopt Ordinance No. 18-01 Approving the Altair Specific Plan Proiect and Adopt Ordinance No. 18-02 Approving the Development Agreement with Ambient Communities (Planning Application Nos. PA14-0158, PA14-0159, PA14-0160, and PA14-0161) (Second Reading) 3 RECOMMENDATION: 6.1 Adopt an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 18-01 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN #15 ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310- 048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) 6.2 Adopt an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 18-02 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT WITH AMBIENT COMMUNITIES FOR THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN #15 ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310- 013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) 7 Adopt Ordinance 18-03 Reauthorizing and Readopting the City's Public, Educational, and Governmental Access Support Fee for Cable Television Franchisees (Second Reading) RECOMMENDATION: 7.1 That the City Council adopt an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 18-03 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA REAUTHORIZING AND READOPTING THE CITY'S PUBLIC, EDUCATIONAL, AND GOVERNMENTAL ACCESS SUPPORT FEE 8 Approve Annual Legislative Platform for Calendar Year 2018 RECOMMENDATION: 8.1 That the City Council approve the annual Legislative Platform for calendar year 2018. 4 9 Approve Annual Boards and Commissions Handbook for Calendar Year 2018 RECOMMENDATION: 9.1 That the City Council approve the annual Boards and Commissions Handbook for calendar year 2018. 10 Approve Annual Citywide Records Retention Schedule and Records Destruction for Calendar Year 2018 RECOMMENDATION: 10.1 That the City Council adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 18- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING REVISIONS TO THE ESTABLISHED CITYWIDE RECORDS RETENTION SCHEDULE, THEREBY AMENDING AND RESTATING THE RECORDS RETENTION POLICY, AND APPROVING THE DESTRUCTION OF CERTAIN RECORDS 11 Consent of City Council to the Sale of Roripaugh Valley Restoration's Interests in the Roripaugh Ranch Development Agreement to Woodside Homes RECOMMENDATION: 11.1 That the City Council adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 18- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA CONSENTING TO THE SALE OF RORIPAUGH VALLEY RESTORATION'S INTERESTS IN THE RORIPAUGH RANCH DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT TO WOODSIDE HOMES (WOODSIDE 05S, LP) 12 Approve a Cooperative Agreement with Temecula Valley Genealogical Society in Support of Facility Use RECOMMENDATION: 12.1 That the City Council approve the Cooperative Agreement with Temecula Valley Genealogical Society for Facility Use. 13 Approve the First Amendment to the Agreement with Gary Austin Casson for the Purchase of Additional Artwork for the Fallen Heroes Memorial Project RECOMMENDATION: 13.1 Approve the First Amendment to the Agreement with Gary Austin Casson, in the amount of $7,200, for the fabrication and installation of artwork on retaining wall; 5 13.2 Transfer $7,200 from Fund 198 Public Art Account 198.199.999.5250 — Other Outside Services to Account 210.190.115 — Fallen Heroes Memorial Capital Improvement Project. 14 Approve an Additional Appropriation and Award a Construction Contract to Hillcrest Contracting for the Temecula Park and Ride, PW06-09 RECOMMENDATION: 14.1 Approve an additional appropriation of $400,000 from the Measure "S" Fund Balance to the Temecula Park and Ride, PW06-09; 14,2 Increase the amount of CMAQ Funds appropriated in the FY 2018-22 CIP Budget by an amount of $607,281; 14.3 Award a Construction Contract to Hillcrest Contracting, in the amount of $1,734,574, for the Temecula Park and Ride, PW06-09; 14.4 Authorize the City Manager to approve Change Orders not to exceed the contingency amount of $173,457.40, which is equal to 10% of the contract amount. 15 Accept Improvements and File the Notice of Completion for the Citywide Concrete Repairs Fiss3l Year 2016-17, PW16-04 RECOMMENDATION: 15.1 Approve an Additional Appropriation of $10,474 from the Measure "S" Fund Balance to the Citywide Concrete Repairs Fiscal Year 2016-17, PW16-04; 15.2 Approve an increase to the contingency, by $10,474 for the Citywide Concrete Repairs Fiscal Year 2016-17, PW16-04 and increase the City Manager change order approval authority by the same amount; 15.3 Accept the improvements for the Citywide Concrete Repairs Fiscal Year 2016-17, PW16-04 as complete; 15.4 Direct the City Clerk to file and record the Notice of Completion, release the Performance Bond, and accept a one-year Maintenance Bond in the amount of 10% of the Contract amount; 15.5 Release the Labor and Materials Bond seven months after filing the Notice of Completion, if no liens have been filed. ******************** RECESS CITY COUNCIL MEETING TO SCHEDULED MEETINGS OF THE TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT, THE SUCCESSOR AGENCY TO THE TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY, THE TEMECULA HOUSING AUTHORITY, AND THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY ***A A A A A A AAA***#-**** 6 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT MEETING Next in Order: Ordinance: CSD 18-01 Resolution: CSD 18-01 CALL TO ORDER: President Jeff Comerchero ROLL CALL: DIRECTORS: Edwards, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart, Comerchero CSD PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 30 minutes is provided for members of the public to address the Board of Directors on items that appear within the Consent Calendar or a matter not listed on the agenda. Each speaker is limited to three minutes. If the speaker chooses to address the Board of Directors on an item listed on the Consent Calendar or a matter not listed on the agenda, a Request to Speak form may be filled out and filed with the City Clerk prior to the Board of Directors addressing Public Comments and the Consent Calendar. Once the speaker is called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. For all Public Hearing or District Business items on the agenda, a Request to Speak form may be filed with the City Clerk prior to the Board of Directors addressing that item. Each speaker is limited to five minutes. CSD CONSENT CALENDAR NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC All matters listed under Consent Calendar are considered to be routine and all will be enacted by one roll call vote. There will be no discussion of these items unless Members of the Temecula Community Services District request specific items be removed from the Consent Calendar for separate action. 16 Approve the Action Minutes of December 12, 2017 RECOMMENDATION: 16.1 That the Board of Directors approve the action minutes and the Joint Meeting of the City CouncilfTemecula Community Services District action minutes of December 12, 2017. 17 Approve Financial Statements for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 RECOMMENDATION: 17.1 That the Board of Directors receive and file the Financial Statements for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017. 7 18 Approve a Cooperative Agreement with Temecula Grape Stompers Square Dance Club in Support of Facility Use RECOMMENDATION: 18.1 That the Board of Directors approve the Cooperative Agreement with Temecula Grape Stompers Square Dance Club in support of facility use. CSD DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SERVICES REPORT CSD GENERAL MANAGER REPORT CSD BOARD OF DIRECTORS REPORTS CSD ADJOURNMENT Next regular meeting: Tuesday, January 23, 2018, at 5:30 PM, for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM, City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. 8 SUCCESSOR AGENCY TO THE TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY MEETING Next in Order: Ordinance: SARDA 18-01 Resolution: SARDA 18-01 CALL TO ORDER: Chairperson Matt Rahn ROLL CALL: DIRECTORS: Comerchero, Edwards, Naggar, Stewart, Rahn SARDA PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 15 minutes is provided for members of the public to address the Board of Directors on items that appear within the Consent Calendar or a matter not listed on the agenda. Each speaker is limited to three minutes. If the speaker chooses to address the Board of Directors on an item listed on the Consent Calendar or a matter not listed on the agenda, a Request to Speak form may be filled out and filed with the City Clerk prior to the Board of Directors addressing Public Comments and the Consent Calendar. Once the speaker is called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. For all Public Hearing or Agency Business items on the agenda, a Request to Speak form may be filed with the City Clerk prior to the Board of Directors addressing that item. Each speaker is limited to five minutes. SARDA CONSENT CALENDAR NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC All matters listed under Consent Calendar are considered to be routine and all will be enacted by one roll call vote. There will be no discussion of these items unless Members of the Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency request specific items be removed from the Consent Calendar for separate action. 19 Approve Financial Statements for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 RECOMMENDATION: 19.1 That the Board of Directors receive and file the Financial Statements for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017. SARDA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT SARDA BOARD OF DIRECTORS REPORTS SARDA ADJOURNMENT Next regular meeting: Tuesday, January 23, 2018, at 5:30 PM, for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM, City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. 9 TEMECULA HOUSING AUTHORITY — No Meeting TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY — No Meeting RECONVENE TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL CITY COUNCIL BUSINESS 20 Introduce Ordinance Adding Chapter 8.49, City Tree Care and Preservation, to Title 8, Health and Safety, of the Temecula Municipal Code RECOMMENDATION: 20.1 That the City Council introduce and read by title only an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 18 - AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ADDING A NEW CHAPTER 8.49, CITY TREE CARE AND PRESERVATION, TO TITLE 8, HEALTH AND SAFETY, OF THE TEMECULA MUNICIPAL CODE 21 Adopt a Resolution in Support of Move 1-15 Through Temecula Valley and Reaffirm Related Task Force Appointments (At the Request of Mayor Rahn and Mayor Pro Tem Naggar) RECOMMENDATION: 21.1 That the City Council adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 18- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA IN SUPPORT OF "MOVE 1-15 THROUGH TEMECULA VALLEY," A SOUTHWEST RIVERSIDE COUNTY REGIONAL TASK FORCE CREATED TO ADDRESS THE DAILY INTERSTATE 15 TRAFFIC CONGESTION BETWEEN THE 1-15/215 JUNCTION AND THE SAN DIEGO COUNTY LINE 22 Selection of 2018 City Council Committees RECOMMENDATION: 22.1 That the City Council consider and appoint members to serve on various City Council Committees for calendar year 2018. BOARD/COMMISSION REPORTS CITY MANAGER REPORT CITY ATTORNEY REPORT 10 ADJOURNMENT Next regular meeting: Tuesday, January 23, 2018, at 5:30 PM, for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM, City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC The agenda packet (including staff reports and public Closed Session information) will be available for public viewing in the Main Reception area at the Temecula Civic Center (41000 Main Street, Temecula) after 4:00 PM the Friday before the City Council meeting. At that time, the agenda packet may also be accessed on the City's website — TemeculaCA.gov — and will be available for public viewing at the respective meeting. Supplemental material received after the posting of the Agenda Any supplemental material distributed to a majority of the City Council regarding any item on the agenda, after the posting of the agenda. will be available for public viewing in the Main Reception area at the Temecula Civic Center (41000 Main Street, Temecula, 8:00 AM — 5:00 PM). In addition, such material will be made available on the City's website — TemeculaCA.aov — and will be available for public review at the respective meeting. If you have questions regarding any item on the agenda for this meeting, please contact the City Clerk's Department, (951) 694-6444. 11 CITY COUNCIL CONSENT Item No. 1 City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Randi Johl, City Clerk DATE: January 9, 2018 SUBJECT: Waive Reading of Standard Ordinances and Resolutions PREPARED BY: Randi Johl, City Clerk RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council waive the reading of the text of all standard ordinances and resolutions included in the agenda except as specifically required by the Government Code. BACKGROUND: The City of Temecula is a general law city formed under the laws of the State of California. With respect to adoption of ordinances and resolutions, the City adheres to the requirements set forth in the Government Code. Unless otherwise required, the full reading of the text of standard ordinances and resolutions is waived. FISCAL IMPACT: None ATTACHMENTS: None Item No. 2 ACTION MINUTES TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL ADJOURNED REGULAR MEETING CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 41000 MAIN STREET TEMECULA, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 12, 2017 — 3:00 PM No Closed Session At 3:03 PM Mayor Edwards called the City Council meeting to order to consider the matters described on the Closed Session agenda. CALL TO ORDER: Mayor Maryann Edwards Prelude Music: None Invocation: To Be Announced Flag Salute: Council Member Mike Naggar ROLL CALL: Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart, Edwards PRESENTATIONS/PROCLAMATIONS Introduction of Jessica Munoz, Riverside Vice -President of Voices for Children, the Non - Profit Training Arm of Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) PUBLIC COMMENTS The following individuals addressed the City Council: • Evan Cohen CITY COUNCIL REPORTS CONSENT CALENDAR 1 Waive Reading of Standard Ordinances and Resolutions - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 1.1 That the City Council waive the reading of the text of all standard ordinances and resolutions included in the agenda except as specifically required by the Government Code. 2 Approve the Action Minutes of November 28, 2017 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Nagger, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 1 2.1 That the City Council approve the action minutes of November 28, 2017. 3 Approve the List of Demands - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 3.1 That the City Council adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 17-82 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A 4 Approve the City Treasurer's Report as of October 31, 2017 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 4.1 That the City Council approve and file the City Treasurer's Report as of October 31, 2017. 5 Approve the Citywide Cumulative Purchase of Miscellaneous Goods, Supplies and Equipment Anticipated to Exceed $30,000 Per Vendor for Fiscal Year 2017-18 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 5.1 That the City Council approve the purchase of miscellaneous consumable and durable goods, supplies and equipment from the following vendors for Fiscal Year 2017-18: Vendor FY 17-18 Estimated Amount Description of Purchases Downs Fueling $50,000 Vehicle Gasoline Hanks Hardware $85,000 Miscellaneous Hardware Items Home Depot $35,000 Miscellaneous Hardware Items Maintex $35,000 Janitorial Supplies Mission Electric $35,000 Electrical Equipment and Supplies Waxie Sanitary Supplies $40,000 Janitorial Supplies 6 Approve a Five-year Contract with MUFG Union Bank N.A. for Banking Services - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 2 6.1 Approve a Five -Year Contract with MUFG Union Bank, N.A., for banking services; 6.2 Authorize the City Manager and City Attorney to execute all necessary agreements. 7 Approve a Consultant Services Agreement with SDI Presence, LLC, for IT Inventory, Assessment, and Lifecycle Plan Consulting - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 7.1 Approve a Consultant Services Agreement with SDI Presence, LLC, in an amount not to exceed $93,325, for IT Inventory, Assessment, and Lifecycle Planning Services; 7.2 Authorize the City Manager to approve Contract Change Orders up to 10% of the contract amount or $9,333; 7.3 Appropriate $102,658 from Fund 320 — Information Technology Available Fund Balance. 8 Approve a Consultant Services Agreement with SoftResources, LLC, for Asset Management Consulting and Project Management Services - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 8.1 Approve a Consultant Services Agreement with SoftResources, LLC, in an amount not to exceed $283,890, for Asset Management Consulting and Project Management Services; 8.2 Authorize the City Manager to approve Contract Change Orders up to 10% of the contract amount or $28,389; 8.3 Appropriate $312,279 from Fund 320 — Information Technology, funded through an interfund transfer from the Measure S Fund in the amount of $135,251, an interfund transfer from the General Fund in the amount of $77,028, and a $100,000 appropriation from Fund 320's available Fund Balance. 9 Approve the Amended Salary Schedule to Include Minimum Wage Adjustments Effective January 1, 2018 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 9.1 Approve the Amended Salary Schedule to be Effective January 1, 2018; 9.2 Appropriate $44,129 from the General Fund available fund balance, and $14,350 from Fund 320 - Information Technology available fund balance. 3 10 Approve the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Agreement for Funding Under Senate Bill 821 Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program, and Authorize the City Manager to Execute the Agreement - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 10.1 Approve the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Agreement for Funding under Senate Bill 821 Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program for program funding for the Citywide Buffered Bike -Lane Striping project; 10.2 Authorize the City Manager to execute the Agreement. 11 Approve Access Easement Agreement and Reimbursement Agreement with Temecula Valley Hospitality, LLC, for Temecula Parkway/Wabash Lane Traffic Signal Improvements and Certain Onsite Improvements Related to the Temecula Park and Ride Project - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 11.1 That the City Council adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 17-83 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE ACCESS EASEMENT AGREEMENT AND REIMBURSEMENT AGREEMENT BETWEEN CITY OF TEMECULA AND TEMECULA VALLEY HOSPITALITY, LLC FOR TEMECULA PARKWAY/WABASH LANE TRAFFIC SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS AND CERTAIN ONSITE IMPROVEMENTS; AND FINDING THE CITY'S ACTION EXEMPT FROM CEQA 12 Approve the First Amendment to a Three -Year Agreement with Counts Unlimited, Inc. for Contractor Services for Fiscal Year 2017-18 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 12.1 That the City Council approve the First Amendment to a Three -Year Agreement for Contractor Services with Counts Unlimited, Inc., in the amount of $20,000, for Citywide Traffic Count Data Collection for Fiscal Year 2017-18. 13 Amend the Capital Improvement Program Budget for Fiscal Years 2018-22 to Add the Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail Extension and Interconnect, PW08-04, as a Standalone Project, and Remove the Project from the Bike Lane and Trail Program — Citywide Project Budget - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 4 13.1 That the City Council adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 17-84 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA TO AMEND THE CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEARS 2018-22 TO ADD THE SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK PEDESTRIAN/BICYCLE TRAIL EXTENSION AND INTERCONNECT, PW08-04, AS A STANDALONE PROJECT, AND REMOVE THE PROJECT FROM THE BIKE LANE AND TRAIL PROGRAM — CITYWIDE PROJECT BUDGET 14 Approve the Plans and Specifications, and Authorize Solicitation of Construction Bids for the Sidewalks — Old Town Boardwalk Enhancement, PW17-16 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 14.1 Approve the Plans and Specifications, and Authorize the Department of Public Works to Solicit Construction Bids for the Sidewalks — Old Town Boardwalk Enhancement, PW 17-16; 14.2 Make a finding that this project is exempt from CEQA pursuant to Article 19, Categorical Exemption, Section 15301, Existing Facilities, of the CEQA Guidelines. 15 Establish an All -Way Stop Control at the Intersections of Temeku Drive and Pin Way/Legends Golf Club Driveway, and Temeku Drive and Gleneagles Drive - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 15.1 That the City Council adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 17-85 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA, ESTABLISHING AN ALL -WAY STOP CONTROL AT THE INTERSECTIONS OF TEMEKU DRIVE AND PIN WAY/LEGENDS GOLF CLUB DRIVEWAY, AND TEMEKU DRIVE AND GLENEAGLES DRIVE RECESS: At 3:15 PM, the City Council recessed and convened as the Temecula Community Services District Meeting. At 3:17 PM, the City Council resumed with the remainder of the City Council Agenda. 5 RECONVENE TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING 19 Consider the Altair Specific Plan Project Including a General Plan Amendment a Specific Plan. a Tentative Tract Map, and a Development Plan (Planning Application Nos. PA14-0158, PA14-0159, PA14-0160, and PA14-0161) - Approved Staff Recommendation (4-1); Motion by Edwards, Second by Comerchero; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, and Edwards with Stewart voting no. The following individuals addressed the City Council on this item: • Greg Brooks • Mary Lou Rosczyk • John Kelliher • Darren Diess • Armando Garcia • Grant Anderson • Cynthia Harris • Tim Noonan • J.P. Rose • Matt Weaver • Pam Nelson • Ed Morel • Trish Smith • Cara Lacey • Dan Silver • Alice Sullivan • Jeff Gutowski • Robin Parks • Mary Bear Magee • Gerard Ste. Marie • Karin Cleary -Rose • Matt Nelson • Ms. Miller • Wayne Hall RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council conduct a Public Hearing and consider the Altair Project including a General Plan Amendment, a Specific Plan, a Tentative Tract Map, and a Development Agreement (Planning Application Nos. PA14-0158, PA14-0159, PA14-0160, and PA14-0161) and adopt related resolutions and introduce ordinance: 19.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 17-86 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA CERTIFYING THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPTING FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPTING A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPTING A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING 6 PROGRAM FOR THE ALTAIR PROJECT, CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES, GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APN 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310- 048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) 19.2 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 17-87 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING A GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT APPLICATION TO REVISE THE CURRENT ALIGNMENT OF THE PROPOSED WESTERN BYPASS, AND TO RECOGNIZE THE PROPOSED LAND USES IDENTIFIED IN THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN BY REPLACING INDUSTRIAL PARK (IP), OPEN SPACE (OS), MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (M), HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (H), AND HILLSIDE RESIDENTIAL (HR) WITH SPECIFIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION (SPI) ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) 19.3 Introduce and read by title only an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 18-01 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN #15 ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310- 048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) 19.4 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 17-88 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING TENTATIVE TRACT MAP 36959 TO SUBDIVIDE 270 ACRES INTO 63 NUMBERED LOTS TO DEFINE THE OPEN SPACE AND THE VILLAGE AREAS, AND 20 LETTERED LOTS TO DEFINE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE STREETS FOR THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN GENERALLY 7 LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) 19.5 Introduce and read by title only an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 18-02 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT WITH AMBIENT COMMUNITIES FOR THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN #15 ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) CITY COUNCIL BUSINESS 20 Adopt Ordinance Reauthorizing the Public, Educational and Government Fee for Cable Television Franchisees — On 20.1, Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Rahn; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. On 20.2, Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Comerchero, Second by Stewart; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. RECOMMENDATION: 20.1 Introduce and read by title only the following ordinance: ORDINANCE NO. 18-03 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA REAUTHORIZING AND READOPTING THE CITY'S PUBLIC, EDUCATIONAL, AND GOVERNMENTAL ACCESS SUPPORT FEE 20.2 Adopt by 4/5 vote the following ordinance: ORDINANCE NO. 17-14 AN URGENCY ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA REAUTHORIZING THE CITY'S PUBLIC, EDUCATIONAL, AND GOVERNMENTAL ACCESS SUPPORT FEE ADJOURNMENT 8 JOINT MEETING OF THE CITY COUNCIL AND TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT 21 Appoint the Mayor and Mayor Pro Tem for Calendar Year 2018 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Edwards, Second by Rahn; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. For the 2018 calendar year, Mayor Pro Tempore Matt Rahn was selected as Mayor and Council Member Mike Naggar was selected as Mayor Pro Tempore. RECOMMENDATION: 21.1 Appoint the Mayor, effective January 1, 2018, to preside until December 31, 2018; 21.2 Appoint the Mayor Pro Tem, effective January 1, 2018, to hold this office until December 31, 2018. 22 Appoint the President and Vice -President of the Temecula Community Services District for Calendar Year 2018 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0); Motion by Naggar, Second by Rahn; and electronic vote reflected approval by Comerchero, Naggar, Rahn, Stewart and Edwards. For the 2018 calendar year, Council Member Jeff Comerchero was selected as TCSD President and Council Member James Stewart was selected as Vice -President. RECOMMENDATION: 22.1 Appoint the President, effective January 1, 2018, to preside until December 31, 2018; 22.2 Appoint the Vice -President, effective January 1, 2018, to hold this office until December 31, 2018. ADJOURNMENT BOARD/COMMISSION REPORTS CITY MANAGER REPORT CITY ATTORNEY REPORT ADJOURNMENT At 9:17 PM, the City Council meeting was formally adjourned to Tuesday, January 9, 2018, for a regular session commencing at 7.00 PM, City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. Maryann Edwards, Mayor ATTEST: Randi Johl, City Clerk [SEAL] 9 Item No. 3 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Jennifer Hennessy, Director of Finance DATE: January 9, 2018 SUBJECT: Approve the List of Demands PREPARED BY: Pascale Brown, Fiscal Services Manager Jada Shafe, Accounting Technician II RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 18- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A BACKGROUND: All claims and demands are reported and summarized for review and approval by the City Council on a routine basis at each City Council meeting. The attached claims represent the paid claims and demands since the last City Council meeting. FISCAL IMPACT: All claims and demands were paid from appropriated funds or authorized resources of the City and have been recorded in accordance with the City's policies and procedures. ATTACHMENTS: 1. Resolution 2. List of Demands RESOLUTION NO. 18- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. That the fallowing claims and demands as set forth in Exhibit A, on file in the office of the City Clerk, has been reviewed by the City Manager's Office and that the same are hereby allowed in the amount of $9,445,132.35. Section 2. The City Clerk shall certify the adoption of this resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 9th day of January, 2018. Matt Rahn, Mayor ATTEST: Randi Johl, City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA I, Randi Johl, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 18- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 9th day of January. 2018, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Randi Johl, City Clerk CITY OF TEMECULA LIST OF DEMANDS 11/30/2017 TOTAL CHECK RUN: $ 762,539.89 12/07/2017 TOTAL CHECK RUN: 3,191,021.72 12/14/2017 TOTAL CHECK RUN: 4,492,997.89 11/30/2017 TOTAL PAYROLL RUN: 411,276.77 12/07/2017 TOTAL PAYROLL RUN: 82,006.09 12/14/2017 TOTAL PAYROLL RUN: 505,289.99 TOTAL LIST OF DEMANDS FOR 01/09/2018 COUNCIL MEETING: j 9,445.132.35 DISBURSEMENTS BV FUND: CHECKS: CITY OF TEMECULA LIST OF DEMANDS 001 GENERAL FUND 120 DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FUND 140 COMMUNITY DEV BLOCK GRANT 165 AFFORDABLE HOUSING 170 MEASURE A FUND 190 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT 192 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL B STREET LIGHTS 194 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "D" REFUSE/RECYCLING 196 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. 197 TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND 210 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS FUND 300 INSURANCE FUND 305 WORKER'S COMPENSATION 320 INFORMATION SYSTEMS 325 TECHNOLOGY REPLACEMENT FUND 330 CENTRAL SERVICES 340 FACILITIES 380 SARDA DEBT SERVICE FUND 395 2011 FINANCING LEASE 2001 & 2008 COPS 472 CFD 01-2 HARVESTON A&B DEBT SERVICE 473 CFD 03-1 CROWNE HILL DEBT SERVICE FUND 474 AD03-4 JOHN WARNER ROAD DEBT SERVICE 475 CFD03-3 WOLF CREEK DEBT SERVICE FUND 476 CFD 03-6 HARVESTON 2 DEBT SERVICE FUND 477 CFD 03-02 RORIPAUGH DEBT SERVICE FUND 478 CFD 16-01 RORIPAUGH PHASE II 501 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE I SADDLEWOOD 502 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 2 WINCHESTER CREEK 503 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 3 RANCHO HIGHLAND 504 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 4 THE VINEYARDS 505 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 5 SIGNET SERIES 506 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 6 WOODCREST COUNTRY 507 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 7 RIDGEVIEW 508 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 8 VILLAGE GROVE 509 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 9 RANCHO SOLANA 510 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 10 MARTINIQUE 511 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 11 MEADOWVIEW 512 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 12 VINTAGE HILLS 513 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 13 PRESLEY DEVELOP. 514 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 14 MORRISON HOMES 515 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 15 BARCLAY ESTATE 516 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 16 TRADEWINDS 517 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 17 MONTE VISTA 518 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 18 TEMEKU HILLS 519 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 19 CHANTEMAR 520 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 20 CROWNE HILL 521 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 21 VAIL RANCH 522 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 22 SUTTON PLACE 523 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 23 PHEASENT RUN 524 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 24 HARVESTON 525 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 25 SERENA HILLS 526 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 26 GALLERYTRADITION 527 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 27 AVONDALE 528 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 28 WOLF CREEK 529 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 29 GALLERY PORTRAIT 700 CERBT CALIFORNIA EE RETIREE-GASB45 $ 4,509,258.98 3,120.70 21,165.49 10,796.07 165,709.54 335,202.04 432.67 3,266.04 22,247.30 61,241.18 1,373,423.66 75,945.91 4,717.78 286,632.89 24,099.68 18,312.33 50,840.48 856,762.50 533,193.75 70.09 70.09 70.09 70.09 70.09 70.09 350.24 2,252.31 1,801.89 1,706.48 368.60 1,510.18 5,936.47 705.69 9,655.87 104.67 300.64 98.40 5,887.71 1,306.05 576.83 586.58 1,395.93 94.62 4,736.22 2,362.19 8,879.64 11,111.03 180.00 297.80 7,391.77 1,887.83 158.77 752.81 8,916.02 136.73 8,320.00 S 8,446,559.50 CITY OF TEMECULA LIST OF DEMANDS 001 GENERAL FUND S 577,488.09 140 COMMUNITY DEV BLOCK GRANT 1,475.35 165 AFFORDABLE HOUSING 7,890.49 190 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT 239,138.79 192 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL B STREET LIGHTS 602.88 194 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL D REFUSE RECYCLING 5,278.96 196 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. 696.71 197 TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND 3,914.65 300 INSURANCE FUND 2,392.82 305 WORKERS' COMPENSATION 6,255.66 320 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 72144.75 330 CENTRAL SERVICES 8,207.26 340 FACILITIES 21,708.23 472 CFD 01-2 HARVESTON A&B DEBT SERVICE 89.25 473 CFD 03-1 CROWNE HILL DEBT SERVICE FUND 89.25 474 AD03-4 JOHN WARNER ROAD DEBT SERVICE 89.25 475 CFD03-3 WOLF CREEK DEBT SERVICE FUND 89.25 476 CFD 03-6 HARVESTON 2 DEBT SERVICE FUND 89.25 477 CFD 03-02 RORIPAUGH DEBT SERVICE FUND 89.25 478 CFD 16-01 RORIPAUGH PHASE II 446.18 501 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 1 SADDLEWOOD 50.08 502 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 2 WINCHESTER CREEK 86.01 503 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 3 RANCHO HIGHLANDS 70.07 504 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 4 THE VINEYARDS 10.61 505 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 5 SIGNET SERIES 119.81 506 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 6 WOODCREST COUNTRY 17.94 507 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 7 RIDGEVIEW 21.05 508 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 8 VILLAGE GROVE 411.26 509 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 9 RANCHO SOLANA 3.72 510 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 10 MARTINIQUE 17.66 5I1 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 11 MEADOWVIEW 6.27 512 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 12 VINTAGE HILLS 233.98 513 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 13 PRESLEY DEVELOP. 49.92 514 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 14 MORRISON HOMES 17.76 515 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 15 BARCLAY ESTATES 14.68 516 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 16 TRADEWINDS 58.66 517 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 17 MONTE VISTA 1.90 518 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 18 TEMEKU HILLS 217.07 519 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 19 CHANTEMAR 115.95 520 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 20 CROWNE HILL 324.89 521 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 21 VAIL RANCH 532.33 522 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 22 SUTTON PLACE 7.93 523 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 23 PHEASENT RUN 13.95 524 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 24 HARVESTON 299.53 525 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 25 SERENA HILLS 96.23 526 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 26 GALLERYTRADITION 2.75 527 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 27 AVONDALE 13.95 528 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 28 WOLF CREEK 461.59 529 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 29 GALLERY PORTRAIT 5.31 700 CERBT CALIFORNIA EE RETIREE-GASB45 47.113.67 TOTAL BY FUND: 998,572.85 S 9.445 132.35 apChkLst Final Check List 11130/2017 11:17:50AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 1 Bank : union UNION BANK Chock 8 Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 3583 11/29/2017 007282 AMAZON.COM, INC REC SUPPLIES:CRC 15997 MISC SUPPLIES VARIOUS EVENTS 49.96 SUPPLIES AQUATICS 115 44 SUPPLIES HUMAN SERVICES 145.44 microscope & computer:Children's Museum 198.05 BOOKS/COLLECTIONS LIBRARY 56 27 MUSEUM SUPPLIES:TVM 32.68 SUPPLIES: HUMAN SVCS 266.40 MISC. SUPPLIES: ECON DEV 34.00 CREDIT BOOKS/COLLECTIONS LIBRAR} -0 47 BOOKS/COLLECTIONS:LIBRARY 46.75 1,104.49 3584 11/30/2017 010349 CALIF DEPT OF CHILD SUPPORT PAYMENT 1,008.45 1,008.45 SUPPORT 3585 11/30/2017 000444 INSTATAX (EDD) STATE TAXES PAYMENT 20.672.57 20 672 57 3586 11/30/2017 000283 INSTATAX (IRS) FEDERAL TAXES PAYMENT 78,655.63 78.655 63 3587 11/30/2017 000389 NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT OBRA - PROJECT RETIREMENT 2,180.72 2,180.72 SOLUTION PAYMENT 3588 11/30/2017 000246 PERS (EMPLOYEES' PERS RETIREMENT PAYMENT 93,520.90 93,520 90 RETIREMENT) 3589 11/30/2017 007262 AMAZON COM. INC COMPUTER EQUIP:INFO TECH 70.84 70 84 186124 11/30/2017 018096 ACME ADMINISTRATORS, INC DEC '17 3RD PARTY CLAIM ADMIN 1,250.00 1.250 00 WRKRS 186125 11/30/2017 010851 ADAMIAK. DAWN REIMB.DECORATIONS:BREAKFAST 181.66 181.66 WITH SANTA 186126 11/30/2017 015217 AIRGAS, INC. GAS FOR DRY ICE 11 07 EXPERIMENTS:PPW GAS FOR DRY ICE EXPERIMENTS PPW 18 98 30.05 186127 11/30/2017 003951 ALL AMERICAN ASPHALT ASPHALT PRODUCTS. CITYVNDE 427 16 42716 186128 11/30/2017 009374 ALLEGRO MUSICAL VENTURES PIANO TUNING & MAINT: THEATER 215 00 215.00 186129 11/30/2017 004240 AMERICAN FORENSIC NURSES PHLEBOTOMY SRVCS.TEMECULA 180 00 (AFN) POLICE PHLEBOTOMY SRVCS:TEMECULA POLIO 540.00 720.00 Pagel ■pChkLst Final Check List 1113012017 11:17:50AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 2 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check# Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 186130 11/30/2017 000936 AMERICAN RED CROSS CERTIFICATION MATERIALS:AQUATICS 35.00 35.00 186131 11/3012017 019709 BAGDASARIAN, NADYA REIMB:TEAM PACE ITEMS 250.00 250.00 186132 1113012017 011954 BAKER & TAYLOR INC BOOK COLLECTIONS:LIBRARY 22.57 22.57 186133 11/30/2017 018101 BARN STAGE COMPANY INC. STTLMNT:CABARETAT THE MERC: 476.00 476.00 THE 11126/17 186134 11/30/2017 010806 BARNEYS TIRE AND WHEEL VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: ADM15 731.58 731.58 186135 11/30/2017 004262 BIO-TOX LABORATORIES DRUG/ALCOHOL ANALYSIS:POLICE 863.50 DRUG/ALCOHOL ANALYSIS:POLICE 3,550.94 DRUG/ALCOHOL ANALYSIS:POLICE 509.00 186136 11/30/2017 014284 BLAKELY'S TRUCK SERVICE VEH & EQUIP REPAIRS: PW STREET 534.11 MAINT VEH & EQUIP REPAIRS: PW STREET MAI 243.50 VEH & EQUIP REPAIRS: PW STREET MAI 4,923.44 372.63 1.150.24 186137 11/30/2017 005292 BUTLER, GREG REIMB:CALPERSALM WORKSHOP 38.46 38.46 186138 11/30/2017 004248 CALIF DEPT OF JUSTICE-ACCTING OCT DOJ ALCOHOL ANALYSIS:TEMECULA POLICE SEP DOJ FINGERPRINTING SRVCS:POLI 2,275.00 32.00 OCT FINGERPRINTING SVCS: VARIOUS I 4,802.00 7,109.00 186139 11/30/2017 000137 CHEVRON AND TEXACO OCT 17 CITY VEHICLES FUEL: POLICE 1.619.97 1.619.97 DEPT 186140 11130/2017 020201 CIRCLE OF SAFE -T, INC. SART EXAMS: TEM POLICE 4,400.00 4,400.00 186141 11/30/2017 009905 COMPRISE TECHNOLOGIES REPLACEMENT WEB FILTER 14.930.00 INC DEVICE:LIBRARY SOFTWARE RENEWAL TEM PUB LIBRAR 13,294.00 28,224.00 186142 11/30/2017 000442 COMPUTER ALERT SYSTEMS QTRLYALARM MONITORING: PBSP 360.00 360.00 186143 11/30/2017 020357 CONCHAS, ART REFUND:CREDIT FOR LIGHTS:TES 28.00 28.00 FIELD 1t2 Page2 apChkLst 11/3012017 11:17:50AM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 3 Bank : union UNION BANK Check # Date Vendor 186144 11/30/2017 010650 CRAFTSMEN PLUMBING & HVAC INC 186145 11/30/2017 008810 CROSSTOWN ELECTRICAL& DATA 186146 11/30/2017 014580 DANCE THEATRE COLLECTIVE 186147 11/30/2017 001393 DATA TICKET. INC 186148 11/30/2017 002990 DAVID TURCH & ASSOCIATES 186149 11/30/2017 003945 DIAMOND ENVIRONMENTAL SRVCS 186150 11/30/2017 004192 DOWNS ENERGY FUEL & LUBRICANTS 186151 11/30/2017 003754 DOWNTOWN IDEA EXCHANGE 186152 11/30/2017 002528 EAGLE GRAPHIC CREATIONS INC 186153 11/30/2017 002390 EASTERN MUNICIPAL WATER DIST 186154 11/30/2017 015090 EVAPCO PRODUCTS, INC. (Conbnuedl Description Amount Pald Check Total PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS: VAR PARKS PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS: VAR PAR HVAC REPAIR STA 73 HVAC REPAIR: STA 73 SNAKED SEWER LINE - SAM HICKS PARI PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS. VAR PAR PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS: VAR PAR PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS: VAR PAR RETRIEVE & REPAIR PIPING FOR LAKE F SNAKED SEWER LINE - SAM HICKS PARI CITYWIDE SURVEILLANCE CAMERAS STTLMNT DANCEXCHANGE 11/21/17 OCT PARKING CITATION PROCESSING POLICE NOV '17 FEDERAL LOBBYING SVCS PORTABLE RESTROOMS SANTA'S ELECTRIC FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES: PUBLIC WORKS FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES- PUBLIC WOF FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES: LAND DEV FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES POLICE DEP PUBLISHING PLANNING DEPT PLATE AWARDS: ECON DEV OCT WATER METER MURR HOT SPRINGS RD OCT WATER METER MURR HOT SPRING OCT WATER METER 39569 SERAPHINA F OCT WATER METER 39656 DIEGO DR NOV CONDENSER H2O SYS MAINT. CIVIC CTR 160.00 312.30 230.00 210.00 290 00 529.49 160.00 150.00 1.110.00 425 00 24.351 15 59 50 981.79 3,500.00 1.375 01 982.84 265 25 5216 85.40 191.00 290.93 158.04 40.45 375.59 120.47 3.576 79 24.351 15 59.50 981.79 3,500.00 1,375 01 1,385.65 191.00 290.93 694 55 583.50 583 50 Page:3 apChkLst Final Check List 1113012017 11:17:50AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 4 Bank : union UNION BANK Continued; Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 186156 11/30/2017 001056 EXCEL LANDSCAPE, INC. NOV LDSCP MAINT SRVCS: LEVEL C 23,074.18 SLOPES NOV LNDSCP MAINT SRVCS: VAR FACILI 11,34040 IRRIGATION REPAIRS VARIOUS PARKS 1,554 48 NOV LNDSCP MAINT PARKS.MEDIANS 54,261.63 LANDSCPE IMPRVMNTS:HARV LAKE PAF 8,321.00 NOV LANDSCAPE MAINT:PARK5 MEDIAN 19.085 51 LANDSCAPE MAINT:PARKS:MEDIANS 51,049.63 NOV LNDSCP MAINT SRVCS: VAR LOCA? 36,314 91 205.001 74 186157 11/30/2017 017736 FEAST CALIFORNIA CAFE, LLC REFRESHMENTS:SISTER CITY EVENT 574.58 574.58 11/30 186158 11/30/2017 000165 FEDERAL EXPRESS INC 11/7-11/9 EXP MAIL SVCS: FIRE & 70.53 70.53 CLERK 186159 11/30/2017 016436 FRICK, TRACY REIMS SISTER CITY SPONSORSHIP 186160 11/30/2017 018858 FRONTIER CALIFORNIA. INC NOV INTERNET SVCS:LIBRARY NOV INTERNET SVCS:SENIOR CENTER NOV INTERNET SVCS:41000 MAIN ST NOV INTERNET SVCS. 41000 MAIN ST NOV INTERNET SVCS:27415 ENTERPRIS 186161 11/30/2017 003946 G T ENTERTAINMENT DJ/ANNOUNCING - 12/1/17 166162 11/30/2017 001937 GALLS, LLC equip: police volunteers EQUIP. POLICE VOLUNTEERS equip police volunteers temecula pd shoulder patches 158 45 158.45 186 98 146 98 4.857 41 2.485 29 10284 7.779.50 350 00 350 00 55.31 26.70 26.18 700 38 186163 11/30/2017 000177 GLENNIES OFFICE PRODUCTS MISC OFFICE SUPPLIES - STA 73 74.57 INC 186164 11/30/2017 003792 GRAINGER 186165 11/30/2017 000186 HANKS HARDWARE INC 808 57 MISC OFC SUPPLIES PUBLIC WORKS 150 40 CREDIT MEMO RETURNED ITEMS -22.64 MISC OFC SUPPLIES:CENTRAL SVCS 47 07 Office Supplies: Planning 60 51 309.91 Drum Spill Containment Platform 125 20 125.20 MISC HARDWARE SUPPLIES CODE 11 92 11.92 ENFORCEMENT 186166 11/30/2017 000520 HDL COREN & CONE INC OCT -DEC PROPERTY TAX CNSLTNG FINANCE 186167 11/30/2017 001013 HINDERLITER DE LLAMAS & ASSOC 5.596 50 5,596.50 MEASURE 5 TRANS TAX 4TH QTR 300 00 SALES TAX & RECOVERY SVCS 4TH QT 9.871 92 10,171.92 Page:4 apChkLst 11/30/2017 11:17:50A M Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 5 Bank : union UNION BANK Check 4 Date Vendor 186168 11/30/2017 020128 HOME HEALTHCARE OF RIVERSIDE 186169 11/30/2017 009693 INLAND VALLEY CLASSICAL BALLET 186170 11/30/2017 006914 INNOVATIVE DOCUMENT SOLUTIONS 186171 11/30/2017 001407 INTER VALLEY POOL SUPPLY INC 186172 11/30/2017 015673 JDS VIDEO & MEDIA PRODUCTIONS 186173 11/30/2017 001091 KEYSER MARSTON ASSOCIATES INC 186174 11/30/2017 004062 KUSTOM SIGNALS INC 186175 11/30/2017 000482 LEIGHTON CONSULTING INC 186176 11/30/2017 004905 LIEBERT. CASSIDY & WHITMORE 186177 11/30/2017 020333 LYTTON VINEYARD & WINERY. LP 186178 11/30/2017 186179 11/30/2017 186160 11/30/2017 014877 MCCREEDY, LOUISE 018314 MICHAEL BAKER INTL INC 013443 MIDWEST TAPE LLC 186181 11/30/2017 004040 MORAMARCO. ANTHONY J. 186182 11/30/2017 020354 MORIN. LEAH (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total MEDICAL SERVICES CLASSES STTLMNT: NUTCRACKER BALLET 11124.11/26 OCT COPIER MAINT/REPAIR/USAGE CITYWIDE OCT COPIER MAINT/REPAIR/USAGE:CIT POOL CHEMICAL SUPPLIES: VAR POOLS VIDEO PRODUCTION ECON DEV SEP AFFORDABLE HOUSING ANALYSIS:COM DEV SEP CONSULTANT SERVICES FOR UTSF OCT AFFORDABLE HOUSING ANALYSIS:. SEP FISCAL IMPACT ANALYSIS CYPRES radar/War repair & maint: tem police OCT GEO TECH CNSLTNG: CHEW OCT GEO TECH CNSLTNG SVCS: WIWJE SEP GEO TECH CNSLTNG SVCS PA16-O OCT 17 LEGAL SVCS FOR TE060-00016 OCT 17 LEGAL SVCS FOR TE060-00001 RFRSHMNTS: SISTER CITY ON 12/2117 REFUND. RETURNED LOST MATERIALS LIBRARY MAR -MAY ENVIRNMNTLTECH SVC: PWO6-09 BOOKS/COLLECTIONS•LIBRARY TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS REFUND.RETURNED LOST MATERIALS:LIBRARY 2,000.00 12,317.04 3,505 26 627 13 441.02 850.00 3.067.50 1.776 25 456.28 1,960.00 1,263.13 6,000.00 3,500.00 2,500.00 2,222.10 1,085 00 1.916 25 28 00 3,710.00 83.94 63.00 2,000.00 12.317.04 4,132.39 441.02 850.00 7,260 03 1,263.13 12.000 00 3,307 10 1,916 25 28.00 3,710.00 83.94 63.00 62 75 62 75 Pages apChkLst Final Check List 11/3012017 11:17:50AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 6 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 186183 11/30/2017 020355 OAKHILLACADEMY REFUND:SANTA'S ELECTRIC LIGHT PARADE 186184 11/30/2017 003964 OFFICE DEPOT BUSINESS SVS OFFICE SUPPLIES HR DIV 186185 11/30/2017 002105 OLDTOWN TIRE & SERVICE CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS TCSD 186186 11/30/2017 012100 OUR NICHOLAS FOUNDATION REFUND DEP SNACK BAR SPORTS INC 186187 11/30/2017 019711 OWEN GROUP, INC., OWEN SEPT ADA TRANSITION PLAN UPDATE DESIGN GROUP SRVCS PW 186188 11/30/2017 000249 PETTY CASH PETTY CASH REIMBURSEMENT 186189 11/30/2017 020353 PIPICH, KATHY RELEASE CLAIMS AGREEMENT PMT 186190 11/30/2017 010338 POOL & ELECTRICAL CHEMICALS AND SUPPLIES VAR PRODUCTS INC POOLS 186191 11/30/2017 010652 QUALITY CODE PUBLISHING MUNICIPAL CODE SERVICES CITY CLERK 186192 11/30/2017 000262 RANCHO CALIF WATER DISTRICT 186193 11/30/2017 020350 REEFE. REBECCA 25.00 25.00 66.58 66.58 744.61 744 61 200 00 200 00 17,655.25 17,655.25 1,005.88 1,005 88 460.00 460 00 631 62 631.62 2.150 55 2.150.55 NOV VAR WATER METERS FIRE STNS 397 18 NOV VAR WATER METERS TCSD SVC LE NOV WATER METER:30875 RANCHO VIS NOV VAR WATER METERS PW VAR SITE REFUND:CREDIT ON ACCTTCSD REFUND:CREDIT ON ACCT TCSD REFUND:CREDIT ON ACCT:TCSD REFUND:CREDIT ON ACCT:TCSD 186194 11/30/2017 001365 RIVERSIDE, COUNTY OF JUL-SEPT 2017 VECTOR CONTROL SRVCS 15,002 65 507 84 1,830 43 17.738.10 60 00 33.00 475.00 380.00 948.00 5,103.08 5,103 08 186195 11/30/2017 012251 ROTH. DONALD J. TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 441.00 TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 315 00 756 00 186196 11/30/2017 009980 SANBORN, GWYNETH A. COUNTRY LIVE! @ THE MERC 652 50 652.50 186197 11/30/2017 008529 SHERIFF'S CIVIL DIV - WAGE GARNISHMENT PAYMENT 50.00 50.00 CENTRAL Page6 apChkLst Final Check List 11/30/2017 11:17:50AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 7 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Descrlptlon Amount Paid Check Total 186198 11/30/2017 009213 SHERRY BERRY MUSIC JAZZ @ THE MERC 11/16/17 186199 11/30/2017 000537 SO CALIF EDISON 186200 11/30/2017 001212 SO CALIF GAS COMPANY 46/ 2.5 467.25 NOV 2-05-791-8807:32444 TEM PKWY 266 25 TC1 NOV 2-28-331-4847:32805 PAUBA LS3 104 06 NOV 2-34-624-4452:32131 S LOOP RD LO 706.84 OCT 2-28-171-2620:40820 WINCHESTER 419.49 OCT 2-30-099-3847:29721 RYECREST 25.54 NOV 2-33-357-5785:44747 REDHAWI( PKI 36 46 OCT 2-27-560-0625:32380 DEERHOLLOW 771 22 OCT 2-30-296-9522:46679 PRIMROSE AVE 644.57 OCT 125-244-2108-3:30600 PAUBA RC) 139 65 OCT 095-167-7907-2.30650 PAUBA RD 186201 11/30/2017 019362 SOFTCHOICE CORPORATION MICROSOFT ENT LICENSE RENEWAL INFO TECH 2,974.43 112.63 252.28 115.825.42 115, 825.42 186202 11/30/2017 002503 SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY FLAT FEE FOR LAST FY 127.46 EMISSIONS:FOC FY 17/18 OPERATING FEES:FOC 378.28 186203 11/30/2017 020356 SOUTHWESTERN RIVERSIDE REFUND SEC DEP RM RENTAL TCC 167.45 186204 11/30/2017 003677 TEMECULA MOTORSPORTS VEH REPAIR & MAINT:TEMECULA LLC POLICE 186205 11/30/2017 009948 TEMECULA PERFORMING "A CHRISTMAS STORY:THE MUSICAL" ARTS CO 11/10-19 186206 11/30/2017 017295 TEMECULA PIZZA FACTORY REFRESHMENTS:CRC TEEN GYM EVENT 10/20 505.74 16745 795.87 795.87 18.949.87 18.949.87 113.56 113.56 186207 11/30/2017 000311 TEMECULA VALLEY HIGH REFUND SEC DEP:RM RENTAL:CRC 20000 200.00 SCHOOL 186208 11/30/2017 019473 TEMECULA VALLEY WOMAN'S REFUND SEC DEP:RM RENTAL:CRC CLUB 186209 11/30/2017 010276 TIME WARNER CABLE OCT HIGH SPEED INTERNET40820 WINCHESTER NOV HIGH SPEED INTERNET:29119 MAR' NOV HIGH SPEED INTERNET:41000 MAIN OCT HIGH SPEED INTERNET:32211 WOL 186210 11/30/2017 014848 VALUTEC CARD SOLUTIONS. OCT TICKETING SERVICES THEATER LLC 200.00 200.00 1.60 348 13 2,079 00 184.62 2,613.35 66 13 66 13 Page 7 apChkLst Final Check List 11130/2017 11:17:50AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 8 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 186211 11/30/2017 014486 VERIZON WIRELESS OCT 25-NOV 10 TASK FORCE TABLETS POLICE 186212 11/30/2017 019371 VOLGISTICS. INC ONLINE VOL. MGMT SYS PRGM SRVC FEE TVM 682 72 682.72 204 00 204 00 186213 11/30/2017 018147 WADDLETON. JEFFREY L DJ/ANNOUNCER SRVCS HOLIDAY 995 00 PARADE 12/1 DJ/ANNOUNCER SRVCS:DUCK POND TF 390 00 186214 11/30/2017 001881 WATER SAFETY PRODUCTS POOL SUPPLIES:AQUATICS PRGM 285.58 INC 1001924 11/20/2017 020334 MASSIE, CAROLINE REFUND'. DATE NIGHT COUPLES COOKING 1.385 00 285 58 40.00 40.00 1001925 11/20/2017 020334 MASSIE, CAROLINE REFUND DATE NIGHT COUPLES 40.00 40.00 COOKING 1001926 11/21/2017 016992 DOCKERY, STEVEN C. REFUND SEC DEP:RM RENTAL:TCC 200 00 200 00 1001927 11/21/2017 016527 ROWE DANCE ACADEMY REFUND SEC DEP RM RENTAL:CRC 150-00 150 00 1001928 11/21/2017 016527 ROWE DANCE ACADEMY REFUND CANCELLED EVENT: RM 1.000.00 1,00000 RENTAL:CRC 1001929 11/21/2017 016527 ROWE DANCE ACADEMY REFUND: CANCELLED EVENT RM 45.00 45.00 RENTAL:CRC 1001930 11/21/2017 020338 SYMONDS BEARD REFUND SEC DEP:PICNIC 200.00 200 00 RENTAL HARVESTON 1001931 11/21/2017 020337 YAP, LOUREE REFUND SEC DEP RM RENTAL.TCC 200.00 200 00 Grand total for UNION BANK: 762.539 89 Page -8 apChkLst Final Check List 11/30/2017 11:17:50AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 9 105 checks in this report. Grand Total All Checks. 762 53989 Page9 apChkLst Final Check List 12/07/2017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 1 Bank : unlon UNION BANK Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Pald Check Total 3582 12/01/2017 014685 COMPASS BANK '11 REFUNDING 01/08 CERT PART 533,193 75 533,193.75 DEBT SVC 3590 12/07/2017 000444 INSTATAX (EDD) STATE TAXES PAYMENT 4,843.49 4,843.49 3591 12/07/2017 000283 INSTATAX (IRS) FEDERAL TAXES PAYMENT 16.038 72 16.038.72 3592 12/07/2017 001065 NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT SOLUTION 3593 12/06/2017 007282 AMAZON. COM. INC NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT PAYMENT 1.400.00 1.400.00 SUPPLIES HUMAN SERVICES 13.28 SUPPLIES HUMAN SVCS 88.64 SUPPLIES HUMAN SVCS 2.16 SUPPLIES: HUMAN SVCS 29.99 SUPPLIES:HUMAN SVCS 799 SUPPLIES HUMAN SVCS 19.73 SUPPLIES:HUMAN SVCS 193.38 SUPPLIES HUMAN SVCS 128.92 484.09 186215 12/07/2017 020198 AACTS INT'L MINISTRIES INC FY 17-18 COMMUNITY SVC FUNDING 5.000.00 5.000 00 186216 12/07/2017 004973 ABACHERLI. LINDI TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 245.00 245 00 186217 12/07/2017 004802 ADLERHORST INTERNATIONAL NOV K-9 ON-SITE TRAINING. POLICE 350.00 350.00 LLC DEPT 186218 12/07/2017 020361 AGUILERA, ISABEL REIMS: SISTER CITY VISIT 58.63 58.63 186219 12/07/2017 015217 AIRGAS, INC GAS FOR DRY ICE EXPERIMENTSPPW 186220 12/07/2017 003951 ALL AMERICAN ASPHALT 18 98 18.98 ASPHALT PRODUCTS CITYWIDE 466.51 ASPHALT PRODUCTS CITYWIDE 519.85 186221 12/07/2017 013015 ALWAYS RELIABLE BACKFLOW BACKFLOW TESTS & REPAIRS VAR 135 D0 PARKS BACKFLOW TESTING AVONDALE / RICH 27 00 186222 12/07/2017 000101 APPLE ONE INC OCT TEMP STAFF SVCS VAR DEPTS. 9,510.33 986 36 162.00 9,510.33 Page 1 apChkLst Final Check List 12/0712017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 2 Bank: union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor 186223 12/07/2017 013950 AQUA CHILL OF SAN DIEGO Description Amount Paid Check Total NOV DRINKING WATER SVCS: INFO TECH NOV DRINKING WATER SYS MAINT: JRC NOV DRINKING WATER SYS MAINT: CIVk NOV DRINKING WATER SYS MAINT MPS NOV DRINKING WATER SYSTEM SRVCS NOV WATER SVCS: POLICE STOREFROF 186224 12/07/2017 019709 BAGDASARIAN. NADYA RFRSHMNTS:TEAM PACE EVENT 12/5 186225 12/07/2017 011954 BAKER & TAYLOR INC 186226 12/07/2017 006254 BALLET FOLKLORICO RECORDS ON TAPE'LIBRARY BOOK COLLECTIONS:LIBRARY BOOK COLLECTIONS LIBRARY TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 28 28 28 28 183.71 34.75 28 28 28 28 331 5B 230 30 230.30 4.40 2.026 98 133.15 19600 352.60 215.60 2,16453 764 40 186227 12/07/2017 015592 BAMM PROMOTIONAL UNIFORMS:AQUATICS 2.009.54 2.009.54 PRODUCTS. INC 186228 12/07/2017 013482 BAS SECURITY SECURITY SERVICES:TCSD 984.50 FACILITIES SECURITY SVCS TCSD FACILITIES 1,836.00 186229 12/07/2017 017145 BOARD, MARGO TEAM PACE SUPPLIES:EOQ 12/15 500.00 186230 12/07/2017 011348 BONCOR WATER SYSTEMS DEC WATER TANK FILTER REPL: LLC STA73 2,820.50 500.00 254.00 254 00 186231 12/07/2017 017115 BUREAU OF OFFICE NOV TRANSCRIPTION 24 85 24 85 SERVICES. INC SRVCS:TEMECULA PD 186232 12/07/2017 017414 CHAMBER MARKETING ADVERTISING: TEMECULA PRESENTS 1.200.00 1.200 00 PARTNERS INC 186233 12/07/2017 016530 COMMUNITY MISSION OF FY 17-18 COMMUNITY SVC FUNDING 5.000.00 5.000.00 HOPE 186234 12/07/2017 002945 CONSOLIDATED ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES VAR PARKS 126.15 126 15 DIST 186235 12/07/2017 010747 CORNERSTONE CHRISTIAN REFUND:SEC DEP. RM RENTAL:TCC 200.00 20000 186236 12/07/2017 014521 COSTAR GROUP DEC 17 WEB SUBSCRIPTION ECO DEV 453.19 453 19 INFORMATION, INC 186237 12/07/2017 001264 COSTCO TEMECULA #491 STATION SUPPLIES STA 92 859 90 859 90 Page2 apChkLst Final Check List 12/07/2017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 3 Bank : union UNION BANK Check p Date Vendor 186238 12/07/2017 004329 COSTCO TEMECULA #491 166239 12/07/2017 010650 CRAFTSMEN PLUMBING & HVAC INC (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total SUPPLIES:CULTURALARTS EVENTS 360 55 SUPPLIES:VARIOUS SPECIAL EVENTS 402.86 763 42 HVAC REPAIRS: CIVIC CENTER 577.17 PLUMBING REPAIRS: VARIOUS PARKS 575 37 PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS VAR PAR 275.67 PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS: VAR PAR 448 56 PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS: VAR PAR 354 56 Splash Pad Improvements: Margarita Prk 4,650.00 Civic Center - Heating System Repair 811.00 PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS: VAR PAR 331.00 PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS: VAR PAR 507.77 PLUMBING SRVCS & REPAIRS: VAR PAR 210.00 HVAC REPAIRS: COMMUNITY REC CENT 1,603.00 HVAC REPAIRS: TVM CHAPEL 1,305.00 11,849.10 186240 12/07/2017 018491 CRONBERG PHOTOGRAPHY TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 196.00 196.00 186241 12/07/2017 020105 CUMBERBATCH, JAMAL TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 525.00 525.00 186242 12/07/2017 003272 DAISY WHEEL RIBBON CO .INC MISC TONER & INK FOR PRINTERS. 898.18 DBA CIV CTR MISC TONER & INK FOR PRINTERS: CIV 1,540 18 2,438.36 186243 12/07/2017 005766 DATA BUSINESS SYSTEMS INC 2017 1099 tax forms finance dept Oty 483 32 483.32 186244 12/07/2017 008943 DEPT OF GENERAL SERVICES 5120 - OAH SVCS -NON STATE (DGS) 186245 12/07/2017 003945 DIAMOND ENVIRONMENTAL SRVCS 186246 12/07/2017 004192 DOWNS ENERGY FUEL & LUBRICANTS PORTABLE RESTROOM RENTALS: VAIL RANCH PA PORTABLE RESTROOM RENTALS:LONG PORTABLE RESTROOM RENTALS: RIVEF PORTABLE RESTROOM RENTALS: LASE 5.915 00 5.915 00 5596 55.96 80.96 55.96 FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES. LAND DEV 70 76 FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES. TCSD FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES: PUBLIC WOF FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES PUBLIC WOR FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES: TRAFFIC DIV FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES PLANNING & FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES BLDG & SAFI FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES POLICE DEP 186247 12/07/2017 019681 EJK CORPORATION PET WASTE BAGS VARIOUS PARKS 465.13 731 06 629.67 188.05 137 90 168 30 31 31 248.84 2,44236 1.507 56 1.50756 Page3 apChkLst Final Check List 12/07/2017 11.21.29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 4 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check 4 Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 186248 12/07/2017 020363 ELKS OF THE USA REFUND SEC DEP:GYMNASIUM:CRC 200.00 200.00 186249 12/07/2017 001056 EXCEL LANDSCAPE INC IRRIGATION REPAIRS VARIOUS 214.21 214.21 MEDIANS 186250 12/07/2017 020362 FERREIRA. YSABELLA REIMB SISTER CITY VISIT 28,01 28 01 186251 12/07/2017 001511 FIELDMAN ROLAPP & ADVISORY SVC CIVIC CTR PRIVATE 6,511.50 6,511 50 ASSOCIATES 186252 12/07/2017 016780 FIELDTURF USA. INC. RET RELEASE: PW15-08 92,312.61 CREDIT MEMO ADJ PER CONTRACT ITE 186253 12/07/2017 016436 FRICK, TRACY REIMB SISTER CITY -40.307.46 52.005 15 279.65 279 65 186254 12/07/2017 018858 FRONTIER CALIFORNIA, INC DEC INTERNET SVCS EOC 135.80 NOV INTERNET SVCS:THEATER 186255 12/07/2017 013076 GAUDET. YVONNE M. TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 14698 262 78 369.60 369 60 186256 12/07/2017 000177 GLENNIES OFFICE PRODUCTS Office Supplies: Planning 39.34 INC Office Supplies: Planning 164 93 186257 12/07/2017 005664 GOSCH TOW NG & RECOVERY TOWING SERVICES TEM POLICE 230 00 186258 12/07/2017 019721 GOVCONNECTION. INC VVFi hardware lifecycle repl public old 204.27 230 00 13.099 68 13,099.68 Page4 apChkLst Final Check List 12/0712017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 5 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor 186260 12/07/2017 000186 HANKS HARDWARE INC Description Amount Paid Check Total MISC SMALL TOOLS & EQUIP PWCIP 70.67 MAINT SUPPLIES. OTTT 12.98 MAINT SUPPLIES: LIBRARY 20.97 MAINT SUPPLIES: CRC 3.05 MAINT SUPPLIES: CRC 21.61 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 11.95 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 21.72 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 94.06 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 240.84 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 67.17 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 49.36 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 31.24 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 69.42 HARDWARE SUPPLIES - STA 12 34.76 HARDWARE SUPPLIES - STA 12 17.39 HARDWARE SUPPLIES - STA 84 121.71 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 52.07 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 14.44 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES:PW STREET C 27.81 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES'.PW STREET C 22.76 SM TOOLS/EQUIP CRC 65.18 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES:PW STREET C 52.13 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES:PW STREET C 8.68 Misc small tools & equip pw land dev 11.61 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES VAR PARKS 11.07 MAINT SUPPLIES: IWTCM 26.59 MAINT SUPPLIES CIVIC CTR 6.51 MAINT. SUPPLIES CIVIC CTR 11.75 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES:PW STREET C 70.57 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 13.57 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 27.90 MAINT SUPPLIES CRC 30.11 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES VAR PARKS 17 18 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES VAR PARKS 43 46 MAINT SUPPLIES. CRC 21 17 MAINT SUPPLIES. CIVIC CTR 18 79 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 79.37 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 308 35 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES VAR PARKS 5 05 MISC SMALL TOOLS & EQUIP: PWCIP 152.24 HARDWARE SUPPLIES - STA 12 134.14 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 22.82 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 130.48 MAINT SUPPLIES CRC 11 94 MAINT SUPPLIES IWTCM 89.14 MAINT SUPPLIES IWTCM 5209 Pages apChkLst Final Check List 12/0712017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 6 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Pald Check Total MAINT SUPPLIES OTTT MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES VAR PARKS MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: PW STREET C MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS MAINT SUPPLIES CIVIC CTR MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 186261 12/07/2017 014167 HELIO POWER, INC. PREV MAINT TO SOLAR PANELS: GARAGE 31.54 130.37 -130.37 10693 19.36 48 81 39 40 47 81 103 30 104 87 2.929 89 1.490.00 1,490 00 186262 12/07/2017 020364 HENSON, KRISTINA REFUND:CREDIT:RM RENTAL:LIBRARY 36.00 36.00 RM A 186263 12/07/2017 010530 I P C INDUSTRIES INC EQUIP RENTAL CODE ENFORCEMENT 136 13 136.13 186264 12/07/2017 000820 K R W &ASSOCIATES ENG PLAN CHECK & REVIEW: PW 900 00 900 00 186265 12/07/2017 001091 KEYSER MARSTON CREDIT OVER CONTRACT AMOUNT -25 00 ASSOCIATES INC PROPOSED ALTAIR SP FISCAL IMPACT 3.360 00 3,335.00 186266 12/07/2017 015328 KROHN, DAVE CATERING SVCS:BREAKFAST 3.963 25 3,963.25 W/SANTA 12/9 186267 12/07/2017 019508 LARRY WALKER ASSOCIATES. OCT ENV COMPLIANCE SRVCS: LAND 1,020.00 1,020.00 INC. DEV 186268 12/07/2017 019722 LEKOS ELECTRIC, INC. NOV INSTALL T TRAFFIC SIGNAL: P W 15-11 TS 186269 12/07/2017 010987 LUDWIG. PERRY PLAYGROUND SAFETY INSPECT CERT COURSE 186270 12/07/2017 013982 M C 1 COMM SERVICE 186271 12/07/2017 014365 MAILFINANCE, INC. 186272 12/07/2017 017427 MATCHETT, VIVIAN 186273 12/0712017 018675 MDG ASSOCIATES. INC. 12,146.70 12,146.70 280.36 280 36 NOV XXX -0346 GENERAL USAGE 33 57 NOV XXX -0714 GEN USAGE: PD MALL AL 35.22 68 79 12/14-03/13/18 POSTAGE 1.224.94 1.224.94 METER LEASE TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 436 80 TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 327 60 764.40 JUL '17 CDBG ADMIN SVCS 5,163 75 5,163 75 Paget apChkLst Final Chetk List 12/07/2017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 7 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description 186274 12/07/2017 016314 MICHAEL BAKER INTL INC OCT PLAN REVISIONS PARK & RIDE. PA/06-09 186275 12/07/2017 012962 MILLER. MISTY Amount Paid Check Total 1.295 21 1 .295 21 TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 319 20 TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 186276 12/07/2017 004040 MORAMARCO. ANTHONY J. GRAPHIC DESIGN:ACTIVITY GUIDE TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 186277 12/07/2017 020368 MORENO, CANDACE REFUND:CREDITONACCTTCSD 186278 12/07/2017 017089 MORRIS-HOPKINS. BROOKE 186279 12/07/2017 001986 MUZAK LLC 186280 12/07/2017 002925 NAPA AUTO PARTS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 239.40 558.60 1.800 00 189 00 441 00 577 50 3,007.50 40 00 40.00 525.00 700.00 14000 17500 7000 1,610.00 DEC DISH NETWORK PRGM.41952 6TH 65 11 ST DEC DISH NETWORK PRGM FOC 151.27 216.38 MISC SUPPLIES PW STREET MAINT 20.22 20.22 DIV 186281 12/07/2017 019816 NEW HORIZONS LEARNING EXCEL 2016 TRAINING:INFO TECH GROUP 186282 12/07/2017 014391 NICHOLS. KELLIE D TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 186263 12/07/2017 019839 O'CONNOR, DENISE TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 3.400 00 3,400.00 201 60 453 60 252 00 226.80 453.60 226 80 478.60 2,293 20 3500 35.00 186284 12/07/2017 003964 OFFICE DEPOT BUSINESS SVS OFFICE SUPPLIES: HR 85 80 DIV OFFICE SUPPLIES: HR 73 40 OFFICE SUPPLIES: HR 19 02 OFFICE SUPPLIES. FINANCE 17.06 OFFICE SUPPLIES: FINANCE 49.36 OFFICE SUPPLIES: HR 8.22 OFFICE SUPPLIES: HR 3.93 OFFICE SUPPLIES:PWCIP 90.25 347.04 Page 7 apChkLst Final Check List 12/07/2017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 8 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 186285 12/07/2017 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE & SERVICE CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS PARKS 367.87 MAINT CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PARKS MAIN 755 66 CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PARKS MAIN 105.97 CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:LAND DEV 4444 CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:LAND DEV 323.51 CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS LAND DEV 417.12 2,014.57 166286 12/07/2017 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE 4 SERVICE CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PARK 80.40 80 40 RANGER 186287 12/07/2017 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE & SERVICE CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS CODE ENF 37.59 37.59 186288 12/07/2017 020260 OM OFFICE SUPPLY INC MONITOR & SPEAKER BAR LIFECYCLE REPLC I 166289 12/07/2017 008871 ORIGINAL WATERMEN. INC LIFEGUARD UNIFORMS:AQUATICS 186290 12/07/2017 002600 PACIFIC STRIPING INC REPAINTING OF TRAFFIC STRIPING: CITYWIDE BILLADJ/REPAINTING OF TRAFFIC STRII REPAINTING OF TRAFFIC STRIPING:WN( 186291 12/07/2017 019093 PEREZ. FRANK REIMB:CDBG TECHNICAL WRKSHPS 11/30 186292 12/07/2017 010338 POOL & ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS INC CHEMICAL SUPPLIES: SPLASH PAD & POOLS CHEMICAL SUPPLIES SPLASH PAD & PO 6,040 00 6,040.00 621 49 621.49 160.188 94 30.50 5.490 10 165.709.54 80.79 80 79 188.57 80.86 CHEMICAL SUPPLIES:SPLASH PAD & PO 193.66 463 09 186293 12/07/2017 011549 POWER SPORTS UNLIMITED VEHICLE MAINT & REPAIR POLICE 1.062 10 MOTORS VEHICLE MAINT & REPAIR POLICE MOT, 586.20 1.648.30 186294 12/07/2017 020171 PREMIER POOLS AND SPAS REFUND PERMIT 256.17 256.17 CANCELLED:B17-2562 186295 12107/2017 005075 PRUDENTIAL OVERALL OCT UNIFORM/FLR MTS/TWL 693 62 693.62 SUPPLY RENTALS:CITY FAC 186296 12/07/2017 020127 QUINN COMPANY EMERGENCY GENERATOR 2,763.87 2,763.87 REPAIR FOC 186297 12/07/2017 019432 RCC CHAMBER SINGERS CHRISTMAS CAROLERS:TEAM PACE 250.00 250.00 12/13 166298 12/07/2017 003591 RENES COMMERCIAL MANAGEMENT WEEDABATEMENT:NADA LANE R -0-W 3,675.00 3,675.00 PageB apChkLst Final Check List 1210712017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 9 Bank: union UNION BANK ;Contnued; Chock N Date Vendor Description Amount Pald Check Total 186299 12/0712017 014027 RIVERSIDE CO ECO DEV OCT -DEC '17 STAFFING LIBRARY 41.860 00 41.860.00 AGENCY 186300 12707/2017 000406 RIVERSIDE CO SHERIFFS 09114/17-10/11/17 LAW ENFORCEMENT 2.082.319 52 2.082,319 52 DEPT 186301 12/07/2017 012251 ROTH. DONALD J TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 56.00 56.00 186302 12/07/2017 013375 RUSSO. ERICA REIMB STAFF TRAINING MATERIALS 6808 68 08 186303 12/07/2017 004274 SAFE 8 SECURE LOCKSMITH LOCKSMITH SRVCS PBSP 94.65 LOCKSMITH SRVCS PBSP 124 65 219 30 186304 12/07/2017 008404 SAFE CHECKS ACCTS PAYABLE CHECKS:FINANCE 1,374.64 1,37464 186305 12/07/2017 017699 SARNOWSKI, SHAWNA. M PHOTOGRAPHER:DUCK POND TREE 150.00 PRESTON LIGHTING 11! PHOTOGRAPHY:SISTER CITY 11130 150.00 PHOTOGRAPHY SRVCS.PU'ESKA MTN D 150 00 450.00 186306 12/07/2017 013695 SHRED -IT US JV, LLC DOCUMENT SHRED 54.72 SRVCS:TEMECULA POLICE DOC COLLECTION & SHRED SRVCS:CIT 173.18 227.90 186307 12107!2017 009746 SIGNS BY TOMORROW MISC SIGNAGE:TWAS THE 153 43 153.43 LIGHTS. CHRISTMAS 186308 12/07/2017 015235 SMOKE GUARD CALIFORNIA. ELEVATOR FIRE CURTAINS MAINT INC. CIVIC CTR 1,500 00 1,500 00 Page9 apChkLst Final Check List 12/07/2017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 10 Bank : union UNION BANK Check # Date Vendor 186310 12/07/2017 000537 SO CALIF EDISON (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total NOV 2-29-295-3510:32211 WOLF VLY 1,064.89 RD NOV 2-29-224-0173:32364 OVERLAND TR 1,620.58 NOV 2-00-397-5042:43200 BUS PARK DR 3,127.07 NOV 2-31-282-0665:27407 DIAZ RD PED 23.88 NOV 2-31-419-2873:43000 HWY-395 23.21 NOV 2-35-164-3770:43487 BUTTERFIELD 25.60 NOV 2-35-164-3663:42335 MEADOWS PK' 24.26 NOV 2-35-164-3515:32932 LEENA WAY 24.26 NOV 2-35-164-3242:44270 MEADOWS PK' 23.99 NOV 2-29-657-2787:41638 WINCHESTER 23.07 NOV 2-29-807-1093:28079 DIAZ RD PED 23.48 NOV 2-29-807-1226:28077 DIAZ RD PED 23.48 NOV 2-31-031-2616:27991 DIAZ RD PED 23.76 NOV 2-29-953-8249:46497 WOLF CREEK I 28.89 NOV 2-29-953-8082:31523 WOLF VLY RD 29.97 NOV 2-39-732-3171:41997 MARGARITA RI 26.32 NOV 2-25-393-4681:41951 MORAGA RD 526.36 NOV 2-00-397-5067:TCSD SVC LEV C 2,030.31 NOV 2-28-904-7706:32329 OVERLAND TR 145.63 NOV 2-21-981-4720:30153 TEM PKWY TPI 21.30 NOV 2-30-520-4414:32781 TEM PKWY LS: 1,087.11 NOV 2-35-403-6337:41375 MCCABE CT 738.95 NOV 2-35-664-9053:29119 MARGARITA R[ 684.88 NOV 2-18-937-3152:28314 MERCEDES Si 618.30 NOV 2-19-171-8568:28300 MERCEDES Si 395.61 NOV 2-29-933-3831:43230 BUS PARK DR 1,485.00 NOV 2-31-536-3481:41902 MAIN ST 169.18 NOV 2-31-536-3655:41904 MAIN ST 339.87 NOV 2-34-333-3589:41702 MAIN ST 24.21 NOV 2-02-351-4946:41845 6TH ST 1,183.79 NOV 2-32-903-8293:41000 MAIN ST 13,982.74 NOV 2-31-912-7494:28690 MERCEDES S1 1,520.59 NOV 2-29-223-8607:42035 2ND ST PED 485.26 NOV 2-31-536-3226:28690 MERCEDES Si 1,217.62 NOV 2-35-707-0010:33451 S HW' -79 PED 48.28 NOV 2-14-204-1615:30027 FRONT ST RDI 35.63 186311 12/07/2017 000537 SO CALIF EDISON TEMP PWR:ULT. INTRCHG PW04-08 #300234 32,877.33 437.00 437.00 Page:10 apChkLst Final Check List 12/0712017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 11 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check 11 Date Vendor 186312 12/07/2017 001212 SO CALIF GAS COMPANY 186313 12107/2017 000519 SOUTH COUNTY PEST CONTROL INC Description Amount Paid Check Total NOV 098-255-9828-8:29119 MARGARITA 58.59 RD NOV 129-535-4236-7:41000 MAIN ST 602 06 NOV 129-582-9784-3:43230 BUS PARK DF 59.42 NOV 133-040-7373-043210 BUS PARK DF 18.90 NOV 091-024-9300-5:30875 RANCHO VIS- 1.724.62 NOV 101-525-0950-0:28816 PUJOL ST 34.21 NOV 026-671-2909.8.42051 MAIN ST 53.11 NOV 028-025-1468-3 41375 MCCABE CT 19.80 NOV 021.725-0775-4:41845 6T1-1 ST 81.92 OCT 196-025-0344-3.42081 MAIN ST 63.04 NOV 181-383-13881-6:28314 MERCEDES c 38.70 NOV 117-188-6393-6:32131 S LOOP RD 26.17 NOV 101-525-1560-6:27415 ENTERPRISE 80.12 PEST CONTROL SRVCS PBSP 70 00 NOV PEST CONTROL SRVCS:CITY FACII 822.00 PEST CONTROL SRVCS:WOLF CREEK P, 49.00 186314 12/07/2017 016257 SPICERS PAPER. INC WHITE COPY PAPER CENTRAL 4.078 70 SERVICES 2.860 66 941 00 4,078.70 186315 12/07/2017 000293 STADIUM PIZZA INC REFRESHMENTS HUMAN SERVICES 35 77 REFRESHMENTS WINTER WONDERLAN 99 96 135.73 186316 12/07/2017 002366 STEAM SUPERIOR CARPET CARPET CLEANING TVE2 250.00 250.00 CLEANING 186317 12/07/2017 011424 STONE CREEK BIBLE CHURCH REFUND:SEC DEP RM RENTAL CRC 200.00 200.00 186318 12/07/2017 003840 STRONGS PAINTING PAINT & REPAIR 3,200.00 SRVCS C. MUSEUM/SNACK BAR PAINTING SRVCS:NICOLAS PK/MEADOIA 2,000.00 5.200.00 186319 12/07/2017 013387 SWEEPING UNLIMITED INC NOV SWEEPING SRVCS PARKING 540.00 540.00 GARAGE 186320 12/07/2017 010924 T & 0 COMMUNICATIONS. INC. GENERAL CABLING SERVICES:CRC 2.240.27 2.240 27 186321 12/07/2017 003677 TEMECULA MOTORSPORTS VEH REPAIR & MAINT:TEMECULA 79.61 LLC POLICE VEH REPAIR & MAINTTEMECULA POLICI 292 68 VEH REPAIR & MAINT.TEMECULA POLICE 80 10 186322 12/07/2017 004209 TEMECULA SUNRISE ROTARY OCT -DEC BUS BENCH PLACEMENT & 2,093 75 FOUND MAINTPW 186323 12/07/2017 010276 TIME WARNER CABLE DEC HIGH SPEED INTERNET:LIBRARY DEC HIGH SPEED INTERNET:41000 MAIN 593.32 452 39 2,093.75 4,226.91 4.820.23 Page 11 apChklst Final Check List 12107!2017 11:21 :29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 12 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description 186324 12/07/2017 019100 TNT ENTERTAINMENT GROUP DJ & SOUND SRVCS:HOLIDAY PARADE LLC 12/1 Amount Paid Check Total 1,87500 1 875 00 186325 12/07/2017 013474 TOWN & COUNTRY TOWING TOWING SERVICES: TEM POLICE 75 00 TOWING SERVICES TEM POLICE 75 00 150 00 186326 12/07/2017 000161 TYLER TECHNOLOGIES, INC EDEN RENEWAL:INFO TECH 46.480 22 46.480 22 186327 12/07/2017 017579 U.S HEALTHWORKS MEDICAL PRE-EMPLOYMENT SCREENINGS- HR 253 00 253.00 186328 12/07/2017 008977 VALLEY EVENTS, INC MISC RENTALS DUCK POND TREE 299 00 299 00 LIGHTING 111 186329 12/07/2017 000319 VARSITY BRANDS HOLDING FIELD SUPPLIES:SPORTS 5.192 83 5.192 83 CO, INC 186330 12/07/2017 014486 VERIZON WIRELESS 186331 12/07/2017 006248 WALKER, JESSICA 186332 12/07/2017 007987 WALMART 10/16-11/15 BROADBAND SVCS CITYWIDE TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS OFFICE SUPPLIES:TCC SUPPLIES:C MUSEUM SUPPLIES:C. MUSEUM SUPPLIES:CU LTU RAL ARTS 2.279.07 2.279.07 565.60 565.60 10096 115.34 204 67 161.67 582.84 186333 12/07/2017 003730 WEST COASTARBORISTS INC 10/9-10/17 TREE MAINTLIBRARY 3,691 00 10/16-31/17 EMERG TREE MAINTVAR SL' 1.203 00 10/16-31/17 TREE MAINT:ROW TREES 9,967.00 10/16-31/17 TREE MAINTPARKS & MEDIA 8,274.00 10/16-31/17 TREE MAINTMPSC 1,483.00 10/16-31/17 TREE MAINTPARKS & MEDIA 1,579 00 26 197 00 186334 12107/2017 004567 WITCHER ELECTRIC REPLACE THREE -POLE PUMP 210 00 STARTER:DUCK PON INSTALL CONTROL BOX PAT BIRDSALL I 350 00 560 00 186335 12107/2017 018871 WONDER SCIENCE TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 546.00 186336 12/07/2017 016864 WOOD, RANDY 1001932 12/01/2017 020365 AVINA, BERNICE 1001933 12/01/2017 020366 FRANCZYK. REBECCA TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 546.00 UNIFORM REIMBURSEMENT REFUND. SEC DEP: RM RENTAL:TCC REFUND:SEC DEP RM RENTAL.CRC 13832 150 00 1,092.00 138 32 150 00 200 00 200 00 Page:12 apChkLst Final Check List 1210712017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 13 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Data Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 1001934 12/0112017 020367 ZIEHL, SHERI REFUND:BIGFOOTS EPIC VIDEO 10.00 10.00 GAME Grand total for UNION BANK: 3,191,021.72 Page:13 apChkLst Final Check List 12/0712017 11:21:29AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 14 128 checks in this report Grand Total All Checks: 3.191.021 72 Page 14 apChkLst 12/14/2017 Final Check List Page: 1 9:35:OOAM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK Check tJ Date Vendor 3564 11/09/2017 006887 UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA 020371 INSTANTCHECKMATE COM 008956 PANERA BREAD 000747 AMERICAN PLANNING ASSOCIATION 000912 CITY CLERKS ASSN OF CALIF 007282 AMAZON.COM, INC 020370 BEENVERIFIED COM 007282 AMAZON COM. INC 3594 12/14/2017 010349 CALIF DEPT OF CHILD SUPPORT 3595 12)14/2017 017429 COBRA ADVANTAGE INC.. DBA: FLEX ADVANTAGE 3596 12/14/2017 000194 I C M A RETIREMENT -PLAN 303355 3597 12/14/2017 000444 INSTATAX (EDO) 3598 12/14/2017 000283 INSTATAX (IRS) 3599 12/14/2017 000389 NATIONWDE RETIREMENT SOLUTION 3600 12/14/2017 001065 NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT SOLUTION 3601 12/14/2017 019088 NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT SOLUTION 3602 12/08/2017 000245 PERS - HEALTH INSUR PREMIUM 3603 12/14/2017 000246 PERS (EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT) 3604 12/13/2017 000621 WESTERN RIVERSIDE NOV 17 TUMF PAYMENT COUNCIL OF Description Amount Paid Check Total LW MEMBERSHIP: WATSON, LUKE LW RFSHMNTS MTG WITH CONSULTANTS 10/4 LW REGISTRATION: FISK, STUART 10/19 LW WORKSHOP REGIS JACOBO. D 10/19 LW OFFICE SUPPLIES: PLANNING LWMEMBERSHIP: LANKENAU, S LWOFFICE SUPPLIES FOR PLANNING SUPPORT PAYMENT REIMBURSEMENT FSA PAYMENT I C MA RETIREMENT TRUST 457 PAYMENT STATE TAXES PAYMENT FEDERAL TAXES PAYMENT OBRA - PROJECT RETIREMENT PAYMENT NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT PAYMENT NATIONWIDE LOAN REPAYMENT PAYMENT PERS HEALTH PAYMENT PERS HEALTH PAYMENT PERS RETIREMENT PAYMENT 83.47 120 21 30 00 200.00 8712 52.45 47 92 621 17 1,008.45 1,008.45 21,399.08 21,399 08 8.724.82 8.724 82 25,092.58 25,092.58 93.055.74 93.055 74 2,929.32 2.929 32 12.374 49 12.374 49 442 44 442.44 112, 827.59 0.00 112,827 59 96,050 59 96,050.59 17,746 00 17,746.00 Page 1 apChkLst Final Check List 12114/2017 9:35:00AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 2 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 3605 12/11/2017 005460 U $ BANK RDA '06 B BONDS DEBT SRVC ADJ 223 40 223.40 PMT 3606 12/11/2017 005460 U S BANK RDA '07 BONDS DEBT SRVC ADJ PMT 1.221 47 1.221 47 3607 12/11/2017 005460 U S BANK RDA'07 BONDS DEBT SRVC PMT 718.309.78 718,309.78 3608 12/11/2017 005460 U S BANK RDA'06 B BONDS DEBT SRVC PMT 134,890.35 134,890.35 186337 12114/2017 007186 AB MAILING SOLUTIONS MAILING SVCS THEATER MID SEASON 1.400.00 1.400 00 MAILER 186338 12/14/2017 014170 AHERN RENTALS INC BOOM LIFT RENTAL. DUCK POND 1.335.98 1.335.98 186339 12/14/2017 015217 AIRGAS. INC. GAS FOR DRY ICE 14.68 14.68 EXPERIMENTS:PPW 186340 12/14/2017 003951 ALL AMERICAN ASPHALT ASPHALT PRODUCTS: CITYWIDE 560 82 560 82 186341 12114/2017 006915 ALLIES PARTY EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT RENTAL PUESKA MTN 1,037.86 1,037.86 EVENT 186342 12/14/2017 005037 AMERICAN ASPHALT SOUTH 'BILLING ADJUSTMNT XTRA WORK -168,468.33 INC NOT SEP RESIDENTIAL SLURRY SEAL PW17 355,772.78 187,304.45 186343 12/14/2017 004240 AMERICAN FORENSIC NURSES PHLEBOTOMY SRVCS:TEMECULA 21000 (AFN) POLICE PHLEBOTOMY SRVCS:TEMECULA POLIC 345 00 555.00 186344 12/14/2017 000936 AMERICAN RED CROSS CERTIFICATION MATERIALS:AQUATICS 60.00 60.00 186345 12/14/2017 019914 ASSOCIATE MECHANICAL HVAC MAINTENANCE: STATION 73 825 00 825.00 186346 12/14/2017 018941 AZTEC LANDSCAPING, INC. NOV RESTROOMS SHELTERS MAINT: 7,329 74 7.329.74 VAR PARKS 166347 12/14/2017 017149 B G P RECREATION. INC. TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 623 70 TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 812.70 1,436.40 186348 12/14/2017 011666 B P S TACTICAL INC TACTICAL BALLISTIC VEST 511.13 511.13 COVERS:POLICE 186349 12/14/2017 011954 BAKER 8 TAYLOR INC BOOK COLLECTIONS LIBRARY 280.47 BOOK COLLECTIONS LIBRARY 14.66 295.13 Page2 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 3 12/14/2017 9:35:OOAM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK {Continued' Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 166350 12/14/2017 005716 BIRTH CHOICE OF TEMECULA FY 17-18 COMMUNITY SVC FUNDING INC 186351 12/14/2017 012583 BLANCAY PRICE SEP LDSCP PLAN CK & INSPECT SVCS 186352 12/14/2017 017115 BUREAU OF OFFICE AUG TRANSCRIPTION SERVICES. INC SRVCS TEMECULA POLICE 186353 12/14/2017 020369 CACHAT, MICHAEL REFUND:OUIMBY FEES PAI D: B 17-1007, 2559 186354 12/14/2017 009640 CERTIFION CORPORATION DEC ONLINE DATABASE SBSCPTN POLICE 186355 12/14/2017 003775 CHAPARRAL HIGH SCHOOL '17 HOLIDAY PARADE BAND STIPEND 12/1 186356 12/14/2017 020296 CIVIC, LLC CITY PUBLIC MOBILE APP INFO TECH 5 000 00 5.000 00 7.195 00 7,195.00 1956 1958 3.12070 3,120 70 150.00 150 00 300.00 300.00 11,000.00 11.000 00 186357 12/14/2017 018719 CM SCHOOL SUPPLY INC SUPPLIES PPW 87 75 87.75 186358 12/14/2017 020240 COLLABORATIVE LEARNING REFUND SEC DEP:RM RENTAL:TCC 200 00 200.00 186359 12/14/2017 004405 COMMUNITY HEALTH EMPLOYEE CHARITY DONATIONS 24 00 24.00 CHARITIES. C/O WELLS FARGO PAYMENT BANK 186360 12/14/2017 020373 COMPTON HIGH SCHOOL '17 HOLIDAY PARADE BAND STIPEND 300 00 300 DO BAND 12/1 186361 12/14/2017 002945 CONSOLIDATED ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 23 25 23.25 DIST. 186362 12/14/2017 004329 COSTCO TEMECULA #491 SUPPLIES'TVM 3824 3824 186363 12/14/2017 017542 COX, KRISTI LYN TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 436 80 TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 308 00 TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 369 60 1.11440 186364 12/14/2017 010650 CRAFTSMEN PLUMBING & install tankless water healer theater HVAC INC 186365 12/14/2017 018491 CRONBERG PHOTOGRAPHY TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 4980 00 4.98000 357.00 357.00 Page:3 apChkLst 12/14/2017 9:35:00AM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 4 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor 186366 12:14,2017 003272 DAISY WHEEL RIBBON CO ,INC DBA 186367 12/14/2017 001393 DATA TICKET. INC. 186368 12/14/2017 012600 DAVID EVANS & ASSOCIATES INC 186369 12/14/2017 003945 DIAMOND ENVIRONMENTAL SRVCS 186370 12/14/2017 019720 DIVERSIFIED WATERSCAPES, INC. 186371 12/14/2017 018247 DOKKEN ENGINEERING 186372 12/14/2017 013939 DOROTHY MCELHINNEY MIDDLE SCH 186373 12/14/2017 004192 DOWNS ENERGY FUEL & LUBRICANTS 186374 12/14/2017 002390 EASTERN MUNICIPAL WATER DIST 186375 12/14/2017 016839 EHS INTERNATIONAL, INC. 186376 12/14/2017 004829 ELLISON WILSON ADVOCACY LLC Description Amount Paid Check Total Misc toner & ink For pnnters:civic OCT PARKING CITATION PROCESSING. POLICE 9/24-10/28/17 DSGN SVCS PW17-07 PORTABLE RESTROOMS: ELECTRIC PARADE PORTABLE RESTROOMS: ELECTRIC PAF BARRICADES ELECTRIC PARADE FENCING & BARRICADES ELECTRIC PA PORTABLE RESTROOM RENTALS:GOH6 NOV WATER QUALITY MAINT:DUCK POND:HARV SEPT DSGN SVCS: PW17-22 '17 HOLIDAY PARADE BAND STIPEND 1211 FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES BLDG & SAFETY FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES TCSD FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES: CODE ENFOI FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES PUBLIC WOF FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES PUBLIC WOF FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES TRAFFIC DIV FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES: PUBLIC WOF FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES LAND DEV FUEL FOR CITY VEHICLES POLICE DEP' NOV WATER METER 32131 S LOOP RD DCDA NOV WATER METER.32131 S LOOP RD 8 NOV WATER METER 32131 S LOOP RD L WC SAFETY CONSULTANT RISK MGMT DEC STATE LOBBYING SVCS CITY MGR 186377 12/14/2017 000164 ESGIL CORPORATION OCT PLAN CK SVCS BLDG & SAFETY 1.379 46 200 00 3.625 00 1.375 01 196 77 1.435 00 2.950 00 6013 6,766 00 10,922 00 200.00 298.74 187 96 68.42 1,015.21 741 66 146.97 262.46 97.18 108.19 54 63 125.91 624 95 437 50 3.500 00 1 379 46 200 00 3.625.00 6,016.91 6,766.00 10,922 00 200 00 2,926 79 805 49 437 50 3,500.00 31,736.66 31.736.66 Page4 apChkLst 12/14/2017 9:35:OOAM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 5 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor 186378 12/14/2017 001056 EXCEL LANDSCAPE, INC. 186379 12/14/2017 017432 EYEMED VISION CARE 186380 12/14/2017 019469 FALCON ENGINEERING SERVICES 186381 12/14/2017 009953 FEDERAL CLEANING CONTRACTORS 186382 12/14/2017 000165 FEDERAL EXPRESS INC 186383 12/14/2017 003747 FINE ARTS NETWORK 186384 12/14/2017 016436 FRICK. TRACY 186385 12/14/2017 018858 FRONTIER CALIFORNIA. INC. 186386 12/14/2017 016184 FUN EXPRESS. LLC 186387 12/14/2017 000177 GLENNIES OFFICE PRODUCTS INC 186388 12/14/2017 010028 GOFORTH & MARTI 186389 12/14/2017 009608 GOLDEN VALLEY MUSIC SOCIETY 186390 12/14/2017 005664 GOSCH TOWING & RECOVERY Description Amount Paid Check Total Irrigation Repairs: Various Locations IRRIGATION REPAIRS VARIOUS SLOPE: VISION PLAN PAYMENT CONST MGMT SVC WINCHESTER RD PW10-13 DEC JANITORIAL SRVCS:POLICE MALL OFFICE 11/16-11/22 EXP MAIL SVCS CLERK & PLAN 11/28 EXP MAIL SVCS CITY CLERK 11/29 EXPRESS MAIL SVCS POLICE 11/2 EXP MAIL SVCS CIP TICKET SALES ADVANCE. NUTCRACKER BALLET SISTER CITY VISIT - TEMECULA THEATER DEC INTERNET SVCS LIBRARY DEC INTERNET SVCS:LIBRARY DEC INTERNET SVCS:SKATE PARK DEC INTERNET SVCS. FIRE STN #95 SUPPLIES HUMAN SVCS SUPPLIES: HUMAN SVCS SUPPLIES:HIGH HOPES Misc Office supplies Code Enforcement MISC OFFICE SUPPLIES. WORKFORCE MISC OFFICE SUPPLIES: CITY CLERK MISC OFFICE SUPPLIES: CITY CLERK Office Supplies. Planning MISC. OFFICE SUPPLIES: CITY CLERK Install furniture at Library: pw tip CREDIT: WORK HAS NOT BEEN COMPLE STTLMNT AN ENGLISH CHRISTMAS 12/2/17 STTLMNT: CLASSICS @ THE MERC - NO` TOWING SERVICES TEM POLICE TOWING SERVICES TEM POLICE TOWING SERVICES. TEM POLICE 1.274 00 3,051.32 1,216.45 1,890.00 922 50 52.80 20.31 19.72 166 92 1000000 24000 7 42 7.42 41.94 122.38 55 97 226.06 261.40 48.34 60.23 6 22 219.53 191 96 1487 124.368.06 -62.184 06 2.562 27 234 50 240 00 230 00 230 00 4.325.32 1.216 45 1,890.00 922.50 259.75 10,000.00 240.00 179.16 543 43 541.15 62.184.00 2.796.77 700.00 Page 5 apChkLst Final Chock List 12/1412017 9:35:OOAM CITY OF TEMECULA Pape: 6 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 186391 12/14/2017 003792 GRAINGER MISC STAGE SUPPLIES: THEATER 186392 12/14/2017 008444 GREAT OAK HIGH SCHOOL '17 HOLIDAY PARADE BAND STIPEND 12/1 186393 12/14/2017 015451 GREATAMERICA FINANCIAL SVCS NOV LEASE FOR 16 COPIERS:CITY HALUOFF-S NOV LEASE FOR 18 COPIERS:CITY HALL 126.92 126.92 300.00 300.00 291.45 1,351.02 NOV LEASE FOR 6 COPIERS:LIBRARY 793.89 2,436.36 Page apChkLst 1211412017 9:35:00AM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 7 Bank : union UNION BANK Check # Date Vendor 186394 12/14/2017 000186 HANKS HARDWARE INC (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total HARDWARE SUPPLIES - STN 73 BC 4.89 HARDWARE SUPPLIES: STA 95 341.18 HARDWARE SUPPLIES - STA 92 127.47 MAINT SUPPLIES TVM -3.46 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES VAR PARKS 37.02 HARDWARE SUPPLIES - STN 73 BC 15.21 HARDWARE SUPPLIES. STA95 91.73 HARDWARE SUPPLIES: STA 95 120.16 HARDWARE SUPPLIES: STA 95 278.07 HARDWARE SUPPLIES: STA95 67.14 HARDWARE SUPPLIES: STA95 49.97 HARDWARE SUPPLIES - STA 12 30 44 MAINT SUPPLIES-HARVESTON LK PK 84.26 MAINT SUPPLIES-HARVESTON LK PK 18.31 MAINT SUPPLIES-HARVESTON LK PK 39.10 MAINT SUPPLIES CIVIC CTR 22 69 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 13.02 MAINT SUPPLIES: CMC CTR 49.77 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 54.88 MAINT SUPPLIES: MAINT FAC 59 22 MAINT SUPPLIES IWTCM 30.20 MAINT SUPPLIES IWTCM 7.06 MAINT SUPPLIES IWTCM 14 31 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES VAR PARKS 35.24 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES. VAR PARKS 40.23 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES VAR PARKS 85 36 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES VAR PARKS 372.19 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES VAR PARKS 13.02 MAINT SUPPLIES OLD TOWN 37.99 MAINT SUPPLIES OLD TOWN 70 19 MAINT SUPPLIES. OLD TOWN 49.57 MAINT SUPPLIES: OLD TOWN 31.66 MAINT SUPPLIES. CIVIC CTR 19.55 MAINT SUPPLIES: TVM 55.44 MAINT SUPPLIES. CIVIC CTR 11.94 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: PW STREET C 365.08 MAINT SUPPLIES-HARVESTON LK PK 37.82 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 8.68 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 59.85 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 15.46 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 3.19 MAINT SUPPLIES: CIVIC CTR 21.08 MAINT SUPPLIES: IWTCM 34.55 MAINT SUPPLIES: IWTCM 6 07 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES: VAR PARKS 18.47 2.946 27 Page:7 apChkLst Final Check List 12/1412017 9:35:OOAM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 8 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check 4 Date Vendor 186395 12/14/2017 003198 HOME DEPOT, THE Description Amount Paid Check Total TRAINING SUPPLIES BC/STATIONS 186396 12/14/2017 018602 HORIZON SOLAR POWER 80% REFUND:PERMIT CANCELLED:B17-2063 186397 12/1412017 017334 HOUSE OF AUTOMATION INC BAY DOOR REPAIR: STATION 84 BAY DOOR REPAIR: STATION 84 BAY DOOR REPAIR: STATION 84 186398 12/14/2017 019903 IMS INFRASTRUCTURE PAVEMENT MGMNT PROGRAM: MANAGEMENT PW17-01 305 21 30521 115.68 115.68 1,415 00 485 00 198 00 2.098 00 43,487 75 43.487.75 186399 12114/2017 012883 JACOB'S HOUSE INC EMPLOYEE CHARITY DONATIONS 40 00 40.00 PAYMENT 186400 12/14/2017 012945 LABELLE- MARVIN INC MATERIALS TESTING SRVCS: 17-03 22.990 00 22.990.00 186401 12/14/2017 017946 LANDRUM, KAREN TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 910.00 910.00 186402 12/14/2017 019722 LEKOS ELECTRIC, INC. OCT INSTALL T TRAFFIC SIGNAL: 5,514.75 5,514.75 PW15-11TS 186403 12/14/2017 003782 MAIN STREET SIGNS SIGNS AND SUPPLIES: 536.05 536.05 RIGHT-OF-WAYS 186404 12/14/2017 000217 MARGARITA OFFICIALS ASSN OFFICIATING ADULT 4,329.00 4,329.00 SOFTBALL:SPORTS 186405 12/1412017 018675 MDG ASSOCIATES. INC OCT CDBG ADMIN SVCS 6,480.00 OCT CDBG ADMIN SVCS 8,650.00 15.130 00 186406 12/14/2017 015259 MERCURY DISPOSAL Household Battery Recycling Program 215.84 215 84 SYSTEMS. INC Page 8 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 9 12/1412017 9:35:00AM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK Check # Date Vendor 186407 12/14/2017 015955 METRO FIRE & SAFETY, INC. 186408 12/14/2017 018314 MICHAEL BAKER INTL INC. (Continued) Description Amount Pald Check Total annual fire ext services:var facilities ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: PARKS ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: SNACK BARS & ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: SAFE, PANTRY ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: PARK GRG & PC ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC.RON ROBERTS 1 ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC. CRC ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: IWTCM ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: CODE ENFORCE FIRE EXTINGUISHER SRVC: CIVIC CENT ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: TVM ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: MPSC ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: CIVIC CTR ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVCOLD TOWN THE/ ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: TVE2 ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: SPORTS PARK ANNUAL FIRE EXT SVC: FOC OCT DSGN SVCS PW17-04 ENG SUPPORT SVCS: PW04-08 OCT DSGN & ENVIRON SVCS PW17-05 186409 12/14/2017 013443 MIDWEST TAPE LLC BOOKS/COLLECTIONS:LIBRARY 186410 12/14/2017 004043 MISSION ELECTRIC SUPPLY. INC 3655 181 76 19062 7806 615 63 47.40 199 22 27.65 32 60 23 70 89 60 200 27 369 39 19461 223 24 19 75 78 02 624 00 1,612 00 540.00 55.56 LAMPS AND BALLAST: LIBRARY 6949 2,608.07 2,77600 55.56 ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES CIVIC CENTER 142 14 LAMPS AND BALLAST LIBRARY 425.98 LAMPS AND BALLAST LIBRARY 958.39 ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES: CIVIC CENTER 441 41 LAMPS AND BALLAST LIBRARY 591.37 2.628 78 186411 12/14/2017 001868 MIYAMOTO-JURKOSKY. SUSAN TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 283.50 ANN TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 315 00 598 50 186412 12/14/2017 017956 MONOPRICE INC. AUDIO VISUAL SUPPLIES -INFO TECH 96 99 96.99 186413 12/14/2017 019019 MUSIC CONNECTION LLC STTLMNT: SPEAKEASY AT THE MERC 478 10 478 10 12/09 186414 12/14/2017 017861 MYTHOS TECHNOLOGY INC DEC IT MONITORING SRVCS: TVE2 100 00 100.00 186415 12/14/2017 018099 NATIONAL SAFETY DOT TESTING HR 266.85 266 85 COMPLIANCE Page9 apChkLst Final Check List 12/14/2017 9:35:00AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 10 Bank : union UNION BANK Check # Date Vendor 186416 12/14/2017 001323 NESTLE WATERS NORTH AMERICA (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 10/23-11/22 WATER DLVRY SVCS: TVE2 46.19 10-23-11/22/17 WATER DELIV SVC: PBSP 61.26 10/23-11/22 WTR DELIV SVC: CITY MGR 27.32 10/23-11/22 WTR DELIV. SVC: SKATE PAR 8 61 10/23-11/22 WTR DELIV. SVC: THEATRE 45.06 10/23-11/22 WTR DELIV. SVC: LIBRARY 85.51 10/23-11/22 WTR DELIV. SVC: IWTCM 18 13 10/23-11/22/17 WTR DELIV SVC TCC 28 21 10/23-11/22117 WTR DELIV SVC: CRC 80.22 10/23-11/22/17 WTR DELIV. SRV: TVM 31.16 10/23-11/22/17 WTR DELIV SVC: FOC 160.21 10/23-11/22/17 WTR DELIV SVC. MRC 51 50 10/23-11/22 DRINKING WATER.AQUATICS 6.51 186417 12/14/2017 019816 NEW HORIZONS LEARNING EXCEL 2016 TRAINING:INFO TECH 1.700.00 GROUP 11/29 EXCEL 2016 TRAINING INFO TECH 11/27 1,700.00 186418 12/14/2017 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE & SERVICE CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:BLDG & 37.59 SAFETY CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:BLDG & SAF 54.78 CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:BLDG & SAF 649 89 3400 00 798.63 89100 186419 12/14/2017 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE & SERVICE CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PW 757.78 STREET MAI NT CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PW STREET 6.64 CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PW PARKS A 780.69 CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PW PARKS M1 47.70 CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PW PARKS A 341.42 1.934 23 166420 12/14/2017 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE & SERVICE CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:POLICE 321.65 321.65 186421 12/14/2017 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE & SERVICE CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:BLDG & 76.47 76 47 SAFETY 186422 12/14/2017 019851 ORTIZ ENTERPRISES. INC 186423 12/14/2017 019711 OWEN GROUP, INC . OWEN PRGS PMT # 5:/-15/SR 79S ULT 848,072.48 848.072.48 INTRCHG OCT ADA TRANSITION PLAN UPDATE 25.340 75 25.340 75 DESIGN GROUP SRVCS PW 186424 12/14/2017 019502 PACIFIC CONSTRUCTION REFUND SEC DEP RM RENTAL CONF 200 00 200 00 ANALYSTS CTR NB 186425 12/14/2017 016585 PACIFIC PLAY SYSTEMS. INC. PLAYGROUND PARTS: MARGARITA 190 00 190 00 PARK 186426 12/14/2017 007197 PALOMA VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL '17 HOLIDAY PARADE BAND STIPEND 12/1 300 00 300 00 Page 10 apChkLst Final Check List 12/14/2017 9:35:OOAM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 11 Bank : union UNION BANK Check 4 Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 186427 12/14/2017 019334 PARK CONSULTING GROUP, NOV CONSULTING & ENTERPRISE INC SRVCS I.T. 186428 12/14/2017 011737 PERLMUTTER PURCHASING USB PWR BANKS & CHRG CABLE POWER ADAPTERS:PD 186429 12/14/2017 000249 PETTY CASH 186430 12/14/2017 000249 PETTY CASH 186431 12/14/2017 020377 PHOENIX PATRIOT FOUNDATION 186432 12/14/2017 017431 PLIC - SBD GRAND ISLAND 71500 711500 1.228 79 1,226 79 PETTY CASH REIMBURSEMENT 586 56 586 56 PETTY CASH FOR CRC 50 00 50.00 FY 17/18 COMMUNITY SERVICE 1.000 00 1,000.00 FUNDING DENTAL INSURANCE PAYMENT 10.472 22 10,472.22 186433 12/14/2017 010338 POOL & ELECTRICAL CHEMICALS AND SUPPLIES: VAR PRCDUCTS INC POOLS 186434 12/14/2017 011549 POWER SPORTS UNLIMITED 2 MOTORCYCLE PURCH:TEMECULA PD 186435 12/14/2017 005820 PRE -PAID LEGAL SERVICES PREPAID LEGAL SERVICES PAYMENT INC 186436 12/14/2017 012904 PROACTIVE FIRE DESIGN NOV FIRE PLAN REVIEW SRVC: PREVENTION 186437 12/14/2017 005075 PRUDENTIAL OVERALL NOV UNIFORMS/FLR SUPPLY MATS:PARKS/CIVIC CNTR 188.57 188.57 61,337 36 61,337.36 342 85 342.85 8,856.40 8.856.40 590.78 590.78 186438 12/14/2017 018831 RADEECAL, INC NEW MOTORCYCLE VEHICLE 1,358.13 1.358.13 WRAPS -TEM PD 186439 12/14/2017 000262 RANCHO CALIF WATER DISTRICT 186440 12/14/2017 002412 RICHARDS WATSON & GERSHON 186441 12/14/2017 017391 RISE INTERPRETING. INC. 186442 12/14/2017 000267 RIVERSIDE CO FIRE DEPARTMENT '17 HOLIDAY PARADE OVERALL AWARD 12/1 200.00 200 00 OCT 2017 LEGAL SERVICES 156,919.29 BILLING ADJ /OCT 2017 LEGAL SRVCS 720 00 ASL INTERPRETATION SERVICE HR 177 45 8/21 ASL INTERPRETATION SERVICE:HR 10/1 160 00 FPARC-TM. 232797, 17-18, Q1 1,277,925 48 157,639 29 337 45 1,277,925.46 Page 11 apChkLst Final Check List 12/14/2017 9:35:OOAM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 12 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 186443 12/14/2017 000406 RIVERSIDE CO SHERIFFS SEPT-OCT'17 EXTRA DUTY YOUTH DEPT COURT 186444 12/14/2017 017446 ROSE AGAIN FOUNDATION FY 17/18 COMMUNITY SERVICE FUNDING 186445 12/14/2017 009980 SANBORN. GWYNETH A. 186446 12/14/2017 017699 SARNOWSKI. SHAVVNA, M PRESTON 186447 12/14/2017 015364 SEASIDE ICE, LLC 186448 12/14/2017 008529 SHERIFF'S CIVIL DIV - CENTRAL 186449 12/14/2017 009213 SHERRY BERRY MUSIC 379 10 379.10 5.000.00 5.000 00 COUNTRY LIVE' @ THE MERC 1218 258.75 COUNTRY LIVE' (B THE MERC 12/2 591.75 PHOTOGRAPHER HOLIDAY PARADE 150.00 1211 PHOTOGRAPHER:MAYOR'S BREAKFAST 150.00 PARTIAL PMT/ICE RINK SET UP:'17 10,506.25 WNTR SEA PARTIAL PMT/ICE RINK SET UP '17 WNTF 6.012 50 WAGE GARNISHMENT PAYMENT 50 00 850 50 300 00 16.518 75 50 00 JAZZ @ THE MERC 12/7 521 00 JAZZ S THE MERC 11/30 560.00 1.081 00 186450 12/14/2017 003506 SHIVELA MIDDLE SCHOOL '17 HOLIDAY PARADE BAND STIPEND 200.00 200 00 BAND 12/1 186451 12/14/2017 009746 SIGNS BY TOMORROW SIGN POSTING SERVICES:PLANNING DEPT SIGN POSTING SERVICES:PLANNING DE BANNER DATE PATCH CITYWIDE CLEAN SIGN POSTING SERVICES: PLANNING DE 186452 12/14/2017 015674 SJ LINKING SYSTEMS RADIO RENTALS HOLIDAY PARADE 1211 212.75 425.50 79.60 1,489 25 2.207 10 730 00 730 00 Pagel2 apChkLst 12/14/2017 9:35:DOAM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 13 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor 186453 12/14/2017 000537 SO CALIF EDISON Description Amount Paid Check Total NOV 2-29-974-7899.26953 YNEZ RD LS3 175 86 NOV 2-29-479-2981:31454 TEM PKWY TC 117 66 NOV 2-31-031-259028301 RANCHO CAL 19 11 NOV 2-29-657-233245538 REDWOOD RD 2672 NOV 2-29-953-8447:31738 WOLF VLY RD 26.59 NOV 2-31-936-3511:46488 PECHANGA PK 53.16 NOV 2-29-657-2563:42902 BUTTERFIELD 212.81 NOV 2-29-458-7548:32000 RANCHO CAL 259.02 NOV 2-25-350-5119:45602 REDHAWK PKV 29.01 NOV WATER METER:31777 DEPORTOLA 26.59 NOV 2-30-220-8749:45850 N WOLF CREE 450 08 NOV 2-27-560-0625:32380 DEERHOLLOA 3.780 26 NOV 2-02-502-8077:43210 BUS PARK DR 349.21 NOV 2-28-629-0507:30600 PAUBA RD 5,923.81 NOV 2-31-404.6020'28771 OT FRONT ST 1.282.44 NOV 2-39-737-1063:42061 MAIN ST 41 54 NOV 2-39-043-8521:29028 OT FRONT ST 24.50 NOV 2-36-531-7916:44205 MAIN ST PED 119 97 NOV 2-27-805-3194 42051 MAIN ST 3.090 16 NOV 2-35-421-1260:41955 4TH ST LS3 16.51 NOV 2-05-791-8807:31587 TEM PKWY LS: 9,443.47 186454 12/14/2017 001212 50 CALIF GAS COMPANY NOV 091-085-1632-0:41951 MORAGA/POOL 25,468 48 197.24 197.24 186455 12/14/2017 002503 SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY FY 17/18 OPERATING FEES: STN 84 111 83 186456 12/14/2017 000519 SOUTH COUNTY PEST CONTROL INC 186457 12/14/2017 012652 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA FLAT FEE FOR LAST FY EMISSIONS FEE 133 83 PEST CONTROL SERVICES: STA 92 42 00 PEST CONTROL SERVICES STA 95 80.00 DEC GEN USAGE 0141,0839,2593,9306 566 70 186458 12/14/2017 009379 SOUTHWEST WOMEN'S "18TH ANN'L CHRISTMAS IN THE AIR" CHORUS 12/2-3 186459 12/14/2017 013351 SPECIAL OLYMPICS SO CALIF FY 17/18 COMMUNITY SERVICE INC FUNDING 186460 12/14/2017 005786 SPRINT OCT 26 - NOV 25 CELLULAR USAGE/EQUIP 245.66 122.00 566.70 1,231 60 1,231 60 2.500 00 2,500.00 4,389 98 4.389 98 186464 12/14/2017 007762 STANDARD INSURANCE BASIC LIFE INSURANCE PAYMENT 8,412.44 8,412.44 COMPANY 186465 12/14/2017 012723 STANDARD INSURANCE VOLUNTARY SUPP LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY PAYMENT 1,050.70 1.050.70 Page 13 apChkLst 1 211 4/2 01 7 9:35:00AM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 14 Bank : union UNION BANK Check # Date Vendor 186466 12/14/2017 008337 STAPLES BUSINESS ADVANTAGE 186467 12/14/2017 003000 STATE WATER RESOURCE CONTROL 186468 12114/2017 012789 STUART, JENNIFER SARAH 186469 12/14/2017 003599 T Y LIN INTERNATIONAL 186470 12/14/2017 001547 TEAMSTERS LOCAL 911 186471 12/14/2017 010061 TEMECULA OLIVE OIL COMPANY 186472 12/14/2017 016532 TEMECULA VALLEY ALANO CLUB 186473 12114/2017 006884 TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER 166474 12/14/2017 000311 TEMECULA VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL 186475 12/14/2017 005970 TEMECULA VALLEY PLAYERS 186476 12/14/2017 003508 THOMPSON MIDDLE SCHOOL 186477 12/14/2017 019500 TOWARD MAXIMUM INDEPENDENCE 186478 12/14/2017 017430 TRANSAMERICA LIFE INSURANCE CO 186479 12/14/2017 019301 TURNER, CHARISS 186480 12/14/2017 019795 TUSKER SURPLUS METALS (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total OFFICE SUPPLIES:LAND DEV OFFICE SUPPLIES.FINANCE OFFICE SUPPLIES.PD OLD TOWN STORI OFFICE SUPPLIES:TCSDADMIN 10/1/17-9/30/18 NPDES PERMIT FEE TCSD INSTRUCTOR EARNINGS 10/1-27/17 CONSULT SRVCS:F V. PKWY/I-15 UNION DUES PAYMENT SPEAKER RECOGN. WORKFORCE DEV REFUND SEC DEP: RM RENTAL. TCC FY17/18 3RD QTR OPERATING AGRMNT:ECODEV '17 HOLIDAY PARADE BAND STIPEND 12/1 "A CHRISTMAS CAROL" 11/30-12/10/17 '17 HOLIDAY PARADE BAND STIPEND 12/1 FY 17/18 COMMUNITY SERVICE FUNDING TRANSAMERICA ACCIDENT ADVANTAGE PAYMENT REIMBURSEMENT FOR THEATER HOSPITALITY WELDING SUPPLIES STATION 95 WELDING SUPPLIES: STATION 95 186481 12/14/2017 002185 U.S. POSTAL SERVICE POSTAL SVCS:THEATER MID-SEASON MAILER 52.21 132.76 140.67 81 31 35, 577.00 4.811 04 75,156.27 5,087 00 240 00 200.00 33,75000 300.00 32,457 09 200 00 2,000 00 3.066.68 116.16 1,499.26 142.46 406.95 35.577.00 4,811 04 75,15627 5,087.00 240.00 200.00 33,750.00 300.00 32,457.09 200.00 2,000.00 3.066.68 116.16 1.641.72 2.313.96 2,313.96 Page. 14 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 15 12/14/2017 9:35:OOAM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK Check AI Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 186482 12/14/2017 007766 UNDERGROUND SERVICE NOV UNDERGROUND UTILITY ALERT LOCATOR ALERTS:P 186483 12/14/2017 012549 UPODIUM VEHICLE MAINT SUPPLIES STA 92 VEHICLE MAINT SUPPLIES STA 12 VEHICLE MAINT SUPPLIES STA 92 186484 12/14/2017 008977 VALLEY EVENTS, INC. MISC RENTALS:HOLIDAY PARADE 12/1 186485 12/14/2017 018514 VISTA VERDE MIDDLE SCHOOL '17 HOLIDAY PARADE BAND STIPEND 12/1 186486 12/14/2017 020372 WL BUTLER CONSTRUCTION, REFUND:ENG GRAD DEF LD16-4005 INC. 186487 12/14/2017 007987 WALMART SUPPLIES & MISC ITEMS:HUMAN SERVICES SUPPLIES:C. MUSEUM REC SUPPLIES CRC SUPPLIES:HIGH HOPES 196 45 196 45 138.76 116.69 178.49 433 94 4,14225 4.142 25 200.00 200 00 20.500.00 20.500.00 431 37 92 51 212 56 125.48 186488 12/14/2017 001342 WAXIE SANITARY SUPPLY INC CLEANING SUPPLIES CIVIC CENTER 1.701 40 CLEANING SUPPLIES:CIVIC CENTER 186489 12/14/2017 003730 WEST COAST ARBORISTS INC 11/1-15/17 TREE MAINT:PARKS & MEDIANS 11/16-30/17 EMERG TREE MAINT. VAR SLI 11/1-15/17 TREE MAINT HARV.LAKE 11/1-15/17 TREE MAINT CRC 11/16-30/17 TREE MAINT:PARKS & MEDIA 11/1-15/17 TREE MAINT WOODCREST CC 11/16-30/17 TREE MAINT:HARV.LAKE 11/1-15/17 TREE MAINTCITYVNDE ROW 186490 12/14/2017 013286 WEST SAFETY SERVICES. INC DEC 911 ENTERPRISE SVCS: IT 186491 12/14/2017 008402 WESTERN RIVERSIDE NOV 2017 MSHCP PAYMENT COUNTY 186492 12/14/2017 004567 WITCHER ELECTRIC 1001935 12/06/2017 018572 SOLCIUS LLC 1001936 12/06/2017 018572 SOLCIUS LLC 1001937 12/07/2017 020374 CARLI, TED 861.92 184 26 1,88566 4.290 00 800.00 445 00 1.830 00 1,540.00 4,984 00 2,697 00 6.833.00 23.419 00 300 00 300 00 10.976 00 10,976 00 INSTALL CONTACTORS & 595 00 TIMERS-HARVESTON PK ELECTRICAL IMPROVEMENTS: MAIN ST 6.780 00 7.375 00 REFUND:DUPL PERMIT:617-3653 98 80 98 80 REFUND:DUPL PERMIT:617-3653 137.00 137 00 REFUND SEC DEP:RM RENTAL:TCC 200.00 200.00 Page 15 apChkLst Final Check List 12/14/2017 9:35:00AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 16 Bank : union UNION BANK (Continued) Check # Date Vendor 1001938 12/07/2017 020189 HERBST, MELISSA 1001939 12/07/2017 020375 PITTS, CORI 1001940 12/07/2017 020376 YOONKER. JANITA Description Amount Paid Check Total REFUND: CREDIT ON ACCT TCSD 105 00 105 00 REFUND HAWAIIAN TAHITIAN DANCE 38 00 38 00 REFUND SEC DEP:PICNIC 200 00 200.00 RENTAL HARVESTON Grand total for UNION BANK: 4.492.997 89 Page 16 apChkLst 12/1412017 9:35:00AM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 17 175 checks in this report. Grand Total All Checks. 4.492.997 89 Page:17 Item No. 4 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Jennifer Hennessy, Director of Finance DATE: January 9, 2018 SUBJECT: Approve the City Treasurer's Report as of November 30, 2017 PREPARED BY: Rudy J. Graciano, Fiscal Services Manager RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council approve and file the City Treasurer's Report as of November 30, 2017. BACKGROUND: Govemment Code Sections 53646 and 41004 require reports to the City Council regarding the City's investment portfolio, receipts, and disbursements respectively. Adequate funds will be available to meet budgeted and actual expenditures of the City for the next six months. Current market values are derived from the Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) reports, Union Bank of Califomia trust and custody statements, and from US Bank trust statements. Attached is the City Treasurer's Report that provides this information. The City's investment portfolio is in compliance with the statement of investment policy and Government Code Sections 53601 and 53635 as of November 30, 2017. FISCAL IMPACT: None ATTACHMENTS: City Treasurer's Report as of November 30, 2017 Investments City of Temecula, California Portfolio Management Portfolio Summary November 30, 2017 Par Market Book % of Value Value Value Portfolio Term City of Temecula 41000 Main Street P.O. Box 9033 Temecula, CA 92590 (951)694-6430 Days to YTM YTM Maturity 380 Equiv. 365 Equiv. Managed Pool Accounts Retention Escrow Account Letter of Credit Local Agency Investment Funds Federal Agency Callable Securities Federal Agency Bullet Securities Investments Cash Passbook/Checking (not included in yield calculaf,onsi Total Cash and Investments Total Eamings Current Year Average Daily Balance Effective Rate of Return 48.080,581.25 48.060.561.25 48.060,561.25 42.03 1 1 0.971 0 984 601,098.83 601.098.83 601,098.83 0.53 1 1 0.148 0.150 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 1 1 0.000 0.000 34.686,034.96 34,652,808.20 34 686,034.96 30.33 1 1 1.156 1.172 22.000.000 00 21.808,870.00 22.000,000.00 19.24 1.300 875 1.503 1 524 9.000,000.00 8.949,180.00 9.000,000.00 7,87 1,020 395 1.272 1 290 114,347,696.04 114,072,319.28 114,347,696.04 100.00% 331 200 1.149 1.165 1.803 887 86 1.803.887 86 1.803.887 86 1 1 0.000 0 000 116,151,583.90 116,876,207.14 November 30 Month Ending 103.846.91 115,586,013.33 1.09% Reporting period 11/01/2017-11/30/2017 Run Date. 12/20/2017 - 10:00 Fatal Year To Data 526,654.48 120,424,141.63 1.04% 116,151, 583.90 331 200 1.149 1.166 Portfolio TEME CP PM (PRF_PM1) 7.3.0 Report Ver. 7.3.6.1 City of Temecula, California Portfolio Management Portfolio Details - Investments November 30, 2017 Balance Purchase CUSIP Investment it Issuer Balance Dab Per Value Managed Pool Accounts Page 1 Stated YTM YTM Days to Maturity Market Value Book Value Rate 360 385 Maturity Date 233358006-6 01-2 REF RES First Amer Govt Oblig Fund C1 506.220.41 506,220.41 506,220.41 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 233358000-6 01-2 REF ST First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 69,198.91 89,198.91 69,198.91 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 278213009-6 03-02 COI First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 1 276213008-6 03-02 IMPR First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 1,139.305 88 1,139,305.88 1,139.305.88 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 276213006-6 03-02 RES First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 743,393.46 743,393.46 743,393.48 0,940 0.927 0.940 1 164741008-6 03-03IMP First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 298.485.08 298,485.06 298,485.08 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 184741006-6 03-03RES First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 391.97 391.97 391.97 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 184741000-6 03-03SPEC First Amer Govl Odic Fund CI 194.257.26 194,257,28 194.257,28 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 184742000-6 03-06SPEC First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 13,855.33 13,855.33 13,655.33 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 229482007-6 03-1 2012 RF First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 07/01/2017 41.45 41.45 41.45 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 229482009-8 03-1 COI First Amer Gov( Odig Fund CI 07/31/2017 13.559 74 13,559.74 13,559.74 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 229462006-6 03-1 RESERV First Amer Govt Odig Fund CI 07/31/2017 17,262.61 17,282.61 17,262.61 0,940 0,927 0.940 1 229482000-6 03-1 SPECF First Amer Govt Obis) Fund CI 07/3112017 22.290.68 22,290.68 22,290.68 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 94669921-6 03-1ACG11 First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 0 00 0.00 0.00 0.870 0.858 0.870 1 94669911-6 03-1ACQA11 First Amer Govt Odig Fund CI 000 0.00 0,00 0,000 0.000 1 94669917-6 03-1RES First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 07/01/2017 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 1 94669916-6 03-1RESB11 First Amer Govt Obkg Fund C( 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 1 94669000.6 03-1SPTAX11 First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 1 276213002-6 03-2 REFU First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 08/01/2017 2.781.53 2,781,53 2,781.53 0,940 0.927 0.940 1 276213000-6 03-2 SPEC First Amer Govl 0bt g Fund CI 4.993.11 4,993.11 4,993.11 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 94686001-0 03-4ADMIN11 First Amer Govl Oblig Fund 0 511.61 511.61 511.61 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 94686005-6 03-4PREPI1 First Amer Govl Oblig Fund CI 13 08 13.08 13.08 0.920 0.907 0.920 1 94686000-6 03-4RE011 First Amer Govt 0Uig Fund CI 31.870.98 31,870.98 31,870.98 0.940 0,927 0.940 1 94686006-6 03-4RES11 First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 34,075.90 34,075.90 34,075.90 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 276213022-6 18-01 BOND F First Amer Govl Oblig Fund CI 08/01/2017 12.602.86 12,602.86 12.602.86 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 276213023-6 16-01 CAPINT First Amer Govt Oblig Fund 0 0.00 0,00 0,00 0,870 0,858 0.870 1 278213029-6 16.01 001 First Amer Govt Oblig Fund 0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 1 276213028-6 16-01 IMP First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 6441 063.04 6,441,083.04 6,441,063.04 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 276213026-6 16-01 RESERV First Amer Govt Obtg Fund CI 3.160.080.71 3,180,080.71 3,180.080.71 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 278213020-6 16-01 SPECF First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 07/01/2017 2.333.23 2.333.23 2.333.23 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 233358009-6 233358009-6 First Amer Govt °Nig Fund 0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 1 94434160-6 RDA-021NT First Amer Govt Odig Fund CI 116.68 116.68 116.68 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 94434161-6 RDA-02PRIN First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 79.47 79.47 79.47 0,940 0.927 0.940 1 107888000-6 RDA-08AINT First Amer Govt Odig Fund 0 68.90 86.90 68.90 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 107886001-6 RDA06APRIN First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI 07/01/2017 40.58 40.58 40.58 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 107888010-6 RDA06BINT First Amer Govt 0114 Fund CI 221.94 221.94 221.94 0.940 0.927 0.940 1 Run Gate: 12/20/2017 - 10:00 Portfolio TEME CP PM (PRF_PM2) 7.3.0 Report Ver. 7 3 6 1 GUSIP Investment R Issuer Average Salaries City of Temecula, California Portfolio Management Portfolio Details - Investments November 30, 2017 Purchase Date Par Value Market Value Stated Book Value Rats Page 2 YTM YTLA Days to Maturity 360 368 Maturity Date Managod Pool Accounts 107886011-6 107886016.6 107886020-6 107886021-6 107886028-6 107886026-6 136343008-6 136343018-6 136343000-6 136343001-6 136343006-6 146161000-6 146161001-6 94669902-3 94434160-1 94434161-2 136343018-2 146161008-3 146161006-3 94669921-5 94669911-5 94669917-5 94669906-5 94669916-5 94669000.5 164742006-5 164742000-5 94869902.5 94686001-5 94686005-5 94686006-5 94869917-1 276213008-1 164742006-1 229482007-1 94689911-1 Run Date: 12/2012017 - 10:00 RDA06BPRIN RDA06BRES RDA07INT RDA07PRIN RDA07PROJ RDAO7RES RDA10APROJ RDA10BPROJ RDA t DINT RDA1OPRIN RDA1ORSRV RDA11AINT RDAI IAPRIN 03-1 BOND3 RDA 02 INTI RDA 02 PRIN2 RDA 10B CIP2 RDA11APROJ RDA11ARSRV 03-01 ACQ11 03-01 ACQA11 03-01 RES 03-01 RESA11 03-01 RESB11 03-01SPTAXI1 03-06 RES 03-06 SPEC 03-1bond fd 03-4 ADMIN11 03-4 PREP11 03-4 RES 11 03-01-1 RES 03-02 IMP 03-06 RES -1 03-1 2012 RE 03-1 ACQ A2 First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI First Amer Gaut Oblig Fund CI First Amer Govt Oti9 Fund CI First Amer Govt Obtig Fund CI First Amer Govt Obhg Fund CI First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI First Amer Govt Obag Fund CI First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI First Amer Govt Oblg Fund CI First Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI first Amer Govt Oblig Fund CI First American Treasury First American Treasury Fust Amencan Treasury First American Treasury Federated Institutional Tax Fr Federated Institutional Tax Fr Federated Tax Free Obligations Federaled Tax Free Obligations Federated Tax Free Obligations Federated Tax Free Obligations Federated Tax Free Obligations Federated Tax Free Obligations Federated Tax Free Obligations Federated Tax Free Obligations Federated Tax Free Obligations Federated Tax Free Obligations Federated Tex Free Obligations Federated Tax Free Obligations CA Local Agency Investment Fun CA Local Agency Investment Fun CA Local Agency Investment Fun CA Local Agency Investment Fun CA Local Agency Investment Fun 07/01/2017 07/01/2017 07/01/2017 07/01/2017 07/01(2017 07/01/2017 07/01/2017 07/01/2017 1.46 202,840.41 1.213.91 7.56 211.131.57 1.108.043,95 20,088.85 5.222.596.31 157,435.39 36.32 1,266.739.34 111.09 38.50 0,00 0.00 0.00 0.00 7,331,691.20 1,315,150.06 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 15,103,984.21 312,548.22 781,370.56 0.00 1.46 202,840.41 1.213.91 7.56 211,131.57 1,108.043.95 20,088.85 5.222,596.31 157,435.39 36.32 1,266, 739.34 111.09 36.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0,00 7,331,691.20 1.315,150.06 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 15,103,984.21 312,548.22 781, 370.56 0.00 1.46 202,840.41 1,213.91 7.56 211,131.57 1,108,043.95 20,088.85 5,222,596.31 157,435.39 36.32 1.266,739.34 111.09 38.50 a.o0 0.00 0.00 0.00 7,331,691.20 1,315,150.06 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 15,103,964.21 312,548.22 781,370.56 0.013 0.680 0.671 0.940 0.927 0.940 0.927 0.930 0.917 0.940 0.927 0.940 0.927 0.940 0.927 0.940 0.927 0.940 0.927 0.940 0.927 0.940 0.927 0.940 0.927 0.930 0.917 0.000 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.800 0.789 0.800 0.789 0.250 0.247 0.250 0.247 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.250 0.247 0.250 0.247 0.000 0.250 0.247 0.000 0.250 0.247 0.000 0.250 0.247 1.172 1.158 1.172 1.156 1.172 1.156 1.172 1.158 1.172 1.156 0.680 0.940 0.940 0.930 0.940 0.940 0.940 0.940 0.940 0.940 0.940 0.940 0.930 0.000 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.800 0.800 0.250 0.250 0.000 0.001 0.250 0.250 0.000 0.250 0.000 0.250 0.000 0.250 1.172 1.172 1.172 1.172 1.172 Portfolio TEME CP PM (PRF_PM2l 7.3.0 CUSIP City of Temecula, California Portfolio Management Portfolio Details - Investments November 30, 2017 Pago 3 Average Purchase Stated YT11 YTM Days to Maturity Investment g Issuer Balance Date Par Value Market Value Book Value Rate 360 365 Maturity Date Managed Pool Accounts 94669921-1 03-1 ACQ B2 CA Local Agency Investment Fun 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.172 1.156 1.172 1 744727011-1 03-3 ACQ 2 CA Local Agency Investment Fun 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.172 1.156 1.172 1 184741006-1 0303-1 RES CA Local Agency Investment Fun 1,448,344.37 1.448.344.37 1,448.344.37 1.172 1.156 1.172 1 107886028-1 RDA 07 PRO -1 CA Local Agency Investment Fun 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.172 1.156 1.172 1 107886028-1 RDA 07 RES -1 CA Loc Agency Investment Fun 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.172 1.158 1.172 1 136343018-1 RDA 108 CIP1 CA Local Agency Investment Fun 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.172 1.156 1.172 1 107886006 RDA 06 RES A MBIA Surety Bond 1.00 1 00 1.00 0.000 0.000 1 94434166 RDA TABs RES MBIA Surety Bond 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.000 0.000 1 229462020-0 03-01 CASH USBANK 07/01/2017 794.68 794.68 794.68 0.000 0.000 1 233358050-1 01-2 SPECESC U.S. Treasury 0.00 0 00 0.00 0.360 0.355 0.360 1 229462020-2 03-01 TREASB U.S Treasury 0731;2017 867.278.89 867 276 89 867,276.89 0.063 0.062 0.063 1 Subtotal and Average 48,063,983.91 46,060,56125 48,080.561.25 48,060,661.25 0.971 0.964 1 Retention Escrow Account ARMY CORPS Army Corps Union Bank Subtotal and Average 901,02411 001.098.63 601 098 83 601,098.83 0.150 0.148 0.150 1 801,008.03 601,096.83 601,098.63 0.140 0.110 1 Letter of Credit 233358006-1 01-2 REFRESI ASSURANCE CO BOND INSURANCE 07/01/2017 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.000 0.000 1 Subtotal and Average 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.000 0.000 1 Local Agency Investment Funds SYSCITY CfTY CA Local Agency Investment Fun 10203,700.21 10.193.925.79 10,203.700.21 1.172 1.158 1.172 1 SYSRDA RDA CA Local Agency Investment Fun 1,777.91 1,778.21 1,777.91 1.172 1.156 1.172 1 SYSTCSD TCSD CA Local Agency Investment Fun 21480.558.84 24.457.106.20 24.480.556.84 1.172 1.156 1.172 1 Subtotal and Average 32,162,701.03 34,806,03410 34,662,60020 34,806,034.08 1.150 1.172 1 Federal Agency Callable Securities 3130A4G89 01207 Federal Home Loan Bank 03/24/2015 1,000.000 00 994.240.00 1,000.000.00 1.850 1.627 1.850 662 09/24/2019 3130AAME5 01226 Federal Home Loan Bank 01/30/2017 1,000,000.00 988,440.00 1,000,000.00 2.020 1.948 1.975 1.516 01/25/2022 3130AANA2 01227 Federal Home Loan Bank 01/30/2017 1.000.000.00 993.040.00 1,000.000.00 1.750 1.728 1.750 972 07/30/2020 3130AAW38 01228 Federal Home Loan Bank 03/22/2017 1,000.000.00 993,180.00 1,000,000.00 1.500 1.479 1.500 1.572 03/22/2022 3130AB3N4 01231 Federal Home Loan Bank 04/28/2017 1,000.000 00 991.350.00 1,000,000.00 1.550 1.529 1.550 697 10/29/2019 3130ABYY6 01235 Federal Horne Loan Bank 06/24/2017 1.000.000.00 987,840.00 1.000,000.00 1.750 1.728 1.750 1.181 02/24/2021 3130ACN83 01238 Federal Home Loan Bank 10130/2017 1.000.000 00 993,640.00 1.000,000.00 1.700 1.877 1.700 896 05/15/2020 Run Dale , 2(1/ (I17 - Portfolio TEME CP PM (PRF_PM2) 7.3.0 CUSIP Investment 8 Issuer City of Temecula, California Portfolio Management Portfolio Details - Investments November 30, 2017 Page 4 Average Purchase Stated YTM YTM Days to Maturity Balance Date Par Value Market Value Book Value Rab 360 365 Maturity Date Federal Agency Callable Securities 3134G67C1 01210 Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp 06/22/2015 1.000.000.00 998,100.00 1.000.000 00 1.200 1.184 1.200 203 06/22/2018 3134G8QB8 01219 Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp 03/29/2016 1,000.000.00 993,690.00 1,000.000.00 1.270 1.253 1.270 483 03/29/2019 3134G8PP8 01220 Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp 03/30/2016 1.000.000.00 986.740.00 1.000.000.00 1.500 1.661 1.684 1.034 09/30/2020 3134GAXX7 01224 Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp 11/30/2016 1,000,000.00992,330,00 1.000,000.00 1.000 0.966 1.000 364 11/30/2018 3134GBAB8 01229 Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp 03/272017 1,000.000.00 991.180.00 1,000,000.00 1.670 1.647 1.670 847 03/27/2020 3134GBGZ9 01232 Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp 04/27/2017 1,000.000.00 990.980.00 1,000,000.00 2.000 1.964 1.991 1,518 01/27/2022 3134GBNK4 01234 Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp 05/302017 1.000.000.00 992.120.00 1.000,000.00 1.625 1.603 1.625 910 05/29/2020 3134GBL42 01237 Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp 09/28/2017 1.000.000.00 991,870.00 1,000.000.00 1.670 1.647 1.670 1.032 09/28/2020 3134GBR95 01239 Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp 10/30/2017 1,000,000.00 996,580.00 1,000.000.00 1.625 1.603 1.625 698 10/30/2019 3136G2EC7 01205 Federal National Mtg Assn 02/27/2015 1.000,000.00 994.320.00 1.000,000 00 1.300 1.282 1.300 453 02/27/2019 3136G2WT0 01216 Federal National Mtg Assn 01/2720161.000.000.00 991.660.00 1.000.000.00 1.450 1.430 1.450 787 01/27/2020 3136G2XH5 01217 Federal National Mtg Assn02/24/2016 1,000,000.00 989,960.00 1,000,000.00 1.400 1.381 1.400 815 02/24/2020 3136G3CL7 01218 Federal National Mtg Assn 03/24/2016 1,000,000.00 985.900.00 1.000,000.00 1.420 1,401 1.420 1,028 09/24/2020 3138G3TE5 01221 Federal National Mtg Assn 06/29/2016 1.000.000.00 983,820.00 1,000,000.00 1.250 1.233 1.250 941 06129/2020 3136G3X59 01222 Federal National Mtg Assn 08/23/2016 1,000,000.00 987,690.00 1,000,000.00 1.100 1.085 1.100 630 08/23/2019 Subtotal and Average 22,000,000.00 22,000,000.00 21,808,670.00 22,000,000.00 1.503 1.524 875 Federal Agency Bullet Securities 3133EDNDO 01196 Federal Farm Credit Bank 06/11/2014 1,000,000.00 999,950.00 1,000,000.00 1.200 1.179 1.195 3133EEHU7 01202 Federal Farm Credit Bank 01/14/2015 1.000.000.00 996.860.00 1,000.000 00 1.410 1.391 1.410 3133EGJ30 01225 Federal Farm Credit Bank 11/18/2016 1.000.000.00 985,310,00 1.000 000 00 1.100 1.085 1.100 3130A4AJ1 01206 Federal Home Loan Bank 02/27/2015 1.000.000.00 999,400.00 1 000,000.00 1.140 1.124 1.140 3130A5MH9 01211 Federal Home Loan Bank 08/26/2015 1,000,000.00 996,380.00 1.000.000.00 1.360 1.341 1.360 3130A8ZV8 01223 Federal Horne Loan Bank 08/23/20161.000.000 00 983.690.00 1.000 000 00 1.000 0.986 1.000 3130AAYM4 01230 Federal Home Loan Bank 03/14/2017 1.000.000 00 999.350.00 1.000,000 00 1.125 1.110 1.125 3130A8DX1 01233 Federal Home Loan Bank 05/24/2017 1,000.000.00 994,740.00 1.000,000.00 1.400 1.381 1,400 3130AC3F9 01236 Federal Home Loan Bank 08/10/2017 1,000,000.00 993,500.00 1.000.000.00 1.420 1.853 1.878 Subtotal and Average 9,000,000.00 9,000,000.00 0,949,160.00 41 01/11/2018 409 01/14/2019 717 11/18/2019 88 02/27/2018 390 12/26/2018 630 08/23/2019 103 03/14/2018 539 05/24/2019 635 08/28/2019 9,000,000.00 1.272 1.290 395 Total and Average 115,585,013.33 Run Crate 12,20/2017 - 10 00 114,347,696.04 114,072,19.26 114,347,696.04 1.149 1.165 200 Portfolio TEME CP PM (PRF PM2730 City of Temecula, California Portfolio Management Portfolio Details - Cash November 30, 2017 Average Purchase Stated YTM YTM Days to CUSIP Investment # Issuer Balancs Dab Par Value Market Value Book Value Rate 360 365 Maturity Passbook/Chocking Accounts 1453718479 WORKERS COMP BANK OF AMERICA MERRILL LYNC 07/01/2017 14,756.42 14,756.42 14.756.42 0.000 0.000 1 SYSPetty Cash Petty Cash City of Temecula 07/01/2017 3.261.00 3.281.00 3,261.00 0.000 0 000 1 SYSGen Ck Acct Gen Ck AcG Urvon Bank of Caiforn,a 1.780.426.44 1.780,426.44 1.780.426.44 0.000 0.000 1 SYSParking Ck PARKING CITA Un4on Bank of California 07/01/2017 5.444.00 5,444.00 5,444.00 0.000 0.000 1 Average Balance 0.00 1 Page 5 Total Cash and Investments 115,585,013.33 Run /)ate 1,_ :II In1 7 - 1t •v 116,151,583.90 115,876, 207.11 116,151,583.90 1.149 1.165 200 Portfolio TEME CP Pm ,PRF PA12 7 i_ Fund aY Fund Name 001 GENERAL FUND 002 MEASURES FUND 100 STATE GAS TAX FUND 120 DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FUND 125 PEG PUBLIC EDUCATION & GOVERNMENT 135 BUSINESS INCUBATOR RESOURCE 145 TEMECULA ENERGY EFFICIENCY ASSET TEAM 150 AB 2766 FUND 160 SUPPLEMENTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES 161 LARRY ROBINSON REWARD 165 AFFORDABLE HOUSING 170 MEASURE A FUND 190 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT 192 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "B" STREET LIGHTS 194 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "D" REFUSE/RECYCLING 195 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL 'R' STREETiROAD MAINT 196 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. 197 TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND 198 PUBLIC ART 210 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT FUND 275 CFD 03-3 WOLF CREEK IMPROVEMENT FUND 277 CFD-RORIPAUGH 278 CFD-RORIPAUGH II 300 INSURANCE FUND 305 WORKER'S COMPENSATION 310 VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT FUND 320 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 325 TECHNOLOGY REPLACEMENT FUND 330 CENTRAL SERVICES 340 FACILITIES 380 SARDA DEBT SERVICE FUND 460 CFD 88-12 DEBT SERVICE FUND 472 CFD 01.2 HARVESTON MB DEBT SERVICE 473 CFD 03-1 CROWNE HILL DEBT SERVICE FUND 474 AD 03-4 JOHN WARNER ROAD DEBT SERVICE 475 CFD 03-3 WOLF CREEK DEBT SERVICE FUND 476 CFD 03-6 HARVESTON 2 DEBT SERVICE FUND 477 CFD 03-02 RORIPAUGH DEBT SERVICE FUND 478 CFD-RORIPAUGH II 502 SERVICE LEVEL'CZONE 2 WINCHESTER CREEK 503 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 3 RANCHO HIGHLANDS 504 SERVICE LEVEL'C'ZONE 4 THE VINEYARDS 505 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 5 SIGNET SERIES 506 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 6 WOODCREST COUNTRY 508 SERVICE LEVEL -IC -ZONE 6 VILLAGE GROVE 509 SERVICE LEVEL'C'ZONE 9 RANCHO SOLANA 510 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 10 MARTINIQUE 511 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 11 MEADOWVIEW 512 SERVICE LEVEL'C'ZONE 12 VINTAGE HILLS 513 SERVICE LEVEL-C'ZONE 13 PRESLEY DEVELOP 514 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 14 MORRISON HOMES 515 SERVICE LEVEL'C'ZONE 15 BARCLAY ESTATES 516 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 16 TRADEWINDS 517 SERVICE LEVEL'C'ZONE 17 MONTE VISTA 518 SERVICE LEVEL'C"ZONE 18 TEMEKU HILLS 519 SERVICE LEVEL"C'2ONE 19 CHANTEMAR 520 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 20 CROWNE HILL 521 SERVICE LEVEL'C'ZONE 21 VAIL RANCH 522 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 22 SUTTON PLACE 523 SERVICE LEVEL'C'ZONE 23 PHEASENT RUN 524 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 24 HARVESTON 525 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 25 SERENA HILLS 526 SERVICE LEVEL-C'ZONE 26 GALLERYTRADITION 527 SERVICE LEVEL'C"ZONE 27 AVONDALE 528 SERVICE LEVEL'C'ZONE 28 WOLF CREEK 530 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 30 FUTURE ZONES Grand Total: Cash and Investments Report CITY OF TEMECULA Through November 2017 Beginning Balance Receipts Disbursements Fund Total $ 32,918,656.01 $ 6,400.384.67 $ 4,819,479.62 $ 34,499,561.06 1.949.127.72 2,597.983.66 4.547.111.38 434,381.87 204,475.69 435,528.13 203,329.43 6.043.650.26 27.345.24 95,436.57 5,975,558.93 277.164.18 29,757.83 8.76 306,913.25 131.939.67 250.00 132,189.67 198,083.69 5.65 198,078.04 126.051.08 126.051.08 74,579.73 8,372.87 82,952.60 25.709.67 0.73 25,708.94 768,980.49 233.84 25,567.32 743.627.01 6,579.216.23 268,198.26 3,610,092.41 3,237,322.08 1.007,850.27 378.943 44 906,175.10 480,618.61 38,429.57 36.105.83 74,535.40 374,543.71 12,905.51 19,095.47 368,353.75 23.737.61 - 0.68 23,736.93 322,496.80 10.43 29,191.28 293,315.95 253,626.63 9,010.37 31,608.06 231,028.94 96,906.88 546.47 2.78 97,450.57 9.319.810.91 8,176.506.45 2,547,321.94 14.948.995.42 298,258.80 226.28 298,485.08 16,367,945.74 863.71 3.58 16,368.805.87 6.436,180.03 4,883.01 - 6,441,063.04 315,421.64 22,042.23 293,379.41 998,023.97 - 15,334.04 982,689.93 1.787,227.41 51.01 1,787,176.40 200,920.73 216,539.41 417,460.14 856,351.44 - 254,636.93 601,714.51 4-40.842.06 29,540.21 411,301.85 526,591.98 12,135.84 96,651.16 442,076.66 16,806,841.74 11,741.24 16,818,582.98 90,255.35 • 2.58 90,252.77 609,705.98 436.23 2,608.46 607,533.75 1,769,047.31 40.30 5,329.29 1.763,758,32 71,427.79 50 39 1,288.75 70.189.43 1.993,710.37 147.57 1,817.50 1,992,040.44 362,028.39 10.50 1,808.51 360,230.38 808,288.56 569.47 1,809.14 807,048.89 3.203.347.72 2.407.00 1,131.24 3,204,623.48 67,085.36 - 3,880.89 63,204.47 3.759.87 563.13 4.323.00 - 1,721.71 845.11 876.60 8,153.93 - 3,760.74 4,393.19 20,156.13 2,137.39 18,018.74 48.574.97 - 18,974.18 29,600.79 21,709.55 - 275.32 21,434.23 7,427.83 838.99 6,588.84 1.630.74 - 230.34 1,400.40 56,661.56 12,501.67 44,159.89 7,533.03 3,434.27 4.098 76 1.829.52 0.03 1,602.47 227.08 1,231.86 1,042.99 188.87 35,152.01 2.969.85 32,182.16 481.32 223.37 257.95 17.005.12 11,606.17 5,398.95 74.645 48 - 5,444.37 69,201.11 104,753.66 - 18,637.54 86,116.12 128,346.39 24,675.70 103,670.69 4,219.20 408.75 3,810.45 11,779.73 728.16 11,051.57 23.090.41 16,156.74 6,933.67 36,002.67 41.96 5,182.47 30.862.16 349.39 308.94 40.45 5,268.93 1,064.61 4.204.32 341,199.55 21,774.56 319,424.99 34.309.57 0.98 34.308.59 $ 115,971,439.48 $ 18,401,686.63 $ 18,496,918.97 $ 115.876,207.14 Journal Entries completed after October's Treasurer's Report was Issued are reflected in the Receipts Disbursements columns. Item No. 5 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Jennifer Hennessy, Director of Finance DATE: January 9, 2018 SUBJECT: Approve Financial Statements for the 1s' Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 PREPARED BY: Pascale Brown, Fiscal Services Manager RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council: 1. Receive and file the Financial Statements for the 1s' Quarter Ended September 30, 2017; 2. Approve an increase in appropriation in Fund 135 Business Incubator in Transfer Out and Transfer In to the General Fund to close out this fund; 3. Approve a transfer of $3,000 from Overtime Wages 001.165.999.5121 to Salaries and Wages 001.163.999.5100. BACKGROUND: The attached Financial Statements reflect the unaudited activity of the City for the 1s` Quarter Ended September 30, 2017. Please see the attached Financial Statements footnotes for an analytical review of financial activity for each of the various funds. The appropriation is needed in Fund 135 to transfer the remaining fund balance to General Fund. The additional transfer is needed to cover Part Time Project cost in Land Development. FISCAL IMPACT: The remaining fund balance in fund 135 Business Incubator will cover the transfer needed to close out the fund. ATTACHMENTS: 1. Quarterly Financial Report Q1'17-18 2. Combining Balance Sheet as of September 30, 2017 3. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance -Budget and Actual for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30. 2017 (General Fund, Special Revenue Funds, Capital Improvement Fund, Debt Service Fund) 4. Combining Statement of Net Position as of September 30, 2017 5. Combining Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Position for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 (Internal Service Funds) 6. Statement of Net Position - Fiduciary Fund California Employee Retiree Benefit Trust (CERBT) Fund as of September 30, 2017 7. Statement of Changes in Fiduciary Net Position — Fiduciary Fund (CERBT) for the 1s` Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Quarterly Financial Update (Q1'201 -lS Prepared by the City of Temecula Finance Department OVERVIEW The attached report summarizes the financial status of the City through September 30, 2017. The report covers all City funds and the Temecula Community Service District (TCSD). The narrative and charts below highlight current revenue and expenditure trends for the City's major funds and provide variance analyses compared to the Annual Budget. SUMMARY — GENERAL FUND The General Fund is the primary operating fund of the City, providing for public safety, public works, planning and development, building and safety, parks maintenance and general City administration. REVENUE HIGHLIGHTS: A total of 79% of General Fund revenue is generated by a variety of taxes, with the remaining 21% from user fees, franchise fees, license fees, fines and reimbursements. The major tax revenues include Sales Tax, Property Tax, Measure C Special Tax and Gas Tax funds. FY17-18 General Fund Revenue the 0-e8,1 gf .tiQ,,1h.rn Cs .+,.,,, , January 9, 2018 Through the end of the first quarter of the fiscal year, 19% of the annual budgeted revenue has been received. As Property Taxes are received in the latter half of the fiscal year, the percentage received to -date is less than the 25% mark. Sales Tax Property Tax Property Tax in lieu of VLF Vehicle License Fees Transient Occupancy Tax Measure C Gas Tax (Transfer In) Total Tax Revenue 38,100,383 8,441,989 22% 7,907,397 551,409 7% 7,721,512 0% 49,836 0% 3,289,776 910,104 28% 1,913,316 32,096 2% 1,212,442 303,111 25% 60,194,662 10,238,709 17% Franchise Fees 3,451,800 630,144 18% Departmental Revenue 4,336,866 1,157,214 27% Transfers In (excl. Gas Tax) 171,000 82,975 49% Reimbursements 2,560,251 419,574 16% Other 5,189,953 1,615,193 31% Total Revenue 75,904,532 14,143,809 19% Sales Tax revenue received through September 30t" reflects the statutory advances for sales activity occurring between July and September. The final remittance for this quarter will be received in December, due to the timing of payments made by the State Board of Equalization. Property Tax & Property Tax in Lieu of Vehicle License Fees are paid primarily in January and May of each year. To date, the City has received Property Transfer Tax related to home sales, and Unsecured Property Tax payments only. GENERAL FUND REVENUE, CONTINUED Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) revenue reflects the 8% tax on hotel/motel stays within the City. TOT payments to date reflect payments for July, August and September, which are trending 4% higher than the prior year's actuals through September 30`h. Measure C revenue is a voter -approved special tax specified for Recreation and Parks Maintenance expenditures. 50% of the tax is recorded in the General Fund and the other 50% is recorded in the TCSD Fund. It is received along with the Property Tax in January and May of each year. The actuals to date reflect the prior year's true -up payment, related to the Teeter Plan. Franchise Fees are received from various utility companies, including Southern CA Gas, Southern CA Electric, CR&R, Frontier and Time Warner Cable Services. Each franchisee has a different payment schedule, so the actuals received to date are only a portion of what is expected for the year. GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURE HIGHLIGHTS: Total Operating Expenditures for the General Fund for the first quarter show 22% of the budget spent, excluding encumbrances. Through the first quarter of the fiscal year, a benchmark of 25% is used to measure expenditure trends. However, due to the uneven spending patterns, some departments will vary from this benchmark. Police expenditures totaled $8.4 million for the first quarter, which is 25% of their annual budget. Fire expenditures totaled $1.9 million through September 30th, which is 24% of their annual budget. City Attorney expenditures through the first quarter totaled $222k, which is 39% of their annual budget, due to higher than anticipated activity levels_ A budget adjustment may be necessary at the Mid -Year Budget Update if the higher spending trend continues. Public Works expenditures to date of $1 million reflect 17% of the annual budget. Parks Maintenance expenditures are trending slightly higher due to the seasonality of this activity, with 27% of their annual budget spent to date. Community Support expenditures include grant payments to local non -profits, most of which are distributed in the second quarter of the fiscal year. FY17-18 General Fund % Spent by Department As of 9/30/2017 Animal Control Fire Police Parks Maintenance CIP Administration Public Works Land Development Building & Safety i Planning Human Resources Finance City Attorney City Clerk rgency Management 'Economic Development City Manager Community SuFport 2IPage i in=6-gimimill IMAM SUMMARY - MEASURE 5 (VOTER -APPROVED 7% TRANSACTIONS USE TAX Measure S Revenue In November 2016, Temecula voters approved a 1% Transactions Use Tax (Sales Tax) to maintain emergency response times, prevent cuts to local public safety services, improve traffic conditions and fund other general services. The Tax became effective April 1, 2017. Collections of $6.5 million through September 30th reflect the statutory advances from the State Board of Equalization. Originally, it was anticipated that Measure S would generate $23 million in revenue per year, however actual receipts have exceeded this original estimate. Measure S Expenditures In accordance with the Measure S Appropriation Guidelines adopted by Council in February 2017, this new funding source is programmed as indicated in the chart. Additional appropriations will be considered as part of the FY2017-18 Mid - Year Budget Update, as Measure 5 revenue has exceeded the original projection. General Services, 6,428,488, 33% Measure 5 Appropriations FY2017-18 Public Safety, 4,994,180, 25% Asset Management, 845,000, 4% SUMMARY -- TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT (TC5D) TCSD Expenditures TCSD Operations through September 30th are tracking to the annual budget, with 25% of their FY17-18 Budget spent. Some Divisions, such as Aquatics, the Community Recreation Center, Human Services and Contract Classes trend higher than the 25% benchmark due to the seasonality of the activities offered by these divisions. idiom= SO% 25% FY2017-18 TCSD % Spent by Division As of 9/30/17 IiIIIiIiuIiiIIiIIi t►` LL fid! bi 4)fp, 5re '� z' `' cf° ,, tt C!� c>'~ p`6 � 3 5UfY1Mf7Ry - OMER FUNDS Below is a summary of all City and TCSD Funds providing the unaudited Beginning Fund Balance as of July 1, 2017, the actual Revenue and Expenditure activity through September 30th, and the Ending Fund Balance as of September 30, 2017. The Affordable Housing Fund and the Internal Service Funds' balance include non -spendable assets, such as loans receivable and fixed assets. Funds Beginning Revenue & Expenditures & Ending Balance Transfers In Transfers Out Balance General Fund 33,702,743 14,143,809 17,065,583 30,780,969 Measure 5 236,202 6,495,022 6,731,224 Special Revenue Funds Gas Tax - 644,298 644,298 - Development Impact Fees 4,336,041 1,253,679 95,000 5,494,720 Public, Education & Gov't (PEG) 309,909 983 34,940 275,952 Business Incubator 130,635 130,635 - CDBG - 38,556 38,556 - TEAM 197,698 714 198,412 AB2766 (Vehicle Subvention) 136,167 371 135,000 1,538 SLESF (Cops Grant) 82,975 82,975 - Major Crimes Fund 25,662 89 25,751 Affordable Housing 10,811,805 3,082 68,983 10,745,904 Measure A 6,251,531 838,695 3,876,200 3,214,026 Capital Improvement Program 17,758,934 8,738,114 10,309,101 16,187,947 2011 Financing Lease - 533,400 533,400 - 39,958,382 12,134,956 15,949,088 36,144,250 Internal Service Funds Insurance 305,196 292,494 292,494 305,196 Workers' Comp 930,498 189,156 65,609 1,054,045 Vehicles & Equipment 1,930,757 184,633 21,419 2,093,971 Information Technology 238,971 764,928 741,229 262,670 Technology Replacement 1,278,467 68,639 86,865 1,260,241 Support Services 467,127 90,998 88,301 469,824 Facilities 497,452 365,097 365,097 497,452 5,648,468 1,955,945 1,661,014 5,943,399 TCSD Funds TCSD Operations 1,138,706 2,292,046 2,540,817 889,935 Service Level B (Street Lights) 169,048 94,445 150,656 112,837 Service Level C (Slope Maint.) 1,440,507 4,756 372,113 1,073,150 Service Level 0 (Refuse/Recycl) 428,535 49,931 28,599 449,867 Service Level R (Road Maint.) 23,411 371 - 23,782 Service Level L (Harveston Lake) 384,353 2,545 61,514 325,384 Library 244,833 212,512 210,256 247,089 Public Art 68,605 21,652 - 90,257 Total of All Funds 3,897,998 2,678,258 3,363,955 3,212,301 60,708,462 30,912,968 38,039,640 76,080,919 41Page app..... tJ ■ 1 I• .iitj 1rj NOVA Alb ECONOMIC INDICATORS Throughout the fiscal year, Finance monitors a number of economic indicators which help guide the development of the City's revenue forecasts. Below is a summary of the most recently available data for each indicator. Unemployment Rates serve as an indicator of the region's relative economic condition. Unemployment rates across the board have decreased since August 2017. Temecula's rate, typically lower than the County, State and Federal rates, carne in at a rate of 3.6%. Seasonal shifts are typical, as shown in the chart below. 7.0 6.5 6.0 5.5 Le+ 5.0 4.5 4.0 3.5 3.0 2017 Unemployment Rates �• National —California — Riverside County — Temecula The Consumer Price Index measures the year -over -year change in the prices of goods and services purchased for consumption by urban households. This economic indicator is the most widely used measure of inflation. Since July'16, the CPI has risen primarily due to sustained increases in the price of gasoline and energy. iki The Consumer Confidence Index measures consumers' outlook on the economy. An index over 100 indicates a higher percentage of optimistic consumers vs. those who are pessimistic. Nationally, the Consumer Confidence index reached a 17 -year high in November 2017. California also experienced a favorable increase in the Confidence index, both attributable to positive trends in the labor market and anticipation of the new Tax Bill. 4.00% 3.00% 2.00% 1.00% 0.00% Consumer Price Index CPI -U All Urban Consumers 2016 2017 -U.SCItyAverage-Rberside-Ontario San Bernardino 5IPage 1 �li�'i umagm Air A Ian Mar May Jul Sep Nov Jan Mar May Jul Sep �• National —California — Riverside County — Temecula The Consumer Price Index measures the year -over -year change in the prices of goods and services purchased for consumption by urban households. This economic indicator is the most widely used measure of inflation. Since July'16, the CPI has risen primarily due to sustained increases in the price of gasoline and energy. iki The Consumer Confidence Index measures consumers' outlook on the economy. An index over 100 indicates a higher percentage of optimistic consumers vs. those who are pessimistic. Nationally, the Consumer Confidence index reached a 17 -year high in November 2017. California also experienced a favorable increase in the Confidence index, both attributable to positive trends in the labor market and anticipation of the new Tax Bill. 4.00% 3.00% 2.00% 1.00% 0.00% Consumer Price Index CPI -U All Urban Consumers 2016 2017 -U.SCItyAverage-Rberside-Ontario San Bernardino 5IPage 1 �li�'i umagm 2017 Facts at a Glance GENERAL CITY INFORMATION City Population Altitude Area in Square Miles Parks/park Acreage Maintained Streets Education Schools Teachers Students (K-12) Number of Libraries Hotels & Motels/Rooms Public Safety Number of Fire Stations Fire Department Personnel Number of Police Stations Police Sworn Officers Police Non -Sworn Personnel 711,02'' 7,000-1,200 feet 37 40/374 Acres 315 32 7,3E2 27,700 2 77 / 18''2 6 71 3 111 36 CITY GOVERNMENT Type of Government Form of Government Date of Incorporation Authorized Positions General Fund Operating Budget Expenditures Per Capita Safety as % of General Fund General Fund Reserves (25%) Capital improvement Program General Law City Manager 72/07/7989 757 $73,733,638 $66'f 57% $78,433,470 $393, 018,297 DEMOGRAPHICS Median Rge Average Household Income Number of Registered Voters Median Home Price (G1ay2017) Unemployment Rate (May'2017) Number of Jobs 34.9 $97,573 52,8'24 $459,000 3.30% 57,700 For more information regarding the City of Temecula: www•temeculaca•gov 951-69q-6554 or 1 -888 -Temecula 6I.. CITY OF TEMECULA COMBINING BALANCE SHEET As of September 30, 2017 Public General Measure S Stale Gas Development Education 8 Fund Fund Tax Fund Impact Fund Government Fund Business Incubator Resource Assembly Community Temecula Bill 2766 Development Energy Motor Block Grant Efficiency Vehicle Fund Asset Team Subvention Fund ASSETS: Cash and Investments 3 33,844.736 5 - S - 5 5.490.534 5 276,752 5 5 - 5 197.766 5 895 Receivables 8.170.767 4.547.112 435.522 21.845 797 - 71.732 626 643 Due from Other Funds 1.098,649 Advances to SARDA - Deposits 1,325 Prepaid- CaIPERS 1.476,452 Inventory 3.058 Land Held for Resale TOTAL ASSETS $ 44,594,987 $ 4,547,112 $ 435,522 $ 5,512,379 $ 277,549 $ • 5 71,732 $ 198,412 S 1.538 LIABILITIES: Due to Other Funds S - 1 4,517,112 $ 435.522 5 - $ - S $ 38.556 5 Other Current Liabilities 11,578,320 17.659 1,597 33.176 Unearned Revenue 1,757,214 - TOTAL LIABILITIES 13.333,534 4.547.112 435,522 17.659 1,597 71,732 DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES: Unavailable Revenues TOTAL DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES FUND BALANCES: 480.484 480,484 Nonspendable: Advances to SARDA Deposits 1,325 Inventory 3.068 Land Held for Resale Notes and Loans Prepaid Costs 1,476,452 Restricted For: Community Development Projects Capital Protects Public Education Debt Seneca Business Incubator Project Parks and Recreation Public Works Reward Committed To: Contractual Obligation - Encumbrances 3,726.878 Economic Uncertainty (20%) 14,746,726 Secondary Reserve (5Mr) 3,686.682 Assigned To: Capital Protects 2.330,779 5,494,720 275,952 198,412 5 1,538 Pechanga-funded Pdice Support 359,259 - - - Unrealized Gains 250,000 Unassigned (1) 3,719,324 TOTAL FUND BALANCES 30.780 969 5,494 720 275,952 - 198,412 1,538 TOTAL LIABILITIES, DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES. and FUND BALANCES 5 44.594.987 S 4.547.112 S 435,522 $ 5,512,379 $ 277,549 $ - $ 71,732 $ 198,412 $ 1,538 NOTE: Balances are unaudited CITY OF TEMECULA COMBINING BALANCE SHEET As of September 30, 2017 Supplemental Lew Temecula Affordable Enforcement Major Crimes Housing 541v4Ces Reward Fund Fund Fund Measure A Fund Capital Project Fund Financing Lease Civic Center and CRC TOTAL ASSETS: Cash and Investments $ - $ 25,672 S 747,997 $ 2,985.370 S 15.580,014 $ $ 59,149,756 Receivables 82,953 79 218953,229 492585 801,559 41,579.749 Due from Other Funds - - - - 4,005,494 5.104.143 Advances to SARDA 5250.954 - - 5.250,954 Deposes - 1.325 Prepaid- CaIPERS 1.476.452 Inventory - 3.058 Land Held for Resale 4,400.388 4,400.388 TOTAL ASSETS 5 52,953 S 25.751 $ 37.352,568 $ 3,478,255 $ 20,387,067 S 5 118.965,825 LIABILITIES: Due to Other Funds 5 62,953 S - S - S - 5 - S - 6 5.104,143 Ottier Current Liabilibes 5,481 264,229 3,440.009 - 15.338.471 Unearned Revenue 263,302 759,111 2.779,627 TOTAL LIABILITIES 82,953 268.783 264,229 4 199120 23.222.241 DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES: Unavailable Revenues TOTAL DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES FUND BALANCES: Nonspendable: Advances to SARDA Depos4s Inventory Land Heid far Resale Notes and Loans Prepaid Costs Restricted For: Community Development Protects Capital Projects Public Education Debt Service Business Incubator Project Parks and Recreation Public Works Reward Committed TO: Contractual Obl gabo, Encumbrances Economic Uncertainly (20%) Secondary Reserve (5%) Assigned To: Capital Projects Pechanga-funded Police support Unrealtzed Gains Unassigned (1) TOTAL FUND BALANCES TOTAL LIABILITIES, DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES. and FUND BALANCES NOTE: Balances are unaudited 26.337,881 26,337,881 4,400,388 574,417 27,392.782 574.417 27,392,782 1.325 3.058 4.400.388 1,476.452 6.345.516 - - - 6,345518 3.214.026 - - 8,710284 275.952 196,412 25.751 - - 25,751 25.751 16.187,947 3.726,878 14,746.728 3.886.682 18,518,726 359259 250.000 3,719.324 10.745.904 3.214.026 16.187.947 - 66,444,735 $ 82,953 S 25.751 $ 37.352,568 8 3,478,255 $ 20,387,067 387 8 - S 116,965,825 CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL GENERAL FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Amended Budget Total Percentage Activity of Budget REVENUES_ SalesTax - State $ 38.100,383 $ 8.441,989 22% Franchise Fees 3.451,800 630,144 18% Motor Vehicle In Lieu- State 49,836 - 0% (1) Property Tax- Secured/Unsecured 7.051,963 382.117 5% (2) Property Tax in Lieu of VLF 7.721,512 - 0% (2) Property Tax Relief (Homeowner) 83,783 - 0% (2) Property Transfer Tax 671,651 169.292 25% Residual RPTTF Distribution 100,000 - 0% (2) Sales Tax Sharing Agreement (882,000) - 0% (3) Transient Occupancy Tax 3,289,776 910,104 28% Vehicle Code Fines 562,079 88,262 16% Development Services. Building & Safety 1,535,843 416,895 27% Fire 855,785 238,091 28% Land Development 899,617 301,019 33% Planning 646,596 118,235 18% Public Works - NPDES 1,200 1,968 164% Park Maintenance 1,913,316 32,096 2% (4) Police 397,825 81,006 20% Bids and Proposals 6,300 1,350 21% Business Licenses 290,000 18,025 6% (5) Investment Interest 60,000 59,117 99% (6) GASB 31 - Change in Fair Market Value on Investments 16,845 0% (6) Lease Income 13.260 1,875 14% Miscellaneous 13.700 19,801 145% Rental lncome 94,594 24,378 26% Right of Way Advertising 32.040 5,820 18% SB1186 Collection State Fee 5,800 540 9% (5) Operating Transfers In Measure S 4.994,180 1,248,545 25% Business Incubator Fund 135 130,635 0% (7) SLESF 171,000 82,975 49% State Gas Tax 1.212,442 303,111 25% Reimbursements: CIP 2,106,604 372,988 18% Mandated Cost 34,000 24,453 72% Pechanga IGA 332,647 - 0% (8) Other 87,000 22,133 25% TOTAL REVENUES $ 75,904,532 $ 14,143,809 19% Notes: (1) Motor Vehicle Lieu revenues are scheduled to be received in December of this fiscal year. (2) Property taxes revenues are schedules to be received in January and May of this fiscal year. (3) The sales tax sharing agreement with Medline is paid within thirty days after each quarter. (4) Special assessment taxes for Park Maintenance is scheduled to be received in January. (5) Business License renewals will primarily start in January 2018. (6) The variance is due to the change in the fair value on investments and fluctuating interest rates. (7) Fund 135 Business Incubator was moved to Economic Development department. The remaining fund balance is being transferred to General Fund. (8) Peet -lenge Intergovernmental Agreement revenues are schedule to be received by the end of this fiscal year CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL GENERAL FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Year -to -Date Year -to -Date Amended Activity Encumbrances Activity and Budget Encumbrances EXPENDITURES: Percentage of Budget City Council $ 447,738 $ 91,786 $ 1.680 $ 93,466 21% Community Support 125,000 2.750 2,750 2% (1) City Manager 1,460.281 321,993 66,491 388,484 27% Economic Development 1,498,939 313,420 195.431 508,851 34% (2) Emergency Management 129,688 29.496 - 29,496 23% City Clerk 1,272,510 277,272 39,756 317,028 25% City Attorney 565,000 222.261 222,261 39% (3) Finance 2,491,265 574,289 97,972 672,261 27% Human Resources 948,742 193,648 17,938 211,586 22% Planning 2,511,974 500.825 250.695 751,520 30% (2) Building & Safety 2,919,578 549,669 240,986 790,655 27% Land Development 1,841,371 435,188 62,292 497,480 27% Public Works 5,945,311 1,024,646 387,764 1.412,410 24% CIP Administration 2,301,464 397,192 193,846 591,038 26% Parks Maintenance 3,725.247 1,006.649 1,307,605 2,314,254 62% (2) Police 33,729,070 8,432,137 272,879 8,705,016 26% Fire 8,106,029 1.932,022 190,244 2,122,266 26% Animal Control 461,770 60,471 401.299 461,770 100% (2) Non Departmental Property Tax Admin 82208 - 0% (4) Separation CAL Time Payout 100,000 0% (4) Audi Reimbursement 289.640 - - - 0% (4) Retiree Medical Contribution 3,329,927 166,469 166,469 5% (5) PERS Replacement Benefit 90,670 - - 0% (5) TOTAL EXPENDITURES (exciuding Transfers) 74,373,422 16.532,183 3,726.878 20.259,061 27% Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures 1,531,110 (2,388,374) Other Financing Sources/(Uses): Operating Transfer Out 2011 Financing Lease (2,135,231) (533,400) Streetlight Acquisition Financing (540.088) Transfers Out (2,675,319) (533,400) Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/( Uses) (1,144,209) (2,921,774) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 33,702,743 33,702,743 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 $ 32,558,534 $ 30,780.969 Notes: (1) The Community Support Funding program was approved by on October 24, 2017 to fund twenty-two (22) non-profit organizations. (2) The variance in Economic Development, Planning, Park Maintenance and Animal Control expenditures are due to encumbrances for services that are recorded for the entire fiscal year. (3) July to September legal services payment were more than expected. (4) Property Tax Admin fees are expected to be paid in January 2018 when Property Tax revenues are received (5) The payment to CALPERS for employee replacement benefit and the Annual Required Contribution(ARC) will be paid by the end of this fiscal year. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL MEASURE S FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 REVENUES: Measure S (Transactions and Use Tax) Investment Interest Annual Total Percentage of Amended Activity Budget Budget $ 23,000,000 $ 6,489,700 28% 5,322 0% (1) TOTAL REVENUES 23,000,000 6,495,022 28% Other Financing Sources (Uses): Operating Transfers Out: General Fund (4,994,180) (1,248,545) 25% IT Equipment Replacement (195,000) (48,750) 25% TCSD Operations (5,341,503) (1,335,376) 25% TCSO Service Level B (360,251) (90,063) 25% Library Services (726,734) (181,684) 25% Vehicle Replacement (650,000) (162,500) 25% Capital Improvement Project (7,433,254) (3,664,306) 49% Total Transfers Out (19,700,922) (6,731,224) 34% Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/0112017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 Notes: (1) The variance is due to the change in the fair value on investments and fluctuating interest rates. 3,299,078 (236,202) 236,202 236,202 $ 3,535,280 $ CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL STATE GAS TAX FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 REVENUES: Section 2103 - 2107 Investment Interest TOTAL REVENUES Annual Amended Budget Total Percentage Activity of Budget $ 3,040,884 $ 643,308 21% 500 990 198% (1) 3,041,384 644,298 21% Other Financing Sources (Uses): Transfers Out • General Fund (1,212,442) (303,111) 25% Transfers Out - CIP (1,828,942) (341,187) 19% Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 (3,041,384) (644,298) $ Notes: (1) The variance is due to the change in the fair value on investments and fluctuating interest rates. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Amended Budget REVENUES: Total Percentage Activity of Budget Open Space 133.790 10.952 8% Investment Interest 19,666 0% Quimby 622,493 6,487 1% Street Improvements 3,504,019 933,199 27% Traffic Signals 500,767 104.016 21% Parks & Recreation 459,004 37,575 8% Corporate Facilites 252,065 63.830 25% Fire Protection 157,739 42,274 27% Library 122,256 10,008 8% Police 185,835 25,672 14% TOTAL REVENUES 5,937,968 1,253,679 21% (1) EXPENDITURES: Operating Expenses 11,790 0% TOTAL EXPENDITURES 11,790 0% Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses): Transfers Out Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 5,926.178 1,253,679 (10,213,143) (95,000) 1% (2) (4,286,965) 1,158,679 4,336,041 4,336,041 $ 49,076 $ 5,494.720 Notes: (1) The variance in Development Impact Fees Fund (DIF) revenues is due to the timing of developers pulling permits, as the DIF fees are paid when permits are granted. (2) Transfers Out for capital project expenditures are made on a reimbursement basis to the CIP fund after expenditures have been incurred. The timing of CIP expenditures has not occurred as anticipated in the budget. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL PUBLIC EDUCATION & GOVERNMENT FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Amended Budget REVENUES: YTD Activity Encumbrances Total Percentage of Activity Budget PEG Fees Revenues $ 297,651 $ $ - 0% (1) Investment Interest 700 983 983 140% (2) TOTAL REVENUES 298,351 983 - 983 0% EXPENDITURES. Operating Expenses 268,400 34,940 4,049 38,989 15% TOTAL EXPENDITURES 268,400 34,940 4,049 38,989 15% Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9130/2017 29,951 (33,957) 309,909 309,909 $ 339,860 $ 275,952 Notes: (1) The variance is due to the change in the fair value on investments and fluctuating interest rates. (2) PEG revenues are expected to be received by the end of February of this fiscal year. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL BUSINESS INCUBATOR RESOURCE for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 REVENUES: Rental Income Reimbursements Investment Interest Transfer In WRCOG Beyond Framework Fund Prgm TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES: Other Financing Sources/(Uses): Transfers Out Annual Amended Budget YTD Total Percentage Activity Activity of Budget 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% (130.635) (130,635) 0% (1) Revenues Overl(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) - (130,635) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 130,635 130.635 $ 130.635 $ 0% Notes: (1) Beginning 7/112017, activity in this fund has been transferred to General Fund under Economic Development. The adjustment to Fund balance reflects the close-out of this fund to the General Fund. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual YTD Percentage of Amended Activity Encumbrances Total Activity Budget Budget REVENUES: Grant Revenue $ 1,318,067 $ 38,556 $ - $ 38,556 3% (1) TOTAL REVENUES 1,318,067 38.556 38,556 3% EXPENDITURES: Salaries and Wages 104,593 Other Outside Services 124,233 6,096 32,460 6,137 6,096 6% 38,597 31% TOTAL EXPENDITURES 228,826 38,556 6,137 44,693 17% Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures 1,089,241 Other Financing Sources/(Uses). Transfers Out Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 (1,089,241) - (1) $ - $ Notes: (1) CDBG Revenue is booked on a reimbursement basis as eligible expenditures occur The construction projects Sidewalks Oki Town and Ynez have started but are not yet completed. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL TEMECULA ENERGY EFFICIENCY ASSET MANAGEMENT TEAM for the lst Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 REVENUES: Investment Interest Reimbursements Annual Amended Budget Total Percentage of Activity Budget $ 2.000 $ 714 36% 111 TOTAL REVENUES 2,000 714 36% Other Financing Sourcesf(Uses): Transfers Out Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 (50,000) (48,000) 714 197,698 197,698 $ 149,698 $ 198,412 Notes: (1) The variance is due to the change in the fair value on investments and fluctuating interest rates. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL ASSEMBLY BILL 2766 MOTOR VEHICLE SUBVENTION for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Amended Budget REVENUES: Total Percentage of Activity Budget AB 2766 $ 139,285 $ 0% Investment Interest 5,500 _ 371 7% (1) TOTAL REVENUES 144,785 371 0% EXPENDITURES: Other Outside Services TOTAL EXPENDITURES Revenues Overf(Under) Expenditures 10,000 10,000 134,785 371 Other Financing Sources/(Uses): Transfers Out (258,170) (135,000) Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) (123,385) (134,629) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 136,167 136,167 0% (2) 0% Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 $ 12,782 $ 1,538 Notes: (1) The variance is due to the change in the fair value on investments and fluctuating interest rates. (2) The annual payment to WRCOG for Clean Cities Coalition is due in October of this fiscal year CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL SUPPLEMENTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES FUND (SLESF) for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Amended Budget Total Percentage of Activity Budget REVENUES: AB 3229 - COPS $ 171,000 $ 82,872 48% (1) Investment Interest 103 0% TOTAL REVENUES 171,000 82,975 49% Other Financing Sources (Uses): Transfers Out (171,000) (82,975) 48.52% (1) Revenues Overl(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sourcesl(Uses) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 Notes: (1) The variance is due to Fiscal Year 2016-17 growth revenues received in October 2017. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL TEMECULA MAJOR CRIMES REWARD FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Amended Budget Total Percentage of Activity Budget REVENUES - Investment Interest $ 300 5 89 300/0 TOTAL REVENUES 300 89 30% EXPENDITURES Other Outside Services TOTAL EXPENDITURES Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) 300 89 Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 25,662 25.662 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 $ 25,962 $ 25,751 (1) Notes: 0% 0% (1) A resolution of the City Council of the City of Temecula establishing the Temecula Major Crimes Reward Fund and Amending Resolution NOS.13-25 and 15-37. Resolution 13-25 A Resolution of the City Council of the City of Temecula providing for the establishment and distribution of a reward to the persons who fumish information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who caused the death of Larry Robinson on March 22. 2013. The Larry Robinson Murder Reward Fund was merged into the Temecula Major Crimes Reward Fund Resolution 15-37 The Justin Triplett Reward Fund was also merged into the Temecula Major Crime Reward Fund. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL AFFORDABLE HOUSING FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Amended Budget REVENUES: YTD Activity Encumbrances Contributions to Agency Trust $ 250,000 $ - $ Investment Interest 700 2,569 Loan Interest 4,301 513 Rental Income 196,000 - Residual Receipt Payment 49,630 TOTAL REVENUES 500,631 3,082 EXPENDITURES: Total Percentage Activity of Budget $ 0% (1) - 2,569 367% (2) - 513 12% 0% (3) 0% (3) 3,082 1% OPERATING EXPENDITURES: Salaries & Benefits 179,325 44,830 44,830 25% Operating and Administrative Expenditures 256,746 24,153 36,019 60,172 23% TOTAL EXPENDITURES 436,071 68,983 36,019 105,002 24% Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 64,560 (65,901) 10,81 1,805 10, 811, 805 $ 10,876,365 $ 1 D.745.904 Notes: (1) Contribution to Agency Trust is expected in January and May of this fiscal year when property tax payments are posted. (2) The variance is due to the change in the fair value on investments and fluctuating interest rates. (3) Temecula Gardens annual ground lease and residual receipt payment is expected to be received by the end of this fiscal year. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL MEASURE A FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Amended Budget REVENUES: Total Activity Encumbrances Total Percentage Activity of Budget Investment Interest $ 50,000 $ 22,243 $ - $ 22,243 44% Reimbursements - 35,483 - 35,483 0% Measure"A" 2,943,681 780,969 - 780,969 27% TOTAL REVENUES 2,993,681 838,695 - 838,695 28°/0 EXPENDITURES: Street Maintenance 2.064,256 266,200 5.459 271,659 13% (1) TOTAL EXPENDITURES 2,064,256 266,200 5,459 271,659 13% Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources/(Uses): Transfers Out Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 929,425 572,495 (6,477,247) (3,610,000) (5,547,822) 6,251,531 (3,037,505) 6,251,531 $ 703,709 $ 3,214,026 Notes: (1) Routine Street maintenance expenditures are scheduled to begin in January of this fiscal year. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Account Number REVENUE: Annual Amended Budget Year -to -Date Activity Encumbrances Total Activity Percentage of Budget Operating Transfers In $ 32,357,829 $ 4,181,187 $ - $ 4,181,187 13% Operating Transfers In -Measure 5 7,433,254 3,664,307 - 3,664,307 49% Grants 18,815,802 585,432 - 585.432 3% Reimbursements / TUMF 24,913,946 262,825 - 262,825 1% Capital Financing 5,375,598 - - - 09‘ Investment Interest - 44,363 - 44,363 0% TOTAL REVENUE 88,896,429 8,738,114 -8.738,114 10% (1) EXPENDITURES: Pechanga Parkway Environmental Diaz Road Widening Emergency Vehicle Preemption Traffic Cameras Communication Pechanga Parkway Widening Ynez Road Improvements Fiber Optic Communication System Sidewalk Sith Street Improvements Overland Drive Extension to Diaz Rd Abbott Corporation Roadway Imprv. Medians and Parkway Citywide Murrieta Creek Bridge @ Overland Pavement Rehabilitation Program - Winchester Road Pavement Rehabilitation Program - Citywide Western Bypass Bridge Over Murrieta Creek Interstate -15 / State Route 79 South Ultimate Interchange Flashing Beacons & Speed Advisory Signs Traffic Signal Equipment Replacement Program -Citywide Traffic Signal Installation -Citywide Fire Station 84 Training Room Imp. Citywide Street Light LED Expanded Recycled Water Plant 165-516 202,729 6,497 46.751 53,248 26% 165-521 718,943 590 590 0% 165-522 105,545 0% 165-523 560,000 - - 0% 165-530 4,495,530 162,141 32,577 194,718 4% 165-535 419,451 0% 165-550 1,321,200 - - 0% 165-555 154,505 12.003 19,966 31,969 21% 165-602 2,182,138 16,430 139,011 155.441 7% 165-620 750,000 - - 0% 165-622 188,000 - 0% 165-648 1,098,884 - - 0% 165-650 1,811, 779 15,300 135,500 150.800 8% 165-655 10,001,445 3,253,788 1,404,024 4,657.812 47% 165-660 61,239 - 0% 165-662 32.107,403 3,624,410 25,111,236 28,735,646 89% 165-670 34,301 0% 165-680 13.954 165-682 732,110 165-687 166,750 165-688 5,375.598 165-689 568,039 4,793 19,909 24,702 177% 19,382 3,707 23,089 3% 0% - - 0% 0% CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS FUND (continued) for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Account Number Annual Amended Budget Year -to -Date Activity Encumbrances Total Activity Percentage of Budget EXPENDITURES - cont'd: 115 Branding and visioning Plan 165-690 100,000 3.345 3,345 3% Main Street Property Improvement 165-691 200,000 0% Margarita Recreation Center 165-692 646.773 - 0% Old Town parking Structure 165-694 1,000,000 6,494 - 6,494 1% Old Town Street Light LED 165-695 29.446 13,200 - 13,200 45% Sidewalks Old Town Boardwalk 165-696 450,000 13,361 - 13,381 3% City Facilities Rehabilitation 165-701 349.235 44,849 263,846 308,695 88% Bike Lane and Trail Program 165-703 651.786 19.857 19,857 3% Medians & Ornamental Ped. Barriers 165-704 10,100 - - - 0% Sidewalks -Citywide 165-708 462,727 640 6,446 7,086 2% Citywide Surveillance Cameras 165-711 1,547,360 17,490 66,036 83.526 5% American With Disabilities ACT 165-713 245,825 70.943 135,937 206.880 84% Citywide Storm Drain Improvements 165-715 17,643 8,368 8,368 47% French Valley Pkwy/I-15 Over -Crossing and Improvements- Phase 1 165-719 211,624 10,553 50,999 61.552 29% Butterfield Stage Road Extension 165-723 12.295,219 184.087 190,514 374,601 3% French Valley Pkwy/I-15 Over -Crossing and Improvements- Phase II 165-726 8,158,430 297,282 3.541,682 3,838,964 47% Murrieta Creek Improvements 165-735 265,573 197 20,695 20,892 8% Temecula Park and Ride 165-747 1,760,233 21,669 1,077,568 1,099,237 62% Fire Station Roripaugh- Phase 11 165-753 36,337 - - 0% Fire Station 73 Living Upgrade 165-757 43,432 332 332 1% Developer Reimbursements 165-763 684,422 - - - 0%, EOC Emergency Operations Center 165-765 29,723 10,058 5,024 15,082 51% Old Town Sidewalks 165-766 502,794 248,033 133,030 381,063 76% Citywide Concrete Repairs 165-770 146,259 113,944 4,940 118,884 81% Ronald H Roberts Public Library 165-773 169,918 81,011 88,733 169,744 100% CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS FUND (continued) for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Account Year -to -Date Percentage Amended Encumbrances Total Activity Number Budget Activity of Budget EXPENDITURES - cont'd: Sidewalk Ynez Road 165-775 137,537 394 15.000 15,394 11% Utility Undergrounding-Citywide 165-776 244,375 89,061 89,061 36% Sport Field Lighting LED 190-113 250,000 - 0% Ronald Reagan Sports Park Restroom 190-114 725,000 - 0% Fallen Heroes Memorial 190-115 150,000 17,510 17,510 12% CRC Pool Site Enhancement 195-116 410.000 - 0% Patricia Birdsall Synthetic Turf 190-119 1,976,631 1,857,075 1,857,075 94% Playground Equipment Safety Surfacing 190-120 1,515,796 - 0% Teen Center 190-122 645,686 - 0% Children's Museum Enhancement 190-125 68,910 - - 0% Flood Control Channel Reconstruction 190-127 557,330 98 87,894 87,992 16% Parks Improvement Program 190-130 392,779 58,953 56,353 115.306 29% Sam Hicks Monument Park Playground 190-132 582,079 984 165.568 166,552 29% Library Parking- Phase II 190-153 1,737,965 3,148 68,409 71,557 4% Public Restroom Renovations 190-155 313,506 - - 0% Ronald Reagan Sports Park Channel Silt Removal and Desilting Pond 190-187 34.505 1,143 33,361 34,504 100% TOTAL EXPENDITURES Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources/(Uses) Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/30/2017 102,826,501 10,309,101 32,925.048 43.234,149 42% (1) (13,930.072) (1.570,987) 17,758 934 17, 758,934 $ 3,828.862 $ 16,187,947 Notes: (1) The variance is primarily due to the timing of project expenditures and revenues differing from that anticipated in the budget. CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, and CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - BUDGET AND ACTUAL 2011 FINANCING LEASE CIVIC CENTER AND CRC for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Annual Amended Budget Total Percentage of Activity Budget REVENUES: 2011 Financing Lease Revenues $ 2,135,231 $ 533,400 25% TOTAL REVENUES 2,135,231 533,400 25% EXPENDITURES: Debt Service Principal Debt Service Interest 1,389,000 746,231 342,000 191,400 25% 26% TOTAL EXPENDITURES 2,135,231 533,400 25% Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures Beginning Fund Balance as of 7/01/2017 Ending Fund Balance as of 9/3012017 CITY OF TEMECULA COMBINING STATEMENT OF NET POSITION INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Workers' Vehicles and Information Technology InsuranceSupportEquipment Technology Replacement Support Facilities Fund Services Fund Fund Fund Fund Fund Fund ASSETS. TOTAL Cash and Investments $ 437.012 $ 1,009.875 $ 1,784,891 $ 427,183 $ 873,283 $ 476,354 $ 637,224 $ 5.645,822 Receivables 1,361 10,912 5.863 5,974 1,455 1,916 1,371 28,852 Prepaid Assets 322,646 36,657 359,303 Property. Ptah, and Equipment (net of accumulated depreaabon) 303.217 538,588 403,120 60,190 1,305,115 TOTAL ASSETS 761,019 1,057,444 2.093,971 971,745 1,277,858 538,460 638,595 7.339,092 LIABILITIES AND NET POSITION LIABILITIES: Cunenl Liabilities 455.823 3.399 - 145,435 17,617 34,131 141,143 797,548 Capital Leases Payable 563,640 - 34,505 598.145 TOTAL LIABILITIES 455.823 3.399 - 709,075 17,617 68,636 141,143 1.395.693 NET POSITION. TOTAL NET POSITION NOTE Balances are unaud ted $ 305,196 $ 1.054.045 $ 2.093,971 $ 262,670 $ 1.260,241 $ 469.824 $ 497,452 $ 5,943,399 CITY OF TEMECULA COMBINING STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES, and CHANGES IN NET POSITION INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 Insurance Workers' Vehicles and Information Technology Su Compensation Equipment Technology Replacement Support Facilities Fund Services Fund Fund Fund Fund Fund Fund REVENUES: TOTAL Investment Interest $ 685 $ 3.009 $ 5,577 $ 906 $ 1.633 $ 1.448 $ 1.393 $ 14,651 Transfer In -Measure 5 162,500 48,750 211,250 Charges for Services 291,809 186,147 16,556 715,272 67,006 89,550 363.704 1.730,044 TOTAL REVENUES 292.494 189,156 184,633 764,928 68,639 90,998 365,097 1,955,945 EXPENSES: Salaries and Wages 8,678 25.395 428.646 - 51,168 129,207 643,094 Operating Expenses 283.816 40,214 287,532 - 28,561 235,890 876,013 Interest 2.293 2,293 Depreciation 21,419 25.051 86.865 6.279 139,614 TOTAL EXPENSES 292,494 65,609 21,419 741,229 86.865 88.301 365.097 1,661,014 Revenues Overl(Under) Expenses 123,547 163,214 23.699 {18.226) 2.697 294,931 Nei Position as of 710112017 305,196 930.498 1,930,757 238,971 1,278,467 467,127 497,452 5.648.468 Net Position as of 9/30/2017 $ 305,196 $ 1,054,045 $ 2,093,971 $ 262.670 $ 1,260,241 $ 469,824 $ 497,452 $ 5,943,399 CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF NET POSITION - Fiduciary Fund CALIFORNIA EMPLOYEE RETIREE BENEFIT TRUST (CERBT) FUND for theist Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 ASSETS: Cash and Investments TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES: Accounts Payable CERBT FUND $ 7,497,719 7,497,719 55,803 TOTAL LIABILITIES 55,803 NET POSITION: 7,441,916 Held in Trust for Retiree Benefits 7,441,916 TOTAL NET POSITION $ 7,441,916 NOTE: Balances are unaudited CITY OF TEMECULA STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FIDUCIARY NET POSITION - Fiduciary Fund CALIFORNIA EMPLOYEE RETIREE BENEFIT TRUST FUND for the 1st Quarter Ended September 30, 2017 ADDITIONS CONTRIBUTIONS: Employer Investment Earnings CERBT FUND $ 166,470 271,838 TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS 438,308 DEDUCTIONS: Benefits 222,273 TOTAL DEDUCTIONS TOTAL ADDITIONS Net Position as of 7/1/2017 Net Position as of 9130/2017 222,273 7,225,881 $ 7,441,916 Item No. 6 CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Randi Johl, City Clerk DATE: January 9, 2018 SUBJECT: Adopt Ordinance No. 18-01 Approving the Altair Specific Plan Project and Adopt Ordinance No. 18-02 Approving the Development Agreement with Ambient Communities (Planning Application Nos. PA14-0158, PA14-0159, PA14-0160, and PA14-0161) (Second Reading) PREPARED BY: Randi Johl, City Clerk RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council: 1. Adopt an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 18-01 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN #15 ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940- 310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) 2. Adopt an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 18-02 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT WITH AMBIENT COMMUNITIES FOR THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN #15 ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310- 048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) BACKGROUND: The City of Temecula is a general law city formed under the laws of the State of California. With respect to adoption of ordinances and resolutions, the City adheres to the requirements set forth in the Government Code. With the exception of urgency ordinances, Government Code Section 36934 requires two readings of standard ordinances more than five days apart. Ordinances must be read in full at the time of introduction or passage unless a motion waiving the reading is adopted by a majority of the City Council present. Ordinance No. 18-01 was first introduced at the adjourned regular meeting of December 12, 2017, FISCAL IMPACT: None ATTACHMENTS: 1. Ordinance No. 18-01 Approving the Altair Specific Plan Project 2. Ordinance No. 18-02 Approving the Development Agreement with Ambient Communities ORDINANCE NO. 18-01 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN #15 ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210- 049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Procedural Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. On November 24, 2014, Rob Honer, representing Ambient Communities filed Planning Application Nos. PA14-0158, a General Plan Amendment; PA14-0159, a Specific Plan; PA14-0160, a Tentative Tract Map; and PA14-0161, a Development Agreement. These applications (collectively "proposed Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. B. The proposed Project consists of a change in the General Plan designation on the proposed Project site from Industrial Park (IP), Open Space (OS), Medium Density Residential (M), High Density Residential (H), and Hillside Residential (HR) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) for the Altair Specific Plan. The Altair Specific Plan is a series of standards and regulations that will govern all development in the proposed Project area. These standards and regulations address land use standards, a form based code, setbacks, building height, and parking requirements. Together, these regulations and standards seek to ensure cohesiveness in the design and aesthetic appearance of the proposed Project site, and compatibility with the surrounding community. In addition to the proposed General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan, the proposed Project also includes a Tentative Tract Map and a Development Agreement. C. The proposed Project was processed including, but not limited to, a public notice in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including the Califomia Environmental Quality Act. D. An Environmental Impact Report (EIR), Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, and Statement of Overriding Considerations were prepared for the proposed Project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act and the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines ("CEQA"). Thereafter, City staff circulated a Notice of Completion indicating the public comment period and intent to adopt the EIR as required by law. The public comment period commenced via the State Clearing House Ords 18-01 1 from May 2, 2016 through June 17, 2016. The City published a Notice of Availability for the Draft EIR in the San Diego Union Tribune, a newspaper of general circulation within the City. A Notice of Availability was also sent to adjacent property owners indicating a review period of May 2, 2016 through June 17, 2016. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Department of Community Development, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, Califomia 92590; the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located 41000 County Center Drive; and the City of Temecula website. E. On November 15, 2017, the Planning Commission considered the Final Environmental Impact Report ("EIR"), Planning Application Nos. PA14-0158, a General Plan Amendment; PA14-0159, a Specific Plan; PA14-0160, a Tentative Tract Map; and PA14-0161, a Development Agreement, at a duly noticed public hearing as prescribed by law, at which time the City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to, and did testify either in support of, or in opposition to, this matter. F. Following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearing, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution No, 17-43 "A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT A RESOLUTION CERTIFYING THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPTING FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPTING A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPTING A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR THE ALTAIR PROJECT, CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007)." G. Following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearings and due consideration of the proposed Project, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution No. 17-46 "A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT AN ORDINANCE ENTITLED 'AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN #15 ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210- 049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007)." H. On December 12, 2017, the City Council of the City of Temecula considered the proposed Project and the EIR, Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, and Statement of Overriding Considerations, at a duly noticed public hearing at which time all interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition Ords 18-01 2 to this matter. The City Council considered all the testimony and any comments received regarding the proposed Project and the EIR, Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, and Statement of Overriding Considerations prior to and at the public hearing. I. Following the public hearing, the Council adopted Resolution No. 17-86 "A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA CERTIFYING THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPTING FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPTING A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPTING A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR THE ALTAIR PROJECT, CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES, GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007)." Resolution No. 17-86 and the findings therein are hereby incorporated by this reference as set forth in full. J. All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Ordinance have occurred. Section 2. Legislative Findings. The City Council in approving the Altair Specific Plan hereby makes the following findings: A. The Specific Plan, which is incorporated herein by this reference, complies with the requirements of California Government Code section 65451 based on, but not limited to, the following: (1) The Specific Plan contains diagrams and text which specify in detail the distribution, location, and extent of the uses of land, including open space, within the area covered by the Specific Plan (Sections 2, 3 and 8 of the Specific Plan). (2) The Specific Plan contains diagrams and text which specify in detail the proposed distribution, location, and extent and intensity of major components of public and private transportation, sewage, water, drainage, solid waste disposal, energy, and other essential facilities proposed to be located within the area covered by the Specific Plan and needed to support the land uses described in the Specific Plan (Sections 4, 6 and 7 of the Specific Plan). (3) The Specific Plan contains diagrams and text which specify in detail the standards and criteria by which development will proceed, and standards for the conservation, development, and utilization of natural resources, where applicable (Sections 3, 8, 9 and 10 of the Specific Plan), (4) The Specific Plan contains a program of implementation measures including regulations, programs, public works projects, and financing Ords 18-01 3 (5) measures necessary to carry out paragraphs (1), (2), and (3) above (Sections 5 and 11 of the Specific Plan). The Specific Plan includes a statement of the relationship of the Specific Plan to the General Plan (Section 2.6 of the Specific Plan). B. Pursuant to Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.16.020(E), the City Council in adopting the Specific Plan finds determines and declares that: (1) The proposed specific plan is consistent with the general plan and development code. The Specific Plan is consistent with the City's General Plan, as amended. The Specific Plan will allow for the construction of up to 1,750 new homes for a range of household sizes, income, and demographics. The Land Use Element identifies the objective for this area which is to "provide complimentary land uses to Old Town that increase the vitality of the area; to increase the range of the housing opportunities west of 1-15; and to encourage sensitive site and building design given the topography of the area." The Specific Plan is consistent with these objectives. The Specific Plan provides a range of multifamily and detached housing types within walking distance of Old Town that will result in a vibrant combination of uses for the aggregate planning areas. The Specific Plan respects existing topography and embraces existing scenic vistas as focal points for the community. The Specific Plan satisfies two of the four implementation measures listed in LU -22 of the Land Use Element Implementation Program: "[p]roviding infill residential opportunities within the area and the adjacent Westside Specific Plan to create a nighttime population for the area," and "[I]ocating additional public and community facilities within and surrounding the Old Town area." The proposed Specific Plan is also consistent with Goal 2 of the Circulation Element of the General Plan which is to create a "regional transportation system that accommodates the safe and efficient movement of people and goods to and from the community." A significant portion of the Western Bypass Corridor project is accomplished in the Specific Plan, connecting SR -79 (Temecula Parkway) to Rancho California Road via Vincent Moraga Drive. The proposed Specific Plan is consistent with Goal 1 of the Housing Element which is to "provide a diversity of housing opportunities that satisfy the physical, social, and economic needs of existing and future residents of Temecula." Single-family detached houses represent 80% of the existing housing stock in the City. The Specific Plan will create a mixture of housing which is needed in the City. Among other policies in the Housing Element, the Specific Plan implements Policy 1.2 of the Housing Element which is to "[e]ncourage residential development that provides a range of housing Ords 18-01 4 types in terms of cost, density and type, and provides the opportunity for local residents to live and work in the same community by balancing jobs and housing types." It also implements Policy 1.3 which is to °[r]equire a mixture of diverse housing types and densities in new developments around the village centers to enhance their people orientation and diversity." The Specific Plan development is predominantly east of the Western Bypass, preserving the western portion of the Specific Plan area as natural open space. thus consistent with Policy 1.5 of the Housing Element which is to "[e]ncourage the use of clustered development to preserve and enhance important environmental resources and open space, consistent with sustainability principles." The Specific Plan will establish the design and development framework for the proposed Project. The Specific Plan is consistent with the City's development code, as amended by this Ordinance. As proposed and conditioned, the Specific Plan will be consistent with the General Plan and all applicable requirements of State Law and other Ordinances of the City. Further findings of consistency with the General Plan can be found in Section 2.6 of the Specific Plan, which is hereby incorporated by this reference. (2) The proposed specific plan would not be detrimental to the public interest, health, safety, convenience or welfare of the city. The City has engaged in extensive studies and review of the potential impacts of the Specific Plan as well as the various potential benefits to the City by the development of the Specific Plan and concluded that the Specific Plan is in the best interests of, and is not detrimental to, the health, safety and general welfare of the City. The proposed specific plan is located directly adjacent to Old Town Temecula and its added residential population base will support the commercial uses of Old Town. There are few housing opportunities in Old Town currently, limiting the clientele of Old Town's shops and restaurants to visitors who arrive primarily by car. Old Town businesses are therefore dependent on tourism, which can fluctuate dramatically. The proposed specific plan will provide up to 1,750 new homes for a range of household sizes, income, and demographics. The Specific Plan was reviewed and determined to be in conformance with the City's General Plan, as amended. The General Plan sets the policies and standards that protect the health, safety and welfare of the community. In addition, the Specific Plan establishes specific building design guidelines and standards that ensure compatibility and interface with the surrounding community in terms of density, design and circulation. Therefore, the Specific Plan is compatible with the health, safety and welfare of the community. Ords 18-01 5 (3) The subject property is physically suitable for the requested land use designations and the anticipated land use developments. There are no physical constraints of the Specific Plan area which would preclude or prohibit the requested land use designations or anticipated developments. Moreover, the Specific Plan land uses are consistent with the land uses of the General Plan, as amended, and will serves as the tool to regulate and implement the goals and policies of the General Plan. The subject property is currently undeveloped land with only a few of the required public utilities located onsite. The proposed development within the Specific Plan area will provide the necessary connections, extensions, and upgrades as required to serve the area. (4) The proposed specific plan shall ensure development of desirable character which will be compatible with existing and proposed development in the surrounding neighborhood. The Specific Plan conforms to the City's effort to manage growth through the use of, among other things, comprehensive planning and design, Project -wide continuity of landscaping and architectural design, design standards and layout concepts exceeding the City's standards for residential development, and the village -center concept. In addition, the Specific Plan is based on a "Smart Growth" design, which aims to enhance the quality of life, preserve the natural environment, and save public funds over time through efficient utilization of infrastructure. Among other things, smart growth principles include, without limitation, a mix of land uses, well- designed compact neighborhoods, a variety of transportation choices, preserve open spaces, natural beauty, and environmentally sensitive areas, and unique neighborhood identities. Section 3. Services Deficit Fiscal Impact Payments A. The City and owners estimate that the increased costs to the City of providing public safety and other municipal services to the area resulting from the General Plan Amendment, adoption of the Specific Plan, and change of zone for the proposed Project will substantially exceed the municipal revenue from the proposed Project ("City Services Deficit"). The City has received a Fiscal Impact Analysis, dated as of September, 2017 ("FIA"), documenting the City Services Deficit. The owners of the property within the proposed Project, and their successors of interest, shall pay the City the sum of Two Hundred Thirty -Seven Dollars ($237.00) per residential dwelling unit within the proposed Project area that is an Occupied Residential Property, each year as mitigation for the City Services Deficit, with an increase in such payment each fiscal year in an amount of five and six -tenths percent (5.6%) of the previous year's payment. Ords 18-01 6 B. The owners and their successors to the property within the proposed Project may fulfill this obligation through the levy of an annual special tax of a community facilities district established by the City pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982, Government Code Section 53311, et seq.; provided, however, the obligation of each owner and their successors to pay the City Services Deficit payment under this obligation remains an obligation of the owners and their successors regardless of the financing mechanism used to pay it and regardless of whether there is a financing mechanism to pay it. C. This requirement is set forth in Section 11.8 of the Specific Plan. Section 4. Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee A. In order to facilitate local wildlife conservation efforts, owner shall pay to the City the following: (1) on or before the issuance of the first (1S') building permit for the proposed Project, the sum of Five Hundred Thousand Dollars ($500,000.00) (the "Initial Wildlife Conservation Fee") less the cost of the land purchase and associated closing costs described in 4.4.5 (iv) of the Development Agreement; and (ii) as provided in Section 11.9 of the Specific Plan and Section 4.5.2 of the Development Agreement, an annual payment of $43 per Occupied Residential Property, in perpetuity, with an increase in such payment each fiscal year in an amount of two percent (2%) of the prior year's fee (the "Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee"). B. For purposes of this Section, "Occupied Residential Property" means an assessor's parcel in the Specific Plan area for which a building permit for residential construction and a certificate of occupancy or final inspection has been issued. C. The proceeds of the Wildlife Conservation Fee shall be used for the following purposes ("Wildlife Conservation Costs"): (1) The initial six million dollars ($6,000,000.00) of the Initial Wildlife Conservation Fee and the Wildlife Conservation Fee shall be held in an account by the City for the purposes of acquiring one hundred (100) acres of conservation lands within the Special Linkage Area south of the Property and/or in Riverside County and within ten (10) miles of the proposed Project site. Western Riverside County Regional Conservation Authority, a Joint Powers Agency formed under Government Code section 6500 et seq. ("RCA") shall acquire such land and City shall reimburse RCA for the cost of its land purchase and associated closing costs, with interest, from the initial $6,000,000.00. The land acquisitions shall be in accordance with the equivalency standards for the acquisition of land submitted to the RCA and the City prior to the City Council's approval of the proposed Project. Once this objective has been satisfied, then the City shall use such funding thereafter for one or more of the conservation activities described below in subsections (2), (3) or (4). The interest rate for the reimbursement shall be compound interest at the rate equal to the average interest rate paid on deposits in the State Local Agency Investment Fund, Government Code Sections 16429.1 to 16429.4, during the year prior to July 1 of each year. Pursuant to Section 4.5.2 of the Development Agreement and Section 11.9 of the Specific Plan, owner, its successors to Ords 18-01 7 the property within the proposed Project, including End Users, shall fulfill this obligation of the Specific Plan with the proceeds of Special Tax C of the CFD(s), provided, however, that the obligation set forth herein and in Section 11.9 of the Specific Plan remains regardless of the financing mechanism used to pay it or whether there is a financing mechanism to pay it. (2) An engineering feasibility study to be prepared by the City in conjunction with the RCA along Interstate 15 between the proposed Project site and the San Diego County Line whose purpose is to evaluate locations and initiate engineering for a wildlife overcrossing or undercrossing across the Interstate 15 freeway in order to allow wildlife (including mountain lion) to safely travel between the Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve and the Palomar Mountain regions; and/or (3) Reimbursement to the RCA of its costs, with interest, for the acquisition of lands south of the proposed Project for conservation (the interest rate for the reimbursement shall be compound annual interest at the rate equal to the average interest rate paid on deposits in the State Local Agency Investment Fund, Government Code Sections 16429.1 to 16429.4, during the year prior to July 1 of each year); and/or (4) Other wildlife conservation efforts, (i) within Riverside County; and (ii) within ten (10) miles of the Project Site undertaken by the City or RCA. D. The owners and their successors to the property within the proposed Project may fulfill this obligation through the levy of an annual special tax of a community facilities district established by the City pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982, Government Code Section 53311, et seq.; provided, however, the obligation of each owner and their successors to pay the Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee payment under this obligation remains an obligation of the owners and their successors regardless of the financing mechanism used to pay it and regardless of whether there is a financing mechanism to pay it. E. Owner shall not be entitled to any fee credits in connection with such conservation funding. F. This requirement is set forth in Section 11.9 of the Specific Plan. Section 5. Section 17.16.070 (Approved specific plans.) of Chapter 17.16 Specific Plan Zoning District (SP-) of Title 17 (Zoning) is hereby amended to add the following, with all other provisions of Section 17.16.070 remaining the same: "SP -15 Altair Specific Plan" Ords 18-01 8 Section 6. Zoning Map Amendment. The City Council hereby amends the Official Zoning Map of the City of Temecula to change the zoning classification for the property located on 270 acres in the southwesterly portion of the City of Temecula, west of Old Town (APNs 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 through 940-310-048, and 940-320-001 through 940-320-007) to the Altair Specific Plan #15. The Altair Specific Plan including the zoning map amendment is attached as Exhibit "B" to this Ordinance and is incorporated herein by this reference as though set forth in full. Section 7. Consistency with General Plan, On December 12, 2017, the City Council adopted Resolution No. 17-87, which amended the Land Use Element and Circulation Element of the General Plan, in conformity with Government Code section 65300. Therefore, the foregoing amendments outlined in this Ordinance are consistent with the goals and policies of the General Plan for the City of Temecula. Section 8. The City Council of the City of Temecula hereby adopts the Altair Specific Plan subject to the Conditions of Approval attached hereto as Exhibit "A". The Altair Specific Plan is on file in the City Clerk's office and is incorporated herein by reference as though set forth in full. Section 9. Severability. If any portion, provision, section, paragraph, sentence, or word of this Ordinance is rendered or declared to be invalid by any final court action in a court of competent jurisdiction, or by reason of any preemptive legislation, the remaining portions, provisions, sections, paragraphs, sentences, and words of this Ordinance shall remain in full force and effect and shall be interpreted by the court so as to give effect to such remaining portions of the Ordinance. Section 10. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall take effect thirty (30) days after its adoption. Section 11. Notice of Adoption. The City Clerk shall certify to the adoption of this Ordinance and cause it to be published in the manner required by law. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 9'h day of January , 2018. Matt Rahn, Mayor ATTEST: Randi Johl, City Clerk [SEAL] Ords 18-01 9 STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Randi Johl, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Ordinance No, 18-01 was duly introduced and placed upon its first reading at a meeting of the City Council of the City of Temecula on the 12th day of December, 2017, and that thereafter, said Ordinance was duly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 9th day of January, 2018, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Randi Johl, City Clerk Ords 18-01 10 Planning Application No.: Project Description: Assessor's Parcel No.: MSHCP Category: DIF Category: TUMF Category: QUIMBY Category: Approval Date: Expiration Date: PLANNING DIVISION Within 48 Hours of Approval EXHIBIT A CITY OF TEMECULA DRAFT CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL PA14-0159 A proposed Specific Plan to include the four -lane divided Western Bypass, up to 1,750 residential units, an elementary school, up to 7,000 square feet of neighborhood commercial, a clubhouse, civic site, parks, trails, and hillside preservation. The Specific Plan will also include off-site improvements for public infrastructure including, but not limited to, construction of the Western Bypass bridge over Murrieta Creek, road widening of Vincent Moraga, construction of Main Street north of Pujol, and off-site sewer, water and dry utility extensions 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310- 044 through 940-310-048, and 940-320-001 through 940-320-007 Credits per the Development Agreement (PA14-0161) Credits per the Development Agreement (PA14-0161) Credits per the Development Agreement (PA14-0161) Exempt per the Development Agreement (PA14-0161) 1. Filing Notice of Determination. The applicant/developer shall deliver to the Planning Division a cashier's check or money order made payable to the County Clerk in the amount of Three Thousand One Hundred and Twenty Hundred Dollars and Zero Cents ($3,128.00) which includes the Three Thousand and Seventy Dollars and Zero Cents ($3,078,00) fee, required by Fish and Wildlife Code Section 711.4(d)(3) plus the Fifty Dollars ($50.00) County administrative fee, to enable the City to file the Notice of Determination for the Environmental Impact Report required under Public Resources Code Section 21152 and Califomia Code of Regulations Section 15904. If within said 48-hour period the applicant/developer has not delivered to the Planning Division the check as required above, the approval for the project granted shall be void by reason of failure of condition (Fish and Wildlife Code Section 711.4(c)). General Requirements 2. Indemnification of the City. The applicant and owner of the real property subject to this condition shall hereby agree to indemnify, protect, hold harmless, and defend the City and its attorneys from any and all claims, actions, awards, judgments, or proceedings against the City to attack, set aside, annul, or seek monetary damages resulting, directly or indirectly, from any action in furtherance of and the approval of the City, or any agency or instrumentality thereof, advisory agency, appeal board or legislative body including actions approved by the voters of the City, concerning the Planning Application. The City shall be deemed for purposes of this condition, to include any agency or instrumentality thereof, or any of its elected or appointed officials, officers, employees, consultants, contractors, legal counsel, and agents. City shall promptly notify both the applicant and landowner of any claim, action, or proceeding to which this condition is applicable and shall further cooperate fully in the defense of the action. The City reserves the right to take any and all action the City deems to be in the best interest of the City and its citizens in regards to such defense. 3. Expiration. This approval shall be used within twenty (20) years per the Development Agreement; otherwise, it shall become null and void. Use means the beginning of substantial construction contemplated by this approval within the three-year period, which is thereafter diligently pursued to completion, or the beginning of substantial utilization contemplated by this approval, or use of a property in conformance with a Conditional Use Permit. 4. Time Extension. The Director of Community Development may, upon an application being filed prior to expiration, and for good cause, grant up to five extensions of time, one year at a time. 5. Consistency with Specific Plans. This project and all subsequent projects within this site shall be consistent with Specific Plan No. 15, Altair Specific Plan. 6. Consistency with Development Agreements. The project and all subsequent projects within this site shall be subject to Development Agreement (PA14-0161). 7. Compliance with EIR. The project and all subsequent projects within this site shall comply with all mitigation measures identified within the EIR for Altair (SCH No. 2014111029). 8. Signage Permits. A separate building permit shall be required for all signage. 9. Landscape Maintenance. Landscaping installed for the project shall be continuously maintained to the reasonable satisfaction of the Director of Community Development. If it is determined that the landscaping is not being maintained, the Director of Community Development shall have the authority to require the property owner to bring the landscaping into conformance with the approved landscape plan. The continued maintenance of all landscaped areas shall be the responsibility of the developer or any successors in interest. 10. Graffiti. All graffiti shall be removed within 24 hours on telecommunication towers. equipment, walls, or other structures. 11. Water Quality and Drainage. Other than stormwater, it is illegal to allow liquids, gels, powders, sediment, fertilizers, landscape debris, and waste from entering the storm drain system or from leaving the property. To ensure compliance with this Condition of Approval: a. Spills and leaks shall be cleaned up immediately. b. Do not wash, maintain, or repair vehicles onsite. c. Do not hose down parking areas, sidewalks, alleys, or gutters. d. Ensure that all materials and products stored outside are protected from rain. e. Ensure all trash bins are covered at all times. 12. Modifications or Revisions. The permittee shall obtain City approval for any modifications or revisions to the approval of this project. 13. Phased Construction. If construction is phased, a construction staging area plan or phasing plan for construction equipment and trash shall be approved by the Director of Community Development. 14. Subdivision Map Act. The tentative subdivision shall comply with the State of California Subdivision Map Act and to all the requirements of Ordinance No. 460, unless modified by the conditions listed below. An Extension of Time may be approved in accordance with the State Map Act and City Ordinance, upon written request, if made 60 days prior to the expiration date. 15. Subdivision Phasing. If subdivision phasing is proposed, a phasing plan shall be submitted to and approved by the Community Development Director. 16. Public Art Ordinance. The applicant shall comply with the requirements of the City's Public Art Ordinance as defined in Section 5.08 of the Temecula Municipal Code. 17. Property Maintenance. All parkways, including within the right-of-way, entryway median, landscaping, walls, fencing, recreational facilities, and on-site lighting shall be maintained by the property owner or maintenance association. 18. Class I Multi -Use Trails. Class I multi -use trails shall be provided as per the City of Temecula's Multi -Use Trails and Bikeways Master Plan, the Tentative Tract Map and the Specific Plan. The construction plans for the Class 1 trails shall be included on the perimeter landscape plans and constructed in concurrence with the installation of the landscaping. 19. Class II Bicycle Lanes. Class II bicycle lanes, as specified in the City of Temecula Multi -Use Trails and Bikeways Master Plan, the Tentative Tract Map and the Specific Plan, shall be identified on the street improvement plans, and constructed in concurrence with the street improvements. 20. Mitigation Monitoring Program. The Altair project is required to comply with all mitigation measures identified in the Final EIR, and Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program (MMRP). 21. Maximum Number of Rental Units (Apartments). Prior to the issuance of a building permit by the City for a residential community in the Project, the Guest Builder shall provide a letter to the City declaring whether the project will include residential units for sale to homeowners (a "For -Sale Community") or residential units for rent (Apartments) to tenants (a "For -Rent Community"), and if it is a For -Rent Community, the number of Rental Units being proposed for the For -Rent Community. Further, in conjunction with the overall development of the Project, the Guest Builder will also provide a list of all previously approved For -Sale and For -Rent Communities in the Project and the number of Rental Units for each For Rent Community. There shall be a maximum of 50% Rental Units within the Project. The number of rental units shall be reconciled prior to development plan approval in each village, A, B, C -North, C -South, D, E, F, and G. Notwithstanding the forgoing, homes that are in a For -Sale Community that are sold to individuals and then later rented to the public shall not count towards the maximum Rental Unit threshold. (REVISED AT CITY COUNCIL MEETING ON DECEMBER 12, 2017). 22. Project Phasing_ The project shall be built in four phases per the attached "Phasing Exhibit, 10D." Infrastructure shall be required prior to the issuance of building permits in each phase per the phasing plan. 23. Fiscal Impact Compliance_ Any development within the Altair Specific Plan will be required to address impacts to the City's budget as a result of the increased costs to the City of providing public safety and other municipal services to the Project area substantially exceeding the municipal revenue generated from the Project ("City Services Deficit")_ The City has a received a Fiscal Impact Analysis dated October, 2017 ("FIA"), documenting the City Services Deficit. The owners of the property within the Project, and their successors of interest, at the time a certificate of occupancy is issued for a residential dwelling, shall pay the City the sum of two - hundred thirty-seven ($237) per residential dwelling unit within the project each year as mitigation for the City Services Deficit. Owner and its successors to the property within the Project may fulfill this obligation through a Community Facilities District Act of 1982, Government Code Section 53311, et seq., provided however, the obligation of each owner and their successors to the pay the City Services Deficit payment under this obligation remains an obligation of the owner and its successors regardless of the financing mechanism used to pay it and regardless of whether there is a financing mechanism to pay it. 24. Trail Siting and Location on the South Parcel/Civic Site. In addition to the mitigation measures identified in the Final EIR for cultural resources, MM -CUL -la through MM -CUL - 3, City Staff will work with the Pechanga Tribe to determine the final trail alignment for an out and back, or loop trail. Using trail siting guidance identified in the Multi -Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) Section 7,0, the trail will utilize existing dirt roads whenever possible. Portions of existing trail may be eliminated, and revegetated to protect environmentally sensitive areas. Any new trail segment will be designed to discourage and prevent intrusion into adjacent environmentally sensitive areas. 25. Direction Fencing. Directional Fencing for wildlife shall be required as identified in the Specific Plan, EIR, and in conformance with the Western Riverside County Multi -Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP). 26. Prior to issuance of grading permit, the RCA shall review and approve for conformance with the Urban Wildlands Interface Guidelines the design of the applicant's Urban Wildlands Interface measures (fencing, lighting, access control, plant palette, drainage, etc.) for development adjacent to all conservation areas (Western Bypass, Villages A and G, and Nature Center). The Nature Center trails shall be reviewed and approved by the RCA and Wildlife Agencies for compliance with Urban Wildlands Interface Guidelines and MSHCP Section 7.4.2, Conditionally Compatible Uses 27. Partial conservation lands totaling 65 acres (APNs 918-080-008 and 009) will be transferred to the RCA prior to any project grading. 28. Acquisition of an additional 100 acres of biologically equivalent or superior replacement lands by the RCA and funded by the proposed Altair Wildlife CFD. All CFD funding up to 6 million dollars will be directed to the RCA until the 100 acres is acquired. 29. The conservation easement over ungraded of the South Parcel will be offered either to the RCA or an entity with a management agreement with the RCA. 30. MSHCP Local Development Mitigation Fees will be paid for the project. Fee credits for onsite conservation acres will be consistent with RCA Resolution 2016-003, Fee Credit and Waiver Policy. Prior to Issuance of Grading Permit 31. Central Park Design Meeting. Prior to the issuance of any grading permits associated with the Central park area, a pre -design meeting shall be held to include Planning. TCSD, and Public Works to complete a final design for the Central Park. The Altair Specific Plan includes a conceptual plan for the park, however, final arrangement and location of amenities shall be determined prior to any grading and/or construction. 32. Placement of Transformer, Provide the Planning Division with a copy of the underground water plans and electrical plans for verification of proper placement of transformer(s) and double detector check valves prior to final agreement with the utility companies. 33. Placement of Double Detector Check Valves. Double detector check valves shall be installed at locations that minimize their visibility from the public right-of-way, subject to review and approval by the Director of Community Development. 34. Pechanga Mitigation Measures. The Altair project is required to comply with Mitigation measures MM -CUL -la through MM -CUL -3. 35. Archaeological/Cultural Resources Grading Note. The following shall be included in the Notes Section of the Grading Plan: "If at any time during excavation/construction of the site, archaeological/cultural resources, or any artifacts or other objects which reasonably appears to be evidence of cultural or archaeological resource are discovered, the property owner shall immediately advise the City of such and the City shall cause all further excavation or other disturbance of the affected area to immediately cease. The Director of Community Development at his/her sole discretion may require the property owner to deposit a sum of money it deems reasonably necessary to allow the City to consult and/or authorize an independent, fully qualified specialist to inspect the site at no cost to the City, in order to assess the significance of the find. Upon determining that the discovery is not an archaeological/ cultural resource, the Director of Community Development shall notify the property owner of such determination and shall authorize the resumption of work. Upon determining that the discovery is an archaeological/cultural resource, the Director of Community Development shall notify the property owner that no further excavation or development may take place until a mitigation plan or other corrective measures have been approved by the Director of Community Development." 36. Cultural Resources Treatment Agreement. The developer is required to enter into a Cultural Resources Treatment Agreement with the Pechanga Tribe. This Agreement will address the treatment and disposition of cultural resources and human remains that may be impacted as a result of the development of the project, as well as provisions for tribal monitors. 37. Discovery of Cultural Resources. The following shall be included in the Notes Section of the Grading Plan: "If cultural resources are discovered during the project construction (inadvertent discoveries), all work in the area of the find shall cease, and a qualified archaeologist and representatives of the Pechanga Tribe shall be retained by the project sponsor to investigate the find, and make recommendations as to treatment and mitigation." 38. Archaeological Monitoring of Cultural Resources. The following shall be included in the Notes Section of the Grading Plan: "A qualified archaeological monitor will be present and will have the authority to stop and redirect grading activities, in consultation with the Pechanga Tribe and their designated monitors, to evaluate the significance of any archaeological resources discovered on the property." 39. Tribal Monitoring of Cultural Resources. The following shall be included in the Notes Section of the Grading Plan: "Tribal monitors from the Pechanga Tribe shall be allowed to monitor all grading, excavation and groundbreaking activities, including all archaeological surveys, testing, and studies, to be compensated by the developer." 40. Relinquishment of Cultural Resources. The following shall be included in the Notes Section of the Grading Plan: "The landowner agrees to relinquish ownership of all cultural resources, including all archaeological artifacts that are found on the project area, to the Pechanga Tribe for proper treatment and disposition." 41. Preservation of Sacred Sites. The following shall be included in the Notes Section of the Grading Plan: "All sacred sites are to be avoided and preserved." 42. Mitigation Measure MM -CUL -la — Retention of a Qualified Archaeologist. Prior to issuance of a grading permit and prior to the start of any ground disturbing activity, the applicant shall retain a qualified archaeologist, defined as an archaeologist meeting the Secretary of the Interior's Professional Qualification Standards for archaeology (Department of the Interior, 2012), and as approved by the City of Temecula, to carry out all mitigation measures related to archaeological resources and to coordinate the archaeological program with the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians (Pechanga Tribe). The Project archaeologist will have the authority to stop and redirect grading in the immediate area of a find in order to evaluate the find and determine the appropriate next steps, in consultation with the Pechanga Tribal Monitor. 43. Mitigation Measure MM -CUL -1 b - Retention of a Professional Pechanga Tribal Monitor. At least 30 days prior to seeking a grading permit, the project Applicant shall contact the Pechanga Tribe to notify the Tribe of their intent to pull permits for the proposed grading and excavation, and to coordinate with the Tribe to develop a Cultural Resources Treatment and Monitoring Agreement. The Agreement shall address the treatment of known cultural resources, the designation, responsibilities, and participation of professional Pechanga Tribal Monitors during grading, excavation and ground disturbing activities; project grading and development scheduling; terms of compensation for the monitors, including overtime and weekend rates, in addition to mileage reimbursement; and treatment and final disposition of any cultural resource , sacred sites, and human remains discovered on the site. The Pechanga Tribal Monitor will have the authority to stop and redirect grading in the immediate area of a find in order to evaluate the find and determine the appropriate next steps, in consultation with the Project archaeologist. Such evaluation shall include culturally appropriate temporary and permanent treatment pursuant to the Agreement which may include avoidance of cultural resources, in-place preservation and/or re -burial on the project property in an area that will not be subject to future disturbances for preservation in perpetuity. 44. Mitigation Measure MM -CUL -1c — Cultural Resources Sensitivity Training. The qualified archeologist, or an archaeologist working under the direction of the qualified archaeologist, and a representative of the Pechanga Tribe shall conduct preconstruction cultural resources sensitivity training which will include a brief review of the cultural sensitivity of the project and the surrounding area to inform construction personnel of the types of cultural resources that may be encountered, and of the proper procedures to be enacted in the event of an inadvertent discovery of archaeological resources or human remains. The applicant shall ensure that construction personnel are made available for and attend the training and shall retain documentation demonstrating attendance. All new construction personnel that begin work on the Project following the initial Training must take the cultural resources sensitivity training prior to beginning work and the project archaeologist and Pechanga Tribe shall make themselves available to provide the training on an as -needed basis. 45. Mitigation Measure MM -CUL -1d — Archaeological and Native American Monitoring and Resurvey of the South Parcel. Prior to issuance of a grading permit and prior to the start of any vegetation removal or ground disturbing activity, a qualified archaeological monitor and Pechanga Tribal monitor shall be retained by the applicant to monitor ground disturbing activities including, but not limited to, brush clearance and grubbing, grading, trenching, excavation, and the construction of fencing and access roads as indicated in MM -CUL -la and lb. The archaeological and Pechanga Tribal monitors shall re -survey the South Parcel involving ground disturbance, after vegetation removal and grubbing and prior to other ground disturbing activities. This will ensure that previously undocumented resources obscured by thick brush can be identified and appropriate treatment measures for the resources can be developed. Archaeological monitoring shall be conducted by an archaeologist familiar with the types of historic and prehistoric resources that could be encountered within the project, and under direct supervision of the qualified archaeologist. If ground disturbing activities occur simultaneous in two or more locations located more than 500 feet apart, additional archaeological and Pechanga Tribal monitors may be required. The archaeological and Pechanga Tribal monitors shall keep daily and/or weekly logs. After monitoring has been completed, the qualified archaeologist shall prepare a monitoring report that details the results of monitoring, which shall be submitted to the City. Pechanga, and to the Eastern Information Center at the University of California, Riverside. 46. Mitigation Measure MM -CUL -1 e — Unanticipated Discovery. If cultural resources are encountered during the course of ground disturbing activities, the applicant shall cease any ground disturbing activities within 100 feet of the find until it can be evaluated by the qualified archaeologist, who shall inspect the find within 24 hours of discovery, during normal working hours. The qualified archaeologist, the archaeological monitor, and/or Native American monitor shall be empowered to halt or redirect ground disturbing activities away from the vicinity of the find until it has been assessed for significance. The qualified archaeologist, in consultation with the applicant and the Pechanga Tribe, shall assess the significance of discovered resources and shall take into account the religious beliefs, customs, and practices of the Pechanga Tribe. Avoidance shall be the preferred manner of mitigation pursuant to Calif. Pub. Res. Code §21083.2(b). Preservation in place may be accomplished by, but is not limited to, complete avoidance, incorporating the resource into open space, or deeding the site into a permanent conservation easement. In the event that preservation in place is demonstrated to be infeasible and data recovery through excavation is determined to be the only feasible mitigation option, a treatment plan shall be prepared and implemented by the qualified archaeologist, in consultation with the applicant and the Pechanga Tribe. The treatment plan shall provide for the adequate recovery of the scientifically consequential information contained in the archaeological resource. The Pechanga Tribe shall be consulted to ensure that cultural values ascribed to the resource, beyond that which is scientifically important, are considered and additional appropriate mitigation to address the cultural values is applied. The treatment plan shall also provide for the analysis, reporting, and curation/disposition of resources in accordance with the Treatment Agreement required in MM -CUL -lb. 47. Mitigation Measure MM -CUL -1f — Completed Avoidance of Impacts to the TCP. The City and the Project Applicant/Land Owner shall ensure that no impacts occur to the Traditional Cultural Property south of the proposed South Parcel Area. This includes, but is not limited to off-site improvements, staging activities, trenching, geotechnical work, Riverside County Flood Control improvements, Water Department impacts, Public Works projects, biological and fire control programs, and any other program or project that would affect the integrity of the TCP. Should any of these activities, or others as indicated, be proposed, the City and the Applicant/Land Owner shall contact the Pechanga Tribe for additional consultation and review. 48. Mitigation Measure MM -CUL -2a — Paleontological Resource Impact Mitigation Program (PRIMP). The applicant shall implement the paleontological mitigation program outlined in the PRIMP (Kennedy and Wirths, 2013) during project implementation. The PRIMP requires paleontological monitoring of mapped exposures of the sandstone facies of the Pauba Formation (Qp) as shown on Attachment 3a of the PRIMP. In addition, because the fanglomerate facies of the Pauba Formation is considered to have undetermined potential to yield significant paleontological resources, initial excavations into the unit shall be spot- checked by a qualified paleontologist (defined as a paleontologist meeting the Society for Vertebrate Paleontology Standards, 2010) to determine if the lithology of the geological unit is conducive to the preservation of unique paleontological resources. The qualified paleontologist shall also contribute to any construction worker cultural resources sensitivity training, either in person or via a module provided to the qualified archaeologist. Monitoring shall be conducted by a qualified paleontologist, or a monitor working under the direct supervision of a qualified paleontologist. Monitors shall have the authority to temporarily halt or divert work away from exposed fossils in order to recover the fossil specimens. The qualified paleontologist, based on observations of subsurface soil stratigraphy or other factors, may reduce or discontinue monitoring, as warranted, if the qualified paleontologist determines that the possibility of encountering fossiliferous deposits is low. Monitors shall prepare daily logs detailing the types of activities and soils observed, and any discoveries. Any fossils recovered shall be prepared to the point of identification and curated at an accredited facility. The qualified paleontologist shall prepare a final monitoring and mitigation report to be submitted to the City and filed with the local repository. 49. Mitigation Measure MM -CUL -2b - Unanticipated Paleontological Resources Discoveries. If construction or other project personnel discover any potential fossils during construction, regardless of the depth of work, work at the discovery location shall cease until the qualified paleontologist has assessed the discovery and made recommendations as to the appropriate treatment. 50. Mitigation Measure MM -CUL -3 — Human Remains. If human remains are uncovered during project construction, the applicant shall immediately halt work and follow the procedures and protocols set forth in Section 15064.5(e) of the CEQA Guidelines, which require compliance with Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5 and Public Resources Code Section 5097.98 (as amended by AB 2641). The applicant shall immediately contact the Riverside County Coroner to evaluate the remains. If the County Coroner determines that the remains are Native American and not subject to his or her authority, the County Coroner shall notify the Native American Heritage Commission (NAHC) within 24 hours. The NAHC shall designate a Most Likely Descendant (MLD) for the remains, who shall have 48 hours from the time of being granted access to the site to provide recommendations to the landowner for the means of treating or disposing of, with appropriate dignity, the human remains and any associated grave goods. Until the landowner has discussed and conferred with the MLD, the landowner shall ensure that the immediate vicinity where the discovery occurred is not subject to further disturbances, is adequately protected according to generally accepted cultural and archaeological standards, and that further activities take into account the possibility of multiple burials. In the event that no MLD is identified, or if the MLD fails to make a recommendation for disposition, or if the landowner rejects the recommendation of the MLD and mediation with the NAHC fails to provide measures acceptable to the landowner, the landowner may reinter the remains and associated grave goods with appropriate dignity on the property in a location not subject to further disturbance. 51. MSHCP Pre -Construction Survey. A 30 -day preconstruction survey, in accordance with MSHCP guidelines and survey protocol, shall be conducted prior to ground disturbance. The results of the 30 -day preconstruction survey shall be submitted to the Planning Division prior to scheduling the pre -grading meeting with Public Works. 52. Burrowing Owl Grading Note. The following shall be included in the Notes Section of the Grading Plan: "No grubbing/clearing of the site shall occur prior to scheduling the pre -grading meeting with Public Works. All project sites containing suitable habitat for burrowing owls, whether owls were found or not, require a 30 -day preconstruction survey that shall be conducted within 30 days prior to ground disturbance to avoid direct take of burrowing owls. If the results of the survey indicate that no burrowing owls are present on-site, then the project may move forward with grading, upon Planning Division approval. If burrowing owls are found to be present or nesting on-site during the preconstruction survey, then the following recommendations must be adhered to: Exclusion and relocation activities may not occur during the breeding season, which is defined as March 1 through August 31, with the following exception: From March 1 through March 15 and from August 1 through August 31 exclusion and relocation activities may take place if it is proven to the City and appropriate regulatory agencies (if any) that egg laying or chick rearing is not taking place. This determination must be made by a qualified biologist." 53. Rough Grading Plans. A copy of the Rough Grading Plans shall be submitted and approved by the Planning Division. Prior to Issuance of Building Permit 54. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF). The City of Temecula adopted an ordinance on March 31, 2003 to collect fees for a Riverside County area wide Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF). This project is subject to payment of these fees at the time of building permit issuance per the Development Agreement (PA14-0161). The fees are subject to the provisions of Chapter 15.08 of the Temecula Municipal Code and the fee schedule in effect at the time of building permit issuance. 55. Development Impact Fee (DIF). The developer shall comply with the provisions of Title 15, Chapter 15.06 of the Temecula Municipal Code and all its resolutions by paying the appropriate City fee per the Development Agreement (PA14-0161). 56. Quimby Requirements. Per the Development Agreement, the developer has satisfied the City's parkland dedication (Quimby) requirement through the provision of parks and open space identified in the Altair Specific Plan. These parks will be privately maintained, but open to the public. The Central Park in Village C will be dedicated to the City per the Development Agreement (PA14-0161). 57. Construction Landscaping and Irrigation Plans. Four (4) copies of Construction Landscaping and Irrigation Plans shall be reviewed and approved by the Planning Division. These plans shall be submitted as a separate submittal, not as part of the building plans or other plan set. These plans shall conform to the approved conceptual landscape plan, or as amended by these conditions. The location, number, height and spread, water usage or KC value, genus, species, and container size of the plants shall be shown. The plans shall be consistent with the Water Efficient Ordinance and Water Storage Contingency Plan per the Rancho California Water District. The plans shall be accompanied by the appropriate filing fee (per the City of Temecula Fee Schedule at time of submittal) and one copy of the approved Grading Plan. 58. Landscaping Site Inspections. The Landscaping and Irrigation Plans shall include a note stating, "Three landscape site inspections are required. The first inspection will be conducted at installation of irrigation while trenches are open. This will verify that irrigation equipment and layout is per plan specifications and details. Any adjustments or discrepancies in actual conditions will be addressed at this time and will require an approval to continue. Where applicable, a mainline pressure check will also be conducted. This will verify that the irrigation mainline is capable of being pressurized to 150 psi for a minimum period of two hours without loss of pressure. The second inspection will verify that all irrigation systems are operating properly, and to verify that all plantings have been installed consistent with the approved construction landscape plans. The third inspection will verify property landscape maintenance for release of the one-year landscape maintenance bond." The applicant/owner shall contact the Planning Division to schedule inspections. 59. Agronomic Soils Report. The Landscaping and Irrigation Plans shall include a note on the plans stating, "The contractor shall provide two copies of an agronomic soils report at the first irrigation inspection." 60. Water Usage Calculations. The Landscaping and Irrigation Plans shall include water usage calculations per Chapter 17.32 of the Development Code (Water Efficient Ordinance), the total cost estimate of plantings and irrigation (in accordance with approved plan). Applicant shall use evapotranspiration (ETo) factor of 0.70 for calculating the maximum allowable water budget. 61. Landscape Maintenance Program. A landscape maintenance program shall be submitted to the Planning Division for approval. The landscape maintenance program shall detail the proper maintenance of all proposed plant materials to assure proper growth and landscape development for the long-term esthetics of the property. The approved maintenance program shall be provided to the landscape maintenance contractor who shall be responsible to carry out the detailed program. 62. Specifications of Landscape Maintenance Program. Specifications of the landscape maintenance program shall indicate, 'Three landscape site inspections are required. The first inspection will be conducted at installation of irrigation while trenches are open. This will verify that irrigation equipment and layout is per plan specifications and details. Any adjustments or discrepancies in actual conditions will be addressed at this time and will require an approval to continue. Where applicable, a mainline pressure check will also be conducted. This will verify that the irrigation mainline is capable of being pressurized to 150 psi for a minimum period of two hours without loss of pressure. The second inspection will verify that all irrigation systems are operating properly, and to verify that all plantings have been installed consistent with the approved construction landscape plans. The third inspection will verify property landscape maintenance for release of the one-year landscape maintenance bond." The applicant/owner shall contact the Planning Division to schedule inspections. 63. Irrigation. The landscaping plans shall include automatic irrigation for all landscaped areas and complete screening of all ground mounted equipment from view of the public from streets and adjacent property for private common areas; front yards and slopes within individual lots; shrub planting to completely screen perimeter walls adjacent to a public right-of-way equal to 66 feet or larger; and, all landscaping excluding City maintained areas and front yard landscaping which shall include, but may not be limited to, private slopes and common areas. 64. Wall and Fence Plans. Wall and fence plans shall be reviewed with all landscape plans, and shall be consistent with the Altair Specific Plan. 65. Precise Grading Plans. Precise Grading Plans shall be consistent with the approved rough grading plans including all structural setback measurements. 66. Landscaping Requirement for Phased Development_ If any phase or area of the project site is not scheduled for development within six months of the completion of grading, the landscaping plans shall indicate it will be temporarily landscaped and irrigated for dust and soil erosion control, 67. WQMP Landscape Compliance. The construction landscape plans shall be consistent with Appendix A, Table 31 of the Low Impact Development (LID) Manual for Southern California for plant materials and treatment facilities, and shall reference the approved precise grading plan for WQMP features. 68. Utility Screening. All utilities shall be screened from public view. Landscape construction drawings shall show and label all utilities and provide appropriate screening. Provide a three-foot clear zone around fire check detectors as required by the Fire Department before starting the screen. Group utilities together in order to reduce intrusion. Screening of utilities is not to look like an after -thought. Plan planting beds and design around utilities. Locate all light poles on plans and ensure that there are no conflicts with trees. Prior to Release of Power, Building Occupancy or Any Use Allowed by This Permit 69. Landscape Installation Consistent with Construction Plans. All required landscape planting and irrigation shall have been installed consistent with the approved construction plans and shall be in a condition acceptable to the Director of Community Development. The plants shall be healthy and free of weeds, disease, or pests. The irrigation system shall be properly constructed and in good working order. 70. Performance Securities. Performance securities, in amounts to be determined by the Director of Community Development, to guarantee the maintenance of the plantings in accordance with the approved construction landscape and irrigation plan, shall be filed with the Planning Division for a period of one year from final Certificate of Occupancy. After that year, if the landscaping and irrigation system have been maintained in a condition satisfactory to the Director of Community Development, the bond shall be released upon request by the applicant. 71. Compliance with Conditions of Approval. All of the foregoing conditions shall be complied with prior to occupancy or any use allowed by this permit. Prior to Recordation of the Final Map 72. Final Map. A copy of the Final Map for each phase shall be submitted to, and approved by, the Planning Division. 73. Environmental Constraint Sheet. A copy of the Environmental Constraint Sheet (ECS) shall be submitted to, and approved by, the Planning Division with the following notes: a. This property is located within 30 miles of Mount Palomar Observatory. All proposed outdoor lighting systems shall comply with the California Institute of Technology, Palomar Observatory recommendations, Ordinance No. 655. 74. Submittal of CC&Rs. A copy of the Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions (CC&Rs) for the project or any phase thereof shall be submitted and approved by the Director of Community Development. The CC&Rs shall include liability insurance and methods of maintaining open space, recreation areas, parking areas, private roads, exterior of all buildings, and landscaped and open areas, including parkways. Applicants shall provide a deposit in the amount of $3,750 for the review of the CC&Rs. Amended CC&Rs will require a $2,000 deposit. The applicant shall be responsible for al costs incurred during review of the CC&Rs and additional fees may be required during the course of the review. 75. Form and Content of CC&Rs. The CC&Rs shall be in the form and content approved by the Director of Community Development, City Engineer, and the City Attorney, and shall include such provisions as are required by this approval and as said officials deem necessary to protect the interests of the City and its residents. 76. Preparation of CC&Rs. The CC&Rs shall be prepared at the developer's sole cost and expense. 77. Review of CC&Rs. The CC&Rs and Articles of Incorporation of the Property Owners Association are subject to the approval of the Director of Community Development, Public Works Director, and the City Attorney. 78. CC&Rs and Management and Maintenance of Common Areas. The CC&Rs shall provide for the effective establishment, operation, management, use, repair, and maintenance of all common areas, drainage facilities, and pollution prevention devices outlined in the Water Quality Management Plan for the project or any phase thereof. 79. CC&Rs and Public Nuisance. The CC&Rs shall provide that the property shall be developed, operated, and maintained so as not to create a public nuisance. 80. Termination of CC&Rs. The CC&Rs shall provide that the association may not be terminated without prior City approval. 81. CC&Rs and Maintenance of Property. The CC&Rs shall provide that if the property is not maintained in the condition required by the CC&Rs, then the City, after making due demand and giving reasonable notice, may enter the property and perform, at the owner's sole expense, any maintenance required thereon by the CC&Rs or the City Ordinances. The property shall be subject to a lien in favor of the City to secure any such expense not promptly reimbursed. 82. Interest in Association. Every owner of a suite or lot governed by CC&Rs shall own as an appurtenance to such suite or lot, either: (1) an undivided interest in the common areas and facilities, or (2) a share in the corporation, or voting membership in an association owning the common areas and facilities. 83. Maintenance of Open Areas. All open areas and landscaping governed by CC&R shall be permanently maintained by the association or other means acceptable to the City. Such proof of this maintenance shall be submitted to the Planning Divisions and Public Works Department prior to the issuance of building permits. 84. Reciprocal Easements. Reciprocal access easements and maintenance agreements ensuring access to all parcels and joint maintenance of all roads, drives, parking areas, drainage facilities, and water quality features, shall be provided by the CC&Rs or by deeds and shall be recorded concurrent with the map or prior to the issuance of building permit where no map is involved. 85. Consent of City of Temecula. An Article must be added to every set of CC&Rs, following the Declarant's signature, to read as follows: CONSENT OF CITY OF TEMECULA The Conditions of Approval for Tentative Tract Map No. 36959, -1, -2, and -3, require the City of Temecula to review and approve the CC&Rs for the Parcel. The City's review of these CC&Rs has been limited to a determination of whether the proposed CC&Rs properly implement the requirements of the Conditions of Approval for the Parcel. The City's consent to these CC&Rs does not contain or imply any approval of the appropriateness or legality of the other provisions of the CC&Rs, including, without limitation, the use restrictions, private easements and encroachments, private maintenance requirements, architecture and landscape controls, assessments, enforcement of assessments, resolutions of disputes or procedural matters. Subject to the limitations set forth herein, the City consents to the CC&Rs. Luke Watson Director Community Development Approved as to Form: Peter M. Thorson City Attorney 86. Operation of Association. No lot or suite in the development shall be sold unless a corporation, association, property owners group or similar entity has been formed with the right to assess all properties individually owned or jointly owned which have any rights or interest in the use of the common areas and common facilities in the development, such assessment power to be sufficient to meet the expenses of such entity, and with authority to control, and the duty to maintain, all of said mutually available features of the development. Such entity shall operate under recorded CC&Rs, which shall include compulsory membership of all owners of Tots and/or suites and flexibility of assessments to meet changing costs of maintenance, repairs, and services. Recorded CC&Rs shall permit enforcement by the City for provisions required as Conditions of Approval. The developer shall submit evidence of compliance with this requirement to, and receive approval of, the City prior to making any such sale. This condition shall not apply to land dedicated to the City for public purposes. 87. Recordation of CC&Rs. CC&Rs shall be finalized and recorded at the time of Final Map Recordation. 88. Copies of CC&Rs. Three copies of the final recorded CC&Rs shall be provided to the Planning Division. 89. General. The CC&Rs shall contain a provision requiring the HOA to perform yearly inspections of garages to ensure adequate parking. 90. General. The CC&Rs shall contain a list of all disclosures (tax rate — Mello Roos, wildlife, noise, etc.) as required by the City of Temecula and State of California. OUTSIDE AGENCY LETTERS 91. Rancho Water. The applicant shall comply with the recommendations set forth in the Rancho Water transmittal dated August 26, 2014, a copy of which is attached. 92. Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (RCFCWD). The applicant shall comply with the recommendations set forth in the RCFCWD transmittal dated March 5, 2015, a copy of which is attached. 93. Metropolitan Water District (MWD). The applicant shall comply with the recommendations set forth in the MWD transmittal dated April 14, 2015, a copy of which is attached. 94. Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE). The applicant shall comply with the recommendations set forth in the ACOE transmittal dated May 18, 2015, a copy of which is attached. 95. Southern California Edison (SCE). The applicant shall comply with the recommendations set forth in the SCE transmittal dated September 17, 2015, a copy of which is attached. 96. Eastern Municipal Water District (EMWD). The applicant shall comply with the recommendations set forth in the EMWD transmittal dated September 21, 2016, a copy of which is attached. FIRE PREVENTION General Requirements 97. Fire Flow. The Fire Prevention Bureau is required to set a minimum fire flow for the remodel or construction of all commercial and residential buildings per CFC Appendix B. The developer shall provide for this project, a water system capable of delivering 2,000 GPM at 20 -PSI residual operating pressure for a 2 -hour duration for this projects. The fire flow as given above has taken into account all information as provided (CFC Appendix B and Temecula City Ordinance 15.16.020). 98. Fire Hydrants. The Fire Prevention Bureau is required to set minimum fire hydrant distances per CFC Appendix C. Standard fire hydrants (6" x 4" x (2) 2'/z" outlets) shall be located on fire access roads and adjacent public streets. For all multi -family projects hydrants shall be spaced at 350 feet apart, and shall be located no more than 210 feet from any point on the street or Fire Department access road(s) frontage to a hydrant for all and for single family dwellings and tract homes hydrants shall be 500 feet apart, and shall be located no more than 250 feet from any point on the street or Fire Department access road(s) frontage to a hydrant. The required fire flow shall be available from any adjacent hydrant(s) in the system. (CFC Appendix C and Temecula City Ordinance 15.16.020). 99. Fire Dept. Plan Review. Final fire and life safety conditions will be addressed when building plans are reviewed by the Fire Prevention Bureau. These conditions will be based on occupancy, use, the California Building Code (CBC), California Fire Code (CFC), and related codes which are in force at the time of building plan submittal. 100. Water Maintenance Agreement. An agreement for the maintenance and repair of any and all existing underground Fire Department water systems, including all fire sprinkler supplies, and all fire hydrants and supplies, will be in place as a condition of this division to maintain available water in perpetuity Prior to Issuance of Grading Permits 101. Turning Radius (Culdesac). Maximum cul-de-sac length shall not exceed 1320 feet. Minimum outside turning radius on any cul-de-sac shall be 37 -feet for single family dwelling tracts and 45 feet for multi -family dwelling tracts. (CFC Chapter 5 along with the Temecula City Ordinance 15.16.020). 102. All Weather Access Roads. Fire apparatus access roads shall be designed and maintained to support the imposed loads of fire apparatus and shall be with a surface to provide all-weather driving capabilities. Access roads shall be 80,000 lbs. GVW with a minimum of AC thickness of .25 feet. In accordance with Section 3310.1, prior to building construction, all locations where structures are to be built shall have fire apparatus access roads. (CFC Chapter 5 and City Ordinance 15.16.020) 103. Access Road Widths. Fire Department vehicle access roads shall have an unobstructed width of not less than 24 feet with an unobstructed vertical clearance of not less than 13 feet 6 inches. (CFC Chapter 5 and Temecula City Ordinance 15.16.020). 104. Gradient Of Access Roads. The gradient for fire apparatus access roads shall not exceed 15 percent (CFC Chapter 5 and City Ordinance 15.16.020). Prior to Issuance of Certificate of Occupancy 105. Knox Box. All manual and electronic gates on required Fire Department access roads or gates obstructing Fire Department access shall be provided with the Knox Rapid entry system for emergency access by firefighting personnel (CFC Chapter 5) 106. File Format Requirements. A simple plot plan and a simple floor plan, each as an electronic file of the .DWG format, must be submitted to the Fire Prevention Bureau. Contact Fire Prevention for approval of alternative file formats which may be acceptable PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT General Requirements 107. Unless otherwise noted, all conditions shall be completed by the Developer at no cost to any Government Agency. It is understood that the Developer correctly shows on the tentative site plan all existing and proposed easements, traveled ways, improvement constraints and drainage courses, and their omission will subject the project to further review and may require revision. 108. Developer shall execute a City Standard Subdivision Improvement Agreements for the applicable phase of the development to install and secure with appropriate security as provided by law, public improvements shown on the tentative map. These improvements include, but are not limited to paving, base, signing & striping, sidewalks, curbs and gutters, grading, clearing and grubbing, undergrounding or relocation of utilities, sewer, water, fire hydrants, street lights, pedestrian ramps, drainage structures, and best management practices for stormwater treatment, reconstruction, replacement and repair of adjacent improvements where the subdivision transitions and connects to existing improvements as applicable. Said improvements shall be installed to City Standards to the satisfaction of the Director of Public Works. 109. Prior to approval of improvement plans or final map for each phase, Developer shall meet with the Fire Marshal to determine if fire protection measures (fire flows, fire hydrant locations, building sprinklers) are required to serve the project. Fire hydrants, if proposed, shall be considered public improvements and shall be served by public water mains to the satisfaction of the Water District Engineer. 110. Prior to issuance of building permits for each phase, Developer shall underground all existing overhead utilities along and within the subdivision boundary. 111. Developer shall cause Owner to waive direct access rights on the final map for all lots abutting the Western Bypass Corridor Road. 112. Developer shall cause Owner to make an offer of dedication to the City and/or other appropriate entities for the Sewer, Water and Storm Drainage easements shown on the tentative map. The offer shall be made by a certificate on the final map. All land so offered shall be free and clear of all liens and encumbrances and without cost to the City. 113. Additional drainage easements may be required. Developer shall dedicate and provide or install drainage structures, as may be required by the Director of Public Works, prior to or concurrent with any grading or building permit. 114. All utility systems such as electric, including those which provide direct service to the project site and/or currently exist along public rights -of -ways adjacent to the site (except electrical lines rated 33 kv or greater), gas, telephone, water, sewer, and cable TV shall be placed underground, with easements provided as required, and designed and constructed in accordance with City Codes and the utility provider. 115. Prior to the issuance of any grading permit, as deemed necessary by the Department of Public Works, the Developer shall consult with the State of California Department of Fish and Game, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to determine if permits or approvals are necessary from such agencies for any action contemplated by this proposal. Such consultation shall be in writing, and copies of said correspondence, including responses from agencies, shall be submitted to the City. Where deemed appropriate by the Director of Public Works, the terms, conditions, and recommendations of the noted agencies shall be incorporated as Conditions of Approval into the areas of development. 116. All easements and/or right-of-way dedications shall be offered for dedication to the public or other appropriate agency and shall continue in force until the City accepts or abandons such offers. All dedications shall be free from all encumbrances as approved by the Department of Public Works. 117_ Landscaping and permanent irrigation facilities shall be installed with all street improvements on and off-site grading. Perimeter walls, where required, shall be treated with graffiti -resistant coating and shall be installed adjacent to street improvements within each phase. 118. The Developer shall pay to the City the Public Facilities Development Impact Fee as required by, and in accordance with, Chapter 15.06 of the Temecula Municipal Code and all Resolutions implementing Chapter 15.06, unless otherwise provided for by a written agreement between the City and the Developer. 119. All development within this site shall be in accordance with the requirements of all City ordinances, except as expressly modified herein or by development agreement, and State laws, and shall conform to the approved Specific Plan. Regulations or procedures not covered by the Specific Plan or appurtenant documents shall be subject to the City ordinances in effect at the time entitlement is required. 120. Approval of this Specific Plan is contingent upon and shall not become effective nor shall it vest until a General Plan Amendment (GPA) is approved by the City Council, and an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) or any other environmental review under the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) are certified by the City Council. 121. Prior to the issuance of a building permit, the Developer shall provide proof to the Director from the Temecula Valley Unified School District that this project has satisfied its obligation to comply with all school district requirements. 122. The first submittal of Final Landscape and Irrigation Plans for each phase shall be pursuant to the landscape plan check process on file in the Planning Department and accompanied by the project's building, improvement, and grading plans. 123. A detailed noise attenuation evaluation shall be conducted in a supplemental acoustical study to be submitted when the tract map is filed with the appropriate agency. 124. Prior to the approval of a development plan or tentative map for individual planning areas, the developer and City staff will review plans, especially for multi -family housing areas, commercial uses, and parks for the provision of appropriate, necessary, and adequate pedestrian and bicycle facilities. 125. Prior to approval of any development projects, appropriate clearances, conditions and approvals from all agencies with jurisdiction on project review shall be obtained by the developer. These agencies shall be determined by the Director of Planning and the Director of Public Works. 126. Developer shall cause property owner to execute and submit to the Director of Public Works for recordation, the City's standard form Geologic Failure Hold Harmless Agreement. 127. The developer or the developer's successor -in -interest shall be responsible for maintaining the undeveloped portion of the site including weed abatement, litter removal and erosion control as applicable. 128. Prior to approval of any development projects, the developer shall investigate the feasibility of a reclaimed water system, to irrigate landscaping within the roadway medians, parkways, drainage channel, schools, the community park, the paseo park, neighborhood parks, and other common open space areas. The developer shall provide evidence that compliance with this condition is in accordance with Senate Bill 2095. 129. Developer shall provide to the Director of Public Works, an acceptable means, CC&Rs and/or other recorded document, for maintaining the private easements within the subdivision and all the private improvements (e.g. roads, driveways, sidewalks, utilities, water quality treatment facilities and private storm drain improvements, etc.) located therein and to distribute the costs of such maintenance in an equitable manner among the owners of the properties within the subdivision. 130. Developer shall comply with all applicable provisions of federal, state, and local laws and regulations in effect at the time of building permit issuance. 131. All lighting shall be reviewed by the City to assure compliance with the Ordinance No. 655. 132. Any signs proposed for this development shall at a minimum be designed in conformance with the City's Sign Ordinance and shall require review and approval of the Planning Director prior to installation of such signs consistent with the Specific Plan. Grading 133. No grading shall be permitted for any development area prior to tentative map approval and issuance of grading permits for the specific area of development. 134. Grading plans and operations shall be in accordance with the Uniform Building Code, City Grading Standards, the recommendations contained in the Geotechnical Report, or any subsequent reports prepared for the project, the conditions of the grading permit, and accepted grading construction practices and the recommendations and standards specified in the Specific Plan and Environmental Impact Report (EIR) document. 135. Prior to issuance of any grading permit, erosion control plans shall be prepared in conformance with applicable City Standards and subject to approval by the Department of Public Works. The Developer shall post security and enter into an agreement guaranteeing the grading and erosion control improvements as applicable. 136. Each subsequent application for a phase of development shall include a conceptual grading plan to indicate at a minimum: a) Preliminary quantity estimates for grading. b) Techniques and methods which will be used to prevent erosion and sedimentation during and after the grading process in compliance with the City Standards and NPDES requirements. c) Preliminary pad and roadway elevations. d) Designation of the borrow or stockpile site location for import/export material. e) Approximate time frames for development including the identification of areas which will be graded during the rainy months. f) Hydrology and hydraulic concerns and mitigations. 137. Major grading activities shall be scheduled during the dry season wherever possible, or as otherwise approved by the Department of Public Works. 138. Soils stabilization, which may include revegetation of graded areas, shall occur within 30 days of completion of grading activities as directed by the Department of Public Works. 139. The site shall be watered during grading operations to control dust. 140. Temporary drainage and sediment control devices shall be installed as directed by the Department of Public Works. 141. An import/export route shall be submitted to the Department of Public Works prior to issuance of any grading permit. The plan shall include limitation to the duration of the grading operation and construction activities, a Traffic Control Plan, and a daily time schedule of operations. 142. Prior to issuance of any grading permit, a soils reports shall be submitted to the Department of Public Works for review and approval, to address engineering, geologic, seismic, and soils engineering concerns for each tentative map or commercial parcel map for each phase of proposed development. 143. A Geotechnical Report shall be prepared by a registered engineer or engineering geologist and submitted to the Department of public Works with the initial grading plan check. The report shall address special study zones and identify any geotechnical hazards for the site including location of faults and potential for liquefaction. The report shall include recommendations to mitigate the impact of ground shaking and liquefaction. 144. All public streets shall be maintained and cleaned if necessary on a daily basis during grading operation and construction activities. Cash deposit, letter of credit or posting of bond to guarantee maintenance of all public rights-of-way affected by the grading operations and construction activities, shall be posted prior to issuance of grading permits. 145. If subsequent Geotechnical and Soils Reports determine that dewatering of the site is necessary during construction, necessary permits (ie. in compliance with NPDES permit) shall be obtained from appropriate agencies prior to approval of the grading plans. Drainage 146. Floodplain/Floodway Development. If applicable, the developer shall comply with the provisions of Title 15, Chapter 15.12 of the Temecula Municipal Code, which requires a Conditional Letter of Map Revision (CLOMR) from FEMA. A FEMA -approved CLOMR shall be submitted to Public Works for review and approval. The developer shall pay all fees required by FEMA (and City) for processing of the FEMA reviews. 147. Drainage Study. A drainage study shall be prepared by a registered civil engineer and submitted to Public Works with the initial grading plan check in accordance with City, Riverside County and engineering standards. The study shall identify storm water runoff quantities (to mitigate the 100 -year storm event) from the development of this site and upstream of the site as required by the City. It shall identify all existing or proposed offsite or onsite, public or private, drainage facilities intended to discharge this runoff. Runoff shall be conveyed to an adequate outfall capable of receiving the storm water runoff without damage to public or private property. The study shall include a capacity analysis verifying the adequacy of all facilities. Any upgrading or upsizing of drainage facilities necessary to convey the storm water runoff shall be provided as part of development of this project. 148. Drainage and flood control facilities shall be provided in accordance with the requirements of the City and/or Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (RCFC&WCD). 149. Prior to approval of any subsequent development applications, the Developer shall submit the master drainage plan to the City and RCFC&WCD to review the adequacy of the proposed and existing downstream drainage facilities. 150. Drainage facilities within each phase shall be constructed immediately after the completion of the site grading and prior to or concurrently with the initial site development within that phase. 151. All drainage facilities shall be designed to convey 100 -year storm flows, subject to the approval of the Department of Public Works and RCFC&WCD, as applicable. 152. The Developer shall construct the proposed on and offsite drainage facility improvements and the interim detention basin provision as recommended in the Specific Plan and Drainage Study documents and/or as directed by the Department of Public Works and RCFC&WCD, as applicable. 153. As required by the Department of Public Works, additional Hydrology and Hydraulic Reports shall be submitted with subsequent tentative maps and/or development applications to study the drainage impacts and analyze necessary measures to mitigate the runoff created as part of the development of this project. 154. The Developer shall accept and properly dispose of all off-site drainage flowing onto or through the site as required by the Director of Public works. 155. The Developer shall protect downstream properties from damages caused by alteration of the drainage patterns; i.e., concentration or diversion of flow. Protection shall be provided by constructing adequate drainage facilities, including enlarging existing facilities or by securing drainage easements as necessary. 156. During review of any future tentative map, an updated geotechnical/geologic report shall be prepared to include any necessary revisions to earthwork, foundation, design, and construction recommendations. 157. Soils Report. A soils report, prepared by a registered soil or civil engineer, shall be submitted to Public Works with the initial grading plan submittal. The report shall address the site's soil conditions and provide recommendations for the construction of engineered structures and preliminary pavement sections. 158. Geological Report. The developer shall complete any outstanding County geologist's requirements, recommendations and/or proposed Conditions of Approval as identified during entitlement. 159. Letter of Permission/Easement. The developer shall obtain documents (letters of permission or easements) for any offsite work performed on adjoining properties. The document's format is as directed by, and shall be submitted to, Public Works for acceptance. The document information shall be noted on the approved grading plan. WQMP / SWPPP 160. Required Clearances. As deemed necessary by Public Works, the developer shall receive written clearance from the following agencies: a. San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board; b. Army Corps of Engineers; c. California Department of Fish and Wildlife; d. Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; or other affected agencies 161. Water Quality Management Plan (WQMP). The developer shall submit a final WQMP (prepared by a registered professional engineer) with the initial grading plan submittal for any phase approval by Public Works. A copy of the final project -specific WQMP must be kept onsite at all times. Refer to the WQMP template and agreement link below: http://www.cityoftemecula.org/Temecula/Government/PublicWorks/WQMPandNPDES/W QMP.htm 162. Erosion & Sediment Control Plan. The developer shall submit a grading/erosion & sediment control plan(s) to be reviewed and approved by Public Works. All plans shall be coordinated for consistency with adjacent projects and existing improvements contiguous to the site. The approved plan shall include all final WQMP water quality facilities and all construction -phase pollution -prevention controls to adequately address non -permitted runoff. Refer to the City's Engineering & Construction Manual at: http://www. citvoftemecula.orq/Temecula/Government/PublicWorks/engineeringconstman ual. htm 163. 0 & M Agreement: The developer shall submit a completed WQMP Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Agreement for review and approval 164. Erosion & Sediment Control Securities. The developer shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 24, Section 18.24.140 of the Temecula Municipal Code by posting security and entering into an agreement to guarantee the erosion & sediment control improvements. 165. NPDES General Permit Compliance. The developer shall obtain project coverage under the State National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) General Permit for Construction Activities and shall provide the following: a_ A copy of the Waste Discharge Identification number (WDID) issued by the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB); b. The project's Risk Level (RL) determination number; and c. The name, contact information and certification number of the Qualified SWPPP Developer (QSD). Pursuant to the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) requirements and City's storm water ordinance, a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) shall be generated and submitted to the Board. Throughout the project duration, the SWPPP shall be routinely updated and readily available (onsite) to the State and City. Review www.cabmphandbooks.com for SWPPP guidelines. Refer to the following link: htto://www.waterboards.ca.gov/water issues/programs/stormwater/construction.shtml Circulation 166. Prior to Final Map recordation for each phase, the Developer is responsible to bond for or construct the traffic signals at the project's accesses, as required, including the associated street improvements, based on traffic signal warrants analysis relative to subsequent tentative maps and/or development applications. 167. Adequate primary and secondary access shall be provided for each phase of development as approved by the Department of Public Works. Access to and from developments areas shall be reviewed by the Department of Public Works at the time of submittal of individual tentative maps and/or development applications. Additional rights-of-way at entries to the aforementioned sites may be required to provide for turning lanes as directed by the Department of Public Works, consistent with the Specific Plan and the Tentative Tract Map. 168. The exact location and number of access points shall be subject to review and approval by the Department of Public Works upon future tentative map and/or development plan approvals consistent with the Specific Plan and the Tentative Tract Map. 169. All street sections shall correspond with Typical Roadway Cross Sections and requirements of the Circulation Element of City's General Plan, City ordinances and standards or as approved with the Specific Plan and the Tentative Map. 170. All intersection intervals shall comply with City standards and requirements. 171. Developer, at its sole cost, shall design and improve Vincent Moraga Road to ensure that all driveways providing access from to adjoining properties shall be allowed for safe ingress and/or egress. Improvements may include, but not be limited to, truck deceleration, acceleration and turn -in lanes. The improvements shall conform to the standards adopted by the City of Temecula for public roadway and rights of way consistent with the Specific Plan and the Tentative Tract Map. 172. Developer, at its sole cost, shall fund the acquisition and installation of traffic signals and related roadway and right of way improvements, when warranted. The design and installation shall conform to the standards adopted by the City of Temecula, consistent with the Specific Plan and the Tentative Tract Map. 173. Developer shall install sight distance corridors at all street intersections and driveways in accordance with City Engineering Standards. The limits of these sight distance corridors shall be reflected on all improvement, grading, or landscape plans prepared in association with the development. No structure, fence, wall, tree, shrub, sign, or other object may be placed or permitted to encroach within the area identified as a sight distance corridor as defined by City of Temecula Engineering Standards. 174. The Developer shall provide bus bays and shelters within the Specific Plan. Location and number of bus bays shall be subject to approval of the City and Riverside Transportation Agency (RTA). Additional rights-of-way dedications associated with bus bays shall be provided by the Developer. 175. Developer shall provide the design of all private streets and drainage systems to the satisfaction of the Director of Public Works. The structural section of all private streets shall conform to City of Temecula Standards based on R -value tests, All private streets and drainage systems shall be inspected by the City. 176. Necessary improvements have been/will be conditioned based on the project traffic studies and the conceptual phasing plan shown in the Altair Specific Plan. Any substantive re -phasing of the development must be approved by the Planning and Public Works Director through a re -phasing application. Prior to the issuance of occupancy permits within any phase, all on and offsite improvements as referred to in the Traffic Reports and subsequent addenda along with additional requirements set herein, or as set by conditions on individual tracts, must be constructed and/or bonded as required by the Department of Public Works. 177. Ensuing Traffic Reports, analyzing traffic impacts associated with subsequent development stages of the Specific Plan, shall be submitted to the Department of Public Works to identify implementation and timing of the necessary improvements to mitigate cumulative traffic impacts. Traffic Mitigation Monitoring Program 178. The Traffic Mitigation Monitoring Program shall be established in compliance with the approved mitigation measures identified in the approved Traffic Impact Analysis and shall be completed prior to issuance of first occupancy permit in each additional phases of the development as required by the Director of Public Works. Water and Sewer 179. Water and sewer facilities shall be installed in accordance with the requirements and specifications of the City, Rancho California Water District (RCWD), and Eastern Municipal Water District (EMWD). Such requirements shall be applicable thru completion of this development. 180. Prior to the approval of final engineering for each phase as subsequent development applications, the Developer shall obtain written approval for the water system from RCWD. 181. Prior to the approval of final engineering for each phase subsequent development applications, the Developer shall obtain written approval for the sewer system from EMWD. 182. The Developer shall install potable water services and meters at locations approved by the Water District Engineer. The locations of said services shall be reflected on public improvement plans. 183. The Developer shall install sewer laterals and clean -outs at locations approved by the Sewer District Engineer. The locations of sewer laterals shall be reflected on public improvement plans. Final Map Notes 184. Add the following notes to the final map as non -mapping data: "All improvements within private Streets are privately owned and are to be privately maintained with including but not limited to: Curbs, gutter, A.C. paving, street lights, storm drains, All Storm Water treatment control facilities are considered private requiring private maintenance." Master HOA 185. Developer shall establish a Master homeowner's association and corresponding covenants, conditions and restrictions (CC&Rs). Said CC&Rs shall be submitted to and approved by the Planning Director prior to final map approval. Prior to issuance of a building permit for a phase, the Developer shall provide the Planning Department with a recorded copy of the official CC&Rs that have been approved by the Department of Real Estate and the Planning Director. At a minimum, the CC&Rs shall contain the following provisions: d. General Enforcement by the City. The City shall have the right, but not the obligation, to enforce those Protective Covenants set forth in this Declaration in favor of, or in which the City has an interest. e. Notice and Amendment. A copy of any proposed amendment shall be provided to the City in advance. If the proposed amendment affects the City, City shall have the right to reasonably disapprove. A copy of the final approved amendment shall be transmitted to City within 30 days for the official record. f. Failure of Association to Maintain Common Area Lots and Easements. In the event that the Association fails to maintain the "Common Area Lots and/or the Association's Easements," the City shall have the right, but not the duty, to perform the necessary maintenance. If the City elects to perform such maintenance, the City shall give written notice to the Association, with a copy thereof to the Owners in the Project, setting forth with particularity the maintenance which the City finds to be required and requesting the same be carried out by the Association within a period of thirty (30) days from the giving of such notice. In the event that the Association fails to carry out such 9. maintenance of the Common Area Lots and/or Association's Easements within the period specified by the City's notice, the City shall be entitled to cause such work to be completed and shall be entitled to reimbursement with respect thereto from the Owners as provided herein. Special Assessments Levied by the City. In the event the City has performed the necessary maintenance to either Common Area Lots and/or Association's Easements, the City shall submit a written invoice to the Association for all costs incurred by the City to perform such maintenance of the Common Area Lots and or Association's Easements. The City shall provide a copy of such invoice to each Owner in the Project, together with a statement that if the Association fails to pay such invoice in full within the time specified, the City will pursue collection against the Owners in the Project pursuant to the provisions of this Section. Said invoice shall be due and payable by the Association within twenty (20) days of receipt by the Association. If the Association shall fail to pay such invoice in full within the period specified, payment shall be deemed delinquent and shall be subject to a late charge in an amount equal to six percent (6%) of the amount of the invoice. Thereafter the City may pursue collection from the Association by means of any remedies available at law or in equity. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, in addition to all other rights and remedies available to the City, the City may levy a special assessment against the Owners of each Lot in the Project for an equal pro rata share of the invoice, plus the late charge. Such special assessment shall constitute a charge on the land and shall be a continuing lien upon each Lot against which the special assessment is levied. Each Owner in the Project hereby vests the City with the right and power to levy such special assessment, to impose a lien upon their respective Lot and to bring all legal actions and/or to pursue lien foreclosure procedures against any Owner and his/her respective Lot for purposes of collecting such special assessment in accordance with the procedures set forth in Article of this Declaration. h. Landscape Maintenance Responsibilities. The HOAs and individual lot or unit owner landscape maintenance responsibilities shall be as set forth on the "Developer Responsibility Map" of the Specific Plan. Lighting Restrictions on Private Residential Lots: Restrictions on lighting within residential lots adjacent to open space conservation areas shall be as set forth in the Specific Plan and Final EIR. Prior to the Issuance of Grading Permits 186. Required Clearances. As deemed necessary by the Director of Public Works, the developer shall receive written clearance when applicable, from the following agencies: a. San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board; b. Army Corps of Engineers; c. California Department of Fish and Wildlife; d. Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; e. Riverside County Health Department; f. City of Temecula Fire Prevention Bureau; g. Planning Department; h. Department of Public Works: i. Community Services District; j. Caltrans; k. Rancho California Water District; I. Eastern Municipal Water District; m. Verizon; n. Telephone Company; o. Southern California Edison Company; p. The Gas Company; and q. Metropolitan Water District or other affected agencies 187. The applicant shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 8.24 of the Temecula Municipal Code (Habitat Conservation) by paying the appropriate fee set forth in that ordinance or by providing documented evidence that the fees have already been paid or fee credits have been provided. 188. Securities. For each of the phases, the developer shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 24, Section 18.24.140 of the Temecula Municipal Code by posting security and entering into an agreement to guarantee the grading and erosion & sediment control improvements. 189. Area Drainage Plan (ADP) Fee to RCFC&WCD. For each phase, the developer shall demonstrate to the City that the flood mitigation charge (ADP fee) has been paid to RCFC&WCD. If the full ADP fee has already been credited to this property, no new charge will be required. 190. The developer shall provide proof to the Department of Public Works and Planning that the conditions of any Wildlife Agency or Army Corps permits if necessary for any restoration have been bonded for and shall be implemented consistent with the timing requirements of the permits. 191. Approval of this request shall not excuse compliance with all applicable sections of the Zoning Ordinance and all other applicable City ordinances in effect at time of building permit issuance, except as otherwise specifically provided in Altair Specific Plan and the Development Agreement. 192, The project shall comply with the latest disabled access requirements pursuant to Title 24 of the California Building Code. 193, Based upon a review of the proposed grading and the grading quantities shown on the tentative map, a grading permit for each phase of this project is required. Developer shall apply for and obtain a grading permit from the Director of Public Works. 194. This project requires off site grading. No grading for any improvements shall occur outside the limits of this approval unless Developer obtains, records, and submits a recorded copy to the Director of Public Works a grading or slope easement or agreement from the owners of the affected properties. If Developer is unable to obtain the grading or slope easement, or agreement, no grading permit will be issued. In that case Developer must either apply for and obtain an amendment of this approval or modify the plans so grading will not occur outside the project and apply for and obtain a finding of substantial conformance from both the Director of Public Works and Planning Director. 195. Encroachment Permits. Prior to commencement of any applicable construction, encroachment permit(s) are required; and shall be obtained: a. from Public Works for public offsite improvements; b. from the California Department of Transportation if encroaching within their right- of-way; and c. from Riverside County Flood Control & Water Conservation District (RCFC&WCD) if encroaching within their right-of-way. 196. Prior to hauling dirt or construction materials to or from any proposed construction site within this project, Developer shall apply for and obtain approval from, the Director of Public Works for the proposed haul route. 197. Upon completion of grading, Developer shall file an "as -graded" geologic plan with the Director of Public Works. The plan shall clearly show all the geology as exposed by the grading operation, all geologic corrective measures as actually constructed and must be based on a contour map which represents both the pre and post site grading. The plan shall be signed by both the soils engineer and the engineering geologist, and shall be submitted on a 24"x 36" mylar or similar drafting film format suitable for a permanent record. Prior to the Issuance of Building Permits 198. Final Map. Final Map shall be approved and recorded for the applicable phase. 199. The developer shall provide proof to the Director of Public Works that the has contributed its fair share towards regional traffic improvements systems (i.e., traffic impact fees) for the area the area through a Development Agreement. This shall include efforts to synchronize traffic lights on streets impacted by development of each phase. 200. Building permits will not be issued for this project unless the local agency providing water and sewer services to the project provides written certification to the City that adequate water service and sewer facilities, respectively, are available to the project at the time of the application for the building permit, and that water and sewer capacity and facilities will continue to be available until the time of occupancy. Phasing 201. Construction of the development permitted by the Specific Plan, including recordation of final subdivision maps, may be carried out in stages provided that, adequate vehicular access is constructed for all dwelling units in each stage of development and further provided that such development conforms substantially with the intent and purpose of the Specific Plan Phasing Plan, 202. Development applications shall be submitted for each planning unit in each phase. Total acreage and land uses within each phase shall be substantially in accordance with the specifications of the Specific Plan. 203. The Developer shall be permitted to seek a reimbursement agreement for qualifying facilities and improvements. The City and the Developer shall proceed in good faith to allocate appropriate reimbursements to the Developer pursuant to the City's then enforceable ordinance applicable to such reimbursement pursuant to Development Agreement. Tract Map 36959-1 (North Phasel In addition to the above noted Conditions, the following improvements shall be completed as part of North Phase and prior to 15t building permit in North Phase: 204. Acquisition of right-of-way on the east side of Vincent Moraga between Felix Valdez and Rancho California Road and construction of the designed Western Bypass Corridor northbound right turn lane improvements within this road segment. 205. Acquisition of right-of-way on the south side of Rancho California Road between Vincent Moraga Drive and the Murrieta Creek Bridge and construction of all intersection improvements within this road segment including an additional westbound left turn lane on Rancho California Road to Vincent Moraga Drive. 206. Traffic signal and utility relocation where needed and construction of the ultimate build -out of the Rancho California Road, Diaz Road and Vincent Moraga Drive intersection. 207. Construction of the designed onsite Western Bypass Corridor Phase 1 improvements from the project's northern property line to the future Altair Vista intersection. 208. Construction of the Ridge Park Drive and Western Bypass Corridor intersection improvements to provide left -turn ingress and right-in/right-out to Ridge Park Drive. Developer shall construct one hundred percent (100%) of this Fair Share traffic improvement. 209. Install Multi -Way Stop Controls at the First Street & Pujol Street intersection. Developer shall construct one hundred percent (100%) of this Fair Share traffic improvement. 210. The following improvements shall be constructed as part of the North Phase and completed prior to the earlier of, i) the 350th building permit in North Phase, or ii) the 15t building permit in the Central Phase: 211. Acquisition of right-of-way on the west side of Vincent Moraga Drive between Felix Valdez and Rancho California Road and construction of the designed Western Bypass Corridor improvements within this road segment. 212. Acquisition of right-of-way on the east side and west side of Vincent Moraga Drive between Felix Valdez and Ridge Park Drive and construction of the designed Western Bypass Corridor improvements within this road segment. 213. Following the occupancy of both villages within this North Phase (Village A and Village B), optimize Adaptive Traffic Signal Program at: (a) Intersection of Old Town Front Street and Rancho California Road; (b) Intersection of Ynez Road and Rancho California Road; (c) including the collection of intersection traffic count data at affected intersections. Tract Map 36959-2 (Central Phase) In addition to the above noted Conditions, the following improvements shall be completed as part of Central Phase and prior to 1st building permit in Central Phase: 214. Construction of the designed Coromell Trail road segment between Altair Vista and First Street. 215. Installation of one (1) new left turn lane (re -stripe only), and modify signal operation, install signal indications and necessary equipment at Ynez Road and Santiago Road. 216. Construction of traffic signals at the Pujol Street and First Street intersection. Developer shall construct one hundred percent (100%) of this Fair Share traffic improvement. 217. The following improvements shall be constructed as part of the Central Phase and completed prior to the issuance of any building permits on pads south of the Village C Park: a. Construction of the "A" Street vehicular bridge that crosses over the Village C Park. 218. The following improvements shall be constructed as part of the Central Phase, shall commence before the 700th building permit is issued in the project and completed prior to the earlier of, i) the 950m building permit in the project, or ii) the 1st building permit in the South Phase: a. Construction of either the Western Bypass Bridge or construction of the Western Bypass Corridor Phase 2 improvements (two (2) eastern lanes; ultimate northbound) including parallel Class 1 bikeway. If requested by Developer, City will allow for stockpiling of dirt on either Village G or the Nature Center Parcel prior to grading permit issuance for the Civic Phase. 219. Following the construction of the Western Bypass Bridge and Phase 2 Road, optimize Adaptive Traffic Signal Program at: (a) Intersection of 1-15 northbound onramp and Temecula Parkway; (b) Intersection of Temecula Parkway and Margarita Road; (c) Intersection of Ynez Road and Santiago Road; (d) including the collection of intersection traffic count data at these affected intersections. Tract Map 36959-3 (South Phase) 220. In addition to the above noted Conditions, the following improvements shall be completed as part of South Phase and prior to 1St building permit in South Phase: a. Construction of both the Western Bypass Bridge and construction of the Western Bypass Corridor Phase 2 improvements (two (2) eastern lanes; ultimate northbound) including parallel Class 1 bikeway. If requested by Developer, City will allow for stockpiling of dirt on either Village G or the Nature Center Parcel prior to grading permit issuance for the Nature Center Phase. b. Construction of traffic signal improvements at the Western Bypass Corridor and Altair Vista intersection. c. Construction of the designed "B" Street North road segment between Altair Vista and the Western Bypass Corridor. 221. Following the completion of the villages in this South Phase (Village D, Village E and Village F), optimize Adaptive Traffic Signal Program at: (a) Intersection of 1-15 northbound onramp and Temecula Parkway; (b) Intersection of Temecula Parkway and Margarita Road; (c) Intersection of Ynez Road and Santiago Road; (d) including the collection of intersection traffic count data at these affected intersections. Tract Map 36959 (Civic Phase) 222. In addition to the above noted Conditions, the following improvements shall be completed as part of Civic Phase and prior to 151 building permit in Civic Phase: a. Construction of all remaining Western Bypass Corridor improvements (Phase 3 which includes 2 western lanes; southbound). b. Construction of traffic signal improvements at the Western Bypass and "B" Street intersection. 223. Following completion of both villages in this Civic Phase (Village G and Nature Center), optimize Adaptive Traffic Signal Program at: (a) Intersection of Old Town Front Street and Rancho California Road. (b) Intersection of Ynez Road and Rancho California Road; (c) Intersection of 1-15 northbound onramp and Temecula Parkway; (d) Intersection of Temecula Parkway and Margarita Road; (e) Intersection of Ynez Road and Santiago Road; (f) including the collection of intersection traffic count data at these affected intersections. TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT General Requirements 224. If any of the following conditions of approval differ from the Specific Plan text or exhibits, the conditions enumerated herein shall take precedent. 225. The current park dedication requirement (Quimby) shall be satisfied with the 5 acre community park, the proposed private Parks that are HOA owned and maintained including recreational areas identified in the Altair Specific Plan. 226. The actual design of the 5 acre community park in Central Phase shall be in substantial conformance with the conceptual designs and guidelines identified within the Specific Plan. Prior to submittal of construction plans, the developer shall meet with the Director of Community Services to determine the location and specifications of the park amenities to be provided on site. Construction plans and specifications must be approved by the Director of Community Services. 227. All park plans submitted for consideration shall be in conformance with the City of Temecula Landscape and Irrigation Specifications and Installation Details and the Park Land and Landscape Dedication Process. 228. The design of the community park in Central Phase shall provide for pedestrian circulation and access for the disabled throughout the park. 229. The developer, the developer's successor or assignee, or Master HOA shall be responsible for all maintenance of the park sites and slopes/landscaping areas except as defined in the Development Agreement, on Developer Responsibility Map. 230. The 5 acre community park shall be improved and dedicated to the City free and clear of any liens, assessment fees, or easements that would preclude the City from utilizing the property for public purposes. A policy of title insurance and a soils assessment report shall also be provided with the conveyance of the property. 231. The developer may receive a credit against the park component of the City's Development Impact Fee (DIF) based upon the actual cost of improving the community park in Central Phase. The fee/credit issue shall be addressed pursuant to the execution of a Development Agreement or a Park Improvement Agreement between the applicant and the City prior to approval of the final map. ALTAIR PROJECT PHASING - EXHIBIT B FIVE PRIMARY PHASES - BASED ON GRADING Updated: 03/15/2016 TOTAL PROJECT Civic Phase Units/Village Cumulative Units G 130 Units 1,750 Units 130 Units South Units/Village D 160 Units E 115 Units F 180 Units 455 Units Phase Cumulative Units 1,325 Units 1,440 Units 1,620 Units Central Phase Units/Village Cumulative Units C -N 225 Units 725 Units C -S 440 Units 1,165 Units 665 Units North Units/Village A 280 Units B 220 Units 500 Units Phase Cumulative Units 280 Units 500 Units NORTH PHASE — Prior to 15t Building Permit North Phase rough graded Ridge Park Drive improvements including "T" intersection. Altair Vista phase 1 Western Bypass phase 1 Vincent Moraga widening from Ridge Park Dr to Rancho Calif Rd (except east lanes between Felix Valdez & Rancho Calif Rd)* East Lanes to build -out width between Felix Valdez & Rancho Calif Road 4,44; Left turn lane on Rancho Cal _ "'�• '�'4.'- - r. r.4 (' Four-way stop at First Street and Pujol Street t.4 North Phase Offsite Sewer * Master Developer shall put forth a good faith effort to acquire the ROW needed along Vincent Moraga. If unsuccessful in the ROW acquisition after several attempts, then the City shall initiate eminent domain proceedings as necessary. These improvements shall be complete prior to the earlier of, i) issuance of the 350th building permit for the project, or ii) issuance of the 15t building permit for the Central Phase. All intersection improvements and signal relocations are complete.* Yellow Highlight: Identifies improvements being constructed earlier than in previous submittal. CENTRAL PHASE — Prior to 15t Building Permit Central Phase rough graded Altair Vista phase 2 "A" Street phase 1 (secondary access provided by neighborhood internal streets) Levant Trail connects Altair Vista to First Street DG trail at Village B toe of slope Central Phase Offsite Sewer Street and Pujol Street Yellow Arrows 1::>: Interim pedestrian access to Old Town will occur from the east side of the Western Bypass, along the base of the Village B pad, to Pujol St. and across the Main St. Bridge. Yellow Highlight: Identifies improvements being constructed earlier than in previous submittal. CENTRAL PHASE — Prior to Building Permits in Village C, south of the park Village C Park phase 2 — Soft' Landscape. !!17 "air.:i 'J • . Altair Vista phase 3 "A" Street phase 2 and vehicular bridge Western Bypass phase 2 (2 lanes constructed; ultimate NB), parallel Class 1 Bikeway* Western Bypass Bridge* Recreation Center (west building) or Community Center (east building) — C of 0 to be obtained prior to the earlier of, i) 950th building permit for the project, or ii) 1st building permit for the South Phase. Main Street transition, grand stairway and Village C Park PH 1 (ADA access provided to 'A' Street) * Start: Construction of the WBC Bridge or grading of the South Phase to complete the WBC connection shall start prior to the 700th building permit (40%) for the project. Complete: The WBC Road and Bridge improvements shall be constructed prior to the earlier of, i) issuance of the 950th building permit for the project (54%), or ii) issuance of the 1st building permit for the South Phase. If the Civic Phase grading has not yet commenced, the City shall provide the Master Developer with the ability to stock pile dirt onto the Civic Site. Yellow Highlight: Identifies improvements being constructed earlier than in previous submittal. SOUTH PHASE — Prior to 1st Building Permit Village C Park phase 2 —'Hard' Landscape. y South Phase rough graded Altair Vista phase 4 "B" Street North connects to Western Bypass and Pujol Street Signal improvements at Western Bypass and Altair Vista Western Bypass phase 2 (2 lanes 1 constructed; ultimate NB) and parallel Class 1 Bikeway* Western Bypass Bridge* * Start: Construction of the WBC Bridge or grading of the South Phase to complete the WBC connection shall start prior to the 700th building permit (40%) for the project. Complete: The WBC Road and Bridge improvements shall be constructed prior to the earlier of, i) issuance of the 950th building permit for the project (54%), or ii) issuance of the 1st building permit for the South Phase. If the Civic Phase grading has not yet commenced, the City shall provide the Master Developer with the ability to stock pile dirt onto the Civic Site. Yellow Highlight: Identifies improvements being constructed earlier than in previous submittal. SOUTH PHASE — Prior to 300th Building Permit Yellow Highlight: Identifies improvements being constructed earlier than in previous submittal. CIVIC PHASE — Prior to 1st Building Permit Civic Phase rough graded Signal improvements at Western Bypass and "B" Street "B" Street South "C" Street Western Bypass phase 3, 2 SB lanes constructed 'e► Civic Phase Offsite Sewer Recreation Center (west building) or Community Center (east building), C of 0 for whichever building has not yet been constructed . %eir orA Yellow Highlight: Identifies improvements being constructed earlier than in previous submittal. TOTAL PROJECT TIMING OF CIVIC PHASE DELIVERY & WESTERN BYPASS BRIDGE Due to traffic volumes, the Western Bypass Bridge will need to be installed prior to a building permit being issued for the Civic Site. If the Civic Phase is accelerated then so will construction of the Western Bypass Bridge as well as the connection to Pujol Street. Yellow Highlight: Identifies improvements being constructed earlier than in previous submittal. COMPLETELY TEMECULA. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 R4'1%,' `_is • - / y 1 ti -i� t-. •r I J 1= r: - sir 1 -its - 4 ,• - �'1 7 t't 0 r. i. '71 r itoesither 20117 s • t; s *alhfir SPECIFIC PLAN Prepared by: 179 Calle Magdalena, #201 Encinitas, CA 92024 EIZI40111111M11111 carrierjohnson + CULTUR3 2850 Womble Road Suite 100-403 San Diego, CA 92106 1 301 Third Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 November 2017 —S COMPANIES' COMPANIES 2020 Camino Del Rio North Suite 1000 San Diego, CA 92108 I • hr - • 1- 11 lin elum1-.1 1� i • 11' { 1 ( 1 i r Neil 2017 ;D1 1 +� r ' *hi :F' A!•+j 1.vr - 11 _,:; F,lti _ It 4, r LP 1,1 `r 1 1, .1 ,' ■ _ d 1 1. d • • f 1. int_ 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS ail t"Ai r 1 SUMMARY 1-1 1.1 Document Purpose 1-1 1.2 Related Application and Studies 1-1 1.3 Legal Authority and Process 1-1 1.4 Organization 1-2 2 INTRODUCTION 2-1 2.1 Vision 2-1 2.2 Smart Growth 2-1 2.3 Site 2- 6 2.4 Design Concept 2-9 2.5 Land Use 2-15 2.6 Relationship to the General Plan 2-17 3 LAND USE 3-1 3.1 Summary 3-1 3.2 Relationship of Land Uses to Zoning 3-7 3.3 Open Space 3-7 3.4 Altair Villages 3-7 3.5 Village A 3-9 3.6 Village B 3-17 3.7 Village C 3-23 3.8 Village D 3-33 November 2017 (TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 3.9 Village E 3-41 3.10 Village F 3-49 3.11 Village G 3-57 3.12 School Site 3-63 3.13 Civic Site 3-69 4 CIRCULATION PLAN 4-1 4.1 Pedestrian Walkways, Trails & Bikeways 4-3 4.2 Circulation Plan - Vehicular 4-19 5 GRADING PLAN 5-1 5.1 Grading Description 5-1 5.2 Grading Plan Standards 5-1 6 INFRASTRUCTURE AND UTILITIES 6-1 6.1 Drainage 6-1 6.2 Water 6-8 6.3 Sewer 6-17 6.4 Dry Utilities 6-21 7 PUBLIC SERVICES 7-1 7.1 Schools 7-1 7.2 Libraries 7-1 7.3 Fire Protection 7-3 7.4 Police 7-3 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANET 7.5 Parks 7-3 7.6 Hospitals 7-4 7.7 Public Transit 7-4 7.8 Waste Management 7-7 8 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN 8-1 8.1 Natural Open Space 8-4 8.2 Interstitial Open Space 8-5 8.3 Active Open Space 8-7 8.4 Private Open Space 8-10 8.5 Park Programming 8-10 8.6 Crime Prevention through Environmental Design 8-11 9 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9-1 9.1 Design Objectives 9-1 9.2 Building Placement 9-1 9.3 Building Form 9-2 9.4 Building Frontage 9-9 9.5 Utility Placement and Screening 9-22 9.6 Fences, Walls and Gates 9-25 9.7 Slopes and Retaining Walls 9-27 9.8 Materials, Textures and Colors 9-32 9.9 Public Art 9-34 %/T11SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS (TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 9.10 Monuments and Gateways 9.11 Wind Screening 9,12 Outdoor Lighting 9.13 Streets 9.14 Signage 9.15 Accessibility 10 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10.1 Application 10.2 Zoning 10.3 Height Limits and Vertical Projections 10.4 Setbacks and Build -To Line 10.5 Signage 10.6 Conceptual Landscape Plan 10.7 Parking 10.8 Fences, Hedges and Walls 10.9 Refuse and Service Areas 10.10 Building Types 10.11 Detached Housing 10.12 Multi-Plex 10.13 Rowhouse 10.14 Live/Work 9-41 9-45 9-45 9-46 9-47 9-48 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 10-4 10-8 10-10 10-24 10-26 10-27 10-28 10-29 10-38 10-42 10-47 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 10.15 Multifamily Walk -Up 10.16 Multifamily Podium 10.17 Micro -Units 10.18 Mixed -Use 10.19 Iconic Tower 10.20 Civic Buildings / Nature Center 10.21 School Buildiings 10,22 Community Buildings 10-51 10-55 10-58 10-60 10-63 10-64 10-66 10-68 11 IMPLEMENTATION 11 - 1 11.1 Regulations that Administer the Specific Plan 11-1 11.2 Capital Improvements 11-5 11,3 Phasing 11-5 11.4 Maintenance 11-7 11.5 Density Transfer 11-7 11,6 Lot Reconfiguration or Consolidation 11-9 11,7 Financing Strategies 11-9 11.8 Services Deficit Fiscal Impact Payments 11-10 11.9 Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee 11-10 11.10 Severability 11-11 APPENDICES Appendix A - Plant Lists iar% SPECIFIC PLP.'. November 2017 TABLE OF CONTEN-5 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANf7 TABLES all r 3 LAND USE Table 3-1 Zones and Development Intensity 3-4 Table 3-1 Cont. Zones and Development Intensity 3-5 8 OPEN & RECREATION Table 8-1 Open Space Summary 8-2 Table 8-2 Park and Open Space Areas 8-2 10 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Table 10-1 Permitted Uses 10-2 Table 10-2 Zoning Regulations 10-3 Table 10-3 Parking Requirements 10-25 Table 10-4 Building Types 10-28 =11111SPECIFIC PL N November 2017 (TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN,% TABLE OF FIGURES alha�ir INTRODUCTION Figure 2-1 Regional Location Map 2-6 Figure 2-2 Vicinity Map 2-8 Figure 2-3 Connection to Open Space 2-10 Figure 2-4 Connection to Old Town Temecula 2-11 Figure 2-5 View Opportunities 2-12 Figure 2-6 Outdoor Rooms Linked Enfilade 2-13 Figure 2-7 Outdoor Rooms Linked in a "Daisy Chain" 2-14 Figure 2-8 Aerial Photograph 2-16 LAND USE Figure 3-1 Natural Open Space 3-2 Figure 3-2 Land Use 3-3 Figure 3-3 Zoning Map 3-6 Figure 3-4 Village A - Plan Area 3-8 Figure 3-5 Vehicular Access - Village A 3-10 Figure 3-6 Pedestrian Circulation - Village A 3-11 Figure 3-7 Park Plan at Village A 3-14 Figure 3-8 Village B - Plan Area 3-16 Figure 3-9 Vehicular Access - Village B 3-18 Figure 3-10 Pedestrian Circulation - Village B 3-19 Figure 3-11 Park Plan at Village B 3-20 SPECIFIC PLS'• November 2017 X Figure 3-12 Village C - Plan Area Figure 3-13 Vehicular Access - Village C Figure 3-14 Pedestrian Circulation - Village C Figure 3-'5 Park Plan at Village C Figure 3-16 Park Section at Village C Figure 3-17 Village D - Plan Area Figure 3-18 Vehicular Access - Village D Figure 3-19 Pedestrian Circulation - Village D Figure 3-20 Park Plan at Village D Figure 3-21 Village E - Plan Area Figure 3-22 Vehicular Access - Village E Figure 3-23 Pedestrian Circulation - Village E Figure 3-24 Park Plan at Village E Figure 3-25 Village F - Plan Area Figure 3-26 Vehicular Access - Village F Figure 3-27 Pedestrian Circulation - Village F Figure 3-28 Park Plan at Village F Figure 3-29 Village G - Plan Area Figure 3-30 Vehicular Access - Village G Figure 3-31 Pedestrian Circulation - Village G Figure 3-32 School - Plan Area 3-22 3-24 3-25 3-29 3-30 3-32 3-34 3-35 3-38 3-40 3-42 3-43 3-46 3-48 3-50 3-51 3-54 3-56 3-58 3-59 3-62 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK Figure 3-33 Vehicular Access - School Figure 3-34 Pedestrian Circulation - School Figure 3-35 Conceptual Site Plan - School Figure 3-36 Civic Site - Plan Area Figure 3-37 Vehicular Access - Civic Site Figure 3-38 Pedestrian Circulation - Civic Site CIRCULATION PLAN Figure 4-1 5 Minute Walk Figure 4-2 Circulation Plan - Pedestrian and Bicycle Figure 4-3 Class I Bikeway Section Figure 4-4 Key Walkway Section Figure 4-5 Plan at Mid -Block Crossing Figure 4-6 Typical Village Sidewalk Section Figure 4-7 Hiking Trail Section Figure 4-8 Bicycle Facilities Figure 4-9 Crossing at Coromell Trail Figure 4-10 Conceptual Plan at Grand Stair Figure 4-11 Vehicular Entries Figure 4-12 Vehicular Circulation Plan Figure 4-13 Street Section - Western Bypass Corridor 1 Figure 4-14 Street Section - Westem Bypass Corridor 2 I SPECIFIC PLh November 2017 1 TABLE OF FIGURES 3-64 3-65 3-66 3-68 3-70 3-71 4-2 4-7 4-8 4-9 4-9 4-10 4-11 4-13 4-16 4-17 4-18 4-23 4-24 4-24 xt TABLE OF FIGURES 1 Figure 4-15 Street Axon - Western Bypass Corridor 2 4-25 Figure 4-16 Street Section - C Street + B Street South 4-26 Figure 4 -17 Street Axon - C Street + B Street South 4-27 Figure 4-18 Street Section - Coromell Trail 4-28 Figure 4-19 Street Section - Coromell Trail - Split Lanes 4-28 Figure 4-20 Street Axon - Coromell Trail - Split Lanes 4-29 Figure 4-21 Street Section - Altair Vista - Planted Parkways 4-30 Figure 4-22 Street Axon - Altair Vista - Planted Parkways 4-31 Figure 4-23 Street Section - Altair Vista + A Street - Urban 4-32 Figure 4-24 Street Axon - Altair Vista + A Street - Urban 4-33 Figure 4-25 Street Section - Altair Vista one way 4-34 Figure 4-26 Street Axon - Altair Vista one way 4-35 Figure 4-27 Street Section - Altair Vista 4-36 Figure 4-28 Street Axon - Altair Vista 4-37 Figure 4-29 Street Section - Altair Vista Culverts + A St Bridge 4-38 Figure 4-30 Street Axon - Altair Vista Culverts + A St Bridge 4-39 Figure 4-31 Street Section - B Street North 4-40 Figure 4-32 Street Section - B Street North with Bikeway 4-40 Figure 4-33 Street Axon - B Street North 4-41 Figure 4-34 Street Section - Alley 4-42 Figure 4-35 Typical Alley at Cottages at Harveston 4-43 1111 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANFJrf Figure 5-1 Project Grading Diagram 5-3 Figure 5-2 Project Grading Sections 5-4 Figure 5-3 Retaining Wall Diagram 5-5 INFRASTRUCTURE AND UTILITIES Figure 6-1 Typical Drainage Draw Plan 6-3 Figure 6-2 Typical Drainage Draw Section 6-3 Figure 6-3 Storm Drainage Plan 6-4 Figure 6-4 Enlarged Storm Drainage Plans 6-6 and 6-7 Figure 6-5 Domestic Water Plan 6-9 Figure 6-6 Enlarged Domestic Water Plans 6-11 and 6-12 Figure 6-7 Sewer Plan 6-16 Figure 6-8 Enlarged Sewer Plans 6-18 and 6-19 Figure 7-1 Public Services 7-2 Figure 7-2 RTA Route Map 7-5 Figure 7-3 Smart Shuttle Route Proposal 7-6 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN Figure 8-1 Parks. Open Space and Amenities Plan 8-3 Figure 8-2 Open Space and Recreational Images 8-9 • i•iSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 1 TABLE OF FIGURES XIII (TABLE OF FIGURES 1 9 DESIGN GUIDELINES Figure 9-1 Motor Court Elements 9-6 Figure 9-2 Building Frontage 9-8 Figure 9-3 Straight Stoop 9-10 Figure 9-4 Sideways Stoop 9-10 Figure 9-5 Projecting Porch 9-12 Figure 9-6 Integral Porch 9-12 Figure 9-7 Recessed Entry 9-14 Figure 9-8 Walled Yard 9-15 Figure 9-9 Raised Yard 9-16 Figure 9-10 Entry Court 9-19 Figure 9-11 Shopfront 9-20 Figure 9 -12 Arcade 9 - 21 Figure 9-13 Utility Locations 9-22 Figure 9-14 Retaining Wall Section where Visible to Public 9-27 Figure 9-15 Stepped Buildings 9-28 Figure 9-16 Roundabout 1 - Plan 9-36 Figure 9-17 Roundabout 1 - Elevation 9-37 Figure 9-18 Roundabout 2 - Plan 9-38 Figure 9-19 Roundabout 2 - Elevation 9-39 Figure 9-20 Roundabout 3 - Elevation 9-39 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrj 1 TABLE OF FIGURES Figure 9-21 Roundabout 3 - Plan 9-40 Figure 9- 22 Major Entry Monument A - Plan Figure 9-23 Major Entry Monument A - Elevation Figure 9-24 Entry Monuments + Gateways Figure 9-25 Major Entry Monument B - Elevation Figure 9-26 Major Entry Monument C - Elevation Figure 9 -27 Gateway Bridge Figure 9-28 Street Organization DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Figure 10-1 Figure 10-2 Figure 10-3 Figure 10-4 Allowable Setback Encroachments - Porch Allowable Setback Encroachments - Stoop Allowable Setback Encroachments - Walls +Trellises 9-41 9-41 9-42 9-43 9-43 9-44 9-47 10-4 10-5 10-5 Allowable Setback Encroachments - Awnings, Balconies, Roofs 10-6 Figure 10-5 Allowable Setback Encroachments - Arcades Figure 10-6 Building -Mounted Signs Figure 10-7 Monument Signs Figure 10-8 Figure 10-9 Figure 10-10 Figure 10-11 Conceptual Landscape Plan Landscape Exhibit 1 Landscape Exhibit 2 Landscape Exhibit 3 %i3>17 SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 10-7 10-8 10-9 10-11 10-12 10-13 10-14 (TABLE OF FIGURES 1 Figure 10-12 Landscape Exhibit 4 10-15 Figure 10-13 Street Tree Plan 10-16 Figure 10-14 Urban Parkway with Tree Grate 10-23 Figure 10-15 Urban Parkway with Planter Pocket 10-23 Figure 10-16 Detached Housing with small entry yard 10-29 Figure 10-17 Detached Housing clustered around common green space 10-30 Figure 10-18 Detached Housing Facing Street 10-31 Figure 10-19 Detached Housing around Motor Court 10-32 Figure 10-20 Detached Housing Clustered around Green 10-33 Figure 10-21 Typical Landscaping at Bungalow Court and Rose Court 10-34 Figure 10-22 Typical Front Yard Landscaping at Detached Housing 10-35 Figure 10-23 4th Floor Limits in Detached Housing 10-36 Figure 10-24 Typical Massing at Detached Housing 10-36 Figure 10-25 Detached garages and/or accessory dwelling 10-37 Figure 10-26 Typical Massing at Multiplex 10-39 Figure 10-27 Multiplex Housing with shared Driveway & Motor Court 10-40 Figure 10-28 Rowhomes along a street facade 10-42 Figure 10-29 Rowhouse massing and articulation 10-45 Figure 10-30 Typical Live/Work Building 10-47 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK Figure 10-31 Example Live/Work Building Section Figure 10-32 Typical Massing at Multifamily Walk -Up Figure 10-33 Motor Court at Multifamily Housing Figure 10-34 Multifamily Walk -Up Housing Arrangement Figure 10-35 Multifamily Podium example with street -level entries Figure 10-36 Multifamily Podium Building Figure 10-37 Resident Courtyard at Multifamily Podium Housing Figure 10-38 Micro -Units Typical Layout Figure 10-39 Building with Micro -Units Figure 10-40 Iconic Tower IMPLEMENTATION Figure 11-1 Public and Private Roads at Altair Figure 11-2 Altair Conceptual Phasing Plan Figure 11-3 Developer Responsibility Map %/i?iiSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 1 TABLE OF FIGURES 10-48 10-51 10-52 10-53 10-55 10-56 10-57 10-58 10-58 10-63 SUMMARY a� l f"a� i r 1 SUMMARY 1.1 Document Purpose The Altair Specific Plan serves as the regulatory ��� _ document and planning instrument for the future �; 30 development of a 270 -acre land parcel west of the ti Old Town planningarea in the Cityof Temecula. This / .f• _ t f Specific Plan is a mechanism for implementing the City of Temecula General Plan in the area defined therein as Altair. 1.2 Related Applications and Studies The Altair Specific Plan is one of several concurrent studies and approvals necessary for the complete entitlement of Altair. These include: • PA14-0158 General Plan Amendment to amend the land use and allowable density and to revise the alignment of the Western Bypass Corridor. • PA14-0159 Specific Plan and Environmental Impact Report (SCH #2014111029) • PA14-0160 Tentative Tract Map • PA14-0161 Development Agreement, including a Fiscal Impact Analysis and formation of a Community Facilities District. 1.3 Legal Authority and Process The City of Temecula General Plan authorizes in its Land Use Element the use of Specific Plans that comply with Section 65451 of the California Government Code and with the City's Development Code. California Government Code Section 65450-65457 grants local planning agencies the authority to create specific plans to execute the applicable general plan for any area within that general plan. Both the General Plan and the Development Code of the City require approval of a specific plan prior to any land use entitlement or building or grading permit in designated specific plan areas of 100 or more acres. Altair is in such a designated area and, therefore, requires an approved specific plan for development. Both the General Plan and the official Zoning Map of the City of Temecula designate the majority of the subject property as SP -8, Westside Specific Plan. This was a previously adopted document that never developed as a built project. Therefore, the new Altair Specific Plan requires a rezone process with a general plan amendment to revise the land uses for the site and remove the SP -8 designation. Specific plans in the City of Temecula require a Planning Commission hearing and City Council hearing, both with public notice. Additionally, the EIR / CEQA process requires a public scoping meeting. The Planning Commission shall make a recommendation to the City Council based on findings listed in the Development Code. Council will then consider the recommendation of the Planning Commission as well as the findings to determine whether to =RR SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 t—t 1-2 adopt the Specific Plan. Adoption will be by ordinance. The findings that must be made are: 1. The proposed specific plan is consistent with the general plan and development code. 2. The proposed specific plan would not be detrimental to the public interest, health, safety, convenience or welfare of the city. 3. The subject property is physically suitable for the requested land use designations and the anticipated land use developments. 4. The proposed specific plan shall ensure development of desirable character which will be compatible with existing and proposed development in the surrounding neighborhood. Upon adoption of the Altair Specific Plan, it becomes the regulatory document for Altair. All future development plans, tentative maps, parcel maps or other entitlements and public improvements located within the boundaries defined by this plan must be found to be consistent with this Specific Plan. All regulations, policies and implementation measures described in this Specific Plan shall be considered individually. If any provision is determined to be without legal basis by a presiding State or Federal court, the remaining document and stipulations shall continue to be valid and enforceable. 1.4 Organization The Altair Specific Plan is organized in eleven sections to cover the various aspects of planning and regulation for development and construction at Altair. Section 1. offers a short summary of the purpose and process of this document and associated approvals. Section 2 introduces the vision and design concept for the Altair community, discusses the smart growth principals that guide this concept and explains the plan's consistency with the City of Temecula General Plan. Section 3 discusses land use and describes the individual Villages and civic plan areas. Section 4 outlines the circulation plans for pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles to achieve a walkable community. Section 5 explains the grading work needed for the site and provides standards to prevent erosion and minimize the visual impacts of grading. Section 6 discusses infrastructure and utilities, including stormwater drainage and treatment, water, sewer, electricity and natural gas services. Section 7 discusses public services available to the project, including libraries, police, fire and rescue, parks, public transit, waste management, schools and the site available for a new elementary school. Section 8 describes the extensive network of parks and open space proposed for Altair, and how open spaces are integrated with the villages concept and with the historic terrain. The Design Guidelines that will ensure the aesthetic quality of development in Altair are located in Section 9. Section 10 includes development standards regulating the site for zoning, building parameters, building type, parking and landscaping. Finally, Section 11 outlines the implementation of this Specific Plan, including proposed phasing, capital improvements and maintenance responsibilities. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANA 2 INTRODUCTION 2.1 Vision The name "Altair" derives from the Latin roots for "a high place" and "an altar". The combined meaning is "a high place of significance or prominence". Altair is also the name of a star in the constellation Aquila. The name is appropriate to this site that sits above the heart of Temecula and is easily seen from many points in the City. The ridge line above Altair has long been a visual backdrop to the City and will only be enhanced by this neighborhood at its base. The community of Altair will play a prominent role in the physical, social and economic evolution of Temecula. INTRODUCTION ol/f"Air OLD TOWN FRONT STREET !N TEMECULA. CALIFORNIA Altair is envisioned as the complementary residential component to the Old Town Specific Plan area of the City of Temecula. The two plan areas are integral to a successful urban mixed-use environment. Altair is located directly adjacent to Old Town Temecula and its added residential population base will support the commercial uses of Old Town. There are few housing opportunities in Old Town currently, limiting the clientelle of Old Town's shops and restaurants to visitors who arrive primarily by car. Old Town businesses are therefore very dependent on tourism, which can fluctuate dramatically. The downtown area must also satisfy the intense parking demand of all of those visitors. Altair will provide up to 1,750 new homes for a range of household sizes, income and demographics. The homes of Altair will be a pedestrian -oriented community within walking or cycling distance of Old Town. The dense design will attract residents looking for an urban lifestyle, a demographic that tends to patronize the type of restaurants and shops already in Old Town. These residents will broaden and stabilize the consumer base for Old Town businesses. Altair also provides public amenities close to Old Town. A central park, plazas, play field and an elementary school are proposed. A new Western Bypass links Temecula Parkway with Rancho California Road, an important public benefit to alleviate traffic congestion in Old Town. Altair's attractive trails, vistas and parks will add to and diversify the tourism market of the vicinity. 2.2 Smart Growth "Smart growth" is a collection of land use and development principles that aim to enhance our quality of life, preserve the natural environment, and save public funds over time through efficient utilization of infrastructure. Smart growth principles ensure that growth is fiscally, environmentally and socially responsible and recognizes the connections between urban development and quality of life. Smart growth enhances and completes communities by placing priority on infill, redevelopment, and densification strategies. The Altair Specific Plan is founded in the philosophy of smart growth. The following is a summary of 10 smart growth principles and how the Altair project embodies each. iSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 2-1 INTRODUCTION 2 - Pr 10 Smart Growth Principles! 1. Mix Land Uses Each neighborhood has a balanced mixture of homes, retail, business, and recreational opportunities to stimulate vitality throughout the day. A. The Altair Specific Plan meets this principle by providing a mix of housing types and active open space in an area of the City currently dominated by commercial uses. B. Old Town is the shopping and nightlife center of Temecula. However, it is separated from the existing housing base east of 1-15, the majority of which is suburban in nature, predominantly single-family homes dependent on vehicular circulation. Altair introduces urban housing adjacent to Old Town to form a larger community integrating a mix of mutually supportive uses. 2. Build well-designed compact neighborhoods. Residents can choose to live, work, shop and play in close proximity. People can easily access daily activities, transit is viable, and local businesses are supported. A. Altair is inherently compact and walkable due to the size, scale and density of the development. Figure 4-1 of this Specific Plan overlays 1/4 mile walking radius on the project map to demonstrate ease of access to Old Town and other parts of the community without driving. B. Safety— landscaping, lighting and visibility are considered and integrated into the design. C. Eyes on the street - dense communities with buildings that face circulation routes and public spaces have many observers to deter crime or notice someone in trouble. D. Livability — each unit has access to private and public open space. Functional needs, such as parking and trash service, are fully considered and accommodated with no negative impacts on the neighborhood. E. Environmental design — homes and open spaces have shade and shelter from the wind. Stormwater is treated and contained to prevent flooding. 3. Provide a variety of transportation choices. Neighborhoods are attractive and have safe infrastructure for walking, cycling and transit, in addition to driving. A. The Altair plan focuses on walking and cycling for both transportation and recreation. Residents walk between villages, to parks, to the neighborhood elementary school, nearby Old Town, and can access a regional trail system. B. Altair features complete streets, that equally accommodate pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and transit riders of all ages and abilities. Complete streets support social interaction and neighborhood vitality beyond the simple need for circulation. C. A potential shuttle route has been coordinated with RTA to connect with the bus system. D. A variety of bike lanes and trails, from sharrows to Class !trails, are provided to match different cycling modes. E. A true walkable neighborhood like Altair results in physical and social public health benefits. Residents are more fit, interact more with their neighbors and breathe cleaner air. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK 2 INTRODUCTION 4. Create diverse housing opportunities. People in different family types, life stages and income levels can afford a home in the neighborhood of their choice. A. The Altair development is very different from the rest of the City, especially east of the freeway, which is characterized by single family housing interspersed with shopping centers and few apartments. B. At Altair, housing is available for all stages of life. Housing types range from micro -units and apartments to rowhouses to detached housing on small lots. Development parcels are small and in close proximity to encourage a mix of people of different ages and lifestyles. C. The Elementary School site will serve younger families. D. The zoning allows day care, either in homes or day care centers, to support young families and provide opportunities for employment. E. Senior housing is encouraged. More importantly, Altair strives to provide communal resources, flexible housing and a supportive neighborhood that allows inhabitants to age in their own homes. 5. Preserve open spaces, natural beauty, and environmentally sensitive areas. Development respects natural landscape features and has a higher aesthetic, environmental, social and financial value. A. Altair preserves over 68 acres of the existing hillside west of Old Town as MSHCP corridor. The Western Bypass Corridor alignment has been revised from previous designs to achieve this significant conservation land, an increase from the land conserved by the prior alignment. This hillside is a critical viewshed seen from Old Town, the freeway and surrounding neighborhoods. B. Additionally, Altair conserves almost 35 acres of land containing native oak trees at the south end of the site. C. Altair features active and passive recreation parks in each village to form a "string of pearls". The main park at Village C is directly visible from Old Town along Main Street, so that the visual link is to open space. D. Altair protects Temecula's green infrastructure, which is as important to the health, happiness and welfare of its residents as roads and utilities. E. Altair sustains the region's shade trees and urban forests, the organic plant and soil materials that filter our water and air, attenuate noise, ease wind, prevent erosion and flood damage, and moderate temperatures. F. Bio-swales and stormwater retention basins are designed to look natural, and are not fenced -off detention ponds. /SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 2-3 INTRODUCTION 2 - - 6. Urban design is important. Site plan trumps architecture, meaning the basic arrangement of the building on the site is far more important than the exterior appearance and "envelope" of the structure. There are three rules of urban design which when combined result in well designed compact neighborhoods: A. Require build -to lines. As opposed to setbacks that establish areas where a building cannot be constructed, build -to lines specify where a building is to be built on the lot. Establishing build -to lines can facilitate a sense of enclosure, and provide a method of creating visually interesting, pedestrian -oriented streetscapes by arranging buildings and entrances to the front of lots. B. Make the building front "permeable" (i.e., no blank walls) and building entrances easily identifiable. Whether commercial or residential, patios, porches, windows and doors are important to activate the street, create pedestrian scale and define public and private space. It is never appropriate to have a blank facade or sidewall along a pedestrian thoroughfare, regardless of topography. All buildings respect this principle and front on Altair Vista. C. Prohibit parking Tots in front of buildings. Pedestrian -oriented neighborhoods start with the location of the parking lot. In an urban village, there are no parking lots along the street front. While parking lots are a necessity, on-site parking should be located below, behind through an alley, or behind from a street, and buildings should be placed at or near the sidewalk. Pedestrians interact with building facades, not cars. While site plan trumps architecture, building height, massing, and materials are all extremely important and should be designed to have a lasting permanence, both programmatically and materially. 7. Foster a unique neighborhood identity. Each community is unique, vibrant, diverse, and inclusive. A. Rooftop patios and balconies take advantage of spectacular views overlooking the City, and help define the unique character of Altair. B. The clubhouse has portions open to the public, including a large terrace overlooking a central park, which helps create synergy between Old Town and Altair. C. Public art is strategically located throughout Altair and helps to define place. D. "Hidden treasures" - utilitarian components treated in creative and fun ways - are woven throughout the community, such as messages or footprints in concrete, painted utility boxes, wayfinding or informational signage, creative bike racks, etc. E. Spaces under bridges are decorated or landscaped to discourage graffiti. F. Design guidelines and regulations are flexible to encourage design ingenuity and allow neighborhoods to express their own November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANE 2 INTRODUCTION distinct ideas of beauty and form. This means that rigidly historical styles are not imposed. G. Strong neighborhood identity increases a sense of ownership and belonging, resulting in better maintained communities, less turnover and higher property values. 8. Direct development toward existing communities with urban infrastructure. Avoid the physical impact and high cost of new infrastructure associated with suburban development by building adjacent to existing infrastructure. A. The Altair development is a logical and efficient extension of existing gray infrastructure—streets, storm sewer, sanitary sewer, water, cable, gas, electric - and essentially defines the southwestern edge of the City. 8. The project provides much needed infrastructure, in the Western Bypass and bridge over Murrieta Creek, to ease existing traffic congestion. Old Town, in particular, will have less vehicular through - traffic and will therefore be more pedestrian -friendly as a result of these improvements. C. Technology — wireless communications, cell towers, satellite, street lights - will be thoughtfully considered and planned into the design to promote modernization with little impact. D. Solar energy opportunities exist. 9. Nurture engaged citizens. Places belong to those who live, work, and play in them. Engaged citizens participate in community life and decision-making. A. People are more aware of social opportunities when they are discovered in the course of daily activities. The centrally located community center overlooking a central park in close proximity to the elementary school, City Hall, museum, theater, Children's Museum, shopping, and special events in Old Town create a synergy that will help to promote civic engagement. B. The site zoned for civic use lies in close proximity to the 1-15 interchange and serves as an anchor to Altair and Old Town. 10. Make Development Decisions Predictable, Fair, and Cost Effective. For a community to be successful in implementing smart growth, its vision, objectives, and actions must be embraced by the private sector. Local governments must make an effort to make development decisions that support innovation in a more timely, cost effective, and predictable way that is mutually beneficial to the City and its residents, and to developers. A. The Altair Project includes a General Plan Amendment, Tentative Map, Specific Plan, Development Agreement, Environmental Impact Report (EIR), and Fiscal Impact Analysis. The resulting documents and associated Conditions of Approval will provide clear direction for preservation of natural resources, development processing requirements, timing of infrastructure improvements, and mitigation of impacts. Sources: Getting to Smart Growth: 100 Policies for Implementation (ICMA.org) City Comforts: How to Build an Urban Village (David Sucher) 10 Smart Growth Principles (www.smartgrowth.bc.ca) Il3iLPECIFIC PL November 2017 2-5 INTRODUCTION 2 2.3 Site The Altair Specific Plan area encompasses 270 acres west of Old Town and Murrieta Creek within the City of Temecula in Riverside County in southern California. The City limits form the western edge of the property- The subject land area is comprised of two portions: the majority 215 acres and a non-contiguous 55 -acre site to the south that is designated for a use benefitting the public, predominantly through conservation. The site slopes dramatically, offering striking views from vantage points on the site as well as providing a visual backdrop to Old Town. A substantial portion of the site will be added to the wildlife corridor established under the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) and will, therefore, be maintained in a natural state. Riverside 1iprNePn Ve,M Srcaerxe Cenyo�, Watlerneae P r► Lake Mathews eij • Lake Mathews Estelle Mountain Reserve Santiago Peak • Ronald W. Caspers Wtkdernes Park 60 Yucaipa Upland Game Iru, aro Area Mystic Lake Lake Peau 51N Recreaeon Ames leerns Reservoir /lien Hee • Canyon L ake Lake �1 Elsinore Murrieta Doheny State Park Santa Rosa Plateau Rearhi girls Raei HUI ,t Alea Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve Camp Pendleton Capistrano Pa Oceanside Winchester Mai 0 0 San Bernadino National Forest Hemet Diamond Valley Lake Or Skinner Reservoir *Vali Lake 79 Cleveland National Forest 0 BI Canyon CO Mt. San Jacinto Morongo Preserve Palm Springs Idyltwild County Park San Bernadino National Forest Palomar /Amnion Pram, taoic.m • Sun Pat Hellhole Canyon Reserve Cleveland National Forest Los Coyotes Reservation N NQvemtrer 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN/ 2 INTRODUCTION The Western Bypass proposed in the Altair Specific Plan establishes the western edge through most of the planned development and acts as a buffer and fire break between development and the MSCHP wildlife corridor, providing a clear line of distinction between urban civilization and natural habitat. The alignment of the Western Bypass Corridor is determined by several factors. It's southern end is anchored by the approved and permitted design of the bridge over Murrieta Creek that will connect the Bypass to Temecula Parkway (SR -79) and planned interchange improvements at Interstate 15. The position of this bridge also constrains the curve and slope of the Bypass as it climbs above the proposed development. The bridge, improved interchange and high visibility from Interstate 15 make the 55 -acre portion of the site south of the Bypass ideally suited for civic or visitor uses, offering direct access to Interstate 15 and Temecula Parkway. The potentially higher traffic volumes associated with these uses are, therefore, separated from the main community, maintaining its safe, walkable character. A civic use at the south parcel will be an anchor to Altair and Old Town due to its function, visible location, and history. This proposed civic site is proximate to the Temeku Village Site where the Luiseno Native Americans originally settled. A facility to pay respect to the Traditional Cultural Place (TCP) and Origin Area, in partnership with the Pechanga Tribal Council, is one possible use for the civic site or a portion thereof. The north end of the Bypass is controlled by the existing alignment of Vincent Moraga Drive, which will become the link to Rancho California Road. A previous plan extended the Bypass further to the north and west, crossing Rancho California Road with a flyover bridge. Traffic studies did not support the high cost of this approach or it's impact to natural habitat. The revised alignment preserves more habitat corridor, specifically Linkage 10 of the MSHCP. Access points off the Western Bypass are restricted, allowing only two vehicular entries into the project from the Bypass, at the north and south ends respectively. This separates the grading and geometry of the Bypass design from the project's internal streets and allows for the most efficient bypass alignment, with less impact to existing terrain. The north entry is the ideal location for the elementary school, allowing convenient pick-up and drop-off from Rancho California Road and the Bypass with minimal disruption to the Altair neighborhood. The east entry to Altair is via Coromell Trail from First Street. This will be the most direct vehicular route to Old Town Temecula. The First Street entry allows Coromell Trail the necessary length to negotiate the grade up to Altair Vista. A vehicular connection at Main Street is not possible, given the topographical constraints of the site, However, direct pedestrian connectivity to Old Town is provided, indeed celebrated, with a grand staircase and plaza at the west end of Main Street. The Main Street axis extends into Altair through the community's focal park and terminates at a plaza and second set of grand steps with seating framed by the recreation center and clubhouse. This axis aligns with Temecula's Civic Center, Town Square and Main Street Bridge. Benefitting from the topography, the park and clubhouse will be visible from Old Town, and the club house terrace will look out onto the park, town and hills beyond. The sloping park lends itself to a natural ampitheater where the public may relax and enjoy the view. Because of this vantage point, a destination restaurant or event facility may possibly be located in the clubhouse. =fffil SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 INTRODUCTION 2 City Limits Highways Roads Figure 2-2 Nov.mbsr 2017 N SPECIFIC PLANT/ 1 2 INTRODUCTION 2.4 Design Concept Altair consists of several neighborhood "villages", each centered on a node or focal point and separated by landscaped terrain. The open space between the villages mimics the existing ravines extending from the hillside above and preserves the sculptural quality of the site. It is the character of the node that gives identity to each village. These public spaces are shared outdoor rooms, typically a plaza or park, that function as the "living room" of each neighborhood. View opportunities from these common spaces are featured. The edges of the villages are less important. There are no high walls or entry monuments. None of the communities at Altair are gated. One should feel as if they have arrived at the center, not entered through a boundary. The village nodes are linked by a main north -south road, Altair Vista, and by a network of pedestrian and bicycle paths, a "string of pearls". This concept provides cohesion to a very linearsite while conserving much of the existing land forms, allowing similar drainage patterns and maintaining views to the hillside above. There is a hierarchy to the scale and character of the neighborhoods reflecting their environment and location within the overall scheme. The primary village occupies an existing promontory with views to and from Old Town. This neighborhood encompasses a Targe park and features a community center at the high point, directly on axis with Main Street and Temecula City Hall. A pedestrian path allows direct access to Main Street. This primary village is higher in density and scale with buildings potentially up to five stories in height. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 2-9 INTRODUCTION 2 co Yo 4774, atl HIc` d .. 4, CIVIC Center IIIII* View to Open Space Gully Altair Vista Natural Open Space November 2017 0 300' 600' N 1200' SCALE: 1' 1200' -0 - SPECIFIC PLANIL Ra� 1 t d �.d tt° Grand Staircase Civic Center O tree:0 UN First Street • 4` Pedestnan Promenade rc_ccecn Ili SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 2 INTRODUCTION • • +> Visual Axis Park/Open Space Altair Vista Natural Open Space 0 300' 600' 1200' INTRODUCTION 2 11111 Panoramic View 411111 View Up to Open Space/Ridge Park/Open Space Altair Vista Natural Open Space November 2017 0 300. 600' N 1200' SPECIFIC PLANFJf 2 INTRODUCTION The village centers are linked by a primary north -south road, Altair Vista, and by a network of pedestrian and bicycle trails, forming a "string of pearls". The experience when traveling along the string is a rhythm of intensity followed by release, just as a well-designed series of interior spaces will play upon volumetric compression and expansion between rooms. The enfilade arrangement of the villages, where one leads to the next, is critical to the spirit of Altair. By passing through each village, residents understand the community as a whole, the personalities of different neighborhoods, and what makes their own village unique. die 4 - Figure 2-6 Outdoor Rooms Linked Enfilade Each village node has an open space with a vantage point unique to its geographic and topographic location. These views combine with the design, function and materials of the open space and the buildings framing it to imbue each village with its distinct character. Artwork, special activities or events add to the individuality of a village. =Iffg SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 2-13 INTRODUCTION 2 Altair Vista, the principal roadway linking the villages, is designed in straight segments that hinge at each village node. This arrangement brings focus to the nodes at the same time that it creates a sequence of unfolding events from village to village. Important to this progression are the exterior spaces formed by the buildings framing the nodes. These spaces serve as outdoor "rooms" for community gathering and neighborhood identity. To extend the analogy, the more narrowly framed sections of Altair Vista between nodes serve as corridors and the ravines separating villages are like natural, diaphonous walls. The buildings framing the outdoor rooms and corridors are, therefore, extremely important to the overall design concept for Altair. Setbacks are minimized and build -to lines are mandated in this Plan in order to create a strong and consistent building edge that clearly defines the outdoor spaces between. In a " November 2017 SPEC',FIC PLAf 2.5 Land Use 2 INTRODUCTION The predominant land use at Altair is residential, consisting of multifamily, attached and detached housing types. Housing types are further defined in Sections 10.10-10.20. Densities range from 4 to 33 dwelling units per net acre, with the higher densities at the village nodes, in the primary village and at the north end of the property. Development will be phased, achieving 870 to 1,750 dwelling units at full build -out. A Community Center to include a recreation center and clubhouse is provided for residents. Some ancillary retail or restaurant space may be included, depending on market demand, as well as a limited number of live/work units located within certain village centers, where street frontage lends itself to ground floor business storefronts. Commercial and live/work uses are allowed in all residential and mixed-use zones with a limit on the total area of such uses in Altair, as described in Table 3-1. An approximate 7 -acre site is set aside for an elementary school and playfield. The school site is located adjacent to the recreation center and near the main park to facilitate shared parking and common amenities. The separate 55 -acre property to the south, referred to as the Civic Site in this Plan, provides the opportunity for a public amenity or tourism use for the City of Temecula to promote its culture and its connection to nature. Possible uses include a nature center with cultural and/or environmental sustainability exhibits. The existing oak tree groves at the west side of the Civic Site will be preserved for their ecological and historical significance. Land Use is discussed in further detail in Section 3. SPECIFIC PLAN Novombor 2017 INTRODUCTION 2 November 2017 SPECIFIC °LAN 2 INTRODUCTION 2.6 Relationship to the General Plan The City of Temecula General Plan presents a Vision for the Future that creates and maintains a "strong business community, quality housing stock, scenic open space, and cultural amenities" to support a "positive community identity". The Altair Specific Plan aligns with this vision by increasing and diversifying housing choices in close proximity to the existing business and mercantile community of Old Town. The Specific Plan also preserves open space and provides park and civic amenities for use by residents and the surrounding community. The General Plan is organized into elements addressing key City planning issues. Each element lists goals and policies to achieve those goals. The Altair Plan supports many of these policies, as described below. The Land Use Element of the General Plan designates certain specific plan areas to establish policies, planning guidelines and implementation strategies for those segments of the City. The Altair development area is already anticipated in the General Plan as Specific Plan Area SP -8 Westside/ Villages at Old Town. The identified Plan Area Objectives are; "To provide complimentary land uses to Old Town that increase the vitality of the area; to increase the range of housing opportunities west of 1-15; and to encourage sensitive site and building design given the topography of the area." =NM SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 2-18 INTRODUCTION 2 The Altair Specific Plan is consistent with these objectives. The Plan provides a range of multifamily and detached housing types within walking distance of Old Town that will result in a vibrant combination of uses for the aggregate planning areas. The Plan respects existing topography and embraces existing scenic vistas as focal points for the community. The Altair Specific Plan satisfies two of the four implementation measures listed in LU -22 of the Land Use Element Implementation Program: • "Providing infill residential opportunities within the area and the adjacent Westside Specific Plan to create o nighttime population for the area. • Locating additional public and community facilities within and surrounding the Old Town area." The Circulation_EIement of the General Plan presents several measures to improve mobility in the Temecula region. One of these measures is the Temecula Five Year Capital Improvement Program, which lists multiple projects, including a "Western Bypass Corridor from SR -79 South to French Valley Parkway." The Western Bypass will help to satisfy a major goal of the Circulation Element: Goal 2 A regional transportation system that accommodates the safe and efficient movement of people and goods to and from the community. Policy 2.2 Develop o bypass system of roadways on the east, west and south sides of the City to accommodate traffic flow from development outside the City and improve center -of -town traffic conditions. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN : i 2 INTRODUCTION A significant portion of the Western Bypass project is accomplished in the Altair Specific Plan, connecting SR -79 (Temecula Parkway) to Rancho California Road via Vincent Moraga Drive. This proposed route differs from the bypass route shown in the Roadway Plan (Figure C-2 of the General Plan). The advantages of the proposed route are discussed further in Section 4 of this document. The Western Bypass route will be revised through a General Plan amendment, concurrent with the adoption of this specific plan. Goal 3 An efficient City circulation system through the use of transportation system management and travel demand management strategies. Policy 3.3 Provide a comprehensive system of Class 1 and/or Class!! bicycle lanes to meet the needs of cyclists traveling to and from work and other destinations within the City. Goal 5 Sofe and efficient alternatives to motorized travel throughout the City. Policy 5.1 Promote pedestrian and bicycle sofety by adhering to uniform trail standards and communicating safety practices to the public. Policy 5.3 Ensure the accessibility of pedestrian facilities to the elderly and disabled. Policy 5.4 Provide o comprehensive network of multi -use trails and bikeways between residential areas and commercial/ employment activity centers, public institutions, and recreation areas. The Temecula Multi -Use Trails and Bikeways Master Plan was developed to advance these policies. Altair is designed as a pedestrian -oriented community with its own system of trails and bikeways that will complement and tie into the citywide system and master plan. The trail system is discussed further in Section 4 of this specific plan. The Housing Element explains that single-family detached houses represent 80% of the existing housing stock in Temecula. A greater range of housing types is needed. Goal 1 Provide a diversity of housing opportunities that satisfy the physical, social, and economic needs of existing and future residents of Temecula. Policy 1.1 Encourage residential development that provides a ronge of housing types in terms of cost, density and type, and provides the opportunity for local residents to live and work in the same community by boloncing jobs and housing types. i�iri SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 zLe 2-20 INTRODUCTION 2 Policy 1.3 Require o mixture of diverse housing types and densities in new developments around the village centers to enhance their people orientation and diversity. Policy 1.4 Support the use of innovative site planning and architectural design in residential development. Policy 1.5 Encourage the use of clustered development to preserve and enhance important environmental resources and open space, consistent with sustainability principles. The Land Use section of this specific plan describes the diversity of residential types and the concentration of densities at village nodes and plazas. Development is predominantly east of the Western Bypass, preserving the western portion of the property as natural open space. The Open $pace and Conservation Elainefit of the General Plan addresses both the need for active parks and recreational space for residents and conservation of natural open space to protect wildlife and resources. Goal 1 A high quality parks and recreation system that meets the diverse recreation needs of residents. Policy 1.1 Ensure sufficient parkland and recreation facilities to support new development through acquisition and/or dedication thot meets the requirement for 5 acres of useable park land per 1,000 population. Policy 1.5 Coordinate long-range pork, trail and open space planning with Riverside County and the City of Murrieta. Policy 1.6 Encourage the establishment of natural habitat spaces for recreotionol hiking and nature education. The neighborhoods at Altair are designed around village greens and parks that serve as focal points identifying each village. These urban green spaces are then linked by a system of pedestrian walkways and trails across open space — a "string of pearls". The core village is developed around a large central park linked to Main Street in Old Town Temecula, both visually and via a pedestrian path. The proposed nature center at the civic site will conserve open space, add trails and educate the public about the natural environment in Temecula. An historic stand of oak trees will be preserved, as will open space views to this parcel from the Temeku Village Site. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN Goal 2 Conservation and protection of surface water, groundwater and imported water resources. 2 INTRODUCTION The Altair Specific Plan is consistent with the many General Plan policies aimed at achieving this goal. Water conservation and protection strategies are detailed in the Drainage Plan and Water Plan portions of Section 6, as well as in the Landscape Guidelines in Section 10. Goal 3 Conservation of important biological habitats and protection of plant and animal species of concern, wildlife movement corridors and general biodiversity. Policy 3.3 Coordinate with the County of Riverside and other relevant agencies in the adoption and implementation of the Riverside County Multi -Species Habitat Conservation Plan. Policy 3.4 Encourage developers to incorporate native drought -resistant vegetation, mature trees, and other significant vegetation into site and landscape designs for proposed projects. Goal 5 Conservation of open space areas for a balance of recreation, scenic enjoyment, and protection of natural resources and features. Policy 5.1 Conserve the western escarpment ..._ and other important landforms and historic landscape features through the development review process. Policy 5.13 Utilize natural, undeveloped greenbelts as buffers between developments and on outskirts of the City to preserve the rural and unique character of Temecula. Portions of the Altair site lie within Proposed Linkage 10 in the Southwest Region of the MSHCP Plan Area. This linkage is intended to provide both "live-in habitat" for various species and a movement corridor connecting the Santa Margarita and the Santa Rosa Plateau Ecological Reserves. The proposed Western Bypass as well as roads at the north and south ends of the site will serve as a buffer between development and the Linkage. Edge treatment along these roads will be developed through the environmental review process with input from Riverside County and MSHCP stakeholders. The Linkage conserves the ridgeline and escarpment west of Old Town and includes the highest elevations of the Altair property. l/ SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 2-21 INTRODUCTION 2 The Growth_tilanagement / Public Facilities Element seeks to ensure that growth in the City occurs in such a manner that services may be provided efficiently and adequately. Goal 2 Orderly and efficient patterns of growth that enhance quality of life for Temecula residents. The proximity of Altair to Old Town Temecula lends efficiency to the project and City since the facilities needed to serve the land uses are close by. The location eliminates the need to install and maintain long utility distribution mains. In addition, on site facilities such as the school and parks can serve the surrounding neighborhood. Goa! 4 A quality school system with adequate facilities and funding to educate the youth of Temecula. Policy 4.4 Coordinate with the School District to provide safe access for school children walking, bicycling, or driving to and from school sites. Policy 4.5 Pursue the establishment of a trade school, a junior college, and/ora four-year college that offers education required by the engineering, biotechnical and biomedical industries locoted in Temecula. Policy 4.6 Plan for the joint use of school/municipol focilities wherever feasible and desirable, including: school grounds, buildings, City parks, mufti -purpose buildings, and recreation facilities. Altair includes a site of approximately 7 acres for a public elementary school and playfield to be built by the Temecula Valley Unified School District. The school site is near the main park and community center Opportunities for shared use of school and community facilities will be pursued with the School District. The Civic Site also has the potential to be developed as a nature center, which could include an educational program. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN r%% - 2 INTRODUCTION The Air Quality Element strives to improve regional air quality through better land planning, reduction of automobile emissions and energy conservation. Goal 2 Improve air quality through effective land use planning in Temecula. Policy 2.2 Encourage infill development near activity centers, within Mixed Use Overlay Areas, and along transportation corridors. Goal 3 Enhance mobility to minimize air pollutant emissions. Policy 3.4 Establish a convenient and efficient system of bicycle routes and pedestrian walkways. Altair is a walkable community connected with pedestrian and bicycle trails to the employment, shopping and entertainment activities of Old Town Temecula. Both the location and design of the project will give residents a choice other than automotive transportation. The Community Design Element proposes to enhance the City's image through quality design that strengthens Temecula's many assets. Goal 2 Design excellence in site planning, architecture, landscape architecture and signs. Goal 4 A streetscape system that provides cohesiveness and enhonces community image. Goal 5 Protection of public views of significant natural features. Goal 7 Community gathering areas which provide for the social, civic, cultural and recreational needs of the community. Altair is a comprehensive plan that strongly integrates landscape design with the planning and architectural concept. The overlay of the trail system and streetscapes with communal open spaces highlighting major vistas results in a composition that engages the surrounding context and natural beauty of the region. %ori SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 INTRODUCTION 2 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN n 3 LAND USE 3.1 Summary LAND USE O1��Ail' The Altair Specific Plan depicts a 270 -acre community of primarily residential development with supporting civic uses and open space. It presents an urban lifestyle in its density, convenience of activities and close relationship to the shopping, dining and entertainment venues of Old Town Temecula. Altair is intended to house multiple demographics, spanning age groups and household types. A dominant pedestrian network linking active open spaces encourages interaction amongst these diverse residents. Due to the property's shape and location, the Altair Specific Plan area is physically and conceptually divided into three main parts. To the south is a 55 -acre area that is separated from the remaining site by a parcel under ownership of the Metropolitan Water District. The location of the original Luiseno Native American settlement, the Temeku Village Site is immediately adjacent to the south. The parcel also lies within the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan {MSHCP) corridor, discussed in more detail in Section 8 of this Specific Plan, and supports an existing stand of oak trees. Because of these significant cultural and biological considerations, the southern parcel is mostly reserved as open space. The remaining area of approximately 13 acres is intended for civic or community use that will provide opportunities for environmental and/or cultural education, recreation trails benefitting the public, and that will promote civic pride and engagement. Possible uses include a nature center or visitor center. The remaining 215 -acre parcel is bifurcated by the Western Bypass road that carries through - traffic around Old Town Temecula. To the west of this road is predominantly natural open space that is a component of the Proposed Linkage 10 of the MSHCP (discussed in Section 8.1). Only two small residential components lie west of the Bypass, villages A and G. The area east of the Bypass is developed with the most density. Uses are mainly residential with supporting civic and community uses (including a school) and interstitial and active open space. These residential uses are described in the following Community Design narrative and in the village descriptions that follow. All residential uses allow a small amount of accessory commercial use to support the neighborhood. These might be a corner coffee shop, ice cream parlor or live/work units with ground floor offices. Accessory commercial uses shall be at street level near village cores. TAHI F 3-1 describes the acreage and density of each land use. FIGURE 3-2 shows the location of each use on the Altair site and FIGURE 3-3 shows zoning per parcel. .. fi SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 LAND USE 3 Natural Open Space Offsit Open Space Civic Center 215 -Acre Parcel Line Western Bypass Natural or . Revegetated Open Space •Off -Site Natural Open Space - - Property Line 55 -Acre Civic Site Parcel Line November 2017 0 300' 600' 1200 SPECIFIC PLAN iSchool Chic V !—r X Civic Site =//1 SPECIFIC PLAN Novomb r 2017 3 LAND USE .Open Space ■ Civic/Community . Residential — - - — Property Line N O LAND USE 3 Table 3-1 3-4... Z ity November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN Tract Map 4 Lot No. 2 Land Use 2 Zone _ (for Net Lot Area) Open 5 - Buildable Lots Min. Max. 1 Min. Max. 1 Upper Hillside Conservation Area Conservation Area Conservation Area Open Space Open Space Open Space Open Space Conservation Area 36959-1 36959-2 36959-3 36959-1 36959-2 36959-3 36959 36959 8 I5 20 7 18 12 7 I{ Open Space Open Space Open Space Open Space Open Space Open Space Open Space Open Space SP -NO SP -NO SP -NO SP -NO SP -NO SP -ND SP -NO SP -NO 29.37 ac 8.06 ac 8.30 ac 4.83 ac 4.60 ac 5.40 ac 4.26 ac 4.23 ac 6.18 ac 4.17 ac 2.36 ac 2.89 ac 9 - 18 D.U./ac 9 - 18 0-U./ac 9 - 18 D.U./ac 9 - 18 O.U./ac 56- 110 O.U. 38 - 75 D.U. 21- 42 D.U. 26- 52 D.U. Villages VILLAGEA 36959-1 36959-1 36959-1 36959-1 1 2 3 4 Residential Residential Residential Residential SP -R SP -R SP -R SP•R L40 - 280 Village A Subtotal (D.U.) 1 64- 128 D.U. 46- 92 D.U. VILLAGE B 36959-1 36959-1 5 6 14 13 19 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Residential Residential Mixed Use Mixed Use Open Space Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential SP -R SP -R SP -M SP -M SP -AD SP -R SP -R 50-8 SP -MR SP -R SP -R SP -R SP -R SP -R SP -R SP -R 7.24 ac 5.16 ac 9 - 18 D.U./ac 9 - 18 D.U./ac 1110 - 220 Village 8 Subtotal (D.U.) 43 - 69 D.U. 68- 109 D.U. 29 - 47 D.U. VILLAGE C: Recreation Center Clubhouse Park North Core South Core 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 36959-2 5.04 ac 1.75 ac 0.30 ac 2.37 ac 3.74 ac 1.63 ac 0.40 ac 2.53 ac 1.64 ac 1.84 ac 1.53 ac 1.30 ac 1.80 ac 2.28 ac 18 - 29 D.U./ac 18 - 29 D.U./ac 18 - 29 D.U./ac 21 - 33 D.U./ac 21 - 33 D.U./ac 21 • 33 D.U./ac 21 - 33 D.U./ac 21 - 33 D.U./ac 21 - 33 O.U./ac 21 - 33 D.U./ac 21 - 33 D.U./ac 1140 • 225 North Core Subtotal (D.U., 8- 13 D.U. 54- 84 D.U. 34- 54 D.U. 39- 61 D.U. 32- 5D D.U. 27 - 43 D.U. 38- 59 D.U. 48- 75 D.U. 1280 - 440 Scuth Core Subtotal (D.U.) 20- 45 D.U. 18- 41 D.U. 15- 35 D.U. 17- 38 D.U. VILLAGE D Park 36959-3 36959-3 36959-3 36959-3 36959-3 1 2 3 4 14 Residential Residential Residential Residential Open Space SP -R 5P -R SP -R SP -R SP -AO 0.80 ac 2.55 ac 2.32 ac 1.96 ac 2.15 ac 8 - 18 O.U./ac 8 - 18 D.U./ac 8 - 18 D.U./ac 8 - 18 D.U./ac 1 70 - 160 Village 0 Subtotal (D.U.) I 8- 22 D.U. 6- 18 D.U. 6 • 17 D.U. 13- 37 D.U. 7- 21 D.U. VILLAGE E 36959-3 36959-3 36959-3 36959-3 36959-3 5 6 7 B 9 10 11 Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential SP -R - 513-8 513-8 SP -R SP -R 1.51 ac 1.23 ac 1.17 ac 2.51 ac 1.42 ac 5 - 15 D.U./ac 5 • 15 D.U./ac 5 - 15 D.U./ac 5 - 15 D.U./ac 5 - 15 D.U./ac 1 40 - 115 Village F Subtotal (D.U.) 30- 90 D.U. 30- 90 O.U. VILLAGE F 36959-3 36959-3 Residential Residential SP -R SP -R 4.51 ac 4.52 ac 7 - 20 D.U./ac 7 - 20 O.U./ac 1 60 - 180 Village FSubtotal (D.U.) 11- 46 O.U. 19- B4 D.U. VILLAGE G 36959 36959 1 2 Residential Residential SP -R SP -R 2.50 ac 4.55 ac 4 - 18 D.U./ac 4 - 18 D.U./ac ( 30 - 130 Village 0 Subtotal (D.0 ) SUBTOTAL Table 3-1 3-4... Z ity November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN LAND USE School 3 36959-2 1 Educational SP -E SP -C SP -NO SP -NO SP -NO SP -NO SP -NO 7.07 ac 50,000 gsf 600- 730 students Civic Site Nature Center Nature Center Nature Center Nature Center Conservation Area Conservation Area 36959 36959 36959 36959 36959 36959 3 4 5 6 9 10 Civic Open Space Open Space Open Space Open Space Open Space 0.31 ac 0.12 ac 0.42 ac 34.63 ac 2.61 ac 16.13 ac 5,000 gsf Interstitial Open Space Open Space (HOA) 36959-2 15 Open Space SP -AO 4.54 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-2 16 Open Space SP -NO 0.78 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-2 17 Open Space SP -NO 0.52 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-2 20 Open Space 5P -AO 0.59 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-2 21 Open Space SP -NO 0.83 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-2 22 Open Space SP -NO 1.63 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-2 23 Open Space SP -A0 1.39 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-2 24 Open Space SP -A0 1.80 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-3 13 Open Space SP -A0 4.88 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-3 15 Open Space SP -NO 0.74 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-3 16 Open Space SP -NO 0.52 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-3 17 Open Space SP -AO 0.25 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-3 18 Open Space SP -N0 0.38 ac Open Space (HOA) 36959-3 19 Open Space SP -A0 2.64 ac rrculation 28.22 ac TOTALS 167.69 ac 107.21 ac 10 - 21. D.U./ac 870 - 1,750 TOTAL DWEWNG UNITS 269.90 ac AVERAGE Definitions: Gross Area: the total area within the lot lines of a lot or parcel of land before public streets, easements or other areas to be dedicated or reserved for public use Net Area: the gross project or lot area, less that portion of the site to be used for arterial and collector roads, public parks, and/or the floodway portion of a floodplain. For the purposes of this Specific Plan, arterial and collector roads shall include only those roads provided by the Master Builder and/or public roads owned by the City of Temecula. terstltial Open Space: non -developable area installed by the Master Developer including fixed slope banks and retaining walls, floodways and drainage basins, utility easements, the Class 1 bikeway, the Western Bypass and Street 1. D.U.: dwelling unit Notes: 1, Maximum density and Intensity within a village may be increased by the transfer of unused development intensity (D.U.) from one village to another, but the total number of dwelling units in the Altair Specific Plan shall not exceed 2. Commercial and live/work uses are allowed in residential and mixed use designations, but the total amount of commercial space in the Altair Specific Plan shall not exceed 22,000 square feet. See zoning regulations and Table 10-1 for permitted uses. 3. If the School District does not use the site, residential uses are permitted on this lot as described in Section 3.12. 4. Lot numbers indicated here correspond to the lot numbers in Tentative Tract Map 36959 and 36959-1, 2 and 3. SP - SPECIFIC PLAN NO - NATURAL OPEN SPACE AO - ACTIVE OPEN SPACE R - RESIDENTIAL ZONE M - MIXED USE MR- MIXED USE / RESIDENTIAL E - EDUCATIONAL ZONE C - CIVIC ZONE Ji -SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-5 LANG USE 3 ZONING MAP LEGEND _ SP -AO Active Open Space Q SP -NO Natural Open Space SP -R Residential Zone SP -M Mixed -Use SP -MR Mixed -Use/ Residential SP -E Educational SP -C Civic I 1 1.111111111111111 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN%1f 3.2 Relationship of Land Uses to Zoning Adoption of the Altair Specific Plan is a rezone of the plan area. The City of Temecula Zoning Map will be amended to reflect the new Specific Plan zone. Development regulations for this zone are defined in this specific plan in Section 10 Development Standards and in Section 11.1, Regulations that Implement the Specific Plan. 3.3 Open Space A significant portion of the Altair plan area is open space, both natural and active. It is the interstitial and boundary open spaces, as well as topographic forms, that give shape to the villages. And it is active open space, in the form of plazas, parks, greens and community gardens, that distinguish and define the villages and civic places. The open space and recreation concept and standards forAltairare discussed in further detail in Section 8 of this specific plan. The Village outlines following in this section describe village nodes and other open space within each village. Requirements and guidelines for common and private open space within private developments are included in the Building Types subsection of Section 10, Development Standards 3.4 Altair Villages Altair is a community of villages arranged to promote an active and socially connected lifestyle. There are seven residential Villages at Altair, labeled A through G, in addition to the sites for the school and civic uses. Descriptions, locations and standards for each village, the school site and the Civic Site are provided in the following pages. L SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 Novembir 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN!I 3.5 Village A r;ri . Villages A and B comprise the northernmost development area and function as a pair to frame the north entrance to Altair via the Western Bypass. The two villages are divided by the Western Bypass Corridor, but are visually engaged over the bypass. The villages occupy previously graded pads resembling plateaus that are approximately at the same elevation and above the depressed bypass road. Therefore, they have a strong visual connection over and across the bypass. They are also similar in character, defined by a higher density and scale of massing. Each village is arranged around a formal green. Village B is discussed in further detail in Section 3.6. Because it is west of the Bypass, Village A has a closer relationship with the natural open space of the MSHCP corridor. The road accessing the village is located between the open space and development to minimize wildlife encroachment into yards or other conflicts. Due to site contours and edge conditions, the outline of Village A creates a narrower "panhandle" shape at the north end. This north section of the village is better suited to lower scale development, such as rowhomes, multiplexes or clustered detached housing. The remaining bulk of the village should be higher scale multifamily development framing the central green. J 5PECIFIC PLAN November 2017 LAND USE 3 BOUNDARIES: Open space for MSHCP corridor to the west and south, Western Bypass to the east, Ridge Park Drive and adjacent properties to the north. SIZE: Approximately 15.6 gross acres. Pad size may vary through implementation of retaining walls and/ or stepped foundation systems. Secondary Access Connecting road / / - Anal route to be determined / / Residential Primary Access Altair Vista 11 11 11 11110 CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANE 3 LAND USE ACCESS: Main entry is at the southeast corner from the Western Bypass. Secondary access is at the north end directly from Ridge Park Drive. Two points of vehicular fire access must be provided for each village area that has 35 dwelling units or more. The road connecting these two entries serves as an edge between development and open space for the MSHCP corridor. Pedestrian and bicycle routes parallel the vehicular path. DWELLING UNITS: See Table 3-1 Pedestrian Crosswalk Altair Vista To Class 1 Trail . SPECIFIC PLAN Pede$trihn, ,circAtiolt, V' CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 LAND USE 3 ALLOWABLE BUILDING TYPES: The following building types are allowed in Village A. See Section 10.10 for definitions and standards of each building type. Lower density uses, such as Detached Housing should be focused toward the north end of this village, with higher scale framing the urban park. Detached Housing Multiplex Rowhouses Live / Work Micro Units Multifamily Walk -Up Multifamily Podium Community Buildings BUILDING FRONTAGE: Buildings should front on the park and other open space, boundary road and secondary streets. Additional frontages may be provided along landscaped paseos, mews or courts. See Figure 9-2. BUILDING SETBACK: Setbacks are required only at the designated streets and at village boundaries. There are no setback requirements at interior lot lines, streets or alleys within the village limits. See Sections10.4 for further explanation of setbacks and yards. From Internal Streets: From Western Bypass ROW: From Ridge Park Drive ROW: 3 ft. min. 20 ft. min. 20 ft. min. 10 ft. max. No maximum No maximum ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT: 2-5 stories. See Table 10-2. DRIVEWAY AND SECONDARY STREET STANDARDS: 1. A one-way loop road or couplet, similar to Figures 4-25 and 4-26 should be provide around the Village A park. 2. A parkway and sidewalk shall be provided on the east side only of the boundary road between the development and the natural open space (MSHCP). Walkways are discouraged adjacent to the MSHCP. 3. Shared driveways are encouraged wherever possible. 4. Driveways on the same side of a street shall be separated by 50 feet to centerline, except at rowhomes. 5. Driveways at rowhomes should be paired to allow more landscaped area between driveway pairs. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN PARKING STANDARDS: 1. Parallel parking shall be provided on the east side only of the boundary road between the development and the open space. 2. Parallel parking shall be provided on one side only of the one-way loop road around the park. 3. Parallel or diagonal on -street parking is encouraged on one or both sides of internal secondary streets. 4. Parallel or diagonal on -street parking is primarily for visitors, guests and overflow parking at night. 5. Required off-street parking shall comply with Section 10.7 and Table 10-3 and will predominantly be provided in private and shared garages. 6. Additional parking shall be located within the developable area. See Sections 9 and 10.7 for standards. 7. Parking lots shall not be visible from the park or surrounding open space. or from the Boundary Road.Easement. APPLICABLE PROJECT STANDARDS: Table 3-1 Land Use Zones and Development Intensity 4 Circulation Plan 5 Grading Plan 6 Infrastructure and Utilities Plan 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan 9 Design Guidelines 10 Development Standards 11 Implementation Plan GRADING STANDARDS: Village A occupies land that has been substantially graded to form a generally flat pad at the foot of the western slope that is significantly higher than the Western Bypass or Ridge Park Drive to the east. Grade changes within the pad area will be resolved in the park and open spaces between building types. The pad narrows at the north end, but the buildable area can be expanded with a sloped site and smaller, stepped buildings. This can be accomplished by placing rear garages at different levels from street entries, sloping interstitial landscape areas and terracing private patios. See Section 9.7 for standards regarding slopes and retaining walls. • SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-13 Village A Park Concept The Village "A" Park, FIGURE 3-7, is a long linear park space allowing a large lawn area for general purpose passive sports and play. At one end is a playground area for children, heavily shaded with trees, while the other end is a natural landscaped area with a winding path and shaded seating spots. A planted parkway or low wall provides a buffer from vehicular circulation. The northwest end opens to views of the natural hillside and ridgeline beyond. The southeast end offers a visual connection above and across the Western Bypass to Village B. Figure 3-7 Park Plan at Vi CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK( OPEN SPACE: See Section 8 for an explanation of public, common and private open space. 3 LAND USE The primary public open space is the Village A Park, an approximately 1 -acre park to be installed with the development of the village. The requirements for this park are prescribed in Table 8-2. Common open space is required for each sub -development in addition to the public park. Common open space is typically a shared amenity for the residents of that development and may be secured if necessary. Requirements are factored by building type and dwelling unit quantity, as defined in Section 10. Smaller common spaces between building groups, over parking structures and at motor courts are encouraged. Private open space requirements per dwelling unit are defined by building type in Section 10. Example of Open Space Development in Village A: Example assumes 40 detached and 170 multifamily walk-up residences are constructed, for a total of 210 dwelling units. Common Open Space: Per Table 10-4, common open space is required at the following ratios: 40 detached units x 80 sf/du = 3,200 sf of common open space 170 multifamily walk-up units x 60 sf/du = 10.200 sf of common open space 13,400 sf of common open space This can be one large common open space shared by both the detached and multifamily residents or separate spaces. A portion of the common open space requirement may be fulfilled in the primary public open space. Table 8-2 requires that 0.65 acres of the 0.95 -acre park must be open to the public. The remaining 0.3 acres (13,068 sf) may be used to satisfy a portion of the required common open space. For example, a pool and deck area of 13,000 sf could be located within the 0.95 -acre Village A Park and could be enclosed as required by code, with access limited to residents of Village A. A separate roof deck or tot lot within the multifamily development could satisfy the remaining 400 sf of required common open space. Private Open Space: May be accomplished through balconies, terraces or yards attached to each dwelling. Per Table 10-4, private open space is required at the following ratios: 40 detached units x 100% = 40 of the units require 100 sf min. of private open space 170 multifamily walk-up units x 100% = 170 of the units require 80 sf min. of private open space LANDSCAPE PALETTE: See Appendix A. Selections for park trees and accent plants should express the unique identity of Village A. See Section 10.6 for Landscape Standards. rf�itr%SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-15 LAND USE 3 Civic Center November 2917 D 300 600' 1200 SPECIFIC PLAN 3.6 Village B 3 LANG USE Village B occupies a previously graded pad and is suitable for large scale multifamily housing mirroring the building forms of Village A. The location of Village B at the north end of the property makes it a gateway site, especially as it occupies a promontory that, together with Village A, frames either side of the Western Bypass Corridor at its northerly base. Development along the edge of the plateau is favorable for views overlooking Temecula to the east. The trapezoidal outline of the plateau presents the opportunity for a triangular green or some other unique shape to distinguish this village from others. Opening the east end of the green also provides view opportunities for housing surrounding the green. Village B is next to the elementary school site making this location ideal for families with young children. Higher density is appropriate to the activity generated by a school. BOUNDARIES: Altair Vista to the west, Western Bypass Corridor to the north, adjacent properties to the east and south. SIZE: Approximately 12.4 gross acres. Pad size may vary through implementation of retaining walls and/ or stepped foundation systems. ACCESS: Entry is at the southwest corner from Altair Vista. Secondary access for emergency only is located further north near the intersection of Altair Vista with the Western Bypass. Two points of vehicular fire access must be provided for each village area that has 35 dwelling units or more. Pedestrian and bicycle routes parallel the vehicular path. DWELLING UNITS: See Table 3-1. rill SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-17 Figure 3-g1.641111111111 AM. ALLOWABLE BUILDING TYPES: The following building types are allowed in Village B. See Section 10.10 for definitions and standards of each building type. Detached Housing Micro Units Multiplex Multifamily Walk -Up Rowhouses Multifamily Podium Live / Work Community Buildings BUILDING FRONTAGE: Buildings should front on the park and on Altair Vista. Additional frontages may be provided along landscaped paseos, mews or courts. See Figure 9-2. BUILDING SETBACK: Setbacks are required only at the designated streets and at village boundaries. There are no setback requirements at interior lot lines, streets or alleys within the village limits. See Section 10.4 for further explanation of setbacks and yards. From Altair Vista Property Line: From Western Bypass ROW: At other lot lines: 3 ft. min. 20 ft. min. 0 ft. min. 10 ft. max. No maximum ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT: 2-5 stories. See Table 10-2. Secondary Fire access on! ResidentidI Altair Vista Primary Entrance CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANE1f DRIVEWAY AND SECONDARY STREET STANDARDS: 1. A one-way loop road or couplet, similar to Figures 4-25 and 4-26 should be provided around the Village B park. 2. No driveways may be located on Altair Vista, except the village access road and any required emergency access. 3. Shared driveways are encouraged wherever possible. 4. Driveways on the same side of a street shall be separated by at 50 feet to centerline, except at rowhomes. 5. Driveways at rowhomes should be paired to allow more landscaped area between the pairs. PARKING STANDARDS: 1. Parallel parking shall be provided on one side only of the one-way loop road around the park. 2. Parallel or diagonal on -street parking is encouraged on one or both sides of internal secondary streets. 3. Parallel or diagonal on -street parking is primarily for visitors, guests and overflow parking at night. 4. Required off-street parking shall comply with Section 10.7 and Table 10-3 and will predominantly be provided in private and shared garages. 5. Additional parking shall be located within the developable area. See Sections 9 and 10.7 for standards. 6. Parking lots shall not be visible from the park or surrounding open space or from Altair Vista. Class 1 Trail 4 A Residential Altair Vista School Figur10 Pedestrian Circulation - Village B CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. =MISPECIFICPLAN November 2017 Village "B" Park Concept: The flatiron shape of the Village "B" Park, FIGURE 3- 11, allows for natural open space in contemporary, geometric form. A large recreational lawn utilizes most of the space, yet there are also pockets of natural landscaped area in the corners and a children's playground. Tucked near the playground is a shaded picnic and seating area. A landscaped parkway provides a buffer from vehicular circulation. LEGEND: 1, NATURAL LANDSCAPE AREA 2. LAWN 3. SHADED SEATING i PICNIC AREA 4. PLANTED PARKWAY 5. PLAYGROUND :ICYCLE RACK Loc*noNs TO BF OETERMINEO) CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. Novimb r 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN FII APPLICABLE PROJECT STANDARDS: Table 3-1 Land Use Zones and Development Intensity 4 Circulation Plan 5 Grading Plan 6 Infrastructure and Utilities Plan 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan 9 Design Guidelines 10 Development Standards 11 Implementation Plan GRADING STANDARDS: Village B occupies land that has been substantially graded to form a generally flat plateau that is significantly higher than the Western Bypass or adjacent properties to the southeast and northeast. Grade changes within the pad area will be resolved in the park and open spaces between building types. The buildable area can be expanded with stepped buildings, by placing rear garages at different levels from street entries, sloping interstitial landscape areas and terracing private patios. See Section 9.7 for standards regarding slopes and retaining walls. OPEN SPACE: See Section 8 for an explanation of public, common and private open space. The primary public open space is the Village B Park, an approximately 0.6 acre park to be installed with the development of the village. The requirements for this park are prescribed in Table 8-2. Common open space is required for each sub -development in addition to the public park. Common open space is typically a shared amenity for the residents of that development and may be secured if necessary. Requirements are factored by building type and dwelling unit quantity, as defined in Section 10. Smaller common spaces between building groups, over parking structures and at motor courts are encouraged. Private open space requirements per dwelling unit are defined by building type in Section 10. Example of Open Space Development in Village B: Example assumes 170 multifamily walk-up residences are constructed. Common Open Space: Per Table 10-4, common open space is required at the following ratios: 170 multifamily walk-up units x 60 sf/du = 10,200 sf of common open space This can be one Targe common open space shared by all buildings or separate spaces. A portion of the common open space requirement may be fulfilled in the primary public open space. Table 8-2 requires that 0.40 acres of the 0.65 -acre park must be open to the public. The remaining 0.25 acres (10,890 sf) may be used to satisfy a portion of the required common open space. For example, a typical 8,000 sf tennis court could be located within the 0.65 -acre Village B Park and could be enclosed, with access limited to residents of Village B. A separate courtyard or roof deck within the multifamily development could satisfy the remaining 2,200 sf of required common open space. Private Open Space: May be accomplished with balconies, terraces or yards attached to each dwelling. Per Table 10-4, private open space is required at the following ratios: 170 multifamily walk-up units x 100% = 170 of the units require 80 sf min. of private open space LANDSCAPE PALETTE: See Appendix A. Selections for park trees and accent plants should express the unique identity of Village B. See Section 10.6 for Landscape Standards. %AJSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-21 LAND USE 3 Novwmbwr gO17 0 300' 800' in SPECIFIC PLAN FJ% 3.7 Village C 3 LAND USE Village C is the core of Altair. It is the most densely developed Village and offers the most variety of uses and building types. It encompasses the central park, includes the community center and is adjacent to the school site. The planning is very urban with apartment buildings, row houses and tight clusters of homes punctuated by plazas. The focal point of Village C and the entire community is a promontory plaza and roundabout anchoring one end of an axis aligning with Main Street in Old Town and anchored on the opposite end by the Temecula Civic Center. From this vantage point, the relationship between Altair and Old Town Temecula is very clear. The plaza is defined by two structures comprising the community center: a recreation center with pool to the northwest and a clubhouse to the northeast. Multi -story attached or stacked residences form the south edge of the plaza, possibly with street -level commercial uses. The club house opens onto the park with terrace seating. Streets and pedestrian paths radiate from the plaza. The park and community center are described in greater detail in FIGURE 3-13 and FIGURE 3-14 and in Section 8: Open Space and Recreation of this Specific Plan. Village C overlooks Old Town and provides a pedestrian link to Main Street through the park. The village is itself divided by terrain and roads into neighborhoods linked by a semi -circular street. The street bridges over the park where it crosses the east -west path descending down to Main Street. This bridge, when seen from Old Town along the Main Street axis, is another visual gateway to the community, framing the park and set against the backdrop of the natural hillside above. It is anticipated that Village C will receive the most visitors from outside the community to use the park and school. A higher level of commercial retail space is therefore appropriate in this planning area. • SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 irS4 LAND USE 3 Primary Access Roundabout 1 See Fig.9-16 Altair Vista Recreation Center Roundabout 2 See Fig.9-17 Iconic Tower Altair Vista Residential 1�1 Residential Residential Secondary„,..-.'.\ Access Brid. e Over Park A Street Roundabout 3 See Fig. 9-20 Figure 3-13 Vehicular Access - Village C CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANET% Roundabout 1 See Fig- 9-16 Mid -Block Crossin see Figure 4-5 Recreation Center Roundabout 2 See Fig. 9-17 Grand Stairca e Seating Iconic Tower Class 1 Trail Altair Vista 3 LAND USE Walkwa son Bridge Grand Staircase to Main Street ------0- axis to Civic Center Mid -Block Crossin see Figure 4-9 Path Under Bridge Pedestrian Promenade Outlook Roundabout 3 See Fig. 9-20 ian Circulation - Village C CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. INNA SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-25 LAND USE 3 3-26 BOUNDARIES: Western Bypass to the west, adjacent properties to the north and east, open space ravine to the south. SIZE: Approximately 21.1 gross acres. Pad size may vary through implementation of retaining walls and/ or stepped foundation systems. ACCESS: Altair Vista from north and south, running through the village. Coromell Trail from north and east. Major internal circulation along A Street. Two points of vehicular fire access must be provided for each village area that has 35 dwelling units or more. Pedestrian and bicycle connectivity is key to the success of Village C and the Park: • Pedestrian and bicycle routes are provided along Altair Vista and A Street. • An accessible link is provided to the Class 1 bike path paralleling Western Bypass • Additional pedestrian access to/from Old Town via Main Street, the grand staircase and east/west path through park • Pedestrian promenade to southeast, connecting to trail system. DWELLING UNITS: See Table 3-1. ALLOWABLE BUILDING TYPES: The following building types are allowed in Village C. See Section 10.10 for definitions and standards of each building type. Lower density uses should be focused toward the north end of this village, with higher scale framing the urban park. Detached Housing Multiplex Rowhouses Live / Work Micro Units Multifamily Walk -Up Multifamily Podium Mixed Use Community Buildings Iconic Tower BUILDING FRONTAGE: Buildings should front on Altair Vista and secondary streets and on the park and other open space. Additional frontages may be provided along landscaped paseos, mews or courts. See Figure 9-2. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK 3 LAND USE BUILDING SETBACK: Setbacks are required only at the designated streets and at village boundaries. There are no setback requirements at interior lot lines, streets or alleys within the village limits. See Section 10.4 for further explanation of setbacks and yards. From Altair Vista Property Line: From Coromell Trail ROW: From A Street Property Line: 3 ft. min 3 ft. min 0 ft. min 5 ft. max. No maximum 5 ft. max. ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT: 2-5 stories. See Table 10-2. DRIVEWAY AND SECONDARY STREET STANDARDS: 1. Shared driveways are encouraged wherever possible. 2. Driveways on the same side of a street shall be separated by 50 feet to centerline, except at rowhomes. 3. Driveways at rowhomes should be paired to allow more landscaped area between driveway pairs. IM SPECIFIC PLAN Hovemb•r 2017 3-27 Central Park at Village C Concept In the heart of the development is a Village "C" Park to serve as a central open space to the Altair community and Old Town Temecula, FIGURE 3-15. It is anchored by the community center at the top of the hill to the west and encircled by the homes and apartment buildings of Village C. The park is strategically situated on axis with Main Street and the City of Temecula Civic Center. The southern edge of the park is designed as a linear path on that same axis that cascades down the slope, passing under the A Street bridge and connecting to the town via a grand staircase to Main Street. Conversely, from Main Street in Old Town the view up the axis features an arched bridge framing the park, with the community center promontory above, an iconic tower and the natural escarpment beyond, The park allows residents along its perimeter to open onto the park with direct access and views. Walkways stretching out from the park allow easy pedestrian access from many points in the community and the City of Temecula. While the site offers a 50' topographical change, the park gracefully incorporates accessible walkways and stairs into the design instead of clumsy ADA ramp "switchbacks". These gradual walkways allow access to the park's recreational, natural, and commercial spaces. Various types of shade structures and planted groves of trees provide shade as users sit, picnic, and move throughout the park. The different areas of the park offer a gradient of uses. The lower end of the park to the east is less formal and features open space and native landscape planting which leads into a nature trail as topography increases. This nature trail encompasses an open lawn space which acts as a play area and amphitheater to the centrally located stage/ picnic shelter. The natural amphitheater may host movie nights, concerts and festivals as well as passive recreation and picnicking, In the upper end of the park to the west are shaded picnic areas, children's play space, and restrooms all located near the parking lot. Additional overflow parking will occur on Altair Vista, A Street and at the school site across the street when school is not in session. The community center is composed of two facilities: a recreation center west of Altair Vista and a clubhouse east of Altair Vista and contiguous to the park. The recreation center edges grand steps at the peak of the Main Street axis, a prime gathering space and scenic viewpoint. The recreation center incorporates outdoor pools and a spa, fitness and exercise rooms for residents. The clubhouse is a dual -fronted building with entry from the street side and openings to a large terrace on the park side. The Master HOA will operate the recreation center and clubhouse facilities and may work with the City's Community Services Department and/or the general public for the potential hosting of classes, activities, wedding and event rentals at the clubhouse. At the highest point in the park, a terrace available for cafes or events has views over the park and out over the City of Temecula. The design of surrounding architecture is critical to the success of the Village C Park. Facades should face the park with entries, windows, balconies and porches to facilitate interaction between the public open space and perimeter residents. Pedestrian walkways edging the park and providing direct access between development and the park are encouraged. These "eyes" on the park will improve park safety and benefit the surrounding buildings with enhanced views. See Sections 9.4.1, 9.4.2, 9.4.4, 9.4.5 and 9.4.8 for examples of frontage types appropriate to face the park. As shown in Figure 10-1 and 10-3, architectural elements such as porches and trellises that soften park facades may encroach into required setbacks. Any walls or fences should be kept low to allow views across by seated persons and to avoid a defensive appearance. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANflf 3 LAND USE KEY PLAN 1. CLUBHOUSE 2. PARKING LOT 3. PARK RESTROOMS 4. SHADE SHELTERS 5. OPEN LAWN 6. PLAYGROUND 7. LARGE SHELTER! STAGE 8. DOG RUN 9. OVERLOOKS 10. FORMAL "URBAN AREA" 11. INFORMAL "NATURAL" AREA (NATIVE TREES AND SHRUBS, BOULDER TRAVERSING AREAS * BICYCLE RACK (FINAL LOCATIONS TO BE VIEWS INTO PARK FROM ADJACENT RESIDENCES "EYES ON THE PARK" POLICE + EMERGENCY VEHICULAR ACCESS POLICE + EMERGENCY ACCESS POINTS (INDICATES POINT THAT CAN BE REACHED BY EMERGENCY VEHICLE FROM SURROUNDING STREETS) ' I. SPECIFIC PLAN Village C PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION TO OLD TOWN CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 4 3-29 Al PARKING STANDARDS: 1. Parallel parking shall be provided on one side only of Altair Vista 2. Parallel or diagonal on -street parking is encouraged on one or both sides of internal secondary streets. 3. Parallel or diagonal on -street parking is primarily for visitors, guests and overflow parking at night. 4. Required off-street parking shall comply with Section 10.7 and Table 10-3 and will predominantly be provided in private and shared garages. 5. Additional parking shall be located within the developable area. See Sections 9 and 10.7 for standards. 6. Residential parking lots shall not be visible from the park or surrounding open space, from Altair Vista, or from A Street. 7. Parking lots shall be provided for the park and for the community center. Both lots shall be accessed from Altair Vista. APPLICABLE PROJECT STANDARDS: Table 3-1 Land Use Zones and Development Intensity 4 Circulation Plan 5 Grading Plan 6 Infrastructure and Utilities Plan 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan 9 Design Guidelines 10 Development Standards 11 Implementation Plan GRADING STANDARDS: Village C steps down from west to east, with different pad levels separated by Altair Vista, A Street and the large park. Buildings should also be stepped to negotiate grade changes and present engaged facades to these streets, with entries in reasonable proximity to street level. This can be accomplished by placing rear garages at different levels from street entries, sloping interstitial landscape areas and terracing porches and entry stoops. Blank basement walls and high retaining walls must be avoided along streets and pedestrian paths. Nor should pedestrians see only exposed roofs and eaves, unless landscaped roof terraces are incorporated. See Section 9.7 for standards regarding slopes and retaining walls. Grading design in Village C should maximize views while maintaining a cohesive neighborhood. Certain promontories shall be maintained, such as the traffic oval and the southeast terminus of the pedestrian promenade. la 4 WESTERN BYPASS UPPt S rniR PIuA CLuEIIOUSE Figure 3-16 Park Section at ♦• A STREET P, ;1 • n e CORGIL. TRAIL GRAND MAIN Si PUJOI.. ST CONCEPTUAL SECTION ONLY, ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANfiL OPEN SPACE: See Section 8 for an explanation of public, common and private open space. The primary public open space is the 5.0 -acre Village C Park, to be installed as part of the master development. The requirements for this park are prescribed in Table 8-2. Common open space is required for each sub -development in addition to the public park. Common open space is typically a shared amenity for the residents of that development and may be secured if necessary. Requirements are factored by building type and dwelling unit quantity, as defined in Section 10. Smaller common spaces between building groups, over parking structures and at motor courts are encouraged. Private open space requirements per dwelling unit are defined by building type in Section 9. Example of Open Space Development in Village C: Example assumes 290 rowhouses and 260 multifamily podium residences are constructed, for a total of 550 dwelling units. Common Open Space: Per Table 10-4, common open space is required at the following ratios: 290 rowhouse units x 60 sf/du 260 multifamily podium units x 50 sf/du = 17,400 sf of common open space = 13,000 sf of common open space = 30,400 sf of common open space Given the large size of Village C and the central park, the common open space should be spread as separate spaces throughout the village, with some kind of exterior amenity in close proximity to all residences, particularly tot lots. These spaces may be shared between different housing types and even distinct projects. Multifamily projects typically have exterior common space within the building footprint, such as podium -level courtyards or pools, or roof terraces. Table 8-2 requires that all 5.0 acres of the Village C Park must be open to the public. Therefore, no portion of the common open space requirement for Village C may be fulfilled by the primary public open space. Private Open Space: May be accomplished with balconies, terraces or yards attached to each dwelling. Per Table 10-4, private open space is required at the following ratios: 290 rowhouse units x 100% = 290 of the units require 100 sf min. of private open space 260 multifamily podium units x 100% = 130 of the units require 60 sf min. of private open space LANDSCAPE PALETTE: See Appendix A. Selections for park trees and accent plants should express the unique identity of Village C. See Section 10.6 for Landscape Standards. %ori SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 dDSE 3-31 LAND USE 3 0 300' BOD' 1200 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN/ 3.8 Village D 3 LAND USE Village D is located on axis with the First Street entrance to Altair. It occupies a stepped plateau bracketed by two open space ravines to the north and south and overlooking the First Street entry. The adjacent Western Bypass is at its highest point in this segment and is elevated above the village. Village D is situated to either side of a central green that is the social and physical focus of the neighborhood. East -west pedestrian paths link the neighborhood with the park and with trails linking to other villages. These paths shall be separate from vehicular routes for the most part and are in addition to walkways along side the vehicular system. This results in a pedestrian "green" network overlapping - but distinct from - the paved vehicular network. BOUNDARIES: Western Bypass to the west, open space ravines to the north and south, adjacent properties to the east. SIZE: Approximately 9.0 gross acres. Pad size may vary through implementation of retaining walls and/or stepped foundation systems. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-33 LAND USE 3 'Altair Vista Access Altair vista Residential Access Residential • r i .04 CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. ACCESS: Altair Vista from adjacent villages from the north and south. Altair Vista intersects the green at the north and south ends and splits into a one-way lane circumnavigating the open space. Traffic is forced to slow upon entering the village and the one-way configuration makes pedestrian crossing safer. Pedestrian and bicycle routes parallel the vehicular path. Additional pedestrian access from trails crossing and through ravines; link to bike path paralleling Western Bypass. Two points of vehicular fire access must be provided for each village area that has 35 dwelling units or more. DWELLING UNITS: See Table 3-1. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrI Altair Vista Class 1 Trail i N .1.1141111 24. Altdir Vista MD 3-t9 _ _PwleaiMMN Residential CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. 3 LAND USE ALLOWABLE BUILDING TYPES: The following building types are allowed in Village D. See Section 10.10 for definitions and standards of each building type. Higher density uses should be focused toward the center of this village, with lower scale and density along the ravine edges, Detached Housing Multiplex Rowhouses Live / Work Micro Units Multifamily Walk -Up Multifamily Podium Mixed -Use Community Building jai SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3`=35 LAND USE 3 BUILDING FRONTAGE: Buildings should front on the park, Altair Vista and surrounding open space. Additional frontages may be provided along landscaped paseos, mews or courts. See Figure 9-2. BUILDING SETBACK: Setbacks are required only at the designated streets and at village boundaries. There are no setback requirements at interior lot lines, streets or alleys within the village limits. See Section 10.4 for further explanation of setbacks and yards. From Altair Vista Property Line: All other Lot Lines: 0 ft. min 0 ft. min 5 ft. max. 10 ft. max. ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT: 2-4 stories. See Table 10-2. DRIVEWAY AND SECONDARY STREET STANDARDS: 1. No individual private drives shall be located on the Altair Vista loop around the park. 2. Secondary street and/or common driveway intersections with Altair Vista shall be limited to four locations. 3. Shared driveways are encouraged wherever possible. 4. Driveways on the same side of a street shall be separated by 50 feet to centerline, except at rowhomes. 5. Driveways at rowhomes should be paired to allow more landscaped area between driveway pairs. PARKING STANDARDS: 1. Parallel parking shall be provided on one side only of the one-way Altair Vista loop around the park. This is primarily for visitors, guests and overflow parking at night. 2. Required off-street parking shall comply with Section 10.7 and Table 10-3 and will predominantly be provided in private garages. 3. Additional parking shall be located in motor courts or along secondary streets. See Sections 4 and 9 for motor court standards. 4. Parking lots shall not be visible from the park or surrounding open space, or from Altair Vista. APPLICABLE PROJECT STANDARDS: Table 3-1 Land Use Zones and Development Intensity 4 Circulation Plan 5 Grading Plan 6 Infrastructure and Utilities Plan 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan 9 Design Guidelines 10 Development Standards 11 Implementation Plan November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN FI/ GRADING STANDARDS: Village D slopes down from west to east, with steep slope banks on all sides. Buildings should be used to negotiate grade changes as much as possible. This can be accomplished by placing rear garages at different levels from street entries, sloping interstitial landscape areas and terracing private patios. See Section 9.7 for standards regarding slopes and retaining walls. OPEN SPACE: See Section 8 for an explanation of public, common and private open space. The primary public open space is the Village D Park, a 0.8 -acre village green to be installed as part of the master development with construction of this segment of Altair Vista. The requirements for this park are prescribed in Table 8-2. Common open space is required for each sub -development in addition to the public park. Common open space is typically a shared amenity for the residents of that development and may be secured if necessary. Requirements are factored by building type and dwelling unit quantity, as defined in Section 10. Smaller common spaces between building groups, over parking structures and at motor courts are encouraged. Private open space requirements per dwelling unit are defined by building type in Section 10. Example of Open Space Development in Village D: Example assumes 90 rowhouses and 30 live/work units are constructed, for a total of 120 dwelling units. Common Open Space: Per Table 10-4, common open space is required at the following ratios: 90 rowhouse units 30 Iive/work units x 60 sf/du x 60 sf/du = 5,400 sf of common open space = 1.800 sf of common open space = 7,200 sf of common open space This can be one large common open space shared by both the rowhouse and live/work residents or separate spaces. Table 8-2 requires that all 0.80 acres of the Village D Park must be open to the public. Therefore, no portion of the common open space requirement for Village D may be fulfilled by the primary public open space, unless it is in excess of the 0.80 -acre minimum public area. Private Open Space: May be accomplished with balconies, terraces or yards attached to each dwelling. Per Table 10-4, private open space is required at the following ratios: 90 rowhouse units 30 live/work units x 100% = 90 of the units require 100 sf min. of private open space x 100% = 30 of the units require 100 sf min. of private open space =104 SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-37 KEY PLAN 91 ACRES LEGEND: 1 SHRUBS OR GRASSES 2 GROVE PICNIC AREA 3 LAWN 4 PLANTED PARKWAY 5 TOT LOT PLAYGROUND 6 SEATWALL 7 SIGN WALL 8 DECORATIVE FENCE. 36' HIGH 9 BENCHES *iv 9 0 * BICYCLE RACK (FINAL LOCATIO•18 TO OE OETEIWNEOI CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANT LANDSCAPE PALETTE: See Appendix A. Selections for park trees and accent plants should express the unique identity of Village D. See Section 10.6 for Landscape Standards. Village "D" Park Concept: Strong geometric arcs divide the space of the 0.80 -acre Village "D" Park, FIGURE 3-20. The largest space is an open recreational lawn. Next to the lawn is a large playground with a dense tree canopy for shade. Tucked between the lawn and playground is a shaded seating area with seatwalls and picnic benches. Bookending the entire park are two natural landscaped areas that frame the park. A planted parkway around the entire park provides a buffer from vehicular circulation. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-39 LAND USE 3 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANET/ 3.9 Village E Village E is elongated in the north -south direction and slopes steeply down from west to east. Buildings will need to step to avoid excessive cut and fill, therefore lower scale development and lower density are suitable for this planning area. The village green is arranged in the east - west direction to give village E a different character and to take advantage of excellent vistas to mountains south and east of the site. BOUNDARIES: Western Bypass to the west, open space ravines to the north, B Street North and Village F to the south, adjacent properties to the east. S'ECIFIC PLAN November 201! '4-41 LAND USE 3 SIZE: Approximately 7.8 gross acres. Pad size may vary through implementation of retaining walls and/ or stepped foundation systems. ACCESS: Altair Vista from Village D from the north; Altair Vista from project entry from the south. Two points of vehicular fire access must be provided for each village area that has 35 dwelling units or more. Pedestrian and bicycle routes parallel vehicular path. Additional pedestrian access from trails crossing and through ravines; link to bike path paralleling east property line. DWELLING UNITS: See Table 3-1. Residential B Street North Secondary Access CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK ALLOWABLE BUILDING TYPES: The following building types are allowed in Village E. See Section 10.10 for definitions and standards of each building type. Lower density uses should be focused toward the north end of this village, with higher scale framing the urban park. Detached Housing Multiplex Rowhouses Live / Work Micro Units Multifamily Walk -Up Community Buildings Altair Vista Residential Class 1 Trail AltairVi m z CC Residential B Street North Residential Figu _ e E. CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. % 7SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 LAND USE 3 BUILDING FRONTAGE: Buildings should front on Altair Vista and on the village park and other open space. Additional frontages may be provided along landscaped paseos, mews or courts. See Figure 9-2. BUILDING SETBACK: Setbacks are required only at the designated streets and at village boundaries. There are no setback requirements at interior lot Tines, streets or alleys within the village limits. See Section 10.4 for further explanation of setbacks and yards. From Altair Vista Property Line: All other Lot Lines: 0 ft. min 0 ft. min 5 ft. max. 10 ft. max. ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT: 2-4 stories. See Table 10.2. DRIVEWAY AND SECONDARY STREET STANDARDS: 1. There shall be no driveways to private garages on Altair Vista. Only driveways to alleys, motor courts or secondary streets are allowed. 2. Shared driveways are encouraged wherever possible. 3. Driveways on the same side of a street shall be separated by 50 feet to centerline, except at rowhomes. 4. Driveways at rowhomes should be paired to allow more landscaped area between driveway pairs. PARKING STANDARDS: 1. Parallel parking shall be provided on one side only of Altair Vista. 2. On -street parking is primarily for visitors, guests and overflow parking at night. 3. Required off-street parking shall comply with Section 10.7 and Table 10-3 and will predominantly be provided in private and shared garages. 4. Additional parking shall be located within the developable area. See Sections 9 and 10.7 for standards. 5, Residential parking lots shall not be visible from the park or surrounding open space, or from Altair Vista. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANI!Jf i _AN: USE APPLICABLE PROJECT STANDARDS: Table 3-1 Land Use Zones and Development Intensity 4 Circulation Plan 5 Grading Plan 6 Infrastructure and Utilities Plan 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan 9 Design Guidelines 10 Development Standards GRADING STANDARDS: Village E slopes down from west to east, with steep slope banks on the north, west and east sides. Buildings should be used to negotiate grade changes as much as possible. This can be accomplished by placing rear garages at different levels from street entries, sloping interstitial landscape areas and terracing private patios. See Section 9.7 for standards regarding slopes and retaining walls. I. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 LAND USE 3 Village "E" Park Concept The Village "E" Park, FIGURE 3-24, is split into two separate spaces by Altair Vista. The western space is a large recreational lawn with perimeter planting of shrubs and shade trees. The eastern space has a recreational lawn, a playground, and a seating area overlooking the hillside. Both sides of the park have a shaded picnic area along the sidewalk nearest the road for an urban plaza feel. 73 ACRES LEGEND: 1. NATURAL LANDSCAPE AREA 2. LAWN 3. SHADED PICNIC AREA 4. SEATING AREA OVERLOOKING HILLSIDE 5. PLAYGROUND 6 SPECIAL PAVING AT CROSS WALK WITH BOLLARDS 7. NATURE PLAY TRAIL 8. CONNECTION TO HIKING TRAIL 0 N 1* BICYCLE RACK (RNA. LOUnONS'O8E DETERANNEDI .11111111111111 at yi e _ CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 Oott SPECIFIC PLANrlL .. LAND USE' OPEN SPACE: See Section 8 for an explanation of public, common and private open space. The primary public open space is the Village E Park, an approximately 0.5 acre park to be installed with the development of the village. The requirements for this park are prescribed in Table 8-2. Access should be provided from the park to the Class 1 bike path to the west and the hiking trail to the east. Common open space is required for each sub -development in addition to the public park. Common open space is typically a shared amenity for the residents of that development and may be secured if necessary. Requirements are factored by building type and dwelling unit quantity, as defined in Section 10. Smaller common spaces between building groups, over parking structures and at motor courts are encouraged. Private open space requirements per dwelling unit are defined by building type in Section 10. Example of Open Space Development in Village E: Example assumes 50 rowhouses and 30 multiplex units are constructed, for a total of 80 dwelling units. Common Ooen Soace: Per Table 10-4, common open space is required at the following ratios: 50 rowhouse units 30 multiplex units x 60 sf/du x 60 sf/du = 3,000 sf of common open space = 1,800 sf of common open space = 4,800 sf of common open space This can be one large common open space shared by both the rowhouse and multiplex residents or separate spaces. A portion of the common open space requirement may be fulfilled in the primary public open space. Table 8-2 requires that 0.25 acres of the 0.35 -acre park must be open to the public. The remaining 0.1 acre (4,356 sf) may be used to satisfy a portion of the required common open space. For example, a community produce garden of 3,000 sf could be located within the 0.35 -acre Village E Park and could be enclosed, with access limited to residents of Village E. A separate courtyard or roof deck within the multifamily development could satisfy the remaining 1,800 sf of required common open space. Private Open Space: May be accomplished with balconies, terraces or yards attached to each dwelling. Per Table 10-4, private open space is required at the following ratios: 50 rowhouse units 30 multiplex units x 100% = 50 of the units require 100 sf min. of private open space x 100% = 30 of the units require 100 sf min. of private open space LANDSCAPE PALETTE: See Appendix A. Selections for park trees and accent plants should express the unique identity of Village E. See Section 10.6 for Landscape Standards. f SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 LAND USE 3 Area November 2017 0 300. 600 1200 SPECIFIC PLAN MI 4 3.10 Village F 3 LAND USE Village F is very linear and has a steep slope along the eastern edge. The west edge is relatively flat and level with the Bypass. Privacy and sound screening are important along this edge. A single street serves the neighborhood, ending at a promontory at the south end of the village. A gated access point is provided from the Western Bypass for emergency use by the Fire Department only. Multistory flats are appropriate on the west side of the street, closer to the Bypass. Attached single-family homes are better suited to the east side of the street, as the terrain slopes quickly and the lots are small. There are two park spaces in Village F. One park is centrally located adjacent to the clubhouse and pool for this village. The other park is at the southern tip and will be a destination for the community. Its elevation and location afford excellent views to the southeast. This park overlooks the south entry to the specific plan area as well as the south end of the Western Bypass and is one of the major entry monuments of Altair. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-5 BOUNDARIES: Western Bypass to the west and south; Altair Vista to the north; B Street North to the east; Village E to the north. SIZE: Approximately 9.0 gross acres. Pad size may vary through implementation of retaining walls and/ or stepped foundation systems. Altair Vista Primary Access Secondary Fire Access only i Residential Residential B Street North Park Access re 3-26 V CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN ..=.PlD l,Sr ACCESS: Altair Vista and B Street North from the north; emergency only access from Western Bypass. Two points of vehicular fire access must be provided for each village area that has 35 dwelling units or more. Pedestrian and bicycle routes parallel vehicular path. Additional pedestrian and bicycle links to bike path paralleling Western Bypass and east property line. DWELLING UNITS: See Table 3-1. i Altair Vista r Residential Class 1 Trail B Street North Residential ))SPECIFIC PLAN CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 LAND USE 3 ALLOWABLE BUILDING TYPES: The following building types are allowed in Village F. See Section 10.10 for definitions and standards of each building type. Lower density uses should be focused toward the north end of this village, with higher scale framing the urban park. Detached Housing Multiplex Rowhouses Micro Units Multifamily Walk -Up Multifamily Podium Community Buildings BUILDING FRONTAGE: Buildings should front on Altair Vista and on the village park and other open space. Additional frontages may be provided along landscaped paseos, mews or courts. See Figure 9-2. BUILDING SETBACK: Setbacks are required only at the designated streets and at village boundaries. There are no setback requirements at interior lot lines, streets or alleys within the village limits. See Section 10.4 for further explanation of setbacks and yards. From Western Bypass ROW: 10 ft. min From B Street North Property Line: 3 ft. min All other Lot Lines: 0 ft. min No maximum No maximum 10 ft. max. ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT: 2-4 stories. See Table 10-2. DRIVEWAY AND SECONDARY STREET STANDARDS: 1. There shall be no driveways to private garages on Altair Vista. Only driveways to alleys, motor courts or secondary streets are allowed. 2. Shared driveways are encouraged wherever possible. 3. Driveways on the same side of a street shall be separated by 50 feet to centerline, except at rowhomes. 4. Driveways at rowhomes should be paired to allow more landscaped area between driveway pairs. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrJ PARKING STANDARDS: 1. Parallel parking shall be provided on one side only of the Altair Vista or its extension into the village. 2. On -street parking is primarily for visitors, guests and overflow parking at night. 3. Required off-street parking shall comply with Section 10.7 and Table 10-3 and will predominantly be provided in private and shared garages. 4. Additional parking shall be located within the developable area. See Sections 9 and 10.7 for standards. 5. Residential parking lots shall not be visible from the park or surrounding open space, from Altair Vista or its extension into the village. APPLICABLE PROJECT STANDARDS: Table 3-1 Land Use Zones and Development Intensity 4 Circulation Plan 5 Grading Plan 6 Infrastructure and Utilities Plan 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan 9 Design Guidelines 10 Development Standards 11 Implementation Plan GRADING STANDARDS: Village F slopes down steeply on the south and east. Buildings should be used to negotiate grade changes as much as possible. This can be accomplished by placing rear garages at different levels from street entries, sloping interstitial landscape areas and terracing private patios. See Section 9.7 for standards regarding slopes and retaining walls. .111m E�iriSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-53 LAND USE 3 Village "F" Park Concept The Village "F" Park, FIGURE 3-28, is also split into two separate spaces by a street. To the west is a large lawn for active recreation and may be used for sports. Shade trees along the lawn's perimeter provide shade for passive recreation. To the east is a smaller lawn adjacent to a playground and shaded picnic area. Natural landscaped areas border the space to create geometry to match the style of similar park spaces in the Altair community. .58 ACAES LEGEND: 1. NATURAL LANDSCAPE AREA 2. LAWN 3. SHADED PICNIC AREA 4. PLAYGROUND 5. SPECIAL PAVING AT CROSSWALK WITH BOLLARDS 9 "® BICYCLE RACK Ir ww (ou T lows Mt* Of rf w,i*f Figure 3-28 Park Plan at Village F CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK OPEN SPACE: See Section 8 for an explanation of public, common and private open space. 3 LAND USE The primary public open space are the Village F Parks, totalling approximately 1.0 acres to be installed with the development of the village. These include the central Village F Park described in FIGURE 3-28 and a Promontory Park at the south end of the village. All buildings shall be generally north of the Promontory Park to maximize views from the park. The requirements for these parks are prescribed in Table 8-2. Common open space is required for each sub -development in addition to the public park. Common open space is typically a shared amenity for the residents of that development and may be secured if necessary. Requirements are factored by building type and dwelling unit quantity, as defined in Section 10. Smaller common spaces between building groups, over parking structures and at motor courts are encouraged. Private open space requirements per dwelling unit are defined by building type in Section 10. Example of Open Space Development in Village F: Assume 40 rowhouses and 80 multifamily walk-up units are constructed, for a total of 120 dwelling units. Common Open Space: Per Table 10-4, common open space is required at the following ratios: 40 rowhouse units 80 multifamily walk-up units x 60 sf/du x 60 sf/du = 2,400 sf of common open space = 4,800 sf of common open space = 7,200 sf of common open space This can be one large common open space shared by both the rowhouse and multifamily residents or separate spaces. A portion of the common open space requirement may be fulfilled in the primary public open space. Table 8-2 requires that 0.40 acre of the 0.60 -acre park must be open to the public. The remaining 0.2 acre (8,712 sf) may be used to satisfy a portion of the required common open space. For example, a community produce garden of 3,000 sf could be located within the 0.35 -acre Village F Park and could be enclosed, with access limited to residents of Village F. A separate courtyard or roof deck within the multifamily development could satisfy the remaining 1,800 sf of required common open space. Private Open Soace: May be accomplished with balconies, terraces or yards attached to each dwelling. Per Table 10-4, private open space is required at the following ratios: 40 rowhouse units x 100% = 40 of the units require 100 sf min. of private open space 80 multifamily walk-up units x 100% =80 of the units require 80 sf min. of private open space LANDSCAPE PALETTE: See Appendix A. Selections for park trees and accent plants should express the unique identity of Village F. See Section 10.6 for Landscape Standards. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-55 LAND USE 3 November,2Q17 0 300' 600' 1200 SPECIFIC PLAN 3.11 Village G Village G is south of the Western Bypass on land that slopes steeply to the southeast, offering prime views. The area has a strong connection to the south 55 -acre parcel and a proposed Nature Center. The interface with the MSHCP corridor is a critical edge condition. A relatively less urban development of clustered homes is appropriate here to take advantage of the views, negotiate the terrain and complement the adjacent open space. BOUNDARIES: Western Bypass to the north and northeast; B Street South to the east; Metropolitan Water District pipeline area and C Street to the south; MSHCP corridor to the west. SIZE: Approximately 7.3 gross acres. Pad size may vary through implementation of retaining walls and/ or stepped foundation systems. iSPECIFIC PL -'J November 2017 3-57 LAND USE 3 ACCESS: C Street from the south. Secondary fire access from B Street South for emergency use only. Two points of vehicular fire access must be provided for each village area that has 35 dwelling units or more. Pedestrian and bicycle routes parallel vehicular path. DWELLING UNITS: See Table 3-1. ALLOWABLE BUILDING TYPES: The following building types are allowed in Village G. See Section 10.10 for definitions and standards of each building type. Buildings should be sited in a manner to maximize vistas in every direction. Detached Housing Multiplex Rowhouses Multifamily Walk -Up Community Buildings B Street North Primary Access C Street f Camino Estribo Fire Access (emergency only,: • B Street • C Street South • Vehicular Access - Village G CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY: ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrI7 3 LAND USE BUILDING FRONTAGE: Buildings should front on CStreet, B Street South, secondary roads and on open space. Additional frontages may be provided along landscaped paseos, mews or courts. See Figure 9-2. BUILDING SETBACK: Setbacks are required only at the designated streets and at village boundaries. There are no setback requirements at interior lot lines, streets or alleys within the village limits. See Section 10.4 for further explanation of setbacks and yards. From B Street South ROW: All other Lot Lines: 3 ft. min 0 ft. min No maximum 10 ft. max. ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT: 2-4 stories. See Table 10-2. -.31 Pedestrian Circulation - Village G I SPECIFIC PLAN CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 LAND USE 3 DRIVEWAY AND SECONDARY STREET STANDARDS: 1. There shall be no driveways to private garages on B Street South. 2. Shared driveways are encouraged wherever possible. 3. Driveways on the same side of a street shall be separated by 50 feet to centerline, except at rowhomes. 4. Driveways at rowhomes should be paired to allow more landscaped area between driveway pairs. PARKING STANDARDS: 1. Parallel parking may be provided on one side only of secondary streets. 2. On -street parking is primarily for visitors, guests and overflow parking at night. 3. Required off-street parking shall comply with Section 10.7 and Table 10-3 and will predominantly be provided in private and shared garages. 4. Additional parking shall be located within the developable area. See Sections 9 and 10.7 for standards. 5. Residential parking lots shall not be visible from surrounding open space, from the Civic Site, or from B Street South or the Western Bypass. APPLICABLE PROJECT STANDARDS: Table 3-1 Land Use Zones and Development Intensity 4 Circulation Plan 5 Grading Plan 6 Infrastructure and Utilities Plan 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan 9 Design Guidelines 10 Development Standards GRADING STANDARDS: Village G slopes down from west to east, with slope banks on either side. There is also a steep slope bank on the north side down to the Western Bypass. Buildings should be used to negotiate grade changes as much as possible. This can be accomplished by placing rear garages at different levels from street entries, sloping interstitial landscape areas and terracing private patios. See Section 9.7 for standards regarding slopes and retaining walls. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN OPEN SPACE: See Section 8 for an explanation of public, common and private open space. 3 4., I: -r The primary public open space is the Village G Park, an approximately 0.35 -acre park to be installed with the development of the village. The requirements for this park are prescribed in Table 8-2. Common open space is required for each sub -development in addition to the public park. Common open space is typically a shared amenity for the residents of that development and may be secured if necessary. Requirements are factored by building type and dwelling unit quantity, as defined in Section 10. Smaller common spaces between building groups, over parking structures and at motor courts are encouraged. Private open space requirements per dwelling unit are defined by building type in Section 10. Example of Open Space Development in Village G: Example assumes 40 detached and 40 multiplex residences are constructed, for a total of 80 dwelling units. Common Open Space: Per Table 10-4, common open space is required at the following ratios: 40 detached units 40 multiplex units x 80 sf/du x 60 sf/du = 3,200 sf of common open space = 2,400 sf of common oven space = 5,600 sf of common open space This can be one large common open space shared by both the detached and multiplex residents or separate spaces. Per Table 8-2, there is no public open space open space requirement for Village G. Therefore, the common open space and private open space calculated according to the quantity and type of dwelling units will fulfill the full open space requirement for Village G. This could be a pool and deck area, with access limited to residents of Village G, a central green or a series of linked playgrounds and smaller spaces. Private Oven Space: May be accomplished with balconies, terraces or yards attached to each dwelling. Per Table 10-4, private open space is required at the following ratios: 40 detached unit x 100% = 40 of the units require 100 sf min. of private open space 40 multiplex units x 100% = 40 of the units require 100 sf min. of private open space LANDSCAPE PALETTE: See Appendix A. Selections for park trees and accent plants should express the unique identity of Village G. See Section 10.6 for Landscape Standards. I iSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-61 LAND USE 3 3-62 School 'moi ----- r-- 1111:. 1111111 IIILi11111111 t' HIhI NM NI 1 rro n m N i F 0 • Civic c Fiaure 3-32 School - Plan Area 0 300' 600' 1200 November 2017 In SPECIFIC PLANFJ 3.12 School Site 3 LAND USE Land of approximately 7 acres will be dedicated to the Temecula Valley Unified School District for a new elementary school to serve Altair and adjacent neighborhoods. The designated site for this school is at the north end of Altair Vista where it connects to the Western Bypass, south of Village B. This location is ideal for a school, as it allows convenient pick-up and drop-off from Rancho California Road and the Bypass with minimal disrupt -ion to the Altair neighborhood. It is anticipated that a percentage of the students will commute to this school from east of 1-15 via Rancho California Road. Any alternate location south of the designated site would route this traffic through Altair, creating gridlock and compromising the walkable nature of the community. Any location further north would lose connection with the neighborhoods of Altair. The designated site also has excellent views and places the school at an elevation where it can be seen as a prominent and recognizable edifice in the community. If the School District elects not to receive the land, the land may be developed with residential uses. Allowable residential density for the school site will be transferred from other villages, so that the total dwelling units for the entire Altair Specific Plan area shall not exceed the limits of Table 3-1. Access points to this parcel shall be similar to Figures 3-31 and 3-32, regardless of use. BOUNDARIES: Western Bypass to the west; Altair Vista to the east and north; Community Center to the south. FRANCIS PARKER SCHOOL IN SAN DIEGO, CA INf7 S'ECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-63 LAND USE 3 SIZE: Approximately 7 net acres. Pad size may vary through implementation of retaining walls and/ or stepped foundation systems. ACCESS: Altair Vista. Routing of bus and vehicular traffic will be further refined in cooperation with the School District. STUDENT BODY: 600-730 students in grades K-6. Primar Access Altair Vista Coromell Trail ` \Secondary Access CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTDAL DESIGN MAY VARY. Novamber 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN!I 3 LAND USE BUILDINGTYPE: The style and scale of the building shall complement surrounding neighborhoods, but shall distinguish itself as an important civic institution. If the School District elects not to receive this land, then allowable building types include: Detached Housing Multiplex Rowhouses Live / Work Micro Units Multifamily Walk -Up Multifamily Podium Mixed Use Altair Vista Coromell Trail Park SPECIFIC PLAN. lation - School CONCEPTUAL PLAN CNL'; ACTUr, r,rSIGN my Novsmb•r 2017 3-65 LAND USE 3 BUILDING FRONTAGE: Buildings should front on Altair Vista. Additional frontages may be provided along internal circulation routes, quads, or courts. See Figure 9-2. BUILDING SETBACK: From Altair Vista ROW: From Western Bypass ROW: 5 ft. min 10 ft. min No maximum No maximum ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT: 1-2 stories for school; 4 stories if residential. See Table 10-2. DRIVEWAY AND SECONDARY STREET STANDARDS: 1. There shall be no driveways to private garages on Altair Vista. Only driveways to secondary streets are allowed. 2. Shared driveways are encouraged wherever possible. 3. Driveways on the same side of a street shall be separated by 50 feet to centerline, except at rowhomes. 4. Driveways at rowhomes should be paired to allow more landscaped area between driveway pairs. • I AQUATICS CENTER 2 SNARED PARKING 163 SPACES) 3 Pur NEI DIS • ELEMENTARY SCMOOI 5 ES PARKING 149 SPACES' Figure 3-35 Conceptual WRIon - Schoo CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN AND PROGRAM MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANfrl ..•ra: 1.11- PARKING e PARKING STANDARDS: 1, Parking shall be provided on site for faculty and visitors, based on the anticipated student body for the size of school that is ultimately built. See section 10.7 2. Overflow parking for special events will be shared with parking for the community swimming pool / recreation center. 3. If residential uses are developed on the site, in the event that the School District elects not to receive the site, parking shall be provided as required in Table 10-3 for the appropriate dwelling types and quantities. APPLICABLE PROJECT STANDARDS: Table 3-1 Land Use Zones and Development Intensity 4 Circulation Plan 5 Grading Plan 6 Infrastructure and Utilities Plan 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan 9 Design Guidelines 10 Development Standards GRADING STANDARDS: The school site slopes down from west to east, with slope banks on either side. See Section 9.7 for standards regarding slopes and retaining walls. COMMON OPEN SPACE: A playfield will be provided at the school site. This field will be a shared facility with the Altair community and open to the general public when school is not in session. The play field will remain even if the School District elects not to receive the site and it is developed as residential use. In this case, the field will be maintained by the Master HOA. PRIVATE OPEN SPACE: Not applicable for school use. If the site is developed as residential use, then common and private open space must be provided as required in Section 10 for the appropriate housing type. LANDSCAPE PALETTE: See "School" section under Appendix A Plant List and Section 10.6.8 School. See "Villages" section under Appendix A plant list if residential units are developed. See Section 10.6 for Landscape Standards. I. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-67 LAND USE 3 BUILDABLE AREA November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrI 3.13 Civic Site 3 LAND USE The southernmost parcel at Altair will be reserved for a nature center that will benefit the public through recreation, tourism and education related to the culture, natural environment and sustainability of the region. A significant portion of the site will be natural open space. The site is strategically located near existing and proposed trails, near the confluence of Temecula Creek and Murrieta Creek, forming the Santa Margarita River, and within the Pechanga Origin Area. The nature center's hours will be limited to dawn until two hours after dusk. BOUNDARIES: Camino Estribo and open space to the west; C Street and storm water easement (open space) to the north; Murrieta Creek to the east and south. SIZE: Approximately 55 total gross acres and 16 net acres. Pad size of 3.6 acres may vary through implementation of retaining walls and/ or stepped foundation systems. ACCESS: B Street South from the Western Bypass and 1-15; C Street from Village G. MAXIMUM SIZE: 20,000 s.f. max. in one or more buildings Site development to include surface parking, outdoor terraces, trails and other landscape features as needed to support the institution's program. BUILDING TYPE: Civic Budding The scale, materials and style of the buildings should be appropriate for a public facility and should be an asset to the community. The buildings must also be sensitive to the adjacent natural open space and the Temeku Village site to the south. Building design is discussed further in Section 10.20. Final siting, design and location of the Nature Center will be developed pursuant to MSFICP guidelines. MISSION TRAILS REGIONAL PARK, SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA f� SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 3-69 LAND USE 3 BUILDING FRONTAGE: A clear entry shall be provided at the termination of B Street South. Procession and circulation for both vehicles and pedestrians shall be carefully designed to avoid conflicts and celebrate arrival. Development on this site shall focus on shared open space and places for outdoor gathering. The building and common spaces should take advantage of the impressive vistas from this site. See Figure 9-2. BUILDING SETBACK: Setbacks are required only at the designated streets and at south parcel boundary. There are no setback requirements at interior lot lines, streets or alleys within the overall boundary. At Camino Estribo and C Street: 10 ft. min No maximum ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT: Up to 2 stories. See Table 10-2. I - C Street 11 \ Natural f Open Space Secondary Fire f Access Only Buildable Pad Nature Center ! Camino Estdbo s 7 II 1 I � I B Street South Primary Access N. t \" 11 I1 1r Natval Open / Space with Trails / / / / western Bypass Tum Around Revegetated Open Spare wah Trois Natural Open Space with Trails Figure 3-37 Vehicular Access - Civic Site CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANFJI 3 LAND USE DRIVEWAY AND SECONDARY STREET STANDARDS: 1. There shall be one primary driveway entry onto B Street South. 2. A secondary driveway will be provided on Camino Estribo for emergency fire access only. 3. Camino Estribo will remain a natural surface road. PARKING STANDARDS: 1. Approximately 120 parking spaces will be provided for the nature center use. Surface parking will comply with City of Temecula standards for parking dimensions, landscaping and screening. 2. Paving shall have a low impact on water quality per the model WQMP. A permeable surface is preferred. C Street I � 1 Natural Open Space Buildable Pad Nalure Center Strep a a •'. • • • • • 1 • 11'I Futuremois To Be Determined Natural Opp SPaCe `\ Natural Open Space Trap From Offsite T. Trail Network 15%- 10%grade; Trill Prom ORslte T. Nature Center (S% • B% grade; Revegetated O• S•ace Trail From Nature Center To Trail Network Ill%- 10%gradel Iran From Nature Center TO Trail Network IS% grade) - ' Existing Trails Il /r� l I \` `' t 111111111138 _ Pedestrian Circulation - Civic Site CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. f��% SPECIFIC PLL.N November 2017 3-72 APPLICABLE PROJECT STANDARDS: Table 3-1 Land Use Zones and Development Intensity 4 Circulation Nan 5 Grading Plan 6 Infrastructure and Utilities Plan 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan 9 Design Guidelines 10 Development Standards GRADING STANDARDS: The site slopes down from west to the east and south, with slope banks on three sides. Site grading for the building pad and trails shall result in undulating slopes that appear natural and mimic existing surrounding topography. See Section 9.7 for standards regarding slopes and retaining walls. TRAIL DEVELOPMENT: 1. Trails will be 8'-10' wide and of a natural, pervious surface. 2. Trail layout will use siting guidance in the Western Riverside County Multiple Species Conservation Plan (MSHCP). 3. The City will work with the Pechanga tribe on the routing of trails to avoid significant cultural artifacts. 4. Existing trails will be utilized wherever possible. 5. Portions of existing trails may be eliminated through revegetation to provide a more specific trail alignment, and to protect sensitive habitat or cultural resources. 6. Proposed trails will begin and end at the Nature Center, providing a loop or out -and -back route. COMMON OPEN SPACE: Most of the south parcel will be left as natural open space. An existing stand of native oak trees at the west side of the parcel will be maintained. The south portion of the parcel will also be maintained as an open space buffer between new development and the historic Temecu Village site to the south. PRIVATE OPEN SPACE: N/A LANDSCAPE PALETTE: See "Civic / Community" section under Appendix A Plant List and Section 10.6.10. See Section 10.6 for Landscape Standards. FJL November 2017 _ SPECIFIC PLAN :.1d7_, USE CONSERVATION AND MITIGATION MEASURES: The Environmental Impact Report for Altair describes mitigation measures that, while applicable to the entire site, are particularly relevant to the conservation open space in the south and west portions of the south parcel and the goal of encouraging wildlife movement through this tract. Noted measures include: • Control Zones for exterior lighting; • Shielded exterior light fixtures that avoid light spillage or uplighting; • Limit hours of operation to the period from dawn to 2 hours after dusk; • Installation of a Wildlife Fence as shown in Figure 8-1 and described in Section 8.1. • Construction period best practices to minimize noise, erosion and other disturbances; • The portion of Camino Estribo west of the development area will remain unpaved to minimize vehicular speeds. f SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 4 CIRCULATION PLAN CIRCULATION Al f"Ai r Transportation corridors and facilities are major components of the nation's landscape and public realm including the Altair Community and City of Temecula. The alignment, scale, and character of our thoroughfares play an integral role in determining urban form, development patterns, and a sense of place. The American Society of Landscape Architects supports the design, construction, and management of streets and highways that enhance interconnected transportation options, particularly for pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders, and people with disabilities. All multi -modal transportation systems should be safe, efficient, convenient, and beautiful. Communities with "complete streets" encourage alternative transportation uses including provision of safe sidewalks and bicycle lanes enhanced with appropriate roadside plantings. Multi -modal streets provide mobility to people of all ages and abilities. Safe routes to schools are critical and encourage physical exercise. Streets should be community assets, compatible with built and natural environments, and reflect the balanced needs of the community and transportation networks. Altair embraces the concept of "complete streets". Narrow travel lanes and roundabouts calm traffic while improving traffic flow. "Sharrows" (shared bike lane symbols) as well as separate Class 1 bikeways provide multiple opportunities for bicycling. A network of large sidewalks, key walkways and separate hiking trails provide safe opportunities for walking, jogging, and rollerblading. Integrated "green infrastructure" and substantial landscape treatments will also help define the streets as sustainable community assets. The plan for Altair intends to return neighborhood streets to their historical function as social spaces and to free non -motorists from the defensive zones necessitated by high-speed automobile traffic. The circulation plan for Altair overlaps vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle systems to provide transportation choices and promote a safe and healthy lifestyle. While this plan recognizes the necessity to accomodate automobiles, the main focus is on human -powered circulation. Pedestrian and cycling routes due not merely parallel car lanes. In many instances, they are completely separate from vehicular streets. Several of the most prominent routes - the Main Street axis, the Promenade - are pedestrian only. Individual development projects within the villages of Altair are an important part of this pedestrian and bicycle system. It is vital to the success of the circulation plan that the final design of these sub -developments include internal pedestrian and cycling routes that connect to the community -wide system of walkways, trails and bikeways. . SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 _ vr c r d c• Ref 1 7) ...e• al. Ekem. 1 4/ I. U. ...... ri5 / Stiyic . Vo° canter Main Street 1 t I 1 1 OLD TO WN / I .1* 01 -,, s1-. . 1 5 minute walk 1/4 m le CC cn uJ 3 Z November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 4.1 Pedestrian Walkways, Trails and Bikeways 4 CIRCULATION The pedestrian and cycling network is interwoven through all of the villages and active open spaces at Altair and connects to adjacent communities. Village nodes are within a S -minute walk of the next village and the majority of the developed area can be traversed north to south in about 30 minutes. See F EGURE 4-1. It is hoped that residents and visitors alike will walk these neighborhoods as much for pleasure as for convenience. 4.1.1 Temecula Multi -Use Trails and Bikeways Master Pian The Temecula Multi -Use Trails and Bikeways Master Plan was developed in response to a 1991 survey of Temecula residents that identified the need for a trail system that would: • Access key destinations within the City and region • Serve as both recreation and transportation routes • Connect neighborhoods to parks, schools employment and commercial areas • Form loops that follow creeks and utility easements wherever feasible ifs SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 .4-3 ICIRCULATION 4 The Plan developed the following goals for the trail system: An interconnected system of pathways and bike routes is needed to support a variety of recreational uses and non -motorized transportation requirements for Temeculo residents. This system should be community -wide and should connect a variety of community and regional destinations (such as schools, parks and other areas of interest) and should utilize open space corridors, flood control channels, utility easements, publicly owned lands and roadways most appropriate for non -motorized uses. Trails and bike routes should be provided to improve the quality of life for residents of Temeculo, offer transportation alternatives, accommodate recreational enjoyment and increase the value and connectiveness (sic) of the community." A trail system is provided in the Altair Plan to provide a non -motorized circulation network, separate from the vehicular system, linking villages with each other and with parks and community amenities. This will serve predominantly pedestrians and bicyclists at slow speeds. The trail system will also link to Old Town and will be accessible by non-residents. Trail and bikeway types identified in this plan are consistent with Types M1, 81 and 83 described in the Trails Master Plan. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANri 4.1.2 Circulation Plan - Pedestrian/ Bicycle 4 CIRCULATION Altair is designed as a Walkable Community. There are numerous factors that contribute to a community's walkability besides a strong pedestrian and bicycle circulation network. Walkable.org a national leader in defining walkable communities has developed a "Healthy Development Checklist". Altair utilizes the following principles from that checklist to enhance walkability: The project promotes interaction between neighbors through parks, street front standards that encourage public / private transition spaces such as porches, etc. • The project is adjacent to Old Town Temecula and includes several strong pedestrian and roadway linkages. • There is a diversity of housing densities and potential diversity of income levels. • Nonresidential land uses such as parks, civic and school facilities are fully integrated with the residential land uses. • Land use is configured around walkable block sizes. Street patterns and block sizes are discussed further in Section 9.13. Neighborhoods are permeable. There are no gated communities or other barriers to pedestrian connectivity. • Where closed motor courts or dead-end streets are unavoidable, a walkway or bike path shall be provided to connect through to the overall circulation network. • Homes are properly oriented towards streets and plazas and will have windows watching over parks, streets and trails. • Architecture will be attractive and supportive of life on the streets, parks and the school. • Public buildings, parks and common destinations are properly placed to maximize the number of people that can walk to them. • • The majority of people can walk safely and comfortably to the elementary school. There are no large off-street parking lots along the street network. The project provides mobility options for those who cannot drive. • The project has a well-connected sidewalk and trail system that leads to local destinations. I SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 4-5 CIRCULATION 4 Street sidewalks are generous at 6' minimum width. • Some sidewalks are at 7' width to allow small children to more safely bike on the sidewalk rather than in the street. • Sidewalks are typically separated from curbs with parkways along the main arterials. • All street corners will have accessibility ramps. • Parkways offer street trees for shade and visual comfort. • Curb extensions prevent motorists from parking too close to corners. • The project connects to a larger trail system for walking and biking. • Decorative, pedestrian height street lights will be provided. • Buildings will address the street (front doors). • Visibility at intersections will be adequate for pedestrian safety. • Speed limit on local streets will be 25mph or below. • Project will contain design elements to calm traffic such as narrow lanes, roundabouts, special pavement in key areas, and raised pedestrian street crossings. • Street sidewalk gradients are typically below 5% slope to accommodate people with disabilities. • Key walkways and sidewalks have high transparency (surveillance ability). • The school, parks and other destinations will have adequate and secure bicycle parking. The majority of people can walk safely and comfortably in five minutes to a public gathering place such as park, plaza or community center. The Circulation Plan -Pedestrian/ Bicycle, FIGURE 4 2 ( FACING PAGE) , notes the locations of the four different levels of pedestrian circulation. Along the Western Bypass and on the south east edge of the community runs an 8 foot wide Class 1 Bike Way. Throughout the site run various 5 foot wide hiking trails and 8 foot wide key pedestrian walkways. Along the interior streets are 6 -foot minimum wide sidewalks (7' wide typical along Altair Vista) for ease of pedestrian circulation. This network satisfies a diverse set of needs, from the person who wants a direct and convenient walk to a certain destination, to the family enjoying a short walk with a stroller or small children, or a weekend athlete running a large loop. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANER 4 CIRCULATION LEGEND CLASS 1 BIKEWAY (8' WIDTH) KEY WALKWAY (8' MIN. WIDTH) • • • • HIKING TRAIL (5' MIN. WIDTH) SIDEWALKS (6' MIN WIDTH) • MID BLOCK CROSSING O CONNECTION POINT TO W.B.C. CLASS 1 BIKEWAY ■LJ/� SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 0 300' 600' 12 CIRCULATION 4 bre 4-3 ChM 1 Biky Section 4.1.2.1 Class 1 Bikeways A Class 1 Bikeway, FIGURE 4-3, will span the entire length of the community following the Western Bypass. At the southeast end of the Western Bypass the class 1 bikeway will also turn back north to connect with First Street. The bikeway is an 8' wide asphalt path with two 4' wide lanes, one for either direction of travel. There is a 2 foot clear zone shoulder on the outside of each lane. The uphill side will also incorporate a 3' vegetated swale (or cobble swale over concrete). Guidelines for a class 1 bike way require a 2% to 5% sustained gradient (and maximum of 12.5% gradient for 10' with landings - railings not required). Typical cross slope shall be 2%. Gaps on surface shall not to exceed %". Clearances shall be 10' vertical and 2' horizontal. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 4 CIRCULATION Figure 4-4 Key Walkway Section 4.1.2.2 Key Walkways The key pedestrian walkways, FIGURE 4 -4, can be found in the core of the community connecting the different villages and open spaces. These walkways provide a pedestrian network allowing users to move about the community while staying away from the main vehicular circulation. All key pedestrian walkways are 8 foot wide minimum. PARKING 3' BAND OF TRUNCATED DOM LANE MARKINGS -4 RAPID FLASHING BEACONS • PARKING �� -- RAISED CROSSWALK DECORATIVE PAVEMENT t Mid -Block Crossing %IAM SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 12 SETBACK VARIES i SEE ARCHITECTURAL GUIDELINES Figure 4-6 TypicarVillage Sidewalk Section 4.1.2.3 Sidewalks and Mews Sidewalks, FIGURE 4-6, will be located on each side of Altair Vista connecting the different villages and parks, and on A Street. Sidewalks shall be a minimum of 6' wide (7' wide along portions of Altair Vista, to allow small children to ride on the sidewalk). (See Vehicular Circulation section for street -specific sidewalk configurations.) There are no requirements for separate sidewalks at alleys, motor courts and streets that are internal to lots at Altair, unless the streets frame parks or are designated to have sidewalks in other sections of this Plan. These are shared streets, or mews, where pedestrians and cyclists have priority over automobiles and where speeds are limited to a walking pace. Mews feature enhanced paving across the entire surface and no curbs. See Section 4.2.3 and the description for Alley Street Type for a further explanation of how motorized and non -motorized traffic co- exist on internal streets. Nowmber2017 SPECIFIC PLAN FI 4 CIRCULATION Figure 4-7 4.1.2.4 Hiking Trails The main hiking trail, FIGURE 4-7, runs along the eastern slope of the community connecting many points of interest. Starting at the school site to the north and running along the 1st Street extension road into the main park, it splits to continue down to 1st Street and switches back to connect to Main Street. While the main portion of the trail continues along the eastern slope, other shorter segments of trails provide pedestrian connections to the different villages. The trail is 5' wide, stabilized, decomposed granite with a 2' wide bench an either side. The uphill side will have a 3' wide vegetated swale (or cobble swale over concrete.) Outdoor recreation access routes (ORAR) utilizes the following guidelines for trails and are adopted for Altair: 5% maximum for any distance (no rest interval required.) 5.1%-8.33% up to 200' maximum (rest interval required every 200'). 8.34%-10% up to 30' maximum (rest interval required every 30'.) 10%-12% for 10' maximum (rest interval required every 10'). Rest intervals shall be 60" minimum length and same width as trail. Salvaged boulders from grading operations should be used along open space trails for visual interest and to create overlooks and rest areas. I. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 110 4.1.3 Bike Routes The circulation network recognizes that bicycling includes a wide range of cycling skills and speeds. A cyclist could be a commuter going to and from work, a small child just learning or someone out for a Saturday ride. The Temecula region is also home to an active road racing community always looking for new training routes. The Temecula Valley Century charity ride has historically gone by the Altair site. The annual Tour de Murrieta incorporates the ridgeline portion of Rancho California Road. In 2013, the Tour of California, an international professional cycling race, visited the area with the start and finish of Stage 1 in Escondido and Stage 2 beginning in Murrieta. These various cycling levels require different bikeway types. Sidewalks along Altair Vista are widened to 7 feet to allow small children to ride on the sidewalk instead of the street. Two Class 1 Bikeways, one paralleling the Bypass and another connecting to First Street, can be used by leisurely riders and children and are wide enough for cyclists to pass pedestrians. In addition, all roads in the Altair community are to have either shared or dedicated bike lanes, except for the Western Bypass. Shared lanes are indicated with "sharrows" painted on the road to inform bicyclists and to alert motorists that the lane is to be shared. Ample bike racks throughout the community, especially at parks, recreation centers and the school further encourage cycling. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 4 CIRCULATION LEGEND CLASS I BIKEWAY PROPOSED CLASS I BIKEWAY CLASS II BIKEWAY PROPOSED CLASS II BIKEWAY 1111.11111111111111111s; Existing and Proposed =INN SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 4-13 ICIRCULATION 4 4.1.4 Pedestrian Bridges Pedestrian bridges will be utilized when necessary to connect trail segments over drainage draws. While the site may feature bridges of various scales, all pedestrian bridges will match the modern rustic motif of the Altair community. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN FII 4.1.5 Connection to OId Town 4 CIRCULATION A significant element of the pedestrian circulation plan is the linkage to OId Town Temecula via Main Street. This connection serves as circulation, community gateway and public open space, and is formed by four major links along the axis with Main Street leading to the central park and plaza in Village C. There is a substantial grade change between the park and the west end of Main Street. Much of this grade is reconciled by the first link: a sloped and meandering, accessible path leading out of the park and under the monumental bridge to Coromell Trail. The next component crosses Coromell Trail with a raised crosswalk, median and flashing warning lights to ensure pedestrian safety and priority over vehicles, as shown in FIGURE 4 - 9. East of Coromell Trail, a grand staircase welcomes visitors from Old Town. The stairs are complemented by an accessible path that stretches to either side of the staircase. This path will be enjoyed by all and is intended to be integral to the composition, not a tacked on necessity. The path slope will be gradual enough to avoid the requirement for railings that are visually confining. Both the stairs and path are broken up into manageable portions interspersed with shaded areas to sit and enjoy the view. Secondary stairs also connect the switchbacks periodically, so that a walker has the option to shorten their path. The design satisfies a variety of moods - a slow stroll along the full length of the path, with areas to stop and enjoy the scenery, a shorter amble along the path via intermediate steps, a direct route on the grand staircase, or merely sitting on one of the break-out landings of the stair to meet a friend or watch people pass by. The arrangement of curved steps, angular paths and segmented stone retaining walls creates a beautiful monumental entry to Altair and proclaims the importance of pedestrians to the community. =1/1 SPECIFIC PLA`: November 2017 4-15 CIRCULATION 4 LANE RAPID F BEACONS DECORATIVE PAVEMENT 1 Figure 4-9 Crossing at coroMIMPIr The visual axis with Main Street is reinforced by the offset stair segments that lead the traveler off and then back onto the axis at critical junctures, such as view platforms and seating areas. These gathering spaces are embraced by the broad arcs of the stair flights. Ornamental landscaping in color blocks between retaining walls further enhances the scheme, evoking stepped gardens that one passes between. Final design of these elements should ensure safety, discourage vandalism and damage from skateboards and employ durable, classic materials. The grand staircase is designed to be a focal public space to meet friends or relax - an event, rather than just a means of travel. Novemb.r 2017 SPECIFIC PLANF7% 4 CIRCULATION The fourth link is the off-site courtyard at the west end of Main Street. A concept for improvements to this now dead-end street is shown in FIGURE 4-10, but the final plans will come about through public dialogue and should be coordinated with the stair and path design to produce a cohesive space. 11111111.MIL Conceptual Plan at Grand Stair CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY: ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 4-1? CIRCULATION 4 November 2017 On Site Circulation OH Site Circulation SPECIFIC PL4NR/ 4.2 Circulation Plan - Vehicular 4 CIRCULATION The vehicular circulation system facilitates resident mobility; access to the school and to parks by non-residents; and through traffic on the Western Bypass. The circulation pattern is fairly simple and is guided by grading constraints and connections to the existing off-site network. FIGURE 4-11 depicts the vehicular entries of Altair. Main connections are at Vincent Moraga Drive on the north, First Street on the east, and Temecula Parkway (SR -79) to the south. The Western Bypass makes the north and south connections and is the largest street section, but it does not provide internal circulation for the Altair community. The Western Bypass links Temecula Parkway to Rancho California Road. It is primarily a public benefit to allow through - traffic to bypass Old Town and relieve congestion. Intersections with the Western Bypass are therefore, limited. It will be a scenic bypass due to its elevation above the City, with easterly views over the proposed development to mountains and valleys beyond. Views to the west will be into the natural hillside of the MSCHP wildlife corridor and dedicated open space. A split -lane configuration with landscaped median enhances the parkway character of the Western Bypass. Coromell Trail connects to the off-site street grid at First Street on the east side of the site. Due to slope limitations, Coromell Trail circumnavigates Village C and intersects with Altair Vista at a roundabout near the school. The Western Bypass, the round -about between First Street and Coromell Trail, and the portion of Altair Vista between the Bypass and Coromell Trail are public streets. All other streets in the Altair site are private. Altair Vista is a north -south spine through Altair that links the Villages. It is the main circulation element serving the residents of Altair, but is not intended as a through -way. A number of traffic calming measures are implemented to slow traffic on Altair Vista, including narrow lanes, street parking on one side (which should alternate sides) and frequent stops. Potential traffic congestion due to the slowing of Altair Vista will be aleviated by the parallel Western Bypass with its faster speeds. The cross section of Altair Vista varies depending on its location and the character of each Village: sometimes more urban, sometimes a couplet framing a park. It is generally framed by a tree -lined parkway and wide sidewalks. With the exception of Streets A, B and C, all remaining automotive access will be provided as part of individual development projects. These will be predominantly alleys and private drives running perpendicular to Altair Vista. These should be very intimate, in contrast with the formality of Altair Vista, with enhanced paving in lieu of raised sidewalks and no minimum setbacks. The character of these passageways is reflective of a mews, where pedestrians, bicycles and cars share the roadway. • I SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 4.2.1 Roundabouts and Couplets Roundabouts are used at Altair to slow and coordinate traffic without the idling, stacked automobiles that occur at signalized intersections. In some cases, such as the entrance from First Street and at the Community Center, roundabouts are installed at important locations in the project where drivers should be more aware of their surroundings. The centers of roundabouts are prime opportunities for special landscaping and public art, as discussed further in Sect -ion 9.9. Couplets are pairs of one-way streets that are separated by more than just a median. They facilitate safe crosswalks because the pedestrian only has to look one way and has a narrower street to cross. Couplets are used at Altair to frame the park at Village D. and are strongly encouraged around greens at Villages A and B. See FIGURE 4-25 and FIGURE 4-26 for an example of the Altair Vista couplet at Village D. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN♦!N • CIRCULATION 4.2.2 Internal Streets Alleys, motor courts and streets that are internal to lots at Altair are shared streets where pedestrians and cyclists have priority over automobiles and where speeds are limited to a walking pace. These are referred to as "mews" or "home zones" in Britain and as "woonerven" in the Netherlands. They have been shown to be safer than streets having separate sidewalks because drivers are forced to be more aware of pedestrians. They also become social spaces that are more intimate than parks but more interactive than a private yard, serving as a transition between public and private space. Mews feature enhanced paving across the entire surface, no curbs, landscaping and smaller pockets of parking that do not form a roadway edge or barrier. Drainage can occur through a central gutter or, preferably, through pervious pavement or to a landscaped area. See also the description for the Alley street type. =FA SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 4-2t CIRCULATION 4 4.2.3 The Vehicular Circulation Plan FIGURE 4-12 notes the locations of the eleven different types of street sections and three roundabouts. Site specific conditions such as additional turn pocket lanes at intersections shall be determined by the traffic study and shall be designed per the Tentative Map. Specific roads (listed from widest to narrowest) shall be constructed as: The Western Bypass Corridor 1- Standard Section - 100' R.O.W. The Western Bypass Corridor 2 - Split Section - 100' R.O.W. C Street and B Street South - Local Street (Modified) - 60' R.O.W. Coromell Trail (Public) - Split Lanes, Separate Trail, with no Parking- 58' P.U.A.E. Altair Vista & A Street - Landscaped Parkways with Parking one side -56' P.U.A.E. Altar Vista & A Street - Urban Parkways with Parking one side - 56' P.U.A.E. Altar Vista - One-way Street with Parking one side - 45' P.U.A.E. Altar Vista - Public - 70' to 83' R.O.W. Altair Vista Culvert / A Street Bridge - 48' R.Q.W. B Street North - 46' to 50' P.U.A.E. Alley Private streets are shown with Public Utility and Access Easements (P.U.A.E.'s) to allow for utility infrastructure. The utilities will primarily be located under sidewalks, with utility boxes or vaults located in the parkway. See Figure 9.13. Above -grade utility boxes and devices shall be screened with landscaping (with required clearances) and irrigation control valves shall be located in parkways or residential setbacks (if HOA maintained). See Section 9.5 for utility placement and screening guidelines. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN• ALTAIR VISTA WESTERN BYPASS C STREET B STREET NORTH B STREETS UTH N •"12 =1/111 SPECIFIC PLAN 4 CIRCULATION I LEGEND i STREET SECTION- WESTERN BYPASS CORFUCOR 1 "BLOC) STREET sECTKYI • WESTERN BYPASS COARDOH 2 (PUBUC) STT SECTION • C STENT & B SrTvtr S. (PUBLIC; STREET SECTION • COROI.HL TRAL SPLIT (PRIVATE) • • • STT SECTK7N - COROFABI TRAIL (PFINATE STREET SECTION - ALTAIR VETA 8 A STFIEET PLANTED PARKWAYS (PRIVATE - STREET SECTION - ALTAR VEA 8 A STREET, URBAN PARKWAYS (PRIVATE) STREET SECTION • ALTAIR VISTA ONE WAY WITH PAPIK143 ONE SIDE (PRIVATE) STREET SEDT ON • ALTAIR VISTA PUBLIC) STREET SECTION - ALTAIR VISTA CULVERT I A STREET BRUME STREET SECTION - B STREET N. wlTi CLASS 1 BYE TRAIL (PRIvATE STREET SECTION - B S [Fitt i N WITH SHARED BKE :AuE (PRIVATE TRANS( TONAL AMAMI TENTATIVE MAP FIOLI DABO UT - 1 • ROUNDABOUT 2 Rauu - ABOur - 3 ROUN:ABOUT - 4 VehicuirrircuRilin FWD November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 Western Bypass Corridor )Public) Stn -Initsgsmjimigo. CotWor 1 (Pum TTM Tots D, N UMW of J ) The Western BypafCorridor 1, FIGURE 4-13 (Section), running along the western perimeter of the developed portion of Altair. • 12 -foot travel lanes. • 7 -foot shoulder running in either direction. • 14 -foot landscaped median separates the different directional lanes of travel and is planted with native trees, shrubs, and ground cover. • 8 -foot wide class I bikeway runs alongside the Western Bypass separated by a parkway with similar planting to the median. • Trees for both the parkways and the median shall be clustered and spaced 15 feet to 100 feet apart with an average count of 40 foot on center. Trees shall be a minimum of 50% 15 gallon size, 45% 24" box, and 5% 36" box. �ar ROW VARIES , 3' , i7 6 3 , BIKEWAY Figure 4-14 Street Section - Western Bypass Corridor 2 ( Public, TTM lot L ). 4 41111 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN r7 4 CIRCULATION The Western Bypass Corridor The design intent is to create a very natural/SoCal native landscape character for this street type. Trees shall be clustered to provide a dynamic experience of openness and enclosure as well as to enhance scenic views. These areas shall use a combination of primarily SoCaI native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers in natural organic patterns with limited non-native shrubs and groundcovers. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 85% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 15%. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 90% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 10%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Turf is not allowed in parkways or median. (Bioswales are considered a separate landscape area type and therefore have their own category description and plant list.) - REFER TO THE CIRCULATION SECTION FOR ADDITIONAL INFO MAI ION. - REFER TO THE APPENDIX FOR PLANT LIST. Figure 4-15 Street Axon - Western Bypass Corridor 2 ( Public ) The Western Bypass Corridor 2, FIGURE 4-14 (Section) and FIGURE 4-15 (Axonometric), running along the western perimeter of the developed portion of Altair, • Two 12 -foot travel lanes and a 7 -foot shoulder running in either direction. • 22 -foot landscaped median separates the different directional lanes of travel and is planted with native trees, shrubs, and ground cover. • 8 -foot wide class I bikeway runs alongside the Western Bypass lower in elevation and separated by a parkway with similar planting to the median. • Trees for both the parkways and the median shall be clustered and spaced 15 feet to 100 feet apart with an average count of 40 foot on center. Trees shall be a minimum of 50% 15 gallon size, 45% 24" box, and 5% 36" box SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 C Street & B Street South -16 Street Section - C Street (TTM lots D+ E) & B Street South (bts B,C+F) (.R CStreet and B Street South - 60' ROW , Fic;uRF 4-16 (Section) and FIGURE 4-17 (Axonometric)_ Features: • Two 12 -foot travel lanes with 6 -foot wide bike lanes each side. • Parking along one side. • 5 -foot contiguous sidewalks along both sides. • 3 -foot landscaped parkways. • Decorative street lights will be located based on safety and comfort. • Dedicated bike lanes shall be provided. • Street trees shall be spaced at 24 feet on center. Trees shall be a minimum of 100% 24" box size. November 2017 SPECIFIC PAN 4 CIRCULATION Figure 4-17 Street Axon - C Street & B Street South (Public) C Street and B Street South These areas shall use a combination of primarily SoCal natives with limited non-native shrubs and groundcovers. SoCaI native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 85% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 15%. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 90% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 10%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Turf is not allowed in parkways. (Bioswales are considered a separate landscape area type and therefore have their own category description and plant list.) -REFER TO THE CIRCULATION SECTION FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. -REFER TO THE APPENDIX FOR PLANT LIST. /NSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 Coror_ell.Trail Lure_ 4-18 Str+ Section - QUIIIIIPtraillr Split Lanes ( Private, TTM lot G) Split Lanes (portion of street), Separate Trail with no Parking - 40' to 58' Easement, FIGURE 4-18 and FIGURE 4-19 (Sections), FIGURE 4-20 (Axonometric) Features: • Two 12 -foot travel lanes. • Split lane portion features 14 -foot travel lane and 6 -foot bike lane each side, separated by a landscaped median. • While there are no sidewalks along this street type, there will be a 5 foot wide hiking trail alongside higher in elevation. Rolled curbs are included for ease of emergency vehicle access. • Decorative street lights will be located based on safety and comfort. Native street trees and various shrubs, grasses, and ground covers will be planted in the median and along the sides of the road on the slopes. Trees for both the parkways and the median shall be clustered and spaced 15 feet to 100 feet apart with an average count of 40 foot on center. Trees shall be a minimum of 50% 15 gallon size, 45% 24" box, and 5% 36" box. Trees shall be a minimum of 50% 15 gallon size, 45% 24" box, and 5% 36" box. Dedicated bike lanes shall be provided when road width allows. 4-28 November 2017 SPECIFIC _aN 4 CIRCULATION Figure 4-20 Street Axon - Coromell Trail - Split Lanes ( Private ) Coromell Trail - Split Lanes, Separate Trail, no Parking The design intent is to create a very natural/ SoCal native landscape character for this street type. Trees shall be clustered to provide a dynamic experience of openness and enclosure as well as to enhance scenic views. These areas shall use a combination of primarily SoCal native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers in natural organic patterns with limited non-native shrubs and groundcovers. SoCaI native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 85% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 15%. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 90% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 10%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Turf is not allowed in parkways. (Bioswales are considered a separate landscape area type and therefore have their own category description and plant list.) — REFER TO THE CIRCULATION SECTION FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. — REFER TO THE APPENDIX FOR PLANT LIST. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 Altair Vista ..4-21 Street Section - Altair Vista - Planted Parkways (Private, TTM lot K) Altair Vista— Landscaped Parkways with Parking one side , FIGURE 4-21 (Section) and FIGURE 4-22 (Axonometric) Features: • Two 12 -foot travel lanes with an 8 -foot parking lane on one side. Each side has a 5 -foot landscaped parkway and 7 -foot sidewalk. • On the parking side, there are breaks in the landscaped parkway with concrete pads allowing pedestrians to exit their parked vehicle. • Decorative street lights will be located based on safety and comfort. Shared bike lanes shall be indicated by "sharrows" painted in the travel lanes. Street trees shall be spaced 24 feet on center. • Street trees at every 24 feet provide shade. Trees shall be a minimum of 100% 24" box size. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 4 CIRCULATION Figure 4-22 Street Axon - Altair Vista - Planted Parkways Altair Vista - Landscaped Parkways with Parking one side It is intended that the urbanized Village streets use a combination of SoCaI native and non-native trees, shrubs and groundcovers. Although the plant species will be the same or similar to the natural areas, this street type shall be designed in more defined patterns (such as blocks of matching plant material, interesting angles, or geometric patterns) rather than natural organic patterns. These areas shall use a combination of SoCal native and non-native shrubs and groundcovers. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Turf is not allowed in parkways. (Bioswales are considered a separate landscape area type and therefore have their own category description and plant list.) - REFER TO THE CIRCULATION SECTION FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. - REFER TO THE APPENDIX FOR PLANT LIST. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 4-31 CIRCULATION 4 Inh'-'il a^tion - Altair Vista (TTM lot F) & A Street ( lot 1) - Urban Parkways ( Private ) Altair Vista & A Street A it Vista and AStreet- Urban Parkways with Parking one side FIGURE 4-23 (Section) and FIGURE 4-24 (Axonometric) Features: • Two 12 -foot travel lanes with an 8 foot parking lane on one side. Each side has a 5 -foot decorative hardscaped parkway and 7 -foot sidewalk. This streetscape is found in the main Village nodes and high pedestrian use areas. • The hardscape parkway provides a larger walkable area for pedestrians and a zone for benches, potted plants, and decorative paving such as brick, granite cobbles, or concrete unit pavers. • Decorative street lights will be located based on safety and comfort. Shared bike lanes shall be indicated by "sharrows" painted in the travel lanes. • Street trees at every 24 feet provide shade and may be in planting beds or with tree grates. Trees shall be a minimum of 100% 24" box size. 4-32 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 4 CIRCULATION —S114Et1 LICI-t 1HF L. PJN FE R '•''.'iTH P,_/"\1\,111.11,, OR l i;'t '' d.Aa f) i'll<I- ! ANE Figure 4-24 Street Axon - Altair Vista & A Street - Urban Parkways Altair Vista and A Street - Urban Parkways with Parking one side It is intended that the urbanized Village streets use a combination of SoCal native and non-native trees, shrubs and groundcovers. Although the plant species will be the same or similar to the natural areas, this street type shall be designed in more defined patterns (such as blocks of matching plant material, interesting angles, or geometric patterns) rather than natural organic patterns. These areas shall use a combination of SoCal native and non-native shrubs and groundcovers. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Turf is not allowed in parkways. (Bioswales are considered a separate landscape area type and therefore have their own category description and plant list.) —REFER TO THE CIRCULATION SECTION FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. —REFER TO THE APPENDIX FOR PLANT LIST. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 Altair Vista - One Way egu - Section - Altair Vista One Way (Private, TTM lot K ) AltairViste- One-WaaStreet with Parkin/Lone side, FIGURE 4-25 (Section) and FIGURE 4-26(Axonometric) Features: 20 -foot travel lane with an 8 -foot parking lane on the developed side. The developed side also has a 5 -foot hardscaped parkway and 7 -foot sidewalk. This streetscape type is found around the Village "A", "B" and "D" parks with a 5 -foot landscaped parkway around the park side. The hardscape parkway provides a larger walkable area for pedestrians and a zone for benches, potted plants, and decorative paving such as brick, granite cobbles, or concrete unit pavers. Decorative street lights will be located based on safety and comfort. Shared bike lanes shall be indicated by "sharrows" painted in the travel lanes. Street trees at every 24 feet provide shade and may be in planting beds or with tree grates. Trees shall be a minimum of 100% 24" box size. Nowmb.r2017 SPECIFIC PLANFII 4 CIRCULATION -SCORED CONC Rt 117 - : REE PLANTER WITH PLANTING OR G POTT5BENCH RAM S �BENCN pure 4-26 Street Axon - Altair Vista One Way Street with Parking One Side Altair Vista - One-way Street with Parking one side It is intended that the urbanized Village streets use a combination of SoCal native and non-native trees, shrubs and groundcovers. Although the plant species will be the same or similar to the natural areas, this street type shall be designed in more defined patterns (such as blocks of matching plant material, interesting angles, or geometric patterns) rather than natural organic patterns. These areas shall use a combination of SoCal native and non-native shrubs and groundcovers. SoCaI native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Turf is not allowed in parkways. (Bioswales are considered a separate landscape area type and therefore have their own category description and plant list.) - REFER TO THE CIRCULATION SECTION FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. - REFER TO THE APPENDIX FOR PLANT LIST. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 Altair Vista (Public) Vista ( Public, TTM Tots C and E ) Altair Vista (Public) - Solit Lanes with no Parkins, FIGURE 4-27 (Section) and FIGURE 4-28 (Axonometric) Features: • Split lane design with 14-27 foot (varies) travel lane and 6 -foot wide bike lane each side, separated by a landscaped median. • This streetscape type is found northeast of the proposed school site, between Coromell Trail and the Western Bypass and will be the main route to the school. • The southwest (school) side features a contiguous 6 -foot sidewalk with a landscaped parkway against the right-of-way line. • The opposite side features a 5 -foot landscaped parkway between the curb and a 6 -foot sidewalk. • Street trees at every 24 feet provide shade. Trees shall be a minimum of 100% 24" box size. • Decorative street lights will be located based on safety and comfort. • Dedicated bike lanes shall be provided. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 4 CIRCULATION O 1'. 70 R.0.W DEDCATED BIKE LA.PJE Figure 4-28 Street Axon - Altair Vista ( Public ) Altair Vista (Public) It is intended that the urbanized Village streets use a combination of SoCal native and non-native trees, shrubs and groundcovers. Although the plant species will be the same or similar to the natural areas, this street type shall be designed in more defined patterns (such as blocks of matching plant material, interesting angles, or geometric patterns) rather than natural organic patterns. These areas shall use a combination of SoCal native and non-native shrubs and groundcovers. SOCaI native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Turf is not allowed in parkways or median. (Bioswales are considered a separate landscape area type and therefore have their own category description and plant list.) -REFER TO THE CIRCULATION SECTION FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. - REFER TO THE APPENDIX FOR PLANT LIST. 7T�SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 Altair Vista Culverts & A Street Bridge PUBLIC UTILITY & Aft -PCS EASEMENT R. R. Ite 4-29 erection - Altair Vista Culverts & A Street Bridge ( Private) Altair Vista &A Street (Bridge/ Culvert Locations), FIGURE 4-29 (Section) and FIGURE 4-30 (Axonometric) Features. • Two 12 -foot travel lanes and 7 -foot sidewalks with 5 feet of bridge treatment. Since this type of streetscape is found at the bridges (or faux bridges) there is no parking and no landscaped parkway. • Decorative street lights will be located based on safety and comfort. Shared bike lanes shall be indicated by "sharrows" painted in the travel lanes. • Shared bike lanes shall be indicated by "sharrows" painted in the travel lanes. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 4 CIRCULATION Figure 4-30 Street Axon - Altair Vista Culvert and A Street Bridge Contiguous Sidewalks with no Parking These areas do not have landscaping since they are bridges or faux bridges (culverts.► SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 CIRCULATION 4 B Street North 10' PKWAY 46` PUBLIC UTILITY & ACCESS EASEMENT Section - B Street North ( Private, portion of TTM lot L ) EXISTING GRADE 36568 Eun d_i� greet Section - B Street North with Class 1 Bikeway ( Private, TTM Tots L and M) BStreet North (Private) Landscaped Parkways with no Parking, FIGURE 4-31 (Section), FIGURE 4-32 (Section ),and FIGURE 4-33 (Axonometric), features: Two 12 -foot travel lanes and no parking. The side adjacent the retaining wall features a 10 -foot heavily planted parkway to screen the wall. The other side has a 5 -foot landscaped parkway and either an 8 -foot class I bikeway or key walkway, depending on the portion of the street. • This streetscape is found at the south entry to the community off the Western Bypass road. • Decorative street lights will be located based on safety and comfort. • Shared bike lanes shall be indicated by "sharrows" painted in the travel lanes. • Street trees shall be spaced 15 feet to 100 feet apart with an average count of 40 feet on center. Trees shall be a minimum of 50% 15 gallon size, 45% 24" box, and 5% 36" box. 4-40 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN f7L 4 CIRCULATION w^. 46' `-SHARED BIKE LANE 11111.1.11.1111161 Axon - B Street North ( Private _ MEN a B Street North (Private) - Landscaped Parkways with no Parking The design intent is to create a very natural/ SoCal native landscape character for this street type. Trees shall be clustered to provide a dynamic experience of openness and enclosure as well as to enhance scenic views. These areas shall use a combination of primarily SoCal native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers in natural organic patterns with limited non-native shrubs and groundcovers. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 85% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 15%. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 90% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 10%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Turf is not allowed in parkways. (Bioswales are considered a separate landscape area type and therefore have their own category description and plant list.) There is a considerable grade change to the west of this street section. See Section 9.7 for standards for slopes and retaining walls, including allowances for stepped walls or taller segmental walls where necessary at steep slopes. -REFER TO THE CIRCULATION SECTION FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. -REFER TO THE APPENDIX FOR PLANT LIST. ll�ii SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 ICIRCULATION 4 Alley Street Type 11111111116. 11111111•11110) Alley Street Typ FIGURE 4-34 (Section) This street type is found in interior developments only and is not part of the primary circulation plan. Features: One 24 -foot drive aisle • No minimum set back; dimension from alley to face of building varies • No sidewalks are required. Drive aisle is also the pedestrian route. • Provide landscaping on one or both sides. Landscaping depth and location should vary so that drive aisle meanders. This slows traffic and creates a more intimate path. • Avoid dead-end alleys. Where a dead-end is necessary, provide adequate turn -around for a fire truck and continue pedestrian path through to connect with other paths. • Where appropriate, alleys should be widened to allow parking. 4-42 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANP 4 CIRCULATION Figure 4-35 Typical Alley at Cottages at Harveston in Temecula Alley Street Type - 24' Width -SEE VILLAGE SECTION AND VILLAGE PLANT LISTS. j % SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 5 GRADING PLAN 5.1 Grading Plan Description GRADING PLAN Al tAir The Grading Plan for the Altair Specific Plan is tailored to the existing topography of the project site. It is intended that the proposed grading plan be sensitive to and reflect natural landforms where possible. Site planning is carefully integrated with these landforms, so that the individual villages are distinguished and separated by topographical features as shown in Figure 5-1 Grading Plan. An earthwork quantity take -off conducted by the project engineer anticipates that the project site grading will approximately balance and will require minimal soil export. During the development of the project, the Master Developer may need to stockpile dirt on the Civic Site for an interim period. This would require a stockpile permit from the City. The Conceptual Grading Plan (Exhibit A for TTM No. 36959-1, 36959-2, 36959-3 and 36959) also accommodates a street system that meets the City of Temecula standards for acceptable grades. The associated Water Quality Management Plan, described in Section 6.1, establishes a basis for appropriate treatment of drainage requirements. The grading concept implements techniques to ensure that the overall shape, height, and grade of any cut or fill slope is designed to simulate the natural terrain and blend as much as possible with the adjacent natural open space. The plan proposes that graded slopes be revegetated and that drainage devices and erosion control facilities be constructed in accordance with project design objectives as well as City standards. Interim erosion control measures shall be provided during construction phases to address water quality regulations, Grading west of the Western Bypass Corridor shall not exceed a maximum slope ratio of 1.5:1. This will reduce amount of grading in the hillside areas. 5.2 Grading Plan Standards 1. All grading activities shall be in substantial conformance with the overall Grading Plan and shall implement any grading related mitigation measures outlined in the Preliminary Geotechnical Studies as contained in the Technical Appendices of the Environmental Impact Report (EIR). 2. Prior to any grading permits a soils report and geotechnical study shall be prepared to further analyze onsite soil conditions and slope stability. An erosion control plan and Water Quality Management Plan (WQMP) shall be prepared and approved. These documents shall include appropriate measures to control erosion and dust. 3. For erosion control purposes, slopes exceeding ten (10') feet in vertical height shall be hydro -mulched, prior to final acceptance and prior to the beginning of the rainy season (October - March). ' SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 GRADING PLAN 5 4, All on-site grading shall be performed to the City of Temecula standards. 5. Graded slopes shall be oriented to minimize visual impacts (i.e., inclusion of complimentary slope plants) to surrounding areas, specifically areas adjacent to proposed structures, 6. Grading work shall be balanced on-site wherever possible. 7. Graded but undeveloped land shall be maintained weed free and planted with interim landscaping, such as hydro -seed, within ninety (90) days of completion of grading, unless building permits are obtained. 8. Unless otherwise approved by the City of Temecula, all cut and fill slopes shall be constructed at inclinations of no steeper than two (2) horizontal feet to one (1) vertical foot. The Grading Plan shall reflect a contouring and landscaping program for the purpose of controlling slope erosion. 9. Slopes in hillside areas shall not exceed a maximum ratio of 1.5:1. This ratio will reduce the amount of grading west of the Western Bypass Corridor, thus reducing potential impacts. All other slopes shall not be steeper than 2:1 unless approved by the Public Works Department and considered safe in a slope stability report prepared by a soils engineer or an engineering geologist. The slope stability report shall also contain recommendations for landscaping and erosion control. 10. Prior to commencing any grading activities, including clearing and grubbing, a grading permit shall be obtained from the City of Temecula. 11. A qualified archaeologist shall be consulted to ascertain the significance of any historic or prehistoric remains. 12. Soil stabilizers shall be used to control dust as required by SCAQMD Rule 403. 13. All grading activities shall comply with the mitigation measures as outlined in the Altair Final Environmental Impact Report. 14. Recycled water shall be utilized for all grading activities. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrI N O ffl}t% SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 5 GRADING PLAN GRADING PLAN 5 TR 36959-1 LOT 2 PID GRADED BRM 1 r 7ERACE DRAM � 1RAcr ROJ840 TR 389562 LOT 23 7R 389563 LOT 20 a TR 38959.2 LOT 10 OPEN SPACE I J TR 360563 LOT 13 (CONSERVATION) OPEN SPACE 9ATLJ911 r ICERi5P1011 1 PJM 2j YAMSYAyI 5.0.5 WESTERN BYPASS CORRIDOR TR 36959-1 LOT 'B' 12. 95IER 9 r REctt1ID WArt 100 rasaK mac TRACE PUN i9a W 4R11CAL CRAP 17 TRRACE 19404 TR 36959-3 LOT 10 "y' ',.( PAD II 7 CRADED 9641/ 11 RE *$ RAIL (r95 PER SEPARATE 1701ST) R/R 15 x. 01rsD L E10STNC T CPADE vARES SECTION A•A pars WESTERN BYPASS CORRIDOR TR 369562 LOT "A" TR 35959.3 LOT TR 36959-1 LOT 5 TR 389562 LOT 24 TR 35959-3 LOT 19 Rn PARIES r21420 RAL PSI 1 (.ALRIANS 5V5 3r + �{ W ES • r R[c+atD 11014 SECTION K.K 015 TR 36959-3 LOT 'C' 'r 51REIT NORM / PRIVATE ACCESS * UITRJTT EASSENT 1 6' 7' ROW r. 1 r sou tr sou -f 1 Ei 10' sn•J 17 x IRAL RA TJ RIQMY TR 36959-3 LOT 13 OPEN SPACE w' ACCESS t nun R (ASEIEN5 j, TRACT 80019AP (991. TRACT 36568 SECTION 11-5 Nis PAD GRADED Bra TR 36939-2 LOT 1 TR 369662 LOT 12 TR 36959-3 LOT 10 Sections 111 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK CORNELL TRAM. h1 SECTION A -A —.c ecocc 94.1.00ar 5 GRADING PLAN EXHIBIT E - TRACT 36959 ALTAIR RETAINING WALL UWE fl .Diagram I SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 5-5 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES ail ka; r 6 INFRASTRUCTURE AND UTILITIES The Altair Specific Plan project site is currently undeveloped land with only a few of the required public utilities located onsite. Proposed development within Altair will provide the necessary connections, extensions, and upgrades as required to serve Altair. As part of the Altair Specific Plan, associated public utility plans have been developed to identify these anticipated facilities. This section reviews the availability of public facilities to serve the Altair Specific Plan as well as the project demands based upon the type and intensity of land uses proposed. The information included in the following infrastructure and utility facilities plan sections is preliminary. The final location and size of all public facilities will be based upon final improvement plans prepared under the direction of a Registered Civil Engineer and based upon the review and approval of the agency with jurisdiction. 6.1 DRAINAGE 6.1.1 Project Description The project site is situated at the base of the Santa Rosa foothills on the westerly side of Temecula Valley. Under pre -project conditions, runoff from these foothills and the project site flows easterly across the project site and directly or indirectly into Murrieta Creek. The project will maintain storm runoff into Murrieta creek. The project proposes storm drainage system to collect and transport the 100 -year on- and off-site storm flows through the site as required by the City of Temecula. Murrieta Creek is a regional drainage facility and under the jurisdiction of Riverside County Flood Control & Water Conservation District (RCFC & WCD). The proposed drainage systems will include separate storm drain facilities (streets, curb and gutter, drainage ditches, drainage swales, inlets, catch basins, and pipe) to convey on-site and off-site (open space) runoff through the project to Murrieta Creek. This dual system will avoid commingling of runoff from the developed (on-site runoff) and non-developed (off-site runoff) areas of the project. The off-site runoff drainage system will collect and carry storm flows from the natural open space hillsides immediately west of the project, through the project site along the proposed Western Bypass, and into Murrieta Creek at two locations. The first location is near the northerly end of the project and the second location is near the southerly end of the project. The storm drain facilities used to convey the off-site runoff consists of catch basins, ditches, and storm drain pipes. • I•%SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 6-1 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES 6 The on-site runoff drainage system will collect and treat surface runoff from the proposed development, before exiting the site. The treatment control best management practices (BMP) include desiltation basins and bioretention basins. Desiltation basins will collect and store sediment from several of the mass -graded pads. Biorention basins will treat storm water from the majority of the remaining graded areas as well as the proposed streets. In addition, the project includes some proposed perimeter slopes along its easterly boundary. The slopes will be landscaped and the runoff will flow directly off-site to existing drainage facilities. The runoff from these slopes is self -treating and does need to be directed to a BMP. The project runoff will discharge into Murrieta Creek at several locations along the easterly boundary. Some locations are at existing storm drain outfalls. In this situation, the proposed drainage system will connect to an existing system prior to reaching the creek. Other locations are new outfall locations into the creek. Each storm drain will be sized to convey its tributary 100 -year flow. 6.1.2 WQMP/NPDES The onsite drainage plan utilizes the project's streets, open channels, ditches and underground storm drains to convey storm water flows. To adequately control storm water quality, both point and non -point sources of urban pollutants must be identified and controlled. As required by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB), the runoff from the proposed developed surfaces will be treated for water quality purposes. This treatment train will incorporate a variety of desiltation basins and bioretention facilities to reduce any potential water quality impacts on Murrieta Creek and the Santa Margarita River Watershed. See Figures 6-1 and 6-2. A Preliminary Water Quality Management Plan has been prepared that identifies the Best Management Practices (BMPs) for storm water treatment facilities, source control and site design. The Preliminary WQMP addresses the project specific constraints of the site and proposed treatment and filtration of storm water runoff. The project will also be required to comply with the NPDES General Construction Activity Storm Water Permit. This permit will be required prior to receipt of a grading permit from the City of Temecula and requires the submission of a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) which will also identify proposed BMPs. The proposed onsite drainage and water quality system facilities located on privately held land will be privately owned and maintained by the proposed Home Owners Association (HOA), while portions of the system within a public R.O.W. will be maintained by the City of Temecula. All storm water and associated water quality facilities will be designed to comply with the City of Temecula and, where applicable, the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District requirements. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANriI Figure 6-1 Typical Drainage Draw Plan i Drainage Draw Section SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 6INFRASTRUCTUREI & UTILITIES 6-3 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES 6 EXHIBIT F - TRACT 36959 ALTAIR CONCEPTUAL STORM DRAIN PLAN MAY'3,P fit DOETVC E*ORY ORO. Ali ROVOCEP STORY DRAM UE RO.OE®CONCRETE G ANG., an November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANET 6.1.3 Drainage Plan Standards 6 INFRASTRUCTURE I 8 UTILITIES Drainage and flood control facilities and improvements shall be designed and constructed in accordance with the City of Temecula and, where applicable, Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District requirements. 1. Major backbone drainage/flood control facilities shall be accepted and maintained by the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District. Local drainage devices, including inlets/catch basins and storm drains to be constructed within street rights-of- way will be maintained by the City of Temecula. Only those drainage easements serving inlets/outlets to facilities to be maintained by the City will be accepted by the City. Onsite easements will not be accepted for maintenance by the City. 2. All drainage facilities shall be designed to provide 100 -year protection. The 10 -year storm flow should be contained within the curb and the 100 -year storm flow should be contained within the street R.O.W. When either of these criteria is exceeded, additional drainage facilities will be installed. 3. Erosion control and Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SWPPP) incorporating Best Management Practices (BMP) shall be prepared and implemented for the project grading and construction phases in accordance with the City of Temecula and San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES). All projects proposing construction activities including: clearing, grading, or excavation which results in the disturbance of at least five acres of total land area, or activities which are part of a larger common plan of development of five acres or greater, shall obtain the appropriate NPDES construction permit and pay the appropriate fees. All development within the Specific Plan boundaries shall be subject to future requirements adopted by the County of Riverside and the City of Temecula to implement the NPDES program. 4. A Preliminary Water Quality Management Plan (WQMP) shall be prepared under the Clean Water Act and the City of Temecula's Storm Water and Urban Runoff Management and Discharge Control Ordinance (Temecula Municipal Code Title 8.28). 5. The EIR mitigation measures, standard Conditions of Approval, and Project Design Guidelines shall be followed. I. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 6—S INFRASTRUCTURE 8 UTILITIES 6 i 6' CONC. CHANNEL • Cr. CMG o/N•F1 ANT M°4RAG ' /fl 24' Er 4E9 Cuifff EX CPC DWANEL £r Tr" .4 v3X EX s6• • 4OV1 EX. fi' ♦ ♦ CONC. CHANNEL • 4. i. / ti 44. 36. CHANNEL �r�L�Tai�+" �c 1 ,�•; NORTH PHASE TR 36959-1 24" a CONC. CNAMMEL Ex. 47' 24 24 24 Jo +e' etc 4e'� PUJOL STREET 1 36 - EM. +8' m CENTRAL PHASE TR 36959-2 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANffl 6 INFRASTRUCTURE S UTILITIES 24" 6' CONC. 2 24' ARI '1 DL. 2 /. tx,N- "it /%/4, « 2:x. x. ! �4Y r B Aye,- EX. . R' Ex. 24' $i; CIVIC PHASE TR 36959 • / ism SPECIFIC PLAN E.. 36" EX. 36' Ex. 6' CONC. `tX J6' CMANNEL EX. 24' I._Ex. 42' PUJOLSTREET Ex 24 6' CONC. CHANNEL EX 6' COHC. CHANNEL SOUTH PHASE TR 36959-3 C STREET \.1:- :4 -r 36'' +e' November 2017 EXISTING STORM ORAIN LINE PROPOSED STORM DRAM UNE PROPOSED CONCRETE CHARM 6-7 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES 6 6-8 6.2 WATER 6.2.1 Water Description Domestic Water & Fire Service The proposed domestic water system is diagrammed in Figures 6-5 and 6-6. The Altair Specific Plan is located within the service area of the Rancho California Water District (RCWD). The project is located within the District's Rancho division and more specifically the 1305 Pressure Zone. The District's main source of domestic water is from the Metropolitan Water District's two existing San Diego Aqueduct pipelines Numbers 4 and 5. These pipelines traverse the southern end of the project site between the proposed Civic Site and Village G. The project's domestic water service can be broken down in three systems as follows: Backbone, Onsite (to be constructed by the subsequent merchant builders) and Offsite. Backbone The backbone public systems will be broken down into four Tracts as follows: Tract 36959-1 is located at the most northerly portion of the project and will connect to the existing 12 -inch main in Ridge Park Drive at the intersection of the proposed Western Bypass public ROW and Ridge Park Drive public ROW. A 12 -inch main will be brought on site within the Western Bypass public ROW to the intersection with Altair Vista public ROW and continuing in Altair Vista to the southerly Tract 36959-1 boundary. This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide domestic and fire service to Villages A and B. Tract 36959-2 is located in the north central portion of the project and will connect to the existing 24 -inch main in Pujol Street at First Street. A 12 -inch main will be brought on site in First Street ROW to the Coromell Trail public access and utility easement which shall loop through Coromell Trail public access and utility easement, A Street public access and utility easement and Altair Vista public access and utility easement and eventually terminate at the northerly Tract 36959-2 boundary. This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide domestic and fire service to Villages C North and South as well as the School Site and Park Site. Tract 36959-3 is located in the south central portion of the project and will connect to the existing 24 -inch transmission main in the Pujol Street ROW at the most southerly portion of Tract 36959- 3. A 12 -inch main will extend northwesterly in the proposed Western Bypass ROW to the park area (Open Space Lot 17 in said Tract) between Villages E and F. At this location the 12 -inch main will traverse the project northerly within the Altair Vista public access and utility easement to the northerly potion of said Tract 36959-3 and terminate. This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide domestic and fire service to Villages 'E', 'F' and 'D'. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrI \J< - h ‘‘• IC\ • •••••••":". * ‘.4 • • 6 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES EXHIBIT D - TRACT 36959 ALTAIR CONCEPTUAL WATER PLAN jN I ett ExpirrnOWOMPPC ExATWOMKTOSO w•Itlt PACPC3K0 DCANFIrIC WIVE* LPG' PIRCPCSED NEL-MED 'mak, L. PFKPOSED flWri101.7 kk 1 11 • •1 I 11 -r--_ 1/4 1 h 11 •• v • 1111111111111111 14111111M111111 SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 6-9 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES 6 Tract 36959 is located at the most southerly end of the Altair Specific Plan and will connect to the existing 30 -inch transmission main within the proposed public ROW of 'C' Street and 'B' Street South in separate locations. This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide domestic and fire service to Village 'G' and the Civic Site. ffsite Offsite water main improvements would be limited to the following: For Tract 36959-1 an offsite connection is required within the existing Ridge Park Drive public ROW where the proposed Western Bypass public ROW intersects with Ridge Park Drive. This will be a 12 -inch connection to the existing 12 -inch domestic water line at that location. This offsite connection will provide domestic and fire service to Villages 'A' and 'B'. For Tract 36959-2 an offsite connection is required at the intersection of existing Pujol Street public ROW and First Street Public ROW. This will be a 12 -inch connection to the existing 12 - inch domestic water line at that location. A 12 -inch line will then extend up within the existing First Street public ROW to the proposed Coromell Trail public ROW. This offsite connection will provide domestic and fire service to Villages 'C' North and South as well as the School site and Park Site. For Tract 36959-3 an offsite connection is required at the intersect -ion of existing Pujol Street public ROW and the proposed Western Bypass public ROW. This will be a 12 -inch connection to the existing 12 -inch domestic water line at that location. This offsite connection will provide domestic and fire service to Villages 'E', 'F' and 'D'. For Tract 36959 two offsite connections will be required and will connect to the existing 30 -inch transmission main within the proposed 'C' Street and 'B' Street public ROW in separate locations. This offsite connection will provide domestic and fire service to Village 'G' and the Civic Site. Onsite Onsite water systems serving the various villages would be constructed by subsequent merchant builders and may become private systems. Final sizes, and systems will be determined at final engineering. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN r// 6 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES 0 0 ' / ,,,,,,,.... ........., \ .. Y 12W . a . • C") Ull l . i Z Ot 17• W I 73 Dr. N. NV \ 12- Al — — _ VINCENT MORAGA 11 "Arl r Frol_7) I si V, a Pe I r. M Ni ,Ae .4 N. /Jr , \ \ tr. Jr fr a Ze a 36. NORTH PHASE TR 36959-1 OLD TOWN FRONT STREET SOUTH PHASE TR 36959-3 1..11111411pater Plans by Phase =ffffl SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 6-11 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES 6 w 8. FOR PUJOL STREET I-1 I to IA rn m CIVIC PHASE TR 36959 a. (J) e' • I Z L aarec R Dace I� MARLK Irn m a r ■ —� — rA El N'• CENTRAL PHASE Ex. 97" SO 401ED'.Cf a a'e )•Z Ee Jr ■ r 1)1570e DOA SJE NOV • / C2,039°. • LEGEND: 1' EASTING DOMESTIC WATER UNE EXISTING RECYCLED WATER UNE PROPOSED DOMESTIC WATER UNE PROPOSED RECYCLED WATER UNE PROPOSED FIRE HYDRANT ir w TR 36959-2 12- w / x•• ) Cr Art EXHIBIT D-2 ALTAIR CONCEPTUAL WATER PLAN It Domest' se SPECIFIC PLANrJ November 2017 MAY :017 Reclaimed Water The proposed reclaimed water system is diagrammed in Figures 6-5 and 6-6. 6 INFRASTRUCTURE I & UTILITIES Reclaimed water is provided by the Rancho California Water District (RCWD). The district maintains existing 24 -inch reclaimed water lines within the District's 1381 Pressure Zone. These existing lines are located in a looped system from the in Vincent Moraga/Felix Valdez intersection and extending southerly to the existing 24 -inch reclaimed main in Pujol Street at the intersection with First Street. At the southerly end of the project, the City's approved Western Bypass bridge plans propose to bring two 12 -inch reclaimed water mains westerly across Murrieta Creek from the existing 20 -inch reclaimed water main in Old Town Front Street. This westerly extension within the proposed bridge from Old Town Front Street to the intersection of the Western Bypass and B Street North will provide a secondary connection point to the RCWD's reclaimed water system and meet the project's irrigation demands. The projects reclaimed water service will have a looped system that will be connected to the existing system described above and can be broken down into two systems as follows: Backbone and Offsite. Backbone The backbone public systems will be broken down into the four Tracts as follows: Tract 36959-1 is located at the most northerly portion of the project and will connect to the existing 24 -inch reclaimed water main at the intersection of the Vincent Moraga and Felix Valdez public ROW. An 8 -inch reclaimed water main will be brought on site within the existing Vincent Moraga public ROW and continue within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW to the southerly Tract 36959-1 boundary- This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide reclaimed water service to Villages 'A' and `B'. Tract 36959-2 is located in the north central portion of the project and will connect to the proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main located at the southerly end of Tract 36959-1 within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW with a proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main. The proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main will continue within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW to the southerly end on Tract 36959-2. An additional proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main will connect to the proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main within the Western Bypass public ROW adjacent to the Recreation Center and traverse easterly through the Recreation Center and Park Site to the easterly boundary of Tract 36959-2 and continue offsite to connect with the existing 24 -inch reclaimed water main located in Pujol Street at the intersection of First Street. This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide reclaimed water to Villages 'C' North and South as well as the School Site and Park Site. >ia?. SPECIFIC PL. v November 2017 6-13 6-14 ILIT ES b Tract 36959-3 is located in the south central portion of the project and will connect to the proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main located at the southerly end of Tract 36959-2 within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW with a proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main. The proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main will continue within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW to the southerly end on Tract 36959-3. An additional proposed 8 -inch main will connect to the proposed 8 -inch main within the Western Bypass public ROW adjacent to Village 'E and 'F' and run easterly through to a terminus at Altair Vista a Private Street- This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide reclaimed water to Villages 'E', 'F' and 'D'. Tract 36959 is located at the most southerly end of the Altair Specific Plan and will connect to the proposed S -inch reclaimed water main located at the southerly end of Tract 36959-3 within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW with a proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main. The proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main will continue within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW and extend offsite to connect with one of the two proposed 12 -inch reclaimed water mains shown on the approved Western Bypass bridge plans. A proposed 10 -inch reclaimed water main will be provided via a connection with the second proposed 12 -inch reclaimed water main shown on the approved Western Bypass bridge plans and extend westerly within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW to the intersection with proposed 'B' Street public ROW and then extend southerly within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW to the Civic Site. A proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main will then connect to the proposed 10 -inch reclaimed water main at the intersection of proposed 'B' Street and proposed 'C' Street both public ROW. The proposed 8 -inch reclaimed water main with then extend westerly through the proposed 'C' Street public ROW and transition to a 6 -inch reclaimed water main within the proposed 'C' Street public ROW and terminate adjacent to Village 'G'. This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide reclaimed water to Villages 'G' and the Civic Site and also close the reclaimed water loop system within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW. Offsite Offsite reclaimed water main improvements would be limited to the following: For Tract 36959-1 an offsite connection is required to connect to the existing 24 -inch reclaimed water main at the intersection of the Vincent Moraga and Felix Valdez public ROW. An offsite 8 -inch reclaimed water main will be brought on site within the existing Vincent Moraga public ROW and continue within the proposed Western Bypass public ROW to the northerly Tract 36959-1 boundary. This offsite connection will provide domestic and fire service to Villages 'A' and 'B'. Novembsr 2017 SPECIFIC PLANF.III. 6 INFRASTRUCTURE I & UTILITIES For Tract 36959-2 an offsite connection is required to connect to the existing 24 -inch reclaimed water main located in Pujol Street at the intersection of First Street. An offsite 8 -inch reclaimed water main will be brought on site within the existing First Street public ROW to the easterly boundary of the Altair Vista Specific Plan. This offsite connection will provide reclaimed water to Villages 'C' North and South as well as the School Site and Park Site. For Tract 36959-3 no offsite connections are required. For Tract 36959 two offsite connections will be required, connecting the two proposed 12 - inch reclaimed water mains shown on the approved Western Bypass bridge plans. These two connections will bring two proposed offsite 12 -inch reclaimed water mains on site within the existing Western Bypass public ROW to the easterly boundary of the Altair Vista Specific Plan. These offsite connect -ions will provide reclaimed water to Villages 'G' and the Civic Site. Final sizes and systems will be determined at final engineering. 6.2.2 Water Development Standards 1. All water lines shall be designed per the Rancho California Water District and the Eastern Municipal Water District requirements for the reclaimed water system. 2. The project shall comply with Title 20, California Administrative Code Section 1604 (f) (Appliance Efficiency standards), which establishes efficiency standards that set the maximum flow rate of all new showerheads, lavatory faucets, as well as Health and Safety Code Section 17621.3 which requires low -flush toilets and urinals in virtually all buildings. 3. The EIR mitigation measures, standard Conditions of Approval, and Project Design Guidelines shall be followed. =FAISPECIFIC PLAN Novemb*r 2017 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES 6 EXHIBIT C • TRACT 36959 ALTAIR CONCEPTUAL SEWER PLAN LEGEND EXISTING GRAM,' SEWER LINE EXISTING FORCE MAIN PROP GRAVITY SEWER LINE PROP 24' SEWER FORCE IMM BY EMWV November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 6INFRASTRUCTUREI & UTILITIES 6.3 SEWER 6.3.1 Sewer Description The proposed sewer system is diagrammed in Figures 6-7 and 6-8. The project is within the boundaries of the Eastern Municipal Water District (EMWD) sanitary sewer service area. All project generated wastewater flows will be transported via a proposed network of onsite and offsite gravity pipes which will be tributary to the District's existing offsite Pujol Street lift station. A Plan of Service (POS) for the entire Altair Specific Plan has been approved by EMWD on July 14, 2016. The Altair Specific Plan has been identified in the EMWD overall master -plan, including the July 2015 approved Pala Lift Station Condition & Capacity Assessment and Implementation Plan which has identified that capacity at build -out will be available to serve the Altair Specific Plan via the Pujol Lift Station. The project's sewer service will be a gravity system that will be connected to the existing system described above and can be broken down into three systems as follows: Backbone, Offsite and Onsite (private to be constructed by the subsequent merchant builders). Backbone The backbone public systems will be broken down into four Tracts as follows: Tract 36959-1 is located at the most northerly portion of the project and sewer will be provided by constructing a new 8 -inch gravity sewer main from the proposed intersection of Altair Vista public ROW and the Western Bypass public ROW, the proposed 8 -inch sewer main will proceed southerly within the proposed Altair Vista public ROW and then leave the proposed Altair Vista public ROW northeasterly along the southerly limits of Tract 36959-1. It will then head southeasterly within the existing EMWD easement along the easterly boundary of the Altair Specific Plan where it will intersect with existing First Street. At this point the sewer will be will be up-sized to 12 -inch and continue easterly within the First Street Public ROW to the Pujol Lift Station, the 12 -inch gravity sewer will be considered offsite improvements associated with the backbone system for Tract 36959-1. This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide sewer service to Villages A and B. Tract 36959-2 is located in the north central portion of the project and sewer will be provided by constructing two 8 -inch gravity sewer mains. The first being located in Altair Vista private street and beginning just northerly of the roundabout in Altair Vista, the 8 -inch sewer will run northerly in Altair Vista and connect to the proposed Tract 36959-1 8 -inch gravity sewer main. The second being located in Altair Vista private street just southerly of the roundabout in Altair Vista and continuing southerly in Altair Vista to the intersection of A Street private street, the 8 -inch sewer will then continue through A Street to the intersection of Coromell Trail private street and then continue southerly within Coromell Trail and connect to the proposed 12-ich gravity sewer constructed in First Street as part of Tract 36959-1. This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide sewer service to Villages C North and South as well as the School Site and Park Site. f! SPECI FIC PLAN November 2017 6-17 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES 6 WESTERN BYPASS CORRIDOR PROP12- '�'TAIR wsrA . R7r R I \` PR,)P R" [Y. x' h ..7 Y4,. Cr re Fart N 7 PLUM STREET L Ex d• LX a- a' F Y!?'F WIN E7. PVJOL UFr Sith oN (UPGRADCS B* EMWJ) II OLD iahvN FRow r STREET PRO' 24 FORCE MAW (M EMWO) PUJOL STREET I or 5 /ix EN 6. . FY 20. MCI NNr C> JO- FORCE AM a re MIX IRI! C+. re' Ma mW (aII m_ m CY PPOP. 2a- rORCE YAM (B+ EMWD) SOUTH PHASE TR 36959-3 NORTH PHASE TR 36959-1 ase November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrI CIVIC PHASE TR 36959 I I I , 6 INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES CENTRAL PHASE TR 36959-2 s uT(1i18TA T EX. M" ICE M& C. J6 PCZ WW CA. 20" FOAL( Iw fr. fB" FORCE ION • 2▪ 0' IOP(f JAW !x M' FORCE YNY LEGEND: EXWTINO ORAvfiv SEWER VIE Ei1STN1G FORCE LWN PROP GRR.ITY SEWEnna PROP N .SEWER FORCE YARN SY E1M4 mow sE i.F1 SIANpv II 1 1 EX. PJ.OL UFT STATIOA (UPGRADES BY EMWO; EXHIBIT C-2 ALTAIR CONCEPTUAL SEWER PLAN I SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 INFRASTRUCTURE 8 UTILITIES 6 6-20.4 Tract 36959-3 is located in the south central portion of the project and sewer will be provided by constructing 8 -inch gravity sewer mains in Altair Vista private street beginning at the northerly boundary of Tract 36959-3 and running southerly within Altair Vista to the intersection of B Street private street and then running easterly to the existing EWWD easement ant then run within the easement northerly and connect to the proposed 12-ich gravity sewer constructed in First Street as part of Tract 36959-1. This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide sewer service to Villages E, F and D. Tract 36959 is located at the most southerly end of the Altair Specific Plan and sewer will be provided by constructing a new 10 -inch sewer main from the prosed civic site within 'B' street public ROW and running northerly to existing Pujol Street public ROW the 10 -inch main will then run northerly within Pujol Street to the proposed 12-ich gravity sewer constructed within First Street as part of Tract 36959-1. This portion of the proposed backbone system will provide domestic and fire service to Village G and the Civic Site. Offsite Offsite sewer main improvements would be limited to the following: For Tract 36959-1 an offsite 12 -inch gravity sewer main will be constructed within First Street public ROW and run easterly within First Street to the Pujol Lift Station. For Tract 36959-2 no offsite connections are required. For Tract 36959-3 no offsite connections are required. For Tract 36959 an offsite new 10 -inch sewer main from the prosed civic site within 'B' street public ROW and running northerly to existing Pujol Street public ROW the 10 -inch main will then run northerly within Pujol Street to the proposed 12-ich gravity sewer constructed within First Street as part of Tract 36959-1. Onsite All onsite sewer systems serving the various villages would be constructed by subsequent merchant builders and may become private systems. Final sizes, and systems will be determined at final engineering. 6.3.2 Sewer Development Standards 1. Sewage disposal facilities shall be installed in accordance with the requirements and specifications of the Riverside County Health Department. 2. Assurance for provision of adequate sewer service is required prior to approval of a subdivision map, and/or Development Plan for commercial uses in accordance with the State Subdivision Map Act. 3. All sewer lines shall be designed per Eastern Municipal Water District requirements. 4. The EIR mitigation measures, standard Conditions of Approval, and Project Design Guidelines shall be followed. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANRALAIIMEMMUMMI 6 INFRASTRUCTURE I & UTILITIES 6.4 DRY UTILITIES 6.4.1 Dry Utility Description Specific Plan Development Guidelines shall dictate the location and screening of onsite electric power facilities such as transformers and underground vaults. The project is currently within the Frontier service area for telephone and fiber optic internet. All onsite telephone service lines shall be within underground conduits. The Specific Plan Development Guidelines shall dictate the location and screening of onsite telephone facilities such as underground vaults and above ground connection pedestals. Spectrum currently provides cable television, internet and residential phone services to the project area. All onsite cable service lines shall be within underground conduits. The Specific Plan Development Guidelines shall dictate the location and screening of onsite cable facilities such as underground vaults and above ground connection pedestals. 6.4.2 Dry Utility Development Standards 1. All natural gas facilities shall be installed underground and by or in accordance with Southern California Edison regulations and specifications. 2. All electric power facilities shall be installed underground and by or in accordance with Southern California Edison regulations and specifications. 3. All telephone facilities shall be installed underground and by or in accordance with Frontier's regulations and specifications. 4. All cable television facilities shall be installed underground and by or in accordance with Spectrum's regulations and specifications. 5. The EIR mitigation measures, standard Conditions of Approval, and Project Design Guidelines shall be followed. ffiSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 PUBLIC SERVICES 7 PUBLIC SERVICES 7.1 Schools Schools located within the Temecula Valley Unified School District provide elementary, middle school and high school education to students generated by residential development in Altair. Vail Elementary School located at 29835 Mira Loma Road (1.12 miles away), Margarita Middle School located at 30600 Margarita Road (2.26 miles away) and Temecula Valley High School located at 31555 Rancho Vista Road (2.03 miles away) currently include the Altair project area within their service boundaries. All three schools operated below capacity in the 2013-2014 school year. A new elementary school is proposed on site to service the area of Temecula immediately west of Interstate 15, including Old Town Temecula. Many of the students for the proposed elementary school will be residents of Altair. A prominent and easily accessed land parcel of approximately 7 acres will be dedicated to the Temecula Valley Unified School District for construction of a school, depending on the District's assessment of their needs. A school facilities fee provides funding for school construction and is authorized by State of California. Developers of residential projects will be responsible for the payment of fees associated with public school service based on the square foot area of residential construction and as established by the school district in accordance with State law. Additionally, a portion of the property taxes generated by the project will be allocated to the school district. 7.2 Libraries There are two libraries in Temecula that are part of the Riverside County Library System, which has 35 branch libraries and two bookmobiles. Temecula Public Library, located at 30600 Pauba Road (1.63 miles from Altair), has a Technical Homework Center, a Law Resource Center and two community rooms. The second facility, Grace Mellman Community Library, is located at 41000 County Center Drive. The County of Riverside has under contract Library Systems and Services, a private national contractor, to operate the library system. =Pi SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 PUBLIC SERVICES 7 1111 HOSPITAL ■ SCHOOL P STOREFRONT POLICE STATION ■ LIBRARY ■ FIRE STATION ■ PARK/RECREATION CENTER ■ ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN AREA November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrlI 7 PUBLIC SERVICES 7.3 Fire Protection Fire protection is provided by the Riverside County Fire Department (RCFD), through a contract with the City of Temecula. Temecula is primarily served by Battalion 15 of RCFD's Temecula Division, which consists of seven stations housing seven engines and one aerial ladder truck to serve multistory buidings. Battalion 15 targets four person staffing, including one paramedic. This policy helps promote faster response times and helps ensure safety of the firefighters and citizens of the Temecula community. Fire service to Altair will likely be provided by Fire Station 12, located at 28330 Mercedes Street, approximately 1/3 mile from the project site. This station provides both fire protection and paramedic services. Fire Station 73, located at 27415 Enterprise Circle West (1.5 miles away and equipped with the ladder truck) and Fire Station 84 at 30650 Pauba Road (1.8 miles away) serve as secondary responders. Altair is located near a wildfire hazard area. The Western Bypass Corridor forms a fire barrier protecting the majority of the proposed development. Fuel Modification setbacks for the remaining areas are defined in the Tentative Tract Map concurrent to this Specific Plan. 7.4 Police The Temecula Police Department provides about one police officer per 1,000 residents through a contract with the Riverside County Sheriff's Department for staff and equipment. The RCSD Southwest Station is located at 30755-A Auld Road in Murrieta, CA and is the closest full station at approximately 6.4 miles from the Specific Plan area. In addition, Temecula has two storefront police locations, one in Old Town Temecula at 28690 Mercedes Street, near 3rd Street (1/3 mile from the project site) and one in the Promenade Mall at 40820 Winchester Road, suite 2020. A traffic team, investigations bureau and special teams to deal with drugs and gang -related issues are integrated into the police department. 7.5 Parks The City of Temecula has more than 39 City parks. City Parks located in the immediate vicinity of Altair include Rotary Park, a 1.09 acre park with BBQ and picnic tables located on the corner of Pujol Street and 1st Street, Town Square Park at the fountain at the east end of Main Street, the Duck Pond at 28250 Rancho California Rd and Sam Hicks Memorial Park, a 1.8 acre park, located within % mile of the project site, contains a children's play area, picnic tables and restrooms. Parks, open space and recreational facilities will be provided in the Altair development. These amenities are described in Section 8. • 11•iSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 PUBLIC SERVICES 7 7.6 Hospitals There are four regional hospitals within an 8 -mile distance of Altair: Temecula Valley Hospital, Rancho Springs Medical Center and Loma Linda University Medical Center in Murrieta, and the Inland Valley Regional Medical Center in Wildomar. Temecula Valley Hospital is the closest and largest, located approximately 2.3 miles away at 31700 Temecula Parkway. This is a 140 -bed facility with five surgical suites, a full ER and expansion potential on it's 37 -acre campus. The hospital has 300 associated physicians. 7.7 Public Transit Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) was established in 1975 to operate bus service in Riverside County. RTA is the Consolidated Transportation Service Agency for western Riverside County and is responsible for coordinating transit services throughout the approximate 2,500 square mile service area, providing driver training, assistance with grant applications and development of Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs). RTA provides both local and regional services throughout the region with 36 fixed -routes, eight CommuterLink routes, and Dial -A -Ride services using 266 vehicles. In the cities of Corona, Beaumont and Banning, RTA coordinates regional services with municipal transit systems. In Riverside, RTA coordinates with the city's Riverside Special Services, which provides ADA complementary service to RTA's fixed -route services. Old Town Temecula is served by bus transit with three Local Routes 79, 23 and 24 with alternate routing and three Commuter Routes 202, 206 and 208. Route 202 runs from Murrieta to the north and reaches in Oceanside to the south. Route 206 runs between Promenade Mall and Corona Transit Station. Route 208 runs from Promenade Mall and reaches Downtown Riverside. In addition, the Temecula Trolley (route 55) is a loop route that circulates just east of Interstate November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK/ TRANSFER STOP TEMECULA Promenade Mall 208 217 MAJOR STOP Temecula City Hall OLD TOWN MAJOR STOPS -- FOR 80TH ROUTES Temecula Valley Hospital 1S\ mecula Walmart 4M� Community Center REDHAWK 'ego Rt 202 continues to oceanside Pechanga Resort Figure 7-2 RTA Route Map *s.,Great Oak HS Rt 217 continues to Escondido Transit Center 15 next to The Promenade at Temecula and Harveston School Road at the north end. 7 PUBLIC SERVICES Local Route 24 also connects to Margarita and Gardner Middle Schools and to Temecula Valley High School. RTA provides discounted monthly passes to students in grades 1-12 to facilitate public transit for commutes to school. Altair will participate with the RTA and the City of Temecula to further a "Smart Shuttle" or "bike share" program to link Altair with Old Town Temecula and the RTA Bus system. A proposed route with connections to RTA bus routes 24 and 79 is shown in Figure 7-3. The Master Developer will contribute financial support for a period of two years as defined in the Development Agreement. The shuttle will be operated by the RTA. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 7-5 PUBLIC SERVICES 7 - OLD TOWN LOOP - PROPOSED SHUTTLE ROUTE November 2017 0 300` 600' 1207 SCALE: 1' - 1200'-0' Connection to RTA Bus Stop Connection to RTA Bus Stop SPECIFIC PLANrI 7.8 Waste Management 7 PUBLIC SERVICES The Riverside County Waste Management Department (RCWMD) operates six landfills that serve Riverside County residents. All new development projects are required to provide Refuse/Recycling Collection and Loading Areas. Development near or adjacent to a Department facility may be subject to additional requirements/restrictions. These projects are addressed on a case-by-case basis. Design Guidelines for Refuse and Recyclables Collection and Loading Areas The City of Temecula publishes Waste and Recycling Design Guidelines for multifamily and commercial projects through it's franchise waste hauler (currently CR&R Inc.). The guidelines are intended to assist project proponents in identifying space and other design considerations for Refuse/Recyclables collection and loading areas, consistent with state and local regulations. See also Section 9.5 for design of refuse and recyclable area enclosures. Trash and Recycling The City of Temecula contracts with a franchise waste hauler (currently CR&R Inc.) for trash and recycling services. CR&R provides trash collection with a state of the art recycling and green waste program. Automated collection is an efficient and safe process for collecting residential waste and recyclables. Through the use of a mechanical arm operated by the driver, trash is collected quickly and neatly. Each home (except multifamily housing) is furnished with three special containers which residents roll out to the curb on collection day: for trash, recycling and green waste, respectively. Section 10.9 describes space requirements for storing these containers. Green Waste Disposal Green waste can be disposed of using the green 3 -yard bin and collected by CR&R or through the City of Temecula's City Wide Clean Up events held periodically. Commercial and multifamily residential properties are required to implement an organic material recycling program in compliance with AB 1826. Detached and attached single-family developments at Altair are also required to provide facilities for green waste. Construction and Demolition (C&D) Recycling Prior to receiving a permit, developers or their contractors must contract with the City of Temecula's franchise waste hauler for recycling of construction and demolition waste. =Pi SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 7-7 OPEN SPACE & RECREATION 8 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN The City of Temecula General Plan targets 5 acres of useable park land per 1,000 population in its Open Space and Conservation Element in order to ensure sufficient park land and recreation facilities. While the General Plan excludes natural open space and trails from its park standard, they are a substantial and integral part of the open space and recreation network at Altair. The large amount of natural and interstitial open space and usable cycling and running trails complements the available active open space. This inter -connected system is consistent with and contributes to the Temecula Multi -Use Trails and Bikeways Master Plan, discussed previously in Section 4. To meet the General Plan target, Altair would need between 9.6 and 19.3 acres of useable park land, based on an expected person per household factor of 2.2 and planned development intensity in the range of 870-1,750 dwelling units. The target factor of 5 acres per 1,000 persons is high for the region. The City of San Diego, for instance, requires only 2.8 acres per 1,000 population in its General Plan, while the City of Riverside requires 3 acres per 1,000 residents. Escondido recognizes the value of passive parks and habitat land by targeting passive and active open space in equal measure, with a combined total of 11.8 acres per 1,000 people. The combined passive and active open space area in the Altair Specific Plan totals approximately 140 acres. This equates to 36 acres per 1,000 residents at the maximum density of 1,750 dwelling units. A successful community has many different kinds of open space that offer a range of activities and varying levels of privacy and control. Open space is divided into four main categories in the Altair Specific Plan: natural open space, interstitial open space, active open space and private open space. A summary of open spaces are shown in Tables 8-1 and 8-2 and general locations are indicated in Figure 8-1. lI i SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 OPEN SPACE & RECREATION B 8-2 Use Acres % of Total Conservation Open Space Open Space Clubhouse and Recreation Center 87.20 31.50 2.05 32.3° 11.7% 0.8% Parks, Trails & Bikeways Master Developer 10.18 Guest Builders 3.55 Elementary School 2.00 Total 15.73 15.73 5.8% Developed Area' (Residential, School + Civic Sites) Roadways 105.21 39.0% 28.22 10.5% Total 269.91 100.0% • Approximately 20% of the Village Lot Areas are 2:1 open space slopes to the east and/or west of each Village. The final buildable pad area is anticipated to be 60 - 65 acres (22%-24% of the total acreage). Table 8-1 Open Space Summary Location Use Responsibility TOTAL AREA (Acres) Portion of Park Area that is Open to the Public Master Developer / School District Guest Builder Active Open Space Master HOA Maintained Sub -HOA Maintained Village A Active Park Guest Builder 0.95 t 0.65 Village B Active Park Guest Builder 0.65 1 0.40 Village C Active Park Plaza Promenade Community Center Master Developer Master Developer Master Developer Master Developer 5.04 0.37 0.59 2.05 0.75 3 5.04 0.37 0.59 2.05 Village D Active Park Master Developer 0.80 0.15 3 0-80 nog E Active Park Guest Builder 0.35 1 t - 0.25 Between E+F Active Park Master Developer 0.25 0.2.5 Vlpge F Active Park Guest Builder 0.60 1 0.40 VWge G Active Park Guest Builder 0.10 a School Play Field School District 2.00 2.00 3 Trail South of 1st Street Class I Bikeway Master Developer 1.40 1.40 Trail North of 1st Street logging Path Master Developer 0.78 0.78 Western Bypass Class I Bikeway Master Developer 0.92 0.92 Active Suibtp 1: 14.19 1f5 35.59 Natural Open Space Upper Hillside Civic Site MSHCP + Slopes MSHCP + Slopes Master Developer Master Developer 69.05 37.24 Interstitial Open Space Passive Ravines. Slopes Master Developer 21.49 21.49 Taal: 141.97 3739 1. Includes Guest Builder constructed "String of Pe rls" parks that are open to the public (1.7 acres). 2. Estimated Common Open Space parks (varies based on product type) which may be public or private. 3. Subject to joint use agreement with School District. Table 8-2 Park and Open Space Areas November 2017 1111111111111111 SPECIFIC PIAN L. -- PRESERVED f RESTORED OPEN SPACE I VILLAGE 'A' PARK VILLAGE 'B' PARK OFF SITE OPEN SPACE CLUBHOUSE UPPER STAIRCASE SEATING PLAZA PROMENADE SCHOOL RECREATION HOA RECREATION CENTER VILLAGE 'C' CORE PARK MAIN ST. PLAZA OLD TOWN GRAND STAIR VILLAGE 'D' PARK VILLAGE 'E' PARK GE 'F' .K a _ WILDLIFE FENCE CIVIC SITE Amenities Plan /iSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 OPEN SPACE 8 8 RECREATION 8-3 OPEN SPACE & RECREATION 8 8.1 Natural Open Space Natural open space is basically left in its current state. While access is not prohibited, natural open space is only intended to be active or programmed for recreation where intentionally delineated. Natural open space in the Altair Specific Plan is primarily located in the MSHCP corridor west of the Western Bypass and at the southern portions of the site. It includes natural habitat, chaparral, Diegan coastal sage scrub, and oak woodland. The majority of this area is part of Proposed Linkage 10 in the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and will provide both live-in habitat and a passageway for critical species including bobcat and mountain lion. A smaller portion is located within the prposed Constrained Linkage 13 of the MSHCP. The natural open space within the Specific Plan area is connected to the much larger MSHCP plan that extends westward beyond the ridgeline, maximizing the value of each area as part of a greater conservation zone. The south 55 -acre parcel is mostly natural open space with a proposed nature center and trails serving the public. The south portion of this parcel is just across the river from the Temeku Village Site. Natural open space in this area provides an appropriate backdrop and helps to maintain the cultural significance of the neighboring historical site. The conservation area preserves a large stand of native oak. Effective separation of natural habitat from development is critical to preserve the habitat and protect both native species and residents, including their pets, from predators. The Western Bypass Corridor divides most of the natural open space from new development. A wildlife fence will also be provided as shown in Figure 8-1 to keep animals out of the Bypass and to separate the natural open space from Villages A and G. •41 A , X Wildlife Fencing Standard: 1. 8.0' high vinyl coated chain Zink "Wildlife Fence" with access gates included throughout. 2. located at the toe of slope along the entire Western Bypass Road as well as areas adjacent to Villages A and G (see Figure 8-1). November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANfrI OPEN SPACE 8 & RECREATION Protection from fire hazards is also critical for development near natural open space. The Western Bypass Corridor will act as a fire break to most of the proposed development at Altair. A Fuel Modification Plan will be a condition of approval of the Tentative Tract Map, which includes fire setback areas where developed parcels are directly adjacent to potential wildfire areas. 8.2 Interstitial Open Space Interstitial open spaces are the landscaped areas between the village clusters and at the edge of the developed area. Interstitial spaces serve several functions. They define the perimeter of each village. They add variety to the circulation experience, especially for pedestrians and cyclists. Interstitial spaces are typically characterized by steep slope banks or ravines, as they transition between development at different elevations. They are also opportunities for bioswales. Therefore, they are integral to the grading and drainage plan patterns discussed in previous sections of this specific plan. They are also destinations in themselves, offering a quieter alternative to the more active parks. All disturbed areas in Altair are slated to be restored with Native vegetation to match the surrounding hillsides. Hiking Trails through the interstitial open space areas will allow residents and visitors to have a close encounter with the natural world. 8.2.1 Ravines The ravines generally run west to east and slope longitudinally down toward the east. They loosely align with existing draws in the undisturbed open space to the west of the Western Bypass. The naturalized drainage draws, shown in section 6 will utilize native riparian vegetation to serve as water quality treatment corridors. These draws will also feature boulders and rock repurposed from grading operations to create naturalized grade breaks and check dams in the draws. Roads and trails cross the ravines over bridges, culverts and footbridges. These spans are creative design opportunities that contribute to the personality of Altair. f iSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 OPEN SPACE 8 RECREATION 8 8-6 8.2.2 Bypass Trail The bypass trail area separates the Western Bypass from the residential development and is a linear open space running along the east edge of the road. The trail roughly parallels the bypass, is contiguous to the road at the north and south ends, but drops away from and below the road for most of its length. The trail can be accessed from several points in the community, as identified in Figure 4-2. It is a paved trail serving pedestrians and cyclists and is designed as a Class 1 Bikeway. There are slope banks to either side of the trail and some low retaining walls. Native landscaping will buffer noise and sight lines from the road to screen adjacent residences. Views from the trail are dramatic and certain vistas are highlighted with breaks in the trees, areas to step off the trail, etc. The bikeway portion of the bypass trail area is included as active open space in Table 8-1. The trail network is also an opportunity to display artwork in a public setting, such as the example on the right. Art installations alongside a trail add whimsy and delight and can support themes such as nature or movement. Altair's contribution to Art in Public Places is discussed in Section 9.9. 8.2.3 Eastern Slope A sculpture on the Lackawanna River Heritage Trail Altair is a linear site occupying the hillside west of Old Town Temecula. The eastern edge of the site slopes down to meet the existing grade at the property line. A stabilized decomposed granite trail runs along the slope, utilizing a bench required by adopted grading standards. As with the Bypass Trail, the elevation change of the eastern slope offers overlooks of the City and vistas of the surrounding terrain. A utility and emergency fire access easement parallels the property line at the base of the slope south of First Street. The easement is proposed to be widened from the existing 30 feet to 40 feet. This easement has long been used by the community as a dog walking trail - a use that is anticipated to continue. This area will also be improved as a paved bikeway per the Circulation section. The eastern slope is intersected by ravines at their bases. Grades are softened at these junctions to slow run-off from the ravine, which also relieves the visual continuity of the slope bank. A major intervention occurs at the perpendicular path connecting the central park to Main Street. This path and how it cuts through the slope bank is described more thoroughly below. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANFI OPEN SPACE 8 8 RECREATION 8.3 Active Open Space Active open space is developed for human recreation and gathering. These spaces are the focus of the individual neighborhoods of the Altair Specific Plan and give each village its unique character. Active spaces are closely tied to adjacent architecture, functioning as outdoor rooms. They often occupy important loci or scenic vantage points within the overall plan. Active open space falls into two general types at Altair: public open space and common open space. 8.3.1 Public Open Space Public Open Spaces are parks, playfields, and other spaces for public use that are typically established by the master developer and maintained by the Altair community as a whole. Public Open Spaces include the central park, the Community Center area, upper stair and plaza and the promenade, all at Village C; the village parks; and the Nature Center trails at the Civic Site. Guest builders can also install and maintain public open spaces as long as they are open to the general public, such as at the village parks. Active public open spaces include circulation elements such as Class! bikeways and established paths that can be used for walking or jogging. The pedestrian link from Village C to Main Street is a series of connected urban spaces at the Grand Stair and Main Street plaza that encourages interaction between residents of Altair and Old Town. A Recreation Center and Clubhouse are provided to serve all residents of Altair. Both of these facilities are located in the Community Center at Village C and they define and punctuate the Plaza at the top of the Main Street axis. See the Village C description in Section 3 for more information on this area of the Plan and its adjacencies. The Recreation Center features an outdoor pool and spa framed by the recreation building and a pergola. Inside the recreation building are locker rooms, restrooms, spaces for fitness equipment and yoga or other exercise classes, a children's game room and offices and other support spaces. The Recreation Center edges grand steps at the peak of the Main Street axis, a prime gathering space and scenic viewpoint. I SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 s -r OPEN SPACE d RECREATION 8 — The Clubhouse anchors the southwest corner of the central park at Village C. The Clubhouse is a 2 -story structure featuring a large terrace that spills out into the park at it's high point. Casual seating is provided on the terrace, offering excellent views of the park, Old Town and the surrounding hills of Temecula. Residents and guests may relax on these terraces while enjoying music or other performances in the park. Inside the Clubhouse are kitchen and dining facilities, meeting rooms and game rooms. A restaurant or wedding / banquet facility may also be considered to optimize this unique location. Under the Development Agreement, the building will provide office space for the Community Services Department, which will work with the Master HOA for the potential hosting of classes, activites and wedding or event rentals at the facility. 8.3.2 Common Open Space Common Open Spaces are defined and installed as part of individual development projects within the Altair Specific Plan area, typically by a guest developer. Common open spaces may be shared facilities serving an entire village or can be communal pools, courtyards or roof terraces for residents of a particular project as a private amenity. Requirements for the minimum aggregate area and dimension of common open spaces per project are designated by building type in Section 10, Development Standards and Table 10-4. Common open spaces should connect to the pedestrian circulation system wherever practical. Some of the common open space amenities for residents may contribute toward the total active park area required to be provided by guest builders in each village. However, a minimum area of park space in each village must be open to the public. The minimum areas of total park and public park are indicated in Table 8-2. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANT] OPEN SPACE 8 & RECREATION The open space and recreational imagery, Figure 8-2, sets the theme of the Altair parks and open space and influences the community as a whole. Natural play areas, open play fields, and nature trails encourage children and adults alike to live active, healthy lifestyles. Urban parks mixed in pockets of open space allow all members of the community to have access to a park space no matter where they live in Altair. A wide array of recreational uses from urban parks to naturalized open space provokes the residents of Altair and Temecula to explore nature and their community. Active open spaces can also satisfy lifestyle needs beyond recreation. Functional program areas such as dog parks, playgrounds and communal vegetable gardens offer convenience and blend social interaction with daily tasks. Most of us can remember playing outside all day until it was dinner time, exploring a creek or corner of a vacant lot, and getting "lost" in nature as a kid. During the last generation, there has been a major shift from outdoors to indoors. Kids seldom play outside anymore unless under the direct supervision of a parent and often times as a scheduled visit to a 'tot lot". In Last Child in the Woods, Richard Louv explores the missing connection to the natural world and describes how we can save our children (and ourselves) from "Nature Deficit Disorder". Feeling the warmth of a boulder, sensing the softness of pine needles underfoot, hearing the rustle of leaves, or experiencing the fragrance of a plant species can connect us to a green space. Research says "Natural Play" contributes to the overall physical, cognitive, and emotional development of children, helps them score higher on tests for concentration and self-discipline, helps them experience more diverse play, helps them exhibit Tess aggressive behavior, strive toward advanced motor fitness, and become healthier. The recreational value of Altair is enhanced by going "beyond the tot lot" by providing open lawn areas and traditional park elements as well as natural places to discover, explore, climb, dig and roll. Native plantings requiring little to no maintenance will be used to blend into the natural setting and reduce maintenance costs. Je 8-2 01111 and Reallional Images SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 8-9 OPEN SPACE & RECREATION 8 8.4 Private Open Space Private Open Spaces are yards, patios, balconies, entry stoops, courts or roof terraces attached to individual dwelling units for the private use of the residential household. Requirements for the minimum area and dimension of private open space per dwelling unit are designated by building type in Section 10, Development Standards. Private open space can be located on any side of a dwelling unit, as fits its purpose. 8.5 Park Programming The Master Developer and Merchant Builder Parks of Altair are intended fora range of flexible and passive uses that will provide common social spaces for each Village and the Altair Community as a whole. These spaces are not intended to be "over -programmed" or "over-amenitized". Instead, they should allow a flexible range of recreational uses such as picnicking, kite flying, pick up soccer games, playing catch, frisbee, concerts, movie nights, children's play, and other uses that are not limited by single -user type facilities that are typically league dominated. Suggested programming can be found in the Conceptual Park Design Concepts in the description of each Village in Sections 3.5 through 3.10. Encouraged programming includes: open lawn areas, natural/native landscape/garden/exploration areas, children's play areas, shaded seating and picnic areas. Discouraged uses include, but are not limited to, ball diamonds, soccer fields, and tennis courts. These types of uses are intended for the school site and will provide the balance between flexible recreation areas and the formally programmed recreation areas. Public parks should generally have a minimum dimension of 85 feet in either direction to allow adequate activity space. Natural open space use is limited to hiking, walking, and bicycling as described in Section 4 Circulation and Section 8.1 Natural Open Space. Common open space programming will reflect the type of activities preferred by residents of each community, expressing the diversity of Altair. Neighborhoods with young families may have more playgrounds, while developments favored by singles might have a dog park or more areas to gather. Community gardens are strongly encouraged in all neighborhoods to support healthy eating and as an educational activity for children. All residences should be within easy walking distance of a tot lot or playground, whether in a park or in common open space. November 2017 PECIFIC PLANffl 8.6 Crime Prevention through Environmental Design OPEN SPACE 8 & RECREATION Crime prevention through environmental design (CPED) as developed by the National Crime Prevention Institute (NCPI) supports the concept that "the proper design and effective use of the built environment can lead to a reduction in the fear and incidence of crime and an improvement in the quality of life" Following are the nine primary strategies that support this concept. These strategies should be integrated into the design of Altair to the greatest extent feasible. 1. Provide clear border definition of controlled space. Examples of border definition may include fences, shrubbery or signs in exterior areas. Within a building, the arrangement of furniture and color definition can serve as a means of identifying controlled space. 2. Provide clearly marked transitional zones. Persons need to be able to identify when they are moving from public to semi-public to private space. 3. Gathering or congregating areas to be located or designated in locations where there is good surveillance and access control. 4. Place safe activities in unsafe locations. Safe activities attract normal users to a location and subsequently render the location less attractive to abnormal users due to observation and possible intervention. S. Place unsafe activities in safe locations. Placing unsafe activities in areas of natural surveillance or controlled access will help overcome risk and make the users of the areas feel safer. 6. Design the use of space to provide natural barriers. Separate activities that may conflict with each other (outdoor basketball court and children's play area, for example) by distance, natural terrain or other functions to avoid such conflict. 7. Improve scheduling of space. The timing in the use of space can reduce the risk for normal users and cause abnormal users to be of greater risk of surveillance and intervention. 8. Design space to increase the perception of natural surveillance. Abnormal users need to be aware of the risk of detection and possible intervention. Windows and clear lines -of -sight serve to provide such a perception of surveillance. 9. Overcome distance and isolation. This strategy may be accomplished through improved communications (portable two-way radios, for example) and design efficiencies, such as the location of restrooms in a public building. IMSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 9 DESIGN GUIDELINES DESIGN GUIDELINES Al t"afi r 9.1 Design Objectives Altair is intended to be an urban environment, with the kind of energy that is inherent in well - executed compact design. Streets and open spaces are well defined by a clear, consistent building edge. Streets are as narrow as is practical to slow traffic and reinforce the pedestrian environment. Building massing is appropriate to a human scale and pedestrian pace. These design guidelines are used in conjunction with the development standards in the following chapter to ensure a community of the highest aesthetic quality. The two sections strive to: • Provide guidance to developers and their design and engineering teams to create projects consistent with the standards of the Altair Specific Plan. • Establish a basis of design against which City staff can review future development projects in the planning area. • Ensure that the components necessary for a connected and pedestrian -friendly community are carried through all of the phases and districts comprising the specific plan. • Allow flexibility and ingenuity in design to create distinctive neighborhoods. These guidelines use positive and negative examples to ensure quality design. There can be circumstances where a preferred method is not achievable or a discouraged material is used skillfully. Therefore, exceptions to these guidelines may be granted through the Design Review process described in Section 11, Implementation. 9.2 Building Placement Placement of buildings sets the scene for development projects, especially on a sloping site, where the visual effect of buildings on a hillside is more apparent. Buildings facing the street should be designed to interface with the street in a special way, so that there is an interplay of building and street. Entries facing the road, along with porches and balconies, reinforce the connection of the road and the community. See Section 9.4 for further discussion of building frontage and Figure 9-2 showing streets that require building entries to face them. Also, refer to Section 10.4 for setbacks and explanation of build -to lines that regulate the location of facades relative to streets and otherlot lines. Buildings shall be arranged in a manner that creates meaningful and pleasant open spaces between them, such as courtyards, paseos and plazas. Buildings and groupings should relate to each other. In particular, perimeter buildings of development projects shall address adjacent developments so that there is no "dead space" between. Views, solar orientation and protection from prevailing winds are important considerations in building placement and orientation. Opportunities for views over buildings and view corridors should be carefully considered to maximize the connection to the surrounding environment and increase the quality of the neighborhood development. =in. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 — 9.3 Building Form These guidelines do not dictate any particular style, but rather discuss building form and elements that are conducive to the design objectives. Variations in style are encouraged for visual interest, vibrancy and diversity. 9.3.1 Building facades should be broken down in scale with off -setting planes. This can be achieved with wall offsets, recesses or with projecting elements such as bay windows, chimneys, stoops and porches. All building facades are important and require the same level of detail. Architecture at Altair will be "four-sided", meaning a high level of design and attention to detail shall be maintained for all elevations. 9.3.2 Proportions of building elements should be carefully considered in relation to eachother and to the building as a whole. A graceful progression of scale and proportion from the building outline to the door frame down to the door handle should inform all designs. Proportion is an opportunity to emphasize verticality or horizontality. The proportion of traditional or structural elements, in particular, shall be correct to their perceived function. For example, columns that are too tall and narrow or oddly space will detract from a building composition. 9.3.3 Indoor / Outdoor spaces such as covered open space, trellises, screen walls and decorative fencing are inviting to pedestrians and help to distinguish public from private space. Indoor / outdoor spaces should progress from open to more enclosed and private. Landscaping should integrate built forms with complementary planting and hardscape. A courtyard functions as an outdoor room and entry foyer. November 2017 A progression of indoor/ outdoor spaces. SPECIFIC PLANA 9,3.4 Roof should be varied with multiple planes, stepped roof lines and a variety of forms, including sloping and flat roofs. Roof terraces are highly encouraged. 9.3.5 Stepped building; are encouraged to reduce the scale of large masses. Elegant transition between levels, either through roof forms or patio terraces, is critical. 9,3.6 RoofTerr@ces are an excellent way to vary roof forms and provide private outdoor space that looks onto public space. In Temecula's mild climate, a roof terrace can be a second living room. Roof terraces are encouraged at Altair, particularly common open space roof terraces for gathering and neighborhood events. Terraces shall be designed to support landscaping and container gardening, including drainage and irrigation, and/or self -watering pots. Example of a successful stepped building in DC. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-3 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9.3.7 Building entries are fundamental to the iconography of residential architecture. The placement, materials and design of entry doors should make a statement about the quality and character of a home. Doors of attached dwelling units such as triplexes should enter at different locations to express the individuality of each unit and support the 3-dimensional building composition. Entry doors at the side facade of end units are preferred at long row home groupings. Recessed or covered entries are recommended, as they provide both protection from weather and a transition zone from public to private . Doorways should be considered as one element of an entry procession, in combination with gates, walkways, stoops or porches. The arrangement of these elements creates of series of spaces that address the public realm (i.e. the street) and gradually introduce the visitor to the private realm. These layers of ascending privacy add security both to the home and the neighborhood as a whole. See further discussion on Building Frontage in this Section. Also see Section 9.3.3 regarding indoor / outdoor spaces. 9.3.8 Windows shall project from or be recessed into exterior walls. Sills, lintels and casing trim around windows are encouraged. Flush mounting of windows is prohibited, unless the window openings are appropriately trimmed on the exterior. Windows facing adjacent buildings should be placed to ensure privacy between neighbors. Energy efficiency should be promoted through the installation of sunscreens above windows where appropriate. The placement and proportion of windows on all sides of a building should be carefully considered. Fabric awnings at residential windows are not permitted due to maintenance issues. Recessed or framed windows like these are preferred. Flush windows without trim are prohibited. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANFif 9.3.9 Street Ieyel facades of public, institutional and commercial buildings should have a high level of transparency and visual activity for the interest of pedestrians. Vacant or lightly used spaces such as utility or storage rooms or private offices should be avoided at street frontages of public and commercial structures. Display windows should be large and extend down to or near to the adjacent walking surface. The street level of residences may be more private, with higher or smaller windows, but should offer interesting elements such as window boxes, planters, operable shutters, decorative gates and artwork. 9.3.10 Balconies should vary in form from projecting to semi -recessed to fully recessed, particularly on large multifamily buildings. Railing materials and transparency should also vary and complement building designs. Railings are opportunities for ornament at a human scale. On multifamily buildings, the effect of repeating and grouping balconies should be considered. To be deemed useable, a balcony should have a 6 foot by 6 foot minimum area for furnishing - A projecting balcony with decorative railing. Li (SPECIFIC PLAN Partially recessed balconies grouped to create a design element. The detailing of the rails provide a distinct character and match the building style. Balcony railings can be extended and joined to form a semi -transparent facade plane. Novwmber 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 WINDOWS & BALCONIES FACE COURT Above: preferred examples of modern and traditional garage doors that support the building style. 9.3.11 Garage doors should face away from streets wherever possible. Shared motor courts, shared driveways and alleys are preferred. Garage doors should vary in size, style and materials such as wood, steel or glass. Doors shall be of high quality and appropriate to the style of architecture exemplified in the building. Individual, single car garage doors are encouraged at double -car garages to reduce scale. LANDSCAPING AT VARIOUS HEIGHTS MATERIALS OF SIMILAR QUALITY AS STREET FRONT HIGHLY DETAILED 3 - DIMENSIONAL FACADES ENHANCED PAVING ART Figure 9-1 Motor Court Elements LOW WALL DEFINES PRIVATE SPACE ELIMINATE PAINTED LINES WALKWAY November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 9.3.12 Motor courts and alleys are shared by pedestrians and vehicles, as signified by enhanced paving and landscaping. Landscape planting should vary in height to soften the space and screen private areas. Motor courts should feel enclosed by surrounding buildings and have a strong separation from the street. Motor courts, in particular, shall have elevations developed to the same quality as street facades. Facades facing alleys and motor courts shall have off -setting planes, balconies, trellises and other elements to create visual interest and reduce scale. See 9.3.11 for description of garage doors. Garages must meet the minimum size requirements defined in Section 10 in order to keep refuse containers stored in garages and out of motor courts. These garage doors are well-proportioned with the balconies above. Above: Parking between the building and street as shown here is prohibited. Open parking structures shall not be visible to or accessed from the street. Below: recessed garage doors and projecting bay windows enliven this alley in Baltimore. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-7 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 1 Street Alignment to be -� Determined Street Alignment to be Determined I EGEND- Street Requiring • "'• Entry Frontage Trail or Open Space • -• Requiring Entry or Garden Frontage November 2017 0 300' 600' 1200' SCALE: 1 • - 1200•-0• SPECIFIC PLAN 9.4 Building Frontage Well designed building frontages are essential to creating a community with active streets and visual character that makes walking enjoyable and interesting. The placement of symbolic elements such as stoops, porches and overhangs identify "home". Other elements, such as arcades, are more appropriate to commercial or civic structures. These elements also establish the transition from public to private space so that pedestrians comfortably know where they are supposed to be. A properly executed facade will anchor the structure into it's site and architectural context. How a building meets the ground is important aesthetically and helps to define its use. A successful facade shall offer transparency and human scale to enhance the pedestrian environment. All structures facing streets, bikeways or open space shall incorporate one or more of the following frontage strategies. FIGURE 9-2 shows key streets and open space where frontage is required. Frontage shall be provided facing trails and pedestrian paths as indicated in FIGURE 9-2, such as the Class 1 Bikeways along the west and east perimeter of development. In some cases frontage may be required on multiple facades, as for a corner lot. While an entry door is not necessary on both facades, other frontage features should be provided to create a 3-dimensional design. A wrap-around porch or side porch separate from the entry element are appropriate solutions at corner lots. Where a building fronts both a street and key open space, such as a park or ravine, both an entry front and a "garden" front, shall be provided on the appropriate opposing sides. For example, the homes along the east edge of Village F will have a street entry front facing the internal circulation road and a second front facing B Street North. Even though there is a significant grade difference, it is important that the view from public routes such as the bikeway and B Street North are not perceived to be to the "back" side of buildings. The frontage types below are described in more detail in the following sections. Building designs are not limited to these types, as long as the aesthetic goals described in the previous paragraph are met. Combining frontage elements is strongly encouraged. 9.4.1 Stoop 9.4.2 Porch 9.4.3 Recessed Entry 9.4.4 Walled Yard 9.4.5 Raised Yard 9.4.6 Entry Court 9.4.7 Shopfront 9.4.8 Arcade ffilSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-9 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 — 94.1 St000 Stoops are exterior stairs and landings that provided access to elevated front doors of buildings. Stoops signify entry by providing an obvious path of access, but the vertical displacement also implies separation between the public and private realm. A person on a stoop has passed onto private property, but is still visible to and engaged with the public. The design of a stoop can thus convey a message about the structure being accessed: a straight stair with just a few steps is very accessible, whereas a high stoop with many steps or a circuitous route makes the entry more removed from the public way. Stoop Design Standards: A. At least half, and preferably all, of the stoop composition should be in the setback zone. B. Entry doors should be further enhanced with a frame, cover or some architectural treatment that is compatible with the stoop design. C. Stoops may be covered or uncovered. D. Railings or low walls should be of the same design and material for both the steps and the landing. E. Railings or low walls should be of compatible materials and design with the building and any garden fences or walls. F. Railings or low walls should be integrated with the building and any garden fences or walls. For instance, stoop walls and building walls that are parallel and of the same material should be flush. G. Large landings that can function as terraces or as places for potted plants and other site furnishings are encouraged. H. Multiple landings are encouraged where many steps are needed. I. Facades facing side streets or common space shall have windows, projections or other architectural features to add visual interest. J. Steps can either be parallel or perpendicular to the street frontage. K. Provide disabled access to buildings and residences in compliance with all applicable codes, including the ADA, CBC nd FHA Guidelines. November 2017 SPECIFIC „AI= Examples of Straight Stoop frontages. Examples of Sideways Stoop frontages. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-11 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9.4.2 Porch A porch is a semi -private outdoor room that has a floor and "ceiling", but no full walls. It offers the resident a protected place to be outdoors and watch passersby while not feeling too exposed. The cover plane of a porch may be a roof, trellis, balcony or building overhang. The floor of a porch is typically elevated above a yard or public way, at the same level or one step below the entry door sill. A front porch is typically located between the entrance and the public way and serves to transition between the public and the private realm. A porch is an element along an entry procession. The design of a porch is significant to the character and style of a building. Porches may project from the building front (Fig. 9-5) or be fully or partially embraced in the building mass (See Fig.9-6). Porch Design Standards: A. Projecting porches can be partially or entirely in the setback zone. B. Porches that are fully integrated into the building plass are typically located behind the build -to line. C. A porch may be partially projecting and partially integrated, to create multiple planes. D. Porch depth shall allow sufficient space for furnishings for sitting or dining. E. Porch covers need not be solid - a trellis is acceptable. But covers shall be static and permanent. A retractable awning or canopy is not sufficient for a porch. F. Porch lids shall be supported on columns, arches or partial walls. An overhang or cantilever alone does not define a porch. G. Entry doors may be more simply detailed when fronted or framed by a porch, H. Porch floors shall be elevated by at least 4 inches above the adjacent grade and shall be of a distinct material from adjacent paving. Fig November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN Example of Projecting Porch. Example of Integral Porch. Example of a Porch integrated with a balcony above in multifamily housing. I. Porches should be accessed by steps that can be partially or fully recessed into the porch or may project from the porch face. A ramp may be substituted where required for accessibility and where no other compliant routes are available. J. Railings or low walls at the edges of a porch should continue down the steps with the same design and material. K. The elements of a porch shall be of compatible materials and design with the building and any garden fences or walls. L Front porches may not be fully enclosed with screening or other material. M. Facades facing side streets or common space shall have windows, projections or other architectural features to add visual interest. JU'Th SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-13 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9.4.3 Recessed Entry A recessed entry is similar to an integral porch in that the entry door is pulled back into the mass of the building and a semi -private outdoor space is created in the entry sequence. However, the recessed entry is generally more enclosed by the building or site walls. Recessed entries are not necessarily elevated, although they can be. The design purpose is to extend the arrival sequence and create more space between public and private without a large, formal lawn. There is a playful ambiguity to recessed entries. On the one hand, the entry door is more hidden and private. On the other hand, the curiosity created by the hidden or shadowed entry invites the observer to look more closely. Recessed entries are often combined with other frontage elements, such as stoops and porches. Recessed Entry Design Standards: A. Recessed entries are placed behind the build - to line. B. Recessed entries shall be enclosed by at least two building walls. C. Recessed entries shall be covered by a building overhang or a trellis, or a combination of these. D. The overhang or trellis may be cantilevered in a recessed entry. E. Recessed entries that are not raised should be integrated with the yard landscaping. Walkway paving materials should be continuous. F. Facades facing side streets or common space shall have windows, projections or other architectural features to add visual interest. Preferred example of a Recessed Entry. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrI 4 4.4 Walled Yard Walled yards are private outdoor spaces between the building and property line that are enclosed by a wall or fence at the property line. The wall or fence presents the same level of detail and visual interest to the public realm as the facade of a building does. Walled yards do not necessarily cover the entire frontage of a lot. They are often most successful when the walls are an extension of building walls at or near the property line. While denoting privacy, walled yards should still offer glimpses of the gardens beyond. Walled yards are often combined with other frontage elements, such as raised yards and entry courts. Walled Yard Design Standards: A. Fences shall be placed at the property line. 8. Solid walls shall be placed within 2 feet of the property line. The space between the wall and property line shall be densely landscaped with plants that climb over the wall or are otherwise integrated with the design of the wall. C. See guidelines for Fences, Walls and Gates for acceptable materials and other design requirements. Materials and style shall be complementary to the building form. D. Fences and walls enclosing yards shall offer some transparency into the garden, particularly at front yards. This can be accomplished by semi-opaque fencing patterns, framed openings in solid walls, see-through gates, or simply by lowering the height of the barrier. E. Gates, when open 90 degrees, shall encroach no more than 18" across the property line, In - swinging gates are preferred. F. Security measures shall be discrete and non- threatening, G. Fences or walls enclosing yards shall be decorative and shall incorporate street furniture elements such as built-in benches, lighting, artwork or potted plants. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES Figure 9-8 Wa) Preferred examples of a Walled Yards. 9-15 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9.4.4 Raised Yard Raised yards are front gardens or lawns that are elevated above the sidewalk. They are particularly useful at Altair to mitigate sloping grades in a creative way, with purpose. Raised yards can be seen as extended stoops that are used as functional space. The steps are placed at the property line, before the yard and at the beginning of the entry sequence. The building and property are elevated, as on a plinth. This arrangement can cause the building to seem more removed from the public realm than other schemes. However, it is not more private. The raised yard can sometimes seem like a stage. Careful design is needed to create a distinct zone without appearing aloof. Raised Yard Design Standards: A. Raised yards are located between the property line and the build -to line, and extend back to recessed entries or to portions of the building that are set back from the build -to line. B. Raised yards shall be contained by short retaining walls that allow some views into the yard. See retaining walls guidelines to follow. Walls retaining raised yards shall be placed at the property line. C. Raised yards more than 6 inches above the sidewalk shall not transition to the adjacent grade with a slope bank. A gradual slope {5% or less) from the build -to line to the property line does not constitute a raised yard. D. Steps shall start at the property line. E. Multiple landings are encouraged where many steps are needed. F. Steps shall be integrated with the design of the retaining walls and yard landscaping. G. Railings or low walls shall be of compatible materials and design with building and retaining walls. H. Large landings that can function as terraces or as places for potted plants and other site furnishings are encouraged. I. Entry doors should be further enhanced with a frame, cover or some architectural treatment that is compatible with the stoop design. J. Facades facing side streets or common space shall have windows, projections or other architectural features to add visual interest. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN RI Preferred example of a Raised Yard. Example of a raised yard that does not meet Design Standards. Walls are too high and do not leave enough space between for seating or substantial landscaping. The front wall is set back from the sidewalk, leaving a narrow strip of grass. There are no steps. The overall impression is defensive rather than inviting. ffil SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-17 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 -- 9A.6 Entry Court Entry courts are outdoor spaces created either by setting back a portion of a single building or by arranging multiple buildings to form a court, or a combination of both. Entry courts may be open or walled. When open, they should be combined with other frontage elements, such as stoops, framed entries and porches. Entry courts may be elevated, but must be accessible, such as a slightly raised terrace. Entry Court Design Standards: See Figure 9-13 for examples of some of these entry court elements: A. Entry courts include both the setback area and space behind the build -to line. B. If used, walls or fences enclosing entry courts shall follow the walled yard design standards as well as the guidelines for Fences, Walls and Gates. C. Entry courts used for vehicular access to parking shall be screened or enclosed. D. Entry courts shall feature enhanced paving, seating, artwork and landscaping that supports these activities. E. Entry courts shall provide clear paths to building entries. F. When an entry court is used at a building or group of buildings with multiple entries, it is not necessary that all entries face the court. G. Buildings adjacent to the street frontage or common space should have entrances facing the public way or some architectural frontage treatment to address the street or common space. November 2017 Examples of Entry Courts at multifamily housing. The top example is preferred because the security gate is set back from the building face and is, therefore, more inviting. SPECIFIC PLAN. Figure 9-10 Entry Court Preferred example of an Entry Court that also serves as a Bungalow Court with detached housing. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN I 9 GUIDELINES DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9-20 9.4.7 Shopfront Shopfronts are featured at commercial, mixed- use and live/work buildings and at community institutions. Whereas the previous frontage types define a transition from public to private space, shopfronts are intended to be very public. Shopfronts are predominantly transparent, with walls or columns for structure only. Openings in walls should frame the activity or product within as a display. Shopfronts should stimulate a high level of street activity and visual interest to promote strolling. Shopfront Design Standards: A. Shopfronts are located at the property line, unless set back by an arcade. B. The floor line of the level above the shopfront shall be at least 15 feet above the sidewalk at any point adjacent to the shopfront. C. Shopfronts shall be 75% transparent at the street level, with clear, untinted glass. D. The bottom of the glass shall be no more than 18 inches above the sidewalk, and shall not slope. E. The bottom edge of shopfront glazing shall rest on a sill of tile, wood or stone. Any wall surfaces below glazing shall be decorative, such as mosaic tile. F. The top edge of shopfront glazing shall be at least 11 feet above the adjacent sidewalk elevation, but shall not slope. G. At outside building corners, shopfront glazing shall extend back a minimum of 20 feet perpendicular to the street frontage. H. Unless fronted by an arcade, shopfronts shall have awnings, canopies or a trellis to shade shoppers. I. Clerestory windows are encouraged. J. Entry doors to shopfronts shall be at least 8'-6" high. K. Entries shall be accessible to the disabled, with no step at the door sill_ L. The Master Developer will develop a sign program for City approval. Figure 9-11 Shopfront November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK !:9 Figure 9-12 Arcade 9.4.8 Arcade Arcades are combined with shopfronts at commercial, mixed-use and live/work buildings and at community institutions. Arcades provide shade and protection in front of shopfronts and present a uniform facade for varied buildings or entries. They also provide a outdoor space that can be lit in the evenings while avoiding light spillage to the night sky. Arcades are similar in appearance and function to galleries, except that they do not encroach over the sidewalk. Arcade Design Standards: A. The front edge of an arcade is located at the property line_ See Figure 10-5. B. The arcade lid shall be solid and can support either a balcony/terrace above or a building overhang. The levels above the arcade shall comply with all setback regulations. C. Arcades in this sense may be supported on columns or arches. D. The spacing and dimension of columns or arches shall align with and be fully integrated with the design and rhythm of the facade or balcony rail above. E. The paving surface shall be of the same material and flush with the adjacent sidewalk. F. The depth of arcades shall be 8 feet minimum and 12 feet maximum from the shopfront face to the front face of the arcade at the property line. I ii SPECIFIC PLAN DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES OCEANSIDE CITY HALL BY IRVING GILL, OCEANSIDE, CALIFORNIA ARCADE AT SANTANA ROW, SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA November 2017 9-21 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 - 9.5 Utility Placement and Screening Utility infrastructure such as water, sewer and gas mains and dry utilities will run under streets and sidewalks in public rights of way or in Public Utility and Access Easements (P.U.A.E.'s) in the case of private streets. The street section diagrams in Specific Plan Section 4.2.3 show PUAE and ROW locations for Altair streets. Placement of Rancho California Water District (RCWD) utilities for water and recycled water systems is required to comply with RCWD standards and requirements, including related advanced metering infrastructure antenna. GAS METERS & DEVICES SERVING INDIVIDUAL DWELLINGS SHALL BE LOCATED IN SETBACK 1 ( S'to6' REMAINING SIDEWALK WIDTH UTILITY DEVICES IN 5' TYPICAL PARKWAY WIDTH PADS FOR LARGE DEVICES MAY ENCROACH 1' INTO SIDEWA R.O.W. OR PUBLIC UTILITY & ACCESS Figure 9-13 Utility Locations 1 ALSO SEE FIGURES 4-13 THROUGH 4-34 Utility devices that serve common areas or multiple properties shall be located in parkways between the sidewalk and street curb. If necessary due to size, these equipment pads may encroach into the sidewalk by a maximum of 1 foot, as shown in FIGURE 9-13. If an above ground utility (such as irrigation controls, water valves, etc.) cannot be located within the parkway, the developer may create a "pop -out" easement within the building setback area to accommodate the utility. This would occur in final engineering and site planning. The purpose of such an easement must be to maximize the sidewalk width, ideally up to 7 feet. At utilities in underground vaults, the vault may extend under the sidewalk, as long as the sidewalk remains flat. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN• 9.5.1 Preferred Examples: Well placed and screened utility meters. Utility devices such as backflow preventers should be located away from public view and screened with landscaping and/or low walls, or with decorative enclosures approved by the Master Developer. Underground vaults are recommended for transformers, irrigation valves, regulators and meters whenever possible, even when serving detached housing and small Tots. If vaults are not possible, then such utilities shall be screened with landscaping and/or walls or fencing as described in Section 9.6. Such screening must not interfere with the use or maintenance of the device. Residential mechanical equipment such as air conditioning units shall be located on private property and screened with landscaping and/or walls or fencing as described in Section 9.6. Air conditioner compressors should not be near dwelling entries. At civic, commercial and institutional buildings and large multifamily buildings, cooling towers and compressors must be located on rooftops and screened from view, including view from higher elevations. Roof top screening may be accomplished by parapets, trellises or other methods that are integrated into the building's architecture and of materials consistent with the overall composition. Satellite dishes shall be located away from public view. Trash, recycling and yard waste containers in multifamily housing, commercial and instiutional uses shall be located in enclosures to screen them from view from any direction. Refuse enclosures shall have solid covers to prevent rainwater intrusion and windblown trash, in compliance with City of Temecula requirements. Enclosures shall be opaque for at least the height of the refuse container. See Section 9.6 for fence, wall and gate guidelines. Enclosures shall be sized per the City of Temecula Waste and Recycling Guidelines, subject to the City's franchise agreement for refuse and recycling collection and disposal. See Section 7.8 Waste Management for further information. Garage space must be provided for trash, recycling and green waste bins beyond the minimum parking dimensions prescribed in Section 10.9. %/ SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-23 (DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9.5.2 Examples of Discouraged Utility Placement: These utilities are not screened, block views of the building and obstruct movement. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANW 9.6 Fences, Walls and Gates Fences and walls are limited to 6 feet high in residential areas and 3 feet high in required front setbacks, except where serving as a guardrail. Fences and walls may only be used for screening of private open spaces, motor courts, utility and refuse areas, and for safety at swimming pools, etc. There are no gated communities at Altair. Fences should not be installed to imply exclusivity or separation from the rest of the community, nor should they impede pedestrian circulation. Fences and screen walls shall be of durable, quality materials: wood, stone, plaster, steel, glass. Chain link fencing is discouraged and is not appropriate in areas visible from public view. Any chain link fencing should be black vinyl -coated. See Section 10.8 for further information. Fences that surround yards are encouraged to have some transparency. This may be accomplished with openings or gates that a passerby may peak through, or the structure of the fence itself may be semi -transparent, such as a picket fence. Fences and walls should be integrated with landscaping. Long fences and walls shall be divided into segments with some rhythm or pattern. Decorative elements such as tile, fountains and niches are encouraged. Glass fences are encouraged around community pools and along ravines and slope banks, where privacy is of less concern. It is preferred that the glass be located above a curb or low wall at sloping grades. EXAMPLES OF ARTWORK INTEGRATED WITH FENCE. I SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-25 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9.6.1 Preferred Fence Examples: These fences are of quality materials, are consistent with their adjacent buildings and enhance the public realm. Gates are opportunities for artistic expression. Unique ornamental gates are strongly encouraged, to signify entry as well as provide identity and character to a home. Walls for screening sound maybe necessary in selected locations as identified in the environmental report. While sound walls are typically opaque, the materials used should provide texture and visual interest. Glass is also acceptable at sound walls. Sculptural forms are encouraged. Sound walls should also be integrated with landscaping, 9.6.2 Examples of Discouraged Fence Installations: In the right photo, the gate and security interface are positioned in front of the steps, creating a very defensive impression. The canopy is not suited to the fence. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANf•Il 9.7 Slopes and Retaining Walls Altair is a sloping site and consequently has areas of extreme grade change. While major areas of elevation change, such as the Eastern Slope, are designed in this Specific Plan, there are smaller examples between homes and around patios and terraces throughout the development. These are designed either as slope banks, retaining walls, or a combination of both. Required standards for erosion control and storm water management at slopes are explained in the Grading section of this specific plan. Slopes and stepped walls are landscaped to prevent erosion and soften their appearance, as described in the Landscape Guidelines. Well-designed retaining walls are encouraged to break up large areas of slope bank. Walls are limited in height per the development standards, although walls may be used in stepped combination to accommodate greater level change. Single, large retaining walls should be avoided. Wherever retaining walls are visible to the public from a road, pedestrian walkway, bike path or from off-site, they are limited to 6 feet in height. Walls may be stepped as shown in FIGURE 9-1a where necessary to retain a taller slope. 1. Laid back segmental walls may exceed 6 feet in height and be used throughout the project as long as: a) they adhere to the wall design standards within the Specific Plan (including landscape screening in areas that are highly visible by the public), and b) they are set back from street curbs (if applicable). 2. Vertical retaining walls may not exceed 8' anywhere in the project. In areas where greater than 8' of vertical walls are desired, the wall system shall be stepped. Small-scale modular materials are preferred at retaining walls: stone, cast stone, brick. Plaster veneer, exposed textured or formed concrete and Gabion meshes are only acceptable in small areas. Segmental concrete block is acceptable only where substantially screened by plant material. The finish of segmental concrete block shall be split -face, ground face or textured. Channel block, wood, timbers, earthbags, shotcrete, galvanized sheet exposed piles, stamped or pebble -finish concrete, kribbing (i.e.Kriblock), and modular plastic are strongly discouraged as exposed materials. All walls shall have caps or tie courses at the top. Wall materials shall be graffitti-resistant or have an anti -graffiti coating. EQUAL 4' MIN. MEM 111.111...1.111.111.110 Public =IRMSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-27 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 - ENTRY LEVEL ENTRY LEVEL Figure 9-15 Stepped Buildings Slopes should be resolved through building forms to the greatest extent possible to avoid the appearance of Targe terraced building pads. Larger multifamily buildings on sloping sites should have entry level access for pedestrians on an upper level and vehicular access at a lower level, away from the street. Smaller buildings can also be stepped to either side of a green, alley or motor court by partially submerging lower floor garages, as shown in FIGURE 9-15. 9.7.1 Examples for Retaining Wall Design The following examples display both preferred and discouraged attributes for retaining walls at Altair. All retaining wall designs must be reviewed and approved by the Master Developer. Stone Wall PREFERRED ATTRIBUTES • Integrated with mixed plant palette. • Multiple planes. • Varied textures and sizes DISCOURAGED ATTRIBUTES • Single monotonous wall plane and top elevation November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrIL Segmental Concrete Wall SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES PREFERRED ATTRIBUTES • Wall cap • Sinuous lines • Ends of walls blend into landscape • Varied coursing DISCOURAGED ATTRIBUTES • No cap • Clumsy wall terminations • No landscape integration PREFERRED ATTRIBUTES • Wall cap • Sinuous lines • Natural color • Planting is in balance with wall height. DISCOURAGED ATTRIBUTES • Unattractive finish • No cap • Drain holes will stain wall • Poor construction 9-29 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 Formed Concrete Vegetated Wall November 2017 PREFERRED ATTRIBUTES • Low height • Deep plane offsets create an appealing shadow pattern DISCOURAGED ATTRIBUTES • Artificial stone pattern is not appropriate to exposed pile structure PREFERRED ATTRIBUTES • variety of color and pattern in plant palette PREFERRED ATTRIBUTES Wall structure is completely hidden by plants Textured Concrete Gabion Mesh /I SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES PREFERRED ATTRIBUTES • Interesting + unique texture • Abstract pattern DISCOURAGED ATTRIBUTES • Pattern attempts to look like natural stone, unsuccessfully PREFERRED ATTRIBUTES • Interesting mix of colors and materials • Wall plane divided into smaller areas by built-in seating • wall cap DISCOURAGED ATTRIBUTES • Scale is too large • No termination at top or base DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9-32 9.8 Materials, Textures and Colors Materials should be durable, refined and appropriate to the building style and form, but are otherwise not limited. Limited maintenance of building finishes should be required. Architectural materials should be compatible with surrounding neighborhoods. Buildings should generally have two to four distinct materials, depending on building size, with two material or clor changes on a single facade. Too many materials can be as unattractive as too few. The distinction between materials shall be of texture and pattern, for a rich facade. 9.8.1 Relationship Between Materials: Materials should be used to compliment and support architectural form. Material changes should occur at volumetric breaks or offsetting planes. Material changes within the same wall plane or at outside corners is discouraged, except where necessary to a compelling design. There should be a consistency of design around all sides of a building, with materials and colors wrapping corners. Monotonous or overly consistent lines between colors or materials are discouraged. Appropriate edging and transitions shall be provided between materials, such as trim boards, reveals, edge beams and wall caps. All transitions shall be properly flashed to prevent water intrusion or material failure. 9.8.2 Materials at the Base of a building shall have a hard surface. The exclusive use of stucco is not appropriate at the ground floor of commercial, mixed use, live/work, civic or institutional buildings. Base materials should not be of a lighter quality than materials above. 9.8.3 Veneer Materials such as brick, tile and stone shall wrap outside corners and jambs and only terminate into perpendicular planes. The installation and detailing of brick and stone should be consistent with the historical use of these materials as bearing walls: solid corners, true bonding patterns, struck mortar joints, lintels and wall caps. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 9.8.4 Color Palettes should not be limited to earthtones. Facades should be developed with layers of color, accent colors and contrasting trim. Contrasting cool and warm tones are encouraged, such as warns natural wood against concrete or stucco. 9.8.5 Reflective Materials such as reflective glass or sheet metal should only be used in very small areas where necessary for a compelling design. Darkly tinted glass is discouraged, especially in residential buildings. Shop fronts and community buildings should have highly transparent glazing. 9.8.6 Sloped Roof Materials shall be tile, metal (standing seam or shingle), or slate. Asphalt shingles are discouraged. Wood shakes or shingles are prohibited due to combustibility. Non-combustible (cementitious) alternative shakes may be allowed upon review of a mock-up installation. Integrated solar roof tiles are strongly encouraged. 9.8.7 Roof Drains should be internal wherever possible. Where gutters and downspouts are utilized, they shall be harmoniously integrated with the building design and of highly durable materials. Damaged gutters and downspouts shall be replaced immediately. 9.8.8 Decorative Paving such as brick or concrete pavers, stone or integrally colored concrete is encouraged as an accent to call attention to building entries, celebrate viewpoints or special places, and to clearly demark pedestrian paths such as cross -walks. For large paving areas pervious, light-colored paving should be used to reduce both storm water run- off and heat island affect due to solar absorption. Accent bands can be of darker materials . 9.8.9 Accessory Elements such as screen walls, secondary structures or carports should complement or match adjacent primary buildings in material selection, color and texture, as well as form. • f iSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-33 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 /D■ : UM ONO WI Pi _ OM ■'' MO ■; MAI NOM MEMO 31t 5 .: fI■ IN 11 l 9.9 Public Art Public art is important to the success of any pedestrian environment and is, therefore, strongly encouraged throughout the community. Art enlivens spaces, aids wayfinding and serves to identify significant places. Public art can vary in scale from grand monuments to small discoveries on a quiet path. Playful art is especially appropriate in areas like playgrounds, parks, and swimming pools that are frequented by children. Everyday functional items such as bike racks, water fountains, benches, picnic shelters or trash receptacles can exhibit whimsy, craft and creativity. Common spaces should incorporate art features where possible. Art installations should be durable and protected from damage. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANFJI Sculptures on the Lackawanna River Heritage Trail in Pennsylvania The City of Temecula requires new development to contribute to Art in Public Places in accordance with Section 5.08 of the Temecula Municipal Code through impact fees. Recognizing that public art is a great community amenity, the Master Developer intends to install artwork throughout Altair and to then seek reimbursement of fees paid towards Art in Public Places, equal to the cost of the art and its installation costs. These installations will be in prominent locations used by the public, as seen in the examples shown in this Specific Plan. Guest developers may also choose to install permanent public artwork within their projects and may also seek reimbursement of their impact fees. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES Li DESIGN GUIDELINES KEY PLAN LEGEND: 9 16 Q 1, PLANTING 2. SCULPTURE / SPECIMEN TREE 3. COBBLE 4. PAVERS IN ROUND -A -BOUT 5. DECORATIVE CONCRETE 6. CROSSWALK CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN WC 9.9.1 Roundabouts Altair features three roundabouts to calm traffic while improving traffic flow. They also serve as artistic landmarks for the community. Each roundabout has a variety of shrubs, grasses and ground cover, boulders and cobbles as well as sculpture. Decorative pavement such as brick, granite cobbles or concrete unit pavers within the street surface further enhance the roundabout and provide a physical texture change to help slow drivers. Figure 9-17 Roundabout 1 - Elevation CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. Roundabout "1", FIGURE 9-16 (Plan) and FIGURE 9-17 (Elevation), located in front of the school site includes a specimen Coast Live Oak and sculptural elements surrounded by shrubs, grasses, boulders and cobbles potentially quarried onsite during grading operations. /r/SPECIFIC PLN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-37 MN= IDESIGN — GUIDELINES 9 KEY PLAN LEGEND: 1. PLANTING 2. SCULPTURE 3. COBBLE 4. PAVERS IN ROUND -A -BOUT 5. SPECIAL PAVING 6. TREE PITS WITH PLANTING 7. CROSSWALK 6 CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN • Figure 9-19 Roundabout 2 - Elevation CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. Roundabout "2", FIGURE 9-18 (Plan) and FIGURE 9-19 (Elevation), located at the Village "C" core adjacent to the Private Recreation Center and Village "C" Core Park includes a pedestrian zone with tree planters and benches connecting the various residential, commercial and recreational spaces. Roundabout "3", FIGURE 9-20 (Elevation) and FIGURE 9-21 (Plan), located at the extension of First Street includes a large sculpture and a variety of planting species in a banding pattern including shrubs, grasses, boulders and cobbles potentially quarried onsite during grading operations. IMMIMIIIMIIbbout 3 - Elevation CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. I. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 KEY PLAN LEGEND: 1 1. PLANTING 2. SCULPTURE 3. COBBLE 4, PAVERS IN ROUND•A-BOUT 5. BIKE PATH 6. HIKING TRAIL 7. DECORATIVE CONCRETE 8. CROSSWALK oundabout 3 lgt CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN F7 9.10 Monuments and Gateways 9.10.1 Entry Statement Monument Plan Major and Minor Entry Statement Monument locations are illustrated in Figure 9-23. Major vehicular entries are located on the south and north ends of the Western Bypass and on the east at First Street. The intent of the major monuments is to denote arrival into Altair and to begin to convey the design theme of the community. Three alternatives are included to illustrate the look and feel of the major monuments at a conceptual level_ NO OBJECTS OVER 36" HIGH IN VISIBILITY TRIANGLE PER SECTION 10.9 CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. Major Entry MQnpment-Alternative A Alternative A, FIGURE 9-22 and FIGURE 9-23, shows a low, linear sign wall in the modern rustic motif. The materials consist of torten steel and natural colored concrete. The lettering is a large san serif font easily read from a distance. Native planting and boulders surround and frame the sign but do no block the letters, and a large Coast Live Oak tree is used as an accent. A plan view illustrating the typical location of the major monument is illustrated in FIGURE 9 - 24. I. SPECIFIC PLAN CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 0 Entry Monuments Gateway Bridge November 2017 0 300' 600' 1200' SPECIFIC PLAN Major Entry Monument-Altemative B Keeping with the modern rustic motif, the Alternative B, FIGURE 9-25, features a corten steel sign panel mounted on a gabion wall, The gabion wall stone may be potentially quarried onsite during the mass grading operations. The lettering is a large san serif font easily read from a distance. Native planting and boulders surround and frame the sign but do no block the letters, and a large Coast Live Oak tree is used as an accent. Figure 9-25 Major Entry Monument B - Elevation CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. Major Entry Monument-Attgmative C Alternative C, FIGURE 9-26, is an angled chevron shaped wedge acting as a retaining wall. This corten steel sign wall maintains the modern rustic motif and provides visual interest with planting spilling over the top. The lettering is a large san serif font easily read from a distance. Native planting and boulders surround and frame the sign but do no block the letters, and a Targe Coast Live Oak tree is used as an accent. IMINEKLMajor Entry Monument C - Elevation filMSPECIFIC PLAN CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9.10.2 Major Vehicular Entries The north entry to Altair is at the intersection of Altair Vista and the Western Bypass. This is a major 4 -way intersection with entries on both sides of the Bypass. The south entry is just east of the Bypass before it crosses Murrieta Creek. This entry features open space on two levels separated by stepped retaining walls and landscaping. The lower open space also functions as a drainage basin and will be planted accordingly. The upper open space is a small park at the elevation of Village F, offering vistas to the southeast. Monument signage will be integrated with the retaining walls. The east entry is at the current terminus of First Street. It features a roundabout 9.10.3 Gateways In addition to the entry monuments discussed above, the bridge linking the north and south portions of Village Cfunctions as a gateway into Altair, as seen in FIGURE 9-27. The bridge is a significant symbol of the Altair community as seen from Old Town. This bridge spans over the linear walkway leading from the central park to Main Street and frames the axial view from City Hall up the hillside to the community center and beyond. The bridge connects the two sides of "A" Street in Village C and will carry both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. Therefore, this bridge will be of substantial construction and size. An arched span would also be appropriate here. 9.10.4 Village and Neighborhood Entries Village identifiers are commonly located in the focal parks or greens of each village. Monument signs that imply a separate product type or community segregation are to be avoided. Signage should be unique to each village and have a neighborhood quality. Figure 9-27 Gateway Bri CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 9.11 Wind Screening Due to location and topography, prevailing winds at Altair blow from west to east and are stronger in the afternoon. Cool air from the ocean warms as it moves eastward and is then forced up over the ridgeline just west of Altair. The air then picks up velocity as it drops down the east face of the ridge and across the Altair site. The design of all outdoor spaces, especially roof decks, should consider orientation, landscaping and walls to screen against wind and to maintain the comfort of occupants. Courtyards are very appropriate to shelter open space from wind. Water features in particular must be designed and located to avoid overspray in windy conditions. LESS THAN 0.5% LIGHT INTENSITY ABOVE 90° HORIZONTAL PLANE - 90° 80° MAXIMUM 10%LIGHT INTENSITY IN FIRST 10° BELOW HORIZONTAL 9.12 Outdoor Lighting Altair is located approximately 20 miles from the Palomar Observatory. Therefore, exterior lighting must comply with the Zone B restrictions of the Mount Palomar Lighting Ordinance (Riverside County Ordinance No. 655). All fixtures shall have International Dark -Sky Association (IDA) seal of approval. LED lighting shall have a color temperature of 2700K or below to minimize blue light. Exterior lighting should provide for the security of pedestrians. However, too much lighting can be uncomfortable and distracting to neighbors. Development at Altair has been carefully sited to be unobtrusive when seen from other parts of the City. Outdoor lighting should be consistent with that goal. Large areas of lighting or high lumen levels that cause the community to "glow" shall be avoided. Parking lot lighting shall be carefully designed to minimize bright areas that can be seen from Old Town and environs. Light poles should be shorter, so that trees screen upward glare. Light fixtures shall incorporate cut-offs and appropriate lenses to eliminate glare and light spillover to adjacent properties. An even level of light along circulation routes is safer than contrasting areas of brightness and shadow. SPECIFIC PL"'. November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-45 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9-46 Light fixture types can help identify different levels of circulation: pedestrian -scale pole lights at public plazas, sidewalks and major walkways, low-level lighting at more private paths and trails, taller poles at vehicle -only roads. Accent lighting shall also celebrate important community design features and monuments. Only structures that are important to community identity, such as the tower or gateway bridge, shall be lit. Lighting of residential or commercial buildings is strongly discouraged. Street lights along Altair Vista should be of a consistent style, material and color. However, some variation in the pole base, or in accessories such as banners, is allowed to distinguish a village or special location. Integration of other systems - such as microcelss, wi-fi, speakers or emergency beacons - into street light poles is encouraged to mimimize redundant support structures. 9.13 Streets The streets of Altair are one of its' most important characteristics. In order for Altair to be a successful development, its' streets must have definition. They should have boundaries, usually building walls of some sort, that communicate where the edges of the street are, that set the street apart, that keep the eyes on and in the street, that make it a place. Width of the street and height of buildings, that create the boundaries of the street, set the stage. The horizontal to vertical proportion of a street determines the scale and character. The elements that are placed in the street, such as trees, landscaping, lighting and street furniture, help to humanize the street Color and material of horizontal and vertical planes of buildings contribute to the beauty of streets as well but on their own merits will not make a street successful. Spacing of buildings along the street also contribute to the definition of streets. The closer buildings are placed gives the street clearer definition. All of these elements, to a greater or lesser degree, contribute to the beauty of the neighborhood. Chapter 4 deals with the design of the principle streets included in the Grading Plan and Tentative Map. The street sections and axonometrics illustrate the quality and design intent of the streets in Altair. The secondary streets that will make up the network of streets within each village should have the same level of quality. Streets should be kept as narrow as practicable, with street parking, trees, landscaping and urban furniture to help beautify and provide a pedestrian - scaled environment. Linking the project's private drives with the surrounding streets is vital for the neighborhood and the rest of the community to avoid the characteristics of a "gated community" that isolates a project and erects barriers. Multiple entry points to the site increases connectivity to the community while providing more convenient circulation for residents and neighbors. Street Standards A street grid scaled for people is fundamental. Streets suitable for pedestrians should avoid excessive block lengths. The objective is to avoid a condition where pedestrians are forced to walk lengthy routes to get to their destination. Long blocks limit travel direction and increase travel time, distance and inconvenience for pedestrians. Pass-through points at mid -block and/ or at the corners of the development should be utilized to enhance walkability and encourage foot traffic to surrounding villages, local businesses, schools and community amenities. In order to accomplish this objective, there shall be a maximum 300 -foot distance between cross -streets or pedestrian paths to adjacent streets. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK PREFERRED: URBAN GRID STREET PATTERN DISCOURAGED: SUBURBAN STREET NETWORK wnH CUL-DE-SACS Figure 9-28 Street Organization Pedestrian only streets (paseos or mews) are highly encouraged to improve walkabilty. Paseos can be as narrow as 6 feet wide with adjoining yard setbacks of up to 10 feet. Where residential yard setbacks are not provided, the width of the mews shall be a minimum of 15 feet. To ensure the durability and longevity of road surfaces, upgraded concrete pads shall be utilized in turn -around areas used by heavy utility vehicles such as trash collection trucks within the project. All streets must be capable of bearing an 80,000 pound gross vehicle weight for fire trucks and equipment, per the Temecula Municipal Code and California Fire Code. 9.14 Signage Community -wide Signage Guidelines will be submitted and reviewed as more precise design evolves at Altair. Signage shall follow the general standards established in Temecula Municipal Code Chapter 17.28 Article 1, except that commercial signs are not prohibited next to residential areas and signage is allowed on awnings and canopies that project into the public right of way per Figure 10-4. The Guidelines should allow for stylistic variation between villages. There should not be a single signage theme or material used uniformly throughout Altair. Design, materials and color should support and celebrate the character and identity of the particular village, and not individual developments. While sub -development name signs are allowed for way -finding, they should be discrete and must not compete with other village signage for visibility. Signage for multifamily housing, commercial and institutional buildings should be mounted on the buildings, except at the Civic Site and school, which may have each have one major and one minor free-standing monument sign. Sign standards are discussed further in Section 10.5. Where these standards are more restrictive than those in the Municipal Code, the standards in this Specific Plan shall apply. Project Pre -application Submittal requirements for signage are outlined in Section 11.1.3.(2). Street identification signs should be consistent throughout Altair. They should be simple and legible from a safe driving distance and at night. Street signs or sign supports are not allowed to span over streets. fflSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DESIGN 9 GUIDELINES 9-47 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9 9.15 Accessibility Altair strives to provide a supportive neighborhood for an inclusive population, especially those with physical disabilities. Development at Altair will fully comply with all applicable accessibility guidelines and regulations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Fair Housing Act (FHA) and California Building Code (CBC). Builders are strongly encouraged to go beyond these baseline requirements to meet the specific housing needs of the disabled. An example would be dwelling units and common spaces equipped with visual aids and open floor plans to assist the Deaf and increase resident safety. Builders are also encouraged to offer customized dwelling amenities to meet the particular special needs of buyers. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS I aikair 10 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10.1 Application These Development Standards should be used integrally with the regulations set forth in Section 3 Land Use, the village descriptions in Section 3 and with Section 9 Design Guidelines. 10.2 Zoning Unless otherwise indicated, the standards described below and in other sections of this Specific Plan replace Chapter 17.06 "Residential Districts" of the City of Temecula Development Code in its entirety. Development regulations for the Altair Specific Plan are prescribed in the following Tables 10-1 and 10-2. Uses listed in Table 10-1 are as defined in the City of Temecula Development Code with the following additions: Live/Work means a dwelling unit with both residential and commercial uses, wherein the commercial space is at the ground floor and the commercial or business activity is conducted by the resident of the contiguous dwelling unit. Commercial activities are limited to the nonresidential and commercial uses allowed in Table 10-1. Community Gardens are shared land areas that are collectively farmed or gardened. They may be sub-divided into individual plots, each maintained by a single gardener or family, although that is not mandated. At Altair, community gardens are intended for the cultivation of non- commercial produce and ornamental plants to be consumed by local residents, The raising or use of animals is not permitted. 10.2.1 Prohibited Uses: The following uses are prohibited in all zones: Adult Entertainment Business Drive-Through Businesses Marijuana Dispensary Tattoo Studio Pawn Shop Donation Center ( temporary donation collection events are allowed ) Gas Station 10.3 Height Limits and Vertical Projections Building height limits listed in TABLE 10-2 are to highest roof deck. Roof parapets, railings, spires, flues, chimneys, elevators, mechanical equipment and screens, antennas, or similar architectural, utility or mechanical features may extend an additional 15 feet beyond the listed height limit. Building height shall be measured from the lowest of either pre-existing grade or proposed finished grade, as defined in City of Temecula Development Code Chapter 17.34 "Definition of Terms". Buildings greater than 55 feet in height from the lowest floor of fire department access shall provide certain high-rise provisions in compliance with Section 15.16.020-1.1.7.1 of the Temecula Municipal Code. 10-1 l %SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 r10-2 Le end P Use is permitted in subject zone C Use is conditionally permitted subject to the approval of a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) Use is prohibited in subject zone Notes 1 Parking for park visitor use only. 2 Conform with Housing Type regulations per Sections 10.10-10.22. 3 A CUP is required if use is added after initial development. 4 Conform with "accessory dwelling" regulations per Sections 10.11-10.22. s Permitted only as an ancillary use to the Nature Center. 6 Only a park ranger's residence Is permitted, subject to City design review. 7 See Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.10, Supplemental Development Stds. Table 10-1 Permitted Uses AdawalIMI November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrII Open Space Residential Mixed Use Public/Institutions Description of Use 1 ZONE: SP -AO SP -NO SP -R SP -M SP -MR SP -E SP -C Residential 2 Single-family detached Duplex (two-family dwellings) Single-family attached (greater than two units) Multiple -family - - - - - - - P P P P P P P P - P P P P P P - P P - - - - - P 6 _ - - - Manufactured Homes Mobilehome Park Efficiency / Micro- Units 7 Secondary Dwelling Unit 1 _ - - - - - - - - - - P P Group Homes Congregate care facilities (elderly or disabled) Residential care facilities 7 (for elderly, disabled, mentally disordered, dependent or neglected children) Recovery or treatment facilityC 7 - - -- - — — - - - C C C C C C - C c C - - - - - - - Guest House 4 Boarding, rooming and lodging facilities 7 Bed and breakfast establishment 7 - - - C C C P P P P P P - - - Family day care homes Live/ Work Home Occupation - - - - - - P P P P P P P P P - - - - Nonresidential Day care centers Educational, K -8th grade Educational, trade or vocational school Higher Education Nature Center / Visitor Center Conference facility Libraries Museums and galleries (nonprofit) Nonprofit clubs and lodge halls Religious Institutions Hospital and Ancillary Medical Office - - - - - - - - - - - - - P 3 - - P 3 P 3 P 3 - - P - - - - P P P C - C - - - - - P P P C P P - - - P P - C - p P s P 5 P s - - Commercial Retail Restaurant Offices - - - - - P P P P P P P P P - - P s P 5 P s _'pen Space Community Gardens Athletic Field Bicycle Paths / Trails Communications and microwave installations Game courts, badminton,tennis, racgetball Nature centers / exhibits Parking Areas Picnic group facilities Private parks and recreation facilities Public parks and recreation facilities Recreational vehicle park Riding stable, public or private Shooting galleries, ranges, archery courses P P P C P P P 1 P P P - - - C - C - C - C - - - P P C P P P P - - - - P C P - P - P - - - - - - P C P - P - P C - - - P p P C P P P P P P - - - C . P C - P P 1 P P P C - Le end P Use is permitted in subject zone C Use is conditionally permitted subject to the approval of a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) Use is prohibited in subject zone Notes 1 Parking for park visitor use only. 2 Conform with Housing Type regulations per Sections 10.10-10.22. 3 A CUP is required if use is added after initial development. 4 Conform with "accessory dwelling" regulations per Sections 10.11-10.22. s Permitted only as an ancillary use to the Nature Center. 6 Only a park ranger's residence Is permitted, subject to City design review. 7 See Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.10, Supplemental Development Stds. Table 10-1 Permitted Uses AdawalIMI November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrII DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS Standards Village 1jI,:, .. 3 village C Village D Village E Viari,;c F Vi ie;;c 5 School 1 Civic t, t, min. maxl min. max? min. max] min. max.' min. max.3 min. maxP min. max, min. max.3 min. max} lot Minimum Lot Area N/A Minimum Lot Frontage Determined by Building Type. See Sections 10.10-10.18 and Table 10.4 Setbacks (feet) 1.2 From Altair Vista Property Line 3 4 10 4 3 10 3 5 5 0 5 5 0 5 5 3 - 3 5 From Western Bypass ROW 20 130 20 100 10 10 From Ridge Park Drive ROW 20 150 From Coromell Trail ROW 3 From "A" Street Property Line 0 5 From Camino Estribo ROW 10 All other Lot Lines 0 - 0- 0 - 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 10 0 - 0 Maximum Height (feet) 6.7 65 70 75 65 55 55 55 50 50 Maximum Stories S 5 5 4 4 4 4 2 2 Other Requirements Park Space Minimum total area 0.95 acre 0.60 acre 5.00 acres 0.80 acres 0.50 acres 1.00 acres 0.35 acre 2.00 Minimum contiguous area 0.65 acre 0.40 acre 5.00 acres 0.80 acres 0.25 acres 040 acres -- 1.50 Common Open Space (sq. ft. per unit) Determined by Building Type. See Section 10.10-10.18 and Table 10-4 Private Open Space (sq. ft. per unit) Determined by Building Type. See Sections 10.10-10.18 and Table 10.4 Allowable Building Types Detached Housing (Section 10.111 • • 1 • • • ■ . 1 Multiplex (Section 10.12) a ■ ■ ■ 1 • • , a Rowhouse (Section 10.13) a • • ■ • ■ • 1 a Live / Work )Section 10.14) • ■ • is • O a Multifamily Walk -Up (Section 10.15) • • ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ • 8 Multifamily Podium (Section 10.16) • ■ ■ ■ ■ • 8 Micro Unit (Section 10.17) ■ • ■ 1 ■ ■ .a Mixed Use (Section 10.18) ■ • ■a Iconic Tower (Section 10.19) ■ Civic Buildings (Section 10.201 li ■ School Buildings (Section 10.21) ■ Community Buildings (Section 10.22) • ■ • • • ■ ■ Notes: 1 Setbacks do not apply to interior lot lines. 2. See Section 10.4 for allowable encroachments into setback area. 3. At least 30% of the building frontage area must comply with the maximum setback. See Fig. 10-1 4. Measured from Boundary Road easement at Village A. 5. May be increased to 8 feet maximum where an arcade is provided per Section 9.4. 6. Structure height is measured as the vertical distance from the grade established by the Grading Plan exhibit referenced in this Specific Plan to the highest point of the parapet of a flat or mansard roof, or to the mid -point of a gable, hip or gambrel roof, Screened mechanical and electrical equipment, chimneys, towers, railings and other integral parts of a building or structure occupying no more than five percent of the roof area shall be excluded from this measurement. Photovoltaic panels and their support framework may be excluded from this measurement. 7. Buildings greater than 55 feet in height from the lowest floor of fire department access shall provide certain high-rise provisions in compliance with the Temecula Municipal Code and California Fire Code. 8. If the School District elects not to receive the land, the land may be developed with the indicated residential uses. Setback and height regulations will match Village B. The park space requirements remain. =PA SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 10-3 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 - 10.4 Setbacks and Build -To Line Required setbacks are determined by the fronting street or boundary within each village per TABLE 10-2, not by zone. Setbacks are required only at the designated street and boundaries. There are no setback requirements at interior lot lines, streets or alleys within the village limits. 10.4.1 Build -To Line: These standards enforce a build -to line to define the streetscape and enhance the pedestrian character of Altair. Build -to lines are required at all street frontages listed in Table 10-2, so there may be multiple build -to lines on a lot. The build -to line is established by the placement of the building relative to required setbacks. The build -to line is essentially the front vertical plane of the building enclosure. To encourage multiplane facades, between SO% and 100% of the building front at street level shall be at the build -to line. Between 40% and 80% of the building front at upper levels shall be at the build -to line. The frontage -facing plane(s) of the remainder of the building must be within 30 feet maximum of the build -to line. 10.4.2 Encroachment into Setbacks: Architectural features including wall projections, eaves, overhangs, extensions, decorative materials and artwork may extend into the required setback zone. Porches, balconies, steps and landings, awnings and canopies (with or without vertical support) may encroach into setbacks, provided that the aggregate of these elements does not exceed 75% of the frontage length. Bay windows and chimneys may encroach no more than 2 feet 6 inches into setbacks. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANFI VOWING MEGM1 �B TABLE 10-2 --ENTRY OVEALYCS & ORNAMENT w� PROJECT I<10 THE SfIBtd WEMS OR lA wu 9*i NPT MIMI I S[ d0 OE PROPERTY LAE —SLOOPS WY H LOCATED Pi TIE SETMp WOW Mt 1�E IO -7 a i Figure 10-2 Allowable Setback Encroachments - Stoop IMSPECIFIC PLAN DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS Mr 10-3 AI ck Encroachments - Walls+Trellises November 2017 10-5 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 - $ BUILDING HEIGHT PER TABLE 10-2 BITIJX , MORNS MD ROOF 01#100MGS MORE TNAN vERTIdi iY ABOVE THE SWIM wr CTEAH11V1C THE PROPERTY LK BY lP TO Y-0' Hall -MOUNTED AR6NG5 DR CM ODES ACRE THMN %TRTG1 iY ABM THE SKIM wY OVET MRC DE PROPERTY INE of UP TO a-0'. BLADE SIGHS M~Y ChERNINO PROPERTY LDE BY 3' o'. BIJLT-M PUNTERS *TX BE LOCATED M 1FE SETS X SERVO PER TAW 16-2 rigure 10-4 All table Setback Encroachments nies November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANf'1I "BUILDING HEIGHT PERITABLE 10-2 B.ILCONES MORE $WI YER1 I4.1Y ABOVE NE SIOEWAIJ WY OYEIB WC THE Roma - MC SICWCE MAY PR4IECT IIWWO S1&CK ARCADES OR MORES SUPPORIED UN CO-ULO S WY WI LYIENJ FOND 1)4 PROPERIN iP .!1&i% WL)i LL N ( • 10 if 0 X MINI AN NW( I PM= 110 fAll UI M AtE D Al 8104111 I nts _ A • I%R%SPECIFIC PLAN Novsmbor 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS (DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 — 10-8 10.5 Signage Signage shall follow the general standards established in Temecula Municipal Code Chapter 17.28 Article 1, except that commercial signs are not prohibited next to residential areas and signage is allowed on awnings and canopies that project into the public right of way. 10.5.1 General Sign Standard"; 1. A community -wide Sign Program for the Altair Specific Plan area may be submitted to the Planning Department for approval. 2. Individual development projects shall include signage exhibits with each Pre -Application Submittal to the City of Temecula per Section 11.1.3 (2). 3. All signs erected or modified in style, color or construction shall obtain a sign permit and shall be consistent with the Altair Sign Program and with approved Pre -Application exhibits. 4. Pylon signs and internally illuminated cabinet signs are prohibited. 5. Internally illuminated channel letters are discouraged. External illumination is preferred at all signs. 6. Illumination for signs must comply with the Zone B restrictions of the Mount Palomar Lighting Ordinance (Riverside County Ordinance No. 655) and with the MSHCP Urban/ Wildlands Interface Guidelines. 10.5.2 Building -Mounted Sign SSlndards: 1. Building signs include wall -mounted, window, blade and awning signs. 2. Commercial and office uses may have two signs for each business. The signs may be of two different types listed above. 3. Signs shall not be located above the finished floor elevation of the level above street level. The only exception shall be for only retail or restaurant uses above street level, where a sign for that establishment may be mounted at the main floor level for that retail or restaurant space. Sign Band Integrated with Architecture Window Sign No Signs Allowed Floor Line Signs Permitted Figure 10-6 Building -Mounted Signs November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANW,. 4. Signs shall be integrated into the building's architecture in style, location, proportion and materials. Building designs should provide logical locations for signage, while avoiding monotony across a long facade. 5. Sign colors shall provide sufficient contrast to be clearly legible, while complimenting the color scheme of the building. 6. Signs are allowed on awnings. Awnings may project into the public right of way or street easements per Figure 10-4. 7. Awnings shall be of canvas or other durable fabric. Hard plastic or vinyl awnings and internally illuminated awnings are prohibited. 8. Window signs are allowed in commercial, institutional, live/work and mixed-use buildings, but should not block or obscure transparency. Window signs are only permitted at street level. WINDOW SIGNS THAT BLOCK TRANSPARENCY LIKE THESE SHADE SIGNS ARE PROHIBITED 9. Blade signs are allowed and may encroach into setbacks as shown in Figure 10-5. Blade signs may also project into the public right of way or street easements by up to three feet. 10. The vertical clearance below blade signs and hanging signs shall be 8'-0" minimum. 11. Blade signs shall not be internally illuminated. 12. See Building Types in Section 10.10 through 10.22 for other restrictions on signage. 10.5.3 Monument sign Standards: 1. Each residential development is limited to one (1) monument sign. 2. External illumination is required far monument signs. 3. Monument signs shall be integrated into the landscape design. 4. Monument signs are limited to one place name or business name, except directional signs may include multiple place names. 5. Monument signs for residential developments are limited in size to 32" high and 60" wide. DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS Figure 10-7 Monument Signs 10,5.4 Sign Size and Scale: Signs shall be of an appropriate size and scale for a pedestrian, smart growth neighborhood. Auto - oriented signage is discouraged. Signs shall not be oriented toward the freeway or Western Bypass. =IMISPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 10-9 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 10-10 10.6 Conceptual Landscape Plan The landscape at Altair will be a key contributor to creating the community's sense of place. The plan will feature natural (native) landscaped open spaces and natural materials such as boulders and cobble contrasted with contemporary elements and materials of design such as corten steel or gabion walls. The preserved and restored natural open space, the Western Bypass streetscape and the Coromell Trail streetscape will lean towards a natural feel similar to the surrounding hillsides, while the urban villages, village streetscapes and parks will have a more refined contemporary flavor. Primarily native as well as non-native low water use plants will be introduced into the urban village areas and parks using clean, geometric patterns. Figure 10-8 categorizes the primary landscape tree types, quantity and arrangement for Altair along with areas of preserved open space and restored open space. Tree types are categorized in Appendix A. (This list is intended as a general guideline and is not all inclusive.) Restored natural open spaces and slopes will utilize the "Tyson Method" supplemented with additional native container stock and/ or seed. The Tyson Method removes (scrapes) the existing vegetation and top layer of seed -bearing topsoil from native areas slated for mass grading, grinds the plant/topsoil mixture and stores it in windrows, then redistributes the material back onto the surface of the completed manufactured slopes. This provides a natural seed bank and mulch material which helps to prevent erosion and encourages natural regrowth of the former vegetation. Container stock and seed for open space restoration (excluding trees) shall be propagated and collected from existing open space areas to ensure genetic compatibility and planted in addition to the Tyson Method mixture. Open space drainage draws, bioretention areas and bioswales shall be landscaped with native riparian vegetation. The list of shrubs, groundcovers and vines in Appendix A provides an opportunity to create a predominantly low water use landscape within the landscape theme of the community. (This list is intended as a general guideline and is not all inclusive.) Figure 10-9 through Figure 10-12 conceptually illustrate the landscape of each Village Planning Area. Building massing is shown on these exhibits only in order to convey potential landscape areas and urban fabric as related to the landscape, trails, bikeways, key walkways, streets, parks, and open space. Figure 1043 shows the location of street trees referenced by street in Appendix A, Plant Lists. Trees shall be selected from the range of species designated for each street. Please refer to the Circulation Plan -Vehicular, Circulation Plan -Pedestrian/ Bicycle, Open Space and Recreation Plan, and Entry Statement Monumentation Plan for additional design requirements and landscape illustrations for each of those planning categories. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN ,� ,o PRESERVED/ RESTORED OPEN SPACE Rd + VILLAGE `A' PARK VILLAGE `B' PARK CLUBHOUS UPPER STAIRCAS SEATIN PLAZA PROMENAD SCHOOL RECREATION HOA RECREATIO CENTER VILLAGE 'C' CORE PARK MAIN ST. PLAZA OLD TOWN GRAND STAIR VILLAGE 'D' PARK e Pian =ffillSPECIFIC PLAN CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY: ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 C j7 NATURAL SLOPES LISNG TYSON f I I ►F 11400 lf/DROSFED AND CONTAINER STOCK PER LATOSCAPE OMELSER, TYP !TOPMAST /YS6A11D1 PRESERVED OPEN SPACE ■TEMPORARY SLOPES HYDROSEED PER LMQSCAPE OUIDELNEB TYP AEMPOLWSLYfpOA1EO) TREES CONCENTRATED AT TOE OF SLOPE FOR A NATVRAL CONRACVER NATURAL SLOPES USING TYSON METHOD • HYDROSEED AND CONTAINER STOCK PER LANDS-/ PE GUIDELINES (PEIN ANENTLY I RPATFD) TREES CONCENTRATED Al Tot Or 9L OPE roR A w1/URAL CN RACTER AND TO PRESERVE SCENIC VIEWS TYP WE9TERN BYPASS TREES CLUSTERED WITH VARIABLE SPACING FROM 1r TO 108' WITH AN AVERAGE COUNT iCr CEN TTA lure 10-9 ` STREET TREES WHIN URBAN VILLAGES SPACED 2r 0 C 10 REDUCE URBAN HEAT ISLAND fKECT APO TO PROVOS SHADED SIDEWALKS TYP CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. Novomb.r 2017 SPECIFIC PLANE DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS gape Exhibi3 CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. MSPECIF'C Pt LN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 • • ■ NATURAL SLOPES USING TYSON IETAr0 HYOR08EED AND COIITA NER STOCK PER LANDSCAPE OUVELINEB, TYP (TEIPGRARILY IRRIGATEDI NATURAL SLOPES USING TYSON METHOD.NYOROSEEOANO CONTAINER STOOK PER LANDSCAPE OUDELMEB. TYP (PERMANENTLY IR:MATEDI TEMPORARY SLOPES .nOROBEED PER LMI08GAPE OLOEL11E8. TYP RERWORARILY IRFbOATED, WESTERN BYPASS TREES CLUSTERED WITH VARIABLE BPACSO FROM IS TO TOP WITH AN AVERAQE COLI T OF MT ON CENTER SHADE TREES AT SAIEWAY TO REDUCE URBAN NEAT ISLAND EFFECT AND TO PROVIDE Ar COMFORTABLE CIRCULAT CORRI 11 VµAQE R®EIME TREES CONCENTRATED AT TOE OF SLOPE FOR A NATURAL CHARACTER AND TO PRESERVE SCENIC VIES. TYP 8.00E TREES AT TRAIL TO REDUCE URBAN NEAT IMANO EFFECT AND TO PROVOS A COMFORTABLE CIRCULATION CORROOR STREET TREES WRHN URBAN vbLAOES SPACED 2d 0 C 10 REDUCE LIRBAN NEAT ISLAND EFFECT MO TO PROVIDE !WADED SIDEWALKS TYP CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANT NATIVE SLOPE RESTORATION USING TYSON NUNZIO. I1YONOSE£D AND CON AJNE R STOCK PER LANDSCAPE GUM NFC TYP (TEMPORARILY IRRIOATFI7} DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS NATIVE TREES CONCETRATED AT TOE OF SLOPE FOR NATURAL CHARACTER TYP PRESERVE OPEN SPACE Landscape Exhi • CONCEPTUAL PLAN ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. - I SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 (DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 WESTERN BYPASS ALTAIR VISTA COROMELL TRAIL A STREET B STREET C STREET ID ROUNDABOUT 1 MAIN STREE r1RST STREET* Refer to the Vehicular Circulation Plan for spacing and quantities per street Refer to the plant list Appendix for tree species and species percentages per street. kry 1114101111114.1*- 11411111111re Figure 10-13 Street Tree Plan November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 1.0,k.i Landscape Development Standards 1. All detailed landscape plans shall be prepared by a California Licensed Landscape Architect for review and approval by the City of Temecula. 2. "Master Developer" and perimeter "Unit Tract" walls and fences will be prohibited at Altair to accommodate and encourage pedestrian and vehicular circulation throughout the community. Walls and fences are allowed for areas such as private residential courtyards, pool enclosures, or other areas where fences are required for safety. Fence materials shall be compatible with the architectural schemes and may include tubular steel view fence, stucco, stone veneer, or material that matches building architecture. Materials such as barbed wire and chain link are prohibited, except as noted in Section 10.8. Also se Section 9.6 for fence wall and gate design guidelines. 3. Retaining walls shall be softened or screened with trees, shrubs and vines. See Section 9.7. 4. At the time of recordation of any final subdivision map which contains greenbelts or open space areas, the subdivision shall have those common areas conveyed to the property owners association or appropriate public maintenance entity either in fee title or as an easement. 5. All planting, irrigation and built elements of open space, parks, streetscapes, monuments, walls, fences, street furnishings, pedestrian bridges, and slopes shall be maintained by an HOA, private maintenance association, or public maintenance entity. 6. All landscaping shall meet the City of Temecula Water Efficient Ordinance, Chapter 17.32 of the City of Temecula Development Code or to the satisfaction of the Planning Director. 7. All loading, service, parking areas, and trash enclosures shall be screened with appropriate green -screens, vines, trees or shrubs at the direction of the City of Temecula. 8. The minimum sizes for trees, shrubs and groundcover shall meet City Code requirements. 9. All parking lot landscaping shall be consistent with the City of Temecula Development Code requirements. 10. Slopes shall be revegetated with trees, shrubs, groundcover, and seed (or mulch) to prevent erosion control. 11. Typical residential front yard landscape requirements shall be in conformance with the City of Temecula Development Code. Special lots or configurations shall have modified landscape standards approved by the Planning Director. 12. Graded or disturbed areas not to be developed shall be treated per the approved Storni Water Pollution Prevention Plan. 13. Developers/ applicants of each property shall ensure that plantings at maturity will not interfere with utility lines and traffic sight lines. PASPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-17 (DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 14. Horticultural soil tests and recommendations shall be required for each developed area based on the proposed plant list for that area. (CA native plants require different horticultural amendments compared with ornamental plants and this shall be reflected in the test recommendations.) 15. All landscape areas shall be designed with a permanent below grade irrigation system based on current code requirements and the latest efficiency technologies. Restored native slopes may utilize a temporary system until established, but shall also be below grade and shall be shut off after full establishment. 16. Each landscape area shall be maintained by the landscape installer for a minimum of 90 days prior to the perpetual maintenance entity taking control of that area. 17. Weather -based or Soil moisture -based irrigation controllers shall be set to "automatically adjust" on or before day 60 of the 90 -day maintenance period. The installing contractor shall make fine-tuned adjustments to each station as necessary during days 60 to 90 of the 90 -day maintenance period in order to maximize water efficiency and plant health. 18. The landscape palette shall conform to the State of California Model Landscape Ordinance. 19. All landscape design and plant selection shall be compatible with recycled water use. 20. Plant species identified in Table 6-2 of the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) shall not be used in areas adjacent to the MSHCP corridor and/or native open space. 21. Recommend a guideline for care and long term maintenance of Oak trees be established. 22. Espaliers, or columnar small tree/clipped hedge, and vines should be used to soften building massing where limited planter areas and/or building density does not allow adequate room for typical tree placement or shrub massing. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 10.6.2 Natural (Permanent] Slopes: All permanent natural slopes (See Conceptual Landscape Plan for Locations) shall be revegetated with native landscaping utilizing native container stock and seed in addition to the "Tyson Method". The Tyson Method removes (scrapes) the existing native vegetation and top layer of seed -bearing topsoil from native areas prior to mass grading, grinds the plant/topsoil mixture and stores it in windrows, then redistributes the material back onto the surface of the completed manufactured graded slopes. This provides a natural seed bank and mulch material which helps to prevent erosion and encourages natural regrowth of the former vegetation. Except for boxed and larger container trees, supplemental container stock and seed for slopes should be collected and propagated from existing open space areas prior to grading to ensure genetic compatibility. Restored plant communities shall be designed to be consistent with the plant communities of the adjoining open space (i.e. Diegan coastal sage scrub next to Diegan coastal sage scrub, Southern mixed chaparral next to Southern mixed chaparral, etc.) especially along the Western Bypass Corridor and preserved natural open space areas. Slope banks five feet or greater in vertical height with slopes between 5:1 and 2:1 shall, at a minimum, be irrigated and landscaped with a combination of appropriate shrubs, vegetative ground cover, and mulch that will absorb rainwater and reduce runoff for erosion control. All trees and shrubs shall be planted in staggered clusters to soften and vary the slope plane. If drip irrigation is used on slopes, a fertilizer injector system shall also be used. A. Slope banks five feet or greater in vertical height with slopes greater than or equal to 3:1 shall, at a minimum, be irrigated and landscaped with a combination of appropriate shrubs, vegetative ground cover, and mulch that will absorb rainwater and reduce runoff for erosion control, and to soften their appearance as follows: 1. One 15 -gallon or larger tree per each six hundred square feet of slope area. Large growing native trees, such as Coast Live Oaks, shall be clustered and concentrated at toes of slopes to emulate patterns found in nature (bigger trees in wetter areas at bottoms of slopes) and to accommodate views from residential pads. (Small native trees including Toyon, Laurel Sumac, Lemonadeberry, and Sugar Bush may be used on the remaining slope areas to meet the intent of this requirement); 2. One 1 -gallon or larger shrub for each one hundred square feet of slope area; and 3. Appropriate vegetative ground cover that will absorb rainwater and reduce runoff. =NM PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS TO -19 (DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 kirk B. In addition to the requirements above, slope banks in excess of ten feet in vertical height with slopes greater or equal to 2:1 shall also provide a 5 -gallon or larger tree per each one thousand square feet of slope area. Large growing native trees, such as Coast Live Oaks, shall be clustered and concentrated at toes of slopes to emulate patterns found in nature (bigger trees in wetter areas at bottoms of slopes) and to accommodate views from residential pads. (Small native trees including Toyon, Laurel Sumac, Lemonadeberry, and Sugar Bush may be used on the remaining slope areas to meet the intent of this requirement). C. Western Bypass Corridor slopes, as illustrated on the Conceptual Landscape Plan, shall comply to the requirements above and shall be irrigated on a temporary basis until establishment (estimated 3 to 5 years) or non -irrigated (only if planted during the appropriate season with the approval of the City.) -Refer to Section 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan for additional information. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. 10.6.3 Temporary Slooes• Temporary Slopes occur within Villages and are likely to be re -graded during the construction of that village. Temporary slopes are illustrated on the Conceptual Landscape Plan and shall be hydroseeded and temporarily irrigated. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. 10.6.4 Hiking Trails, Bikeways: Restored natural open spaces and slopes adjacent to the hiking trails and bikeways will utilize the same landscape guidelines as Natural (Permanent) Slopes. Larger native trees shall be clustered around trails and bikeways to provide a natural appearance and shade for pedestrians. -Refer to Sections 4 and 8 for additional information. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. Key Pedestrian Walkways: When not within natural slope areas, key pedestrian walkway areas shall use a combination of SoCal native and non-native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Areas adjacent to native open space shall use 100% natives. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Recreational turf shall be provided for recreational use areas only per City standards. -Refer to Section 4 Circulation and Section 8 Open Space and Recreation Plan for additional information. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10.6.5 Drainage Draws. Bioswales. Retention/Detention/Water Quality Basins Drainage Draws, Bioswales, and Retention/ Detention/ Water Quality basins shall be designed using low water use native plants at the tops of slopes and medium to higher water use native plants towards the bottom of slopes and the bottom of swales and basins. The intent is to re-create a native riparian ecosystem of concentrated canopy trees such as California Sycamore, Cottonwood, and Cost Live Oak with an understory of native grasses and shrubs. (Trees may be reduced or eliminated for narrow bioswale areas if necessary based on site constraints). -Refer to Section 6 Infrastructure and Utilities for additional information. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. 10.8.8 Roundabouts; These areas shall use a combination of SoCal native and non-native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water us- age. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) -Refer to Section 9 Design Guidelines for additional information. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. 10.6.7 Entry Statements: These areas shall use a combination of SoCal native and non-native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Areas adjacent to native open space shall use 100% natives. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) -Refer to Section 9 Design Guidelines for additional information. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. 10.8.8 Park and Recreation Areas: These areas shall use a combination of SoCal native and non-native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Areas adjacent to native open space shall use 100% natives. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Recreational turf is encouraged for park and recreation areas. Turf areas shall be wide and long enough to allow passive or active recreation uses per City standards. -Refer to Sections 3 and 8 for additional information. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. •I�IIiSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 10-21 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 10-22,1 10.6.9 School; These areas shall use a combination of SoCal native and non-native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Areas adjacent to native open space shall use 100% natives. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Recreational turf is encouraged for school recreation areas. Turf areas shall be wide and long enough to allow passive or active recreation uses per City standards. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. 10.6.10 Villages A. B. C. D. E. F. G; It is intended that the Village areas use a combination of SoCal native and non-native trees, shrubs and groundcovers. Although the plant species will be the same or similar to the natural areas, it shall be designed in more defined patterns (such as blocks of matching plant material, interesting angles, or geometric patterns) rather than natural organic patterns. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Areas adjacent to native open space shall use 100% natives. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Recreational turf shall be provided for recreational use areas only per City standards. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. 10.6.11 Civic/ Community; These areas shall use a combination of SoCal native and non- native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers. SoCal native shrubs and groundcovers shall compose a minimum of 50% of the total planting area of this zone and non -natives a maximum of 50%. Areas adjacent to native open space shall use 100% natives. Low water use plants shall compose a minimum of 75% of the total planting area of this zone and medium water use plants a maximum of 25%. Irrigation for trees, shrubs and groundcovers shall be based on water usage. (However, low water use plants may be added to medium water use zones if they can tolerate the additional water.) Recreational turf shall be provided for recreational use areas only per City standards. -Refer to the Appendix for plant list. 10,6.12 Parking Lots; All parking lot landscape shall be consistent with the city's adopted water efficient landscape ordinance as listed in Chapter 17.32 of the Temecula Municipal Code. Parking areas shall have a minimum of a five foot perimeter planting area. A minimum of one tree per four parking spaces shall be provided. Trees shall be broad canopy species and at least fifteen - gallon in size at installation. Planting islands are required at the end of each parking bank and every ten spaces. Islands shall be a minimum of five feet wide and as long as the adjacent parking space. Each island shall have one tree and a combination of shrubs and groundcover. -For additional requirements, see Temecula Municipal Code, Chapter 17.24.050.H November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANf!IL 10.8.18 Shade; The utilization of shade trees and shade structures is encouraged considering the climate in Temecula. Street trees in the urban village areas are spaced at 24' o.c. to optimize the shade canopy over the sidewalks and to reduce the urban heat island effect. The conceptual village park plans found in the Section 3 illustrate how shade trees, shade structures, and shade sails may be incorporated to provide shaded outdoor spaces. Clusters of native trees are also encouraged along bikeways and hiking trails in the natural open space areas to shade pedestrians. Figure 10-14 Urban Parkway with Tree Grate Figure 10-15 Urban ParkwaywiithPlanterPacket 10.6.14 Tree Grates; This specific plan intends to provide a variety of street types, with both landscape parkways and urban parkways. Urban parkways may use either planting pockets or tree grates. Tree grates shall be used in higher pedestrian traffic areas. Tree grates shall complement the grates in Old Town. When planter pockets are used, plants shall be greater than 24" in height and robust/ hardy to prevent pedestrians from walking over them. -Refer to Section 4 Circulation for additional information. =NM SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-23 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 - it -24 10.7 Parking Parking Lot Dimensions: The standard minimum parking space shall be nine feet wide by eighteen feet long. In exchange for electric vehicle charging stations or extensive bike rack systems above the minimum requirements, the Planning Director has the option to allow up to 10% of the required parking stalls to be compact stalls with minimum dimensions of eight feet wide by sixteen feet long. Parking spaces are required to have clear delineation with paint or other easily distinguishable material. Drive aisles shall be a minimum of fourteen feet wide for one-way aisles, and directional signs and arrows shall be provided. When fire apparatus access is required, the minimum driveway width shall be twenty feet for one-way traffic and twenty-four feet for two-way traffic. 10.7.1 Off-street parking and loading shall comply with City of Temecula Development Code Chapter 17.24, except as modified below and in Table 10-3. These modifications recognize that Altair is a pedestrian -oriented community where residents will walk to recreation facilities, restaurants, etc. A key principle of walkable and sustainable communities is the reduction of parking requirements, in order to change the mindset from driving to walking or cycling on short trips and to reduce the amount of space taken up by parking, which in turn allows the community to be more compact and walkable. Ride Share programs are encouraged to reduce traffic and parking demand. A higher proportion of enclosed and covered parking is mandated for residential uses to reduce the size of open parking areas and maintain the aesthetic quality of the community. Large parking areas are to be avoided, and are limited to locations of high parking demand, such as near the community center, school and park or at the civic use on the south parcel. Parking for the Recreation Center, Clubhouse and Park in Village C will be available to the public on a first come, first served basis. However, school parking will be prohibited in those lots. Parking on the school site will be for the exclusive use of the school on days when school is in session. On days when the school is closed, the school parking lot will be open to the public. A designated, permanent loading/unloading space shall be provided at each Village, and may provide shared use by multiple lots within that village. The size shall be large enough to accommodate moving and delivery trucks and ride share services. The loading space may be either off-street or on -street, including on Altair Vista. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANT DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS Description of Use Required Number of Spaces AddItiot Residential Uses Single-family residence Detached residence 2 enclosed spaces per residence Duplex (two-family dwellings) 2 enclosed spaces for each unit within the duplex Single-family attached (greater than two units) 1.5 enclosed spaces per unit plus 0.5 covered space per unit - Guest or service parking shall be provided for all residential uses at a rate of one space for every 10 dwelling units, unless noted otherwise. See Note 1. Multiple -family residential 1 bedroom or less 2 bedrooms 3 bedrooms or more 1 covered space per unit 1.5 covered spaces per unit plus 0.5 uncovered spaces per unit 2 covered spaces per unit plus 0.25 uncovered spaces per unit Efficiency Units (micro -units) 0.5 covered spaces per unit Transitional Housing 0.5 covered spaces per unit Congregate care facilities (elderly or disabled) 0.5 covered spaces per unit plus 1 guest space for every 8 units Residential care facilities + group homes 1 covered space for every 3 residents Guest House Boarding, rooming and lodging facilities Bed and breakfast establishment 1 space per guest room or suite Family day care homes As required by Section 17.06.050(1) of the Temecula Municipal Code Live/ Work Same as for applicable Multiple -family residential unit plus 0.5 uncovered space per unit for customers Home Occupation Same as for applicable residence . Guest or service parking shall be provided for all residential uses at a rate of one space for every 10 dwelling units, unless noted otherwise. See Note 1. - Provide secured bicycle parking for multifamily residential uses at a rate of 0.5 spaces per unit. Units with Individual enclosed garages are exempt from this requirement. See Note 3 Nonresidential Uses Nature Center 120 spaces per Section 3.13 Bicycle Spaces: Nate 3 1 space for every 10 vehicle spaces Note 2 Educational (trade or vocational school; higher ed) As required by Temecula Municipal Code, Table 17.24.040 Conference facility Religious Institutions 1 space for every 3 seats or 1 space per 35 gross square feet (gsf) 1 space for every 20 vehicle spaces Libraries, museums, galleries 1 space per 300 gross square feet (gsf) Recreational facilities (including pools) 1 space per 1,000 sf gross of recreation area Office 1 space per 300 gross square feet (gsf) 1 space for every 10 vehicle spaces Retail 1 space per 400 gross square feet (gsf) Restaurant, lodge hall, club 1 space per 200 gross square feet (gsf) 1 space for every 20 vehicle spaces Notes: 1. Guest parking requirement may be satisfied by on -street parking on internal Village streets and on A Street. Street parking on Altair Vista may not be used to satisfy the residential guest parking requirement. 2. Parking requirements at elementary school will be determined by Temecula Valley Unified School District, as approved by the City of Temecula. 3. No bicycle or motorcycle credits will be given for vehicle parking spaces. MI 10-3 ENE Requirements «1 SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 10-25 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 10.7.2 On -street parking Safe and enjoyable pedestrian circulation is critical in the Altair Specific Plan. Street parking has been found to increase pedestrian safety and comfort by slowing traffic speeds and by separating traffic lanes from sidewalks. Therefore, street parking is strongly encouraged in this specific plan, including at internal streets and alleys. Street parking is provided on one side of Altair Vista. This will aleviate overflow parking from the parks in villages C and D. Guest parking requirements listed in Table 10-3 may be satisfied by on -street parking on internal streets, but not on Altair Vista. Striping is not required for parking on private streets. 10.7.3 Parking Standards "Enclosed" parking shall be located in a private garage with a door. "Covered" parking may be located in a garage or under a trellis, roof, building overhang or solar panels. No parking may be located between a building and the street, except in the case of motor courts where some buildings may be to the rear of the court. See the Design Guidelines for motor courts. Parking is prohibited in setback areas. Garage doors shall not face the street. Garage doors and parking may front alleys and motor courts. 10,7,3 Bicyclejarkingshall be provided per Table 10.4. Bicycle parking for multifamily residential uses shall be in a secure room or secure garage. Bicycle parking for office uses shall be located in lockers or a secure room. All other bicycle parking may be on exterior racks designed to be used with personal locks. Bicycle parking shall comply with the Design Standards in Section 17.24.040(F)(3) of the City of Temecula Development Code. 10.7.4 Motorcycle parking shall be provided to meet the requirements of Section 17.24,040(G) of the City of Temecula Development Code. No bicycle or motorcycle parking credits will be given for vehicle parking spaces. 10.7.5 Landscaping of parking areas shall comply with Section 10.6 Landscape Standards and Appendix A Plant List. 10.8 Fences, Hedges and Walls Fences, hedges and walls are limited to 6 feet high in residential areas and 3 feet high in required front setbacks, except where serving as a guardrail or enclosing a pool or other hazard. The design and materials of fences and walls shall comply with the Design Guidelines in this plan, Sections 9.6 and 9.7. Exceptions at sports fields and dog parks may be allowed at the discretion of the Director of Community Development. 10.8.1 Site Visibility A triangular site visibility area shall be provided at all street intersections, with each leg of the triangle measured at 15 feet from the curb return. Nothing may be located or allowed to grow in the visibility area which obstructs visibility and is taller than 36 inches from the top of the curb. Site visibility areas are not required at alley or driveway intersections with streets. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN FJ 10.9 Refuse and Service Areas DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS There are a variety of housing types at Altair that will receive services such as trash pickup in different ways depending on the extent to which facilities are shared within the sub -development. A multifamily apartment building over a common garage both generates and disposes of refuse differently than a household in detached housing or a commercial building. Guidelines for each building type are included in the following sections, with general information below. The City of Temecula contracts with a private waste disposal service, currently CR&R Inc., for collection of trash, recycling and organic waste. The franchise agreement for these services will guide the type and quantity of waste bins, storage areas and collection routes for waste disposal and recycling. Single-family detached homes typically have three bins (one for each type of waste collected) that are stored in private garages or other enclosures and moved to the curb on collection day. Multiplex housing and rowhouse developments may store all refuse bins, including trash and recycling, in a common location by demonstrating that adequate space is provided for the number of dwelling units and other uses, as approved by the Planning Director and the franchise hauler. Live/Work and multifamily housing projects that do not have private garages, mixed use, commercial and institutional buildings will have common enclosures for waste bins with space for trash, recycling and organics. Compactors are encouraged to reduce the quantity of bins and resultant space needed. For Live/Work units, the commercial and residential bin requirements should be calculated separately for the areas of each use. Larger mixed use projects should have separate trash rooms or enclosures for commercial and residential uses. Residential podium buildings greater than three stories and over 30 dwelling units, with a common garage, are strongly encouraged to provide trash and recycling chutes to a common trash room, typically in the garage. When stored in private garages, sufficient space must be provided for the three bins outside of the required parking space (20'x20' for 2 -car garage, 10'x20' for single -car and 10'x36' for tandem garages). There also must be adequate clearance to manuever the bins past parked cars and out to the street. Refuse enclosures shall be opaque for at least the height of the tallest waste container and must have a solid cover to prevent rainwater intrusion and windblown trash, in compliance with the City of Temecula Water Quality Management Plan. Common waste bin enclosures shall meet the requirements of the Municipal Code and the City of Temecula Waste and Recycling Guidelines for Commercial and Multifamily Housing, which detail clearances around bins, aisles, gates and a paved surface with curb. Clearances for truck access must be provided as defined in the guidelines. Paving in front of refuse enclosures shall be reinforced with stress pads to protect the paving from the weight and operation of the collection truck. Site plans and trash enclosure plans for all new projects shall be submitted to the City and the franchise waste hauler for review and approval.. =ffiffl PLAN November 2017 10-27 10-28 10.10 Building Types A wide variety of building types are encouraged at Altair, to promote the social diversity of the community as well as serving the housing needs of the City of Temecula. A mix of building types also enhances visual interest and creates a vibrant urban fabric. The building types should support the goals of a compact and walkable com- munity with fairly high densities. Traditional, single-family houses on single lots are not included, as they are al- ready prevalent in the City. Large footprint multi -family housing encircling common garages, commonly referred to as "wraps", are also discouraged because they create uncomfortably large block lengths for pedestrians. Building types are listed below and are described in greater detail in the following pages. Table 10-4 as well as the Planning Area descriptions in Section 3 identify allowable building types for each village. Notes: 1. Percentage of dwelling units that must provide a private exterior open space of the minimum size indicated. 2. As defined by the building type in which the micro -unit is located. 3. If project developer provides common open space on the second level or higher, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. per dwelling unit, but to no less than 6' x 6'. 4. If private open space is provided on the third level or higher in the noted housing types, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. for that dwelling unit, but to no less than 6' x 6'. 5. Reductions granted by notes 3 and 4 may not be used in combination. Table 10-4 Building Types November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN♦7% Private Common Building Type Lot Width (ft) lot Depth (ft.l Open Space Open Space Building Height 1 section min. max. min. max. ratio ,51 min. size area per d.u. (stories) 10.11 Detached Housing 25 45 60 - 100% 100 s.f.4 80 s.f. 2 - 4 4 10.12 Multiplex 24 - 35 - 100% 1 100 s.f. 60 s.f. 2 - 4 4 10.13 Rowhouse 24 -- 35 -- 100% 100 s.f. 60 s.f. 2 - 4 4 10.14 Live / Work 24 - 35 - 100% 100 s.f. 60 s.f. 2 - 4 10.15 Multifamily Walk -Up -- -- -- -- 100% 80 s.f. 60 s.f. 2 - 4 10.16 Multifamily Podium -•-- -- -- 100% 60 s.f. 50 s.f. 4 - 5 10.17 Micro Unit -- z -- 2 -- 2 -- 2 75% 50 s.f. 45 s.f. -- 2 10.18 Mixed Use -- - - -- 100% 60 s.f. 50 s.f. 4 - 5 10.19 Iconic Tower -- - -- -- -• -- -- 50-75 feet 10.20 Civic Buildings -- -- - -- -. .- - 2 10.21 School Buildings •- - -- -- -- -. -- 2 10.22 Community Buildings - - -- - - - - 1- 3 Notes: 1. Percentage of dwelling units that must provide a private exterior open space of the minimum size indicated. 2. As defined by the building type in which the micro -unit is located. 3. If project developer provides common open space on the second level or higher, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. per dwelling unit, but to no less than 6' x 6'. 4. If private open space is provided on the third level or higher in the noted housing types, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. for that dwelling unit, but to no less than 6' x 6'. 5. Reductions granted by notes 3 and 4 may not be used in combination. Table 10-4 Building Types November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN♦7% 10.11 Detached Housing Single -Family duster development consists of individually owned, multistory dwellings arranged around or along a common outdoor space. In contrast to traditional single-family / single -lot housing, a higher density is achieved in the cluster type by placing buildings in close proximity to each other and by greatly reducing or eliminating private yards. The design and execution of the common outdoor space is critical to replace the privacy and buffering provided by private yards. Buildings may be arranged around courts, commons, greens or linearly along pedestrian mews, paseos, or "rosewalks". Each dwelling has a private garage accessed from a motor court or alley. DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS Figure 10-16 Detached Housing with small entry yard A. Lpl Size Width: 25 feet minimum; 45 feet maximum, except at corner lots Depth: 60 feet minimum; no maximum B. Access; 1. All units shall have doors at street level facing the lot frontage or common open space. Stoops are encouraged, except at required accessible units for the disabled. 2. Private garages should be accessed through the dwelling or a private, enclosed court. Ifs SPECF!C November 2017 10-29 (DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 --- 10-30 Setback Per Table 10-2 6 Minimum Between Houses file I BUNGALOW COURT ALLEY Garages Face Alley Garages Face Alley A. Pedestrian Front Entry TVehicular Garage Entry 6' Minimum Between Houses ALLEY OR MOTOR COURT Figure 10-17 Detached Housing November 2017 — ROSE WALK SPECIFIC PLANK% G. Parking 1. See Table 10-3 for the required minimum number of resident and guest parking spaces. 2. See Section 10.7 for general parking requirements. 3. Required enclosed parking shall be in private garages accessed from a motor court or alley. See Section 9.3.12 and Figure 10-17 through Figure 10-19 for motor court and alley standards. 4. Garages must be of sufficient size to allow a 20'x20' parking area (for 2 -car garages) clear of any equipment and clear of the space needed for refuse and recycling bin storage. The clear parking area shall be 10'x20' for single -car garages or 10' x 36' for tandem garages. 5. An enclosed storage area for three bins (refuse, recycling and organic waste) must be provided at each dwelling unit, preferably in private garages. Location for bin storage in garages must allow for manuevering of the bins to the street or alley when cars are parked. 6. Garages may be attached, detached or located beneath the dwelling and shall be fully enclosed. Detached garages must be linked to dwellings by walls, trellises and / or decorative paving to create an outdoor room between the garage and dwelling, and shall be of similar materials as the dwelling. 7. Unenclosed off-street guest parking shall be located in motor courts or behind buildings and shall not be visible from streets. See Figure 9-1 and Figure 10-19. 8. Unenclosed off-street parking shall be covered with a trellis or solar panels. 9. Dwelling units may have direct or indirect access to parking stalls_ Garages Face Alley Alley paving meanders around landscape, utility, and/or parking area 6' Min. Between Buildings shed Housing Facing Street =ffil SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-31 (DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 Setback Per Table 1 MOTOR COURT Figure 10-19 Detached Housing around Motor Court D. Services: Propertne Garage entries & additional parking at motor court. Dwelling entries at common green space(pedestrian only). Common may be easement or separate parcel. 1. Utilities and meters shall be screened from view from the street or common areas. 2. Residential mechanical equipment such as air conditioning units shall be located on private property and screened with landscaping and/or walls or fencing as described in Sections 9.5 and 9.6. 3. Air conditioner compressors should not be near dwelling entries. 4. A common area to store the individual bins for organic waste for each dwelling unit may be considered, if consistent with the franchise waste disposal agreement and as approved by the Planning Director and franchise hauler. The storage area shall be enclosed by walls or an opaque fence and roof. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN Figure 10-20 Detached Housing Clustered around Green E. Open Space; (see Section 8 for an explanation of private and common open space) 1. Private Open Space: 100% of detached dwelling units shall have at least 100 square feet of private open space in a balcony, porch, patio or yard. Private open space shall have a minimum dimension in either direction of 6'-0" to accomodate a table and chairs. 2. If private open space is provided on the third level or higher in a detached dwelling unit, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. for that dwelling unit. This reduction may not be used in combination with a reduction for common open space on the second level or higher (note 5 below). 3. Common Open Space: Common open space shall be provided at a ratio of 80 square feet per dwelling unit, but shall be no less than 300 square feet. Common open space shall have a minimum horizontal dimension of 25 feet. 4. Common open space may be shared among buildings in a single, central park, but the minimum ratio shall be based on the total number of dwelling units and may not be reduced. 5. If a project developer provides common open space on the second level or higher, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s,f. per dwelling unit. This reduction may not be used in combination with a reduction for private open space on the third level or higher (note 2 above). 6. Common open space shall include furniture such as benches, play structures, bike racks, games (chess tables, bocce ball, etc.), picnic tables. 7. Common Areas over structures (including roof decks and terraces) shall provide structural integrity and appropriate design for container gardening and irrigation. 8. Roof decks and terraces are encouraged. ism SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENTI 10 STANDARDS 10-33 Rose G� DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 EVERGREEN SHRUB. TYPI DA ACCENT SHRUB, TYPICAL ACCENT TREE. TYPICAL. t STREET FLOWERING ACCENT PERENNIAL SHRUBS, TYPICAL. EVERGREEN GROUNDCOVER, TYPICAL. ACCENT SHRUB EVERGREEN CANOPY TREE, TYP CONCRETE WALK • STREET TREE PROPERTY LINE 7' WIDE SIDEWALK 5' WIDE PARKWAY ACCENT TREE, TYPICAL. EVERGREEN FOUNDATION SHRUB, TYPICAL. FLOWERING ACCENT PERENNIAL SHRUBS, TYPICAL. Figure 10-21 Typical Landscaping at November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrI% MTTORCOURT EVERGREEN FO FLOWERING A PERENNIAL 5 EVERGREEN GROUNDCOV o o 'o'ovo-o;a'o�■k, %, ,o+ o'oo o����; 061 o leo' fdY%loke%��r'��,�i;,dJr%fd1.•��i/fdlr�lr.{t�.�i�i�dD1a��U'''��;}•; 111P1PIP1MMAMMIPI STREET ALLEY EVERGREEN F SHRUB, TYPIC FLOWERING A PERENNIAL S EVERGREEN GROUNDCOV TYPICAL STREET TREE PROPERTY LINE 7' WIDE SIDEWALK 5' WIDE PARKWAY TREE, SHRUB. T �' T T "• is ow •f; DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 SIMILAR MATERIALS WITHIN GROUP - OF BUILDINGS F. Landscape Standards: 1. Trees shall be included in common areas, green spaces, alleys and motor courts for shade and to soften building massing. 2. Shrub massings shall be used to provide visual interest and plant diversity. 3. Turf shall be used only as a recreational element in common areas and is not allowed in areas less than 8' wide. G. Frontage Guid lines: 1. See Sections 9.4 and 10.4 for applicable street frontage requirements. 2. Architectural and landscape elements should be used to delineate public, semi -private and private space. 3. Porches, stoops and balconies may project into required street setbacks. H. Building Size and Massing: 1. Buildings may be two to four stories. 2. The fourth story may not exceed 65% of the building footprint area. See Figure 10-23. 3. A minimum of 6 feet shall be provided between buildings. 4. Other design guidelines in this chapter shall apply. AREA OF 4th FLOOR MAY NOT EXCEED 6596 OF FOOTPRINT AREA Figure 10-23 4th Floor Limits LEVEL 4 LEVEL 3 LEVEL 2 LEVEL I BUILDING FOOTPRINT AREA in Detached Housing 2 — r .L.414%. .. •-- NM impori LOW WALLS AT GRADE LANDSCAPED SPACE BETWEEN BUILDINGS VARIED MATERIALS - AT EACH DWELLING Figure 10-24 Typical Massing at Detached Housing November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANf:I Accessory Dwellings: 1. Accessory dwellings are allowed with detached housing, and should be linked to dwellings by walls, trellises and / or decorative paving to create an outdoor room between the main and accessory dwelling. See Figure 10-25. Both dwellings shall be of similar materials. 2. The accessory dwelling shall be smaller than and clearly subsidiary to the main dwelling. Only one accessory dwelling is permitted per detached home. 3. Accessory dwellings may be located over detached garages. 4. A secondary dwelling unit permit is required for accessory dwelling units that include cooking facilities with a vent. 5. One off-street covered parking space shall be provided for each accessory dwelling unit in addition to the parking required for the main dwelling unit. 6. Accessory dwelling units may not be sold separately or sub -divided from the main residence. Setback Per Table 10.2 Accessory Dwelling Detached Garage Property Line Illtitactied garages and/or accessory dwelling =PM SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10'37 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 10.12 Multi-Plex Multi-plexes combine two- to six -dwelling units into one structure. They differ from both the single-family cluster type and the rowhouse type in that the individual dwelling unit is not distinctly expressed in the multi-plex type. Duplexes and triplexes in particular should appear as a single large house. Duplexes and triplexes can then be combined with courtyards to form quad- and six-plexes. Multi-plexes generally include multi -story dwelling units of two to three stories each. Flats may be allowed in combination with multi -story dwellings, but no multi-plex structure should consist exclusively of flats. A. LQt Size Width: 24 feet, minimum Depth: 35 feet, minimum B. Access: 1. Dwelling unit entries shall primarily be located at the ground floor. 2. No dwelling unit entry shall be above the second floor above grade. 3. Dwelling unit entries should be located on different facades in an asymetrical arrangement or may face interior courts. 4. At least one dwelling unit entry of a multi-plex shall face the street at or near street level. 5. Each dwelling unit entry should have a unique character and/ or orientation. C. Parking: 1. Required enclosed parking shall be in private garages below and / or adjacent to dwelling units. 2. Garage entries should be on different sides of the multi-plex structure. 3. Garage doors should be of similar materials, but should vary in size or detailing. 4. Free-standing private garages are discouraged. 5. Dwelling units shall have direct access to parking garages. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANI!Il SIMILAR AND COMPLEMENTARY MATERIALS REDUCE MASS WITH DECKS, OVERHANGS, ETC. GARAGES ON DIFFERENT SIDES 6. Garages must be of sufficient size to allow a 20'x20' parking area (for 2 -car garages) clear of any equipment and clear of the space needed for refuse and recycling bin storage. The dear parking area shall be 10'x20' for single -car garages or 10' x 36' for tandem garages. 7. An enclosed storage area for three bins (refuse, recycling and organic yard waste) must be provided at each dwelling unit, preferably in private garages. Location for bin storage in garages must allow for manuevering of the bins to the street or alley when cars are parked. Alternatively, a common space may be provided as described in the next paragraph. d Services: 1. In lieu of waste bin storage in individual garages, a common area may be provided to store the individual bins for refuse, recycling and organic waste bins for each dwelling unit, or common dumpster bins for each type of waste. The storage area shall be enclosed by walls or an opaque fence and roof. 2. Access must be provided to common waste storage enclosures from each dwelling unit, as well as access by collection trucks per Section 10.9. Driveway or alley access is accept- able for both resident and collection access, if consistent with the franchise waste disposal agreement and as approved by the Planning Director and franchise hauler. 3. Utilities and meters shall be screened from view from the street or common areas. 4. Residential mechanical equipment such as air conditioning units shall be located on private property and screened with landscaping and/or walls or fencing as described in Sections 9.5 and 9.6. 5. Air conditioner compressors should not be near dwelling entries. 6. A fire riser room is required to house the fire sprinkler riser and fire alarm control panel. Ifm SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS DISTINCT DWELLING ENTRIES 10-39 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 - VARIED ROOF FORMS STEPPED BUILDING FORMS WITH ROOF DECK OVER GARAGE DISTINCT DWELLING ENTRIES E. Open Space; (see Section 8 for an explanation of private and common open space) 1. Private Open Space: 100% of multiplex dwelling units shall have at least 100 square feet of private open space in a balcony, patio or yard. Private open space shall have a minimum dimension in either direction of 6'-0" to accomodate a table and chairs. 2. If private open space is provided on the third level or higher in a multiplex dwelling unit, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. for that dwelling unit. This reduction may not be used in combination with a reduction for common open space on the second level or higher (note 5 below). 3. Common Open Space: Common open space shall be provided at a ratio of 60 square feet per dwelling unit, but shall be no less than 300 square feet. Common open space shall have a minimum horizontal dimension of 25 feet. 4. Common open space may be shared among buildings in a single, central park, but the minimum ratio shall be based on the total number of dwelling units and may not be reduced. 5. If project developer provides common open space on the second level or higher, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. per dwelling unit. This reduction may not be used in combination with a reduction for private open space on the third level or higher (note 2 above). 11111111111111111111111WinAllinild!@ November 2017 ENHANCED PAVING DEFINES DRIVE COURT LOW WALLS & GATE AT SHARED DRIVEWAY DEFINE STREET WALL SPECIFIC PLANFI 6. Common open space shall include furniture such as benches, play structures, bike racks, games (chess tables, bocce ball, etc.), picnic tables. 7. Common Areas over structures (including roof decks and terraces) shall provide structural integrity and appropriate design for container gardening and irrigation. 8. Community swimming pools (not the Recreation Center) may be counted toward the common open space requirement. 9. Roof decks and terraces are encouraged. F. Landscape Standards: 1. Trees shall be included in common areas, green spaces, alleys and motor courts for shade and to soften building massing. 2. Shrub massings shall be used to provide visual interest and plant diversity. 3. Turf shall be used only as a recreational element in common areas and is not allowed in areas less than 8' wide. G. Frontage Guidelines: 1. See Sections 9.4 and 10.4 for applicable street frontage requirements. 2. Architectural and landscape elements should be used to delineate public, semi -private and private space. 3. Porches, stoops and balconies may project into required street setbacks. H. Building Size and Massing; 1. Buildings may be two to four stories. 2. The fourth story may not exceed 65% of the building footprint area. See Figure 10-23. 3. Other design guidelines in this chapter shall apply. Accessory Dwellings: Accessory dwellings are not appropriate to the multi-plex building type. PAMSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-41 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 -- f0-42 10.13 Rowhouse Rowhouses are attached dwelling units arranged side-by-side, typically in a linear manner. The massing and character of the rowhouse type differs from multi-plexes in the clear and distinct expression of each dwelling unit. The basic forms and volumes should be repetitve, creating a rhythm of projecting elements both in plan and elevation. Materials should be consistent and complementary. Variation is achieved through modulation of the facade and roof line, rather than through color and materials. Dwelling units can be given individuality by smaller changes in entry detailing, etc. The end units of a row should have openings on the side and a counterpoint to the forms of the middle units. A. LQt.5ize. Width: 24 feet, minimum Depth: 35 feet, minimum B. Access; 1. All units, except end units, shall have doors at street level facing the lot frontage or common open space. Stoops are encouraged, except at required accessible units for the disabled. 2. End units should have doors at the end (side) walls. REPETITIVE ENTRY DETAILS AND MATERIALS STOOPS VARY IN ORIENTATION, BUT NOT MATERIALS November 2017 REPETITIVE VOLUMES AND ROOF FORMS SPECIFIC PLANFj C. Parking 1. Required enclosed parking shall be in private garages accessed from a motor court or alley. See Section 9.3.12 for motor court standards. 2. Garage entrances should be on the opposite side of the building from the predominant entry side, to avoid interruption of the pedestrian frontage by driveways. 3. Unenclosed off-street parking shall be located in motor courts or behind buildings and shall not be visible from streets. 4. Unenclosed off-street parking shall be covered with a trellis or solar panels. 5. Free-standing private garages are discouraged. 6. Dwelling units shall have direct access to parking garages. 7. Garages must be of sufficient size to allow a 20'x20' parking area (for 2 -car garages) clear of any equipment and clear of the space needed for refuse and recycling bin storage. The clear parking area shall be 10'x20' for single -car garages or 10' x 36' for tandem garages. 8. An enclosed storage area for three bins (refuse, recycling and organic waste) must be provided at each dwelling unit, preferably in private garages. Location for bin storage in garages must allow for manuevering of the bins to the street or alley when cars are parked. D. Sgrv_i4g�: 1. In lieu of waste bin storage in individual garages, a common area may be provided to store the individual bins for refuse, recycling and organic waste bins for each dwelling unit, or common dumpster bins for each type of waste. The storage area shall be enclosed by walls or an opaque fence and roof. 2. Access must be provided to common waste storage enclosures from each dwelling unit, as well as access by collection trucks per Section 10.9. Driveway or alley access is acceptable for both resident and collection access, if consistent with the franchise waste disposal agreement and as approved by the Planning Director and franchise hauler. 3. Utilities and meters shall be screened from view from the street or common areas. 4. Residential mechanical equipment such as air conditioning units shall be located on private property and screened with landscaping and/or walls or fencing as described in Sections 9.5 and 9.6. 5. Air conditioner compressors should not be near dwelling entries. 6. A fire riser room is required to house the fire sprinkler riser and fire alarm control panel. rISPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-43 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 10-44 E. Open Space: (see Section 8 for an explanation of private and common open space) 1. Private Open Space: 100% of rowhouse dwelling units shall have at least 100 square feet of private open space in a balcony, patio or yard. Private open space shall have a minimum dimension in either direction of 6'-0" to accomodate a table and chairs. 2. If private open space is provided on the third level or higher in a rowhouse unit, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. for that dwelling unit. This reduction may not be used in combination with a reduction for common open space on the second level or higher (note 5 below). 3. Common Open Space: Common open space shall be provided at a ratio of 60 square feet per dwelling unit, but shall be no less than 300 square feet. Common open space shall have a minimum horizontal dimension of 25 feet. 4. Common open space may be shared among buildings in a single, central park, but the mini- mum ratio shall be based on the total number of dwelling units and may not be reduced. 5. If a project developer provides common open space on the second level or higher, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. per dwelling unit. This reduction may not be used in combination with a reduction for private open space on the third level or higher (note 2 above). 6. Common open space shall include furniture such as benches, play structures, bike racks, games (chess tables, bocce ball, etc.), picnic tables. 7. Common Areas over structures (including roof decks and terraces) shall provide structural integrity and appropriate design for container gardening and irrigation. 8. Community swimming pools (not the Recreation Center) may be counted toward the com- mon open space requirement. 9. Roof decks and terraces are encouraged. Fes_ .landscape Standards:. 1. Trees shall be included in common areas, green spaces, alleys and motor courts for shade and to soften building massing. 2. Shrub massings shall be used to provide visual interest and plant diversity. 3. Turf shall be used only as a recreational element in common areas and is not allowed in areas Tess than 8' wide. Frontage Guidelines: 1. See Sections 9.4 and 10.4 for applicable street frontage requirements. 2. Architectural and landscape elements should be used to delineate public, semi -private and private space. 3. Porches, stoops and balconies may project into required street setbacks. See Section 10.4. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrj REPEATED VERTICAL VOLUMES C rl oG11E1 ❑DCC E SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS Rhythm and repetition of forms are fundemental to rowhouse massing Entry porches and stoop add visual interest at street level, continue rhythm, and reduce scale. Repetitive roof forms and differentiation of end units. 10-45 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 H. Building Size and Massing: 1. Buildings may be two to four stories. 2. No dwelling unit entries may be above the third story. 3. The fourth story may not exceed 65% of the building footprint area. See Figure 10-23. 4. Rhythm and repetition of forms are fundamental to row house massing 5. Entry porches and stoops add visual interest at street level, continue rhythms and reduce scale. 6. Other design guidelines in this chapter shall apply. I. Accessory Dwell= Accessory dwellings are not allowed in the rowhouse building type. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN EMPHASIZE CORNERS CONSISTENT SIGNAGE PROG RAM 10.14 Live/Work The Live / Work building type combines residential and commercial uses into a single dwelling unit. Those dwelling units are then repeated side-by-side to create a commercial strip that serves as the focus of a neighborhood. The residential portion of the unit can either be behind or above the commercial portion. Subject to building codes and other applicable regulations, the living space may be either open to or separated from the commercial space. Additional residential -only units may also be included in Live / Work buildings, typically on upper floors. A. Lot Size Width: 24 feet, minimum Depth: 35 feet, minimum DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS RECESSED COMMERCIAL ENTRIES OR ARCADE DISTINCT RESIDENTIAL SCALE AT UPPER LEVELS AWNINGS OR ARCADE FOR SHADE SHOPFRONT PER GUIDELINES IN SECTION 9.4,7 SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 10-47 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 10-4$ B. Access: 1. All commercial spaces shall be accessed at street level, generally on the same side of the building. 2. Commercial frontage shall follow the "shopfront" guidelines in Section 9.4.7. Arcades (Section 9.4.8) are also appropriate at Live/Work buildings 3. Separate doors shall be provided to the residential portions of live/work units. These doors may be located at the commercial "store front" facade of the building or at the rear or sides. 4. Residential entries adjacent to commercial "store fronts" shall be limited to doorways and shall not include any living space, in order to maintain a cohesive and uninterrupted commercial "street". S. if residential entries are adjacent to commercial entries, they should be designed to clearly differentiate between residential and commercial access. For example, the dwelling entry might have an opaque door and stoop, while the commercial front would be very transparent with at -grade entry. Figure 10-31 Example Live/Work Building sianpuimumeme C. Parking: 1. Residential parking shall be in enclosed private garages accessed from the rear of the building, opposite the commercial front 2. Commercial parking will be provided on the street. 3. Garages must be of sufficient size to allow a 20'x20' parking area (for 2 -car garages) clear of any equipment and clear of the space needed for refuse and recycling bin storage, if not provided in a common area. The clear parking area shall be 10'x20' for single -car garages or 10' x 36' for tandem garages. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANn O. Services: 1. A common enclosure for refuse, recycling and organic waste bins shall be provided in motor courts or alleys and shall be covered by an opaque fence and roof. 2. For Live/Work units, the commercial and residential bin requirements should be calculated separately for the areas of each use. See Section 10.9. 3. See Section 10.9 for trash bin enclosure requirements. 4. Access must be provided to common waste storage enclosures from each dwelling unit, as well as access by collection trucks per Section 10.9. Driveway or alley access is acceptable for both resident and collection access, if consistent with the franchise waste disposal agreement and as approved by the Planning Director and franchise hauler. 5. Utilities and meters shall be grouped as much as possible and shall be screened from view from the street or common areas. 6. Residential mechanical equipment such as air conditioning units shall be located on private property and screened with landscaping and/or walls or fencing as described in Sections 9.5 and 9.6. 7. Air conditioner compressors shall be located on the roof and screened from view from the street, public areas or other buildings with a parapet or mechanical equipment screen. E. Open Space: (see Section 8 for an explanation of private and common open space) 1. Private Ooen Space: 100% of live/work dwelling units shall have at least 100 square feet of private open space in a balcony, patio or yard. Private open space shall have a minimum dimension in either direction of 5'-6" to accomodate a table and chairs. 2. If private open space is provided on the third level or higher in a live/work unit, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. for that dwelling unit. This reduction may not be used in combination with a reduction for common open space on the second level or higher (note 5 below). 3. Common Open Space; Common open space shall be provided at a ratio of 60 square feet per dwelling unit, but shall be no less than 300 square feet. Common open space shall have a minimum horizontal dimension of 25 feet. 4. Common open space may be shared among buildings in a single, central park, but the minimum ratio shall be based on the total number of dwelling units and may not be reduced. 5. If a project developer provides common open space on the second level or higher, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. per dwelling unit. This reduction may not be used in combination with a reduction for private open space on the third level or higher (note 2 above). 6. Common open space shall include furniture such as benches, play structures, bike racks, games (chess tables, bocce ball, etc.), picnic tables. 7. Common Areas over structures (including roof decks and terraces) shall provide structural integrity and appropriate design for container gardening and irrigation. 8. Community swimming pools (not the Recreation Center) may be counted toward the common open space requirement. 9. Roof decks and terraces are encouraged. I. SPECIFIC PLA'. November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-49 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 F. Landscape Standards: 1. Trees shall be included in common areas, green spaces, alleys and motor courts for shade and to soften building massing. 2. Shrub massings shall be used to provide visual interest and plant diversity. 3. Turf shall be used only as a recreational element in common areas and is not allowed in areas less than 8' wide. G. Frontage Guidelines: 1. See Sections 9.4 and 10.4 for applicable street frontage requirements. 2. Architectural and landscape elements should be used to delineate public, semi -private and private space. 3. Porches, stoops and balconies may project into required street setbacks. See Section 10.4. H. Building Size and Massing 1. Buildings may be two to four stories. 2. No dwelling unit entries may be above the third story. 3. The fourth story may not exceed 65% of the building footprint area. See Figure 10-23. 4. Other design guidelines in this chapter shall apply. !. Accessory Dwellings: Accessory dwellings are not allowed in the live/work building type. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANIrI VARIED ROOF LINES HIGHLY DETAILED 10.15 Multifamily Walk -Up Multifamily Walkups are buildings of two to four stories combining stacked dwelling units. The dwelling units are typically flats, but can be multistory. Vertical circulation is via stairs rather than elevators, typically exterior stairs and walkways that are internal to the site. A. Lot Size Not applicable to this building_type B. Access: 1. Ground floor units shall have doors at street level facing the lot frontage or common open space. Stoops are encouraged, except at required accessible units for the disabled. 2. Upper level units are accessed via open stairs and walkways. No more than four dwelling units shall be served by a single walkway. C. Parking: 1. Required enclosed parking shall be in private, interior tuck -under garages accessed from a motor court. See Section 9.3.12 and Figure 10-33 for motor court standards. 2. Unenclosed off-street parking shall be located in motor courts or behind buildings and shall not be visible from streets. 3. Unenclosed off-street parking shall be covered with a trellis or solar panels. 3 - DIMENSIONAL FACADES LOW WALLS AT GRADE Figur-32 Typical Massing at Multifamily Walk -Up =MSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS VARIED MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 4. Garages must be of sufficient size to allow a 20'x20' parking area (for 2 -car garages) clear of any equipment and clear of the space needed for refuse and recycling bin storage, if not provided in a common area. The clear parking area shall be 10'x20' for single -car garages or 10' x 36' for tandem garages. Free-standing private garages are permitted. 5. Dwelling units may have direct or indirect access to parking stalls. VARY GARAGE DOOR SIZE&TYPE DECORATIVE GARAGE DOORS OF HIGH-QUALITY MATERIALS COVERED REFUSE ENCLOSURE 10-52 WINDOWS+BALCONIES FACE COURT GATEWAY HIGHLY DETAILED ENTRY 3-DIMENSIONAL FACADES TRELLIS OR SOLAR PANEL TO SHADE PARKING ENHANCED PERVIOUS PAVING Figure 10-33 Motor Court at Multifamily Housing D. Services; 1. Common enclosures for refuse, recycling and organic waste bins shall be provided in motor courts and shall be covered by an opaque fence and roof. 2. See Section 10.9 for trash bin enclosure requirements. 3. Access must be provided to common waste storage enclosures from each dwelling unit, as well as access by collection trucks per Section 10.9. Driveway or alley access is acceptable for both resident and collection access, if consistent with the franchise waste disposal agreement and as approved by the Planning Director and franchise hauler.. 4. Utilities and meters shall be grouped as much as possible and shall be screened from view from the street or common areas. 5. Air conditioner compressors shall be located on the roof and screened from view from the street, public areas or other buildings with a parapet or mechanical equipment screen. LANDSCAPING AT VARIOUS HEIGHTS MAXIMIZE GREEN SPACE November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN�L E. Open Space: (see Section 8 for an explanation of private and common open space) 1. Private Oben Space: 100% of multifamily walk-up dwelling units shall have at least 80 square feet of private open space in a balcony, patio or yard. Private open space shall have a minimum dimension in either direction of 6'-0" to accomodate a table and chairs. 2. Common Open Space: Common open space shall be provided at a ratio of 60 square feet per dwelling unit, but shall be no less than 300 square feet. 3. Common open space shall have a minimum horizontal dimension of 25 feet. 4. Common open space may be shared among buildings in a single, central park, but the minimum ratio shall be based on the total number of dwelling units and may not be reduced. 5. Common open space shall include furniture such as benches, play structures, bike racks, games (chess tables, bocce ball, etc.), picnic tables. 6. Community swimming pools (not the Recreation Center) may be counted toward the common open space requirement. 7. Roof decks and terraces are encouraged for either private or common open space. 8. If the project developer provides common open space on the second level or higher, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. per dwelling unit. This reduction may not be used in combination with other reductions for private open space. 9. Common Areas over structures (including roof decks and terraces) shall provide structural integrity and appropriate design for container gardening and irrigation. DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS vehicular entries =ffffl SPECIFIC PLAN arranged to form a court with multiple vehicular and pedestrian openings November 2017 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 F. Landscape Standards: 1. Trees shall be included in common areas, green spaces, alleys and motor courts for shade and to soften building massing. 2. Shrub massings shall be used to provide visual interest and plant diversity. 3. Turf shall be used only as a recreational element in common areas and is not allowed in areas less than 8' wide. G. Frontage Guidelines: 1. See Sections 9.4 and 10.4 for applicable street frontage requirements. 2. Architectural and landscape elements should be used to delineate public, semi -private and private space. 3. Porches, stoops and balconies may project into required street setbacks. See Section 10.4. H. Building Size and Massing: 1. Buildings may be two to four stories. 2. No dwelling unit entries may be above the third story. 3. The fourth story may not exceed 65% of the building footprint area. See Figure 10-23. 4. Other design guidelines in this chapter shall apply. I. Accessory Dwellings: Accessory dwellings are not allowed in the multifamily building type. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANI'.i 10.16 Multifamily Podium Multifamily Podium buildings combine four or five stories of stacked dwelling units over a subterranean or partially subterranean enclosed parking garage. The dwelling units are typically flats, but can be multistory. Vertical circulation is via interior stairs and elevators, accessing internal common corridors. Multifamily podium buildings are often also mixed-use buildings (see 10.18). Ground floor retail is encouraged in multifamily podium buildings to activate the street and the pedestrian experience. A. Lot Size Not applicable to this building type. B. Access: 1. Dwelling units are typically accessed via internal common corridors. 2. Entries to the building are through a common lobby and directly from the garage. 3. Ground floor units may have doors at street level facing the lot frontage or common open space, but this is not a requirement. 4. The common garage is accessed by no more than two secured openings from a driveway or alley, not directly from the street. C. Parki 1. Required enclosed parking shall be located below the residential portion of the building, typically in a common garage structure. 2. Private garages may be allowed to satisfy a portion of the enclosed parking requirement, provided they are located along the edge of the common garage, under the footprint of the residential floors, and are accessed from an alley or motor court. 3. Unenclosed off-street parking shall be covered with a trellis or solar panels. 4. Free-standing private garages are not permitted to serve multifamily podium buildings. S. Dwelling units shall have direct access through the building to the common parking garage. Iasi SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-55 Figure DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 - 10-56 D. Services: 1. Common refuse and recycling bins shall be provided in an enclosed room within the common garage. 2. Residential podium buildings greater than three stories and over 30 dwelling units, with a common garage, are strongly encouraged to provide trash and recycling chutes to a common trash room. 3. An area for organic waste bins shall be provided outside the building and shall be covered by an opaque fence and roof. 4. See Section 10.9 for trash room and waste bin enclosure requirements. 5. Compactors are encouraged to reduce the quantity of bins and resultant space needed. 6. Air conditioner compressors shall be located on the roof and screened from view from the street, public areas or other buildings with a parapet or mechanical equipment screen. 10-36 Multifamily Podium Building 7. Utilities shall be screened from view from the street and shall be located in building recesses or closets with decorative gates and fencing for security. E. Open Spac_e; (see Section 8 for an explanation of private and common open space) 1. Private Open Space: 100% of multifamily podium dwelling units shall have at least 60 square feet of private open space in a balcony, patio or yard. Private open space shall have a minimum dimension in either direction of 6'-0" to accomodate a table and chairs. 2. Common Open Soace: Common open space shall be provided at a ratio of 50 square feet per dwelling unit, but shall be no less than 300 square feet. 3. Common open space shall have a minimum horizontal dimension of 25 feet. 4. Common open space is typically accomodated as a courtyard over the parking structure and/or located on roof decks. 5. Common open space shall include furniture such as benches, play structures, bike racks, games (chess tables, bocce ball, etc.), picnic tables. 6. Community swimming pools (not the Recreation Center) may be counted toward the common open space requirement. 7. Both private and common roof decks and terraces are encouraged. 8. If the project developer provides common open space on the second level or higher, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. per dwelling unit, but not to less than 6' x 6'. This reduction may not be used in combination with other reductions for private open space. 9. Common Areas over structures (including roof decks and terraces) shall provide structural integrity and appropriate design for container gardening and irrigation. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAMR F. Landscape Standards: 1. Trees shall be included in common areas, green spaces, alleys and motor courts for shade and to soften building massing. 2. Shrub massings shall be used to provide visual interest and plant diversity. 3. Turf shall be used only as a recreational element in common areas and is not allowed in areas less than 8' wide. G. Frontage Guidelines: 1. See Sections 9.4 and 10.4 for applicable street frontage requirements. 2. Architectural and landscape elements should be used to delineate public, semi -private and private space. 3. Stoops, balconies, canopies and entry marquees may project into required street setbacks. H. Building Size and Massing: 1. Buildings may be four to five stories. 2. Massing shall be broken into multiple components resulting in an overall pedestrian scale. 3. Provide multiple off -setting planes at each facade. 4. Vary roof lines. 5. Other design guidelines in this chapter shall apply. Accessory Dwellings; Accessory dwellings are not allowed in the multifamily podium building type. IMMIllesident Courtyard at Multifamily Podium Housing SPECIFIC PLAN N:= r, DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-=,7 10.17 Micro -Units Micro -units are efficiency dwelling units that provide affordable housing for smaller households. The units are typically between 250 and 400 square feet. Micro -units may be located in any building type except detached housing, although they may be an accessory dwelling to detached housing as described in paragraph 10.11.1. A. Development Standards: Micro -units shall comply with Sections 17.10.025. C and D of the Temecula Municipal Code. B. - Lot Sim; As defined by the building type in which the unit is located. C. Access: As defined by the building type in which the unit is located. D. parkin 1. Parking for micro -units shall be provided at a ratio of one space per dwelling unit. 2. If the micro -unit development employs management or support staff on site, then one parking space shall be provided for each employee that does not live on on site. 3. Micro -unit parking may be enclosed or open. Figure 10-38 Micro—Units Typical Layout D. Services; As defined by the building type in which the unit is located. Flgune 10-39 Building with Micro -Un - DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN P E. Open Space: (see Section 8 for an explanation of private and common open space) 1. Private Oben Space: 75% of micro dwelling units shall have at least 50 square feet of private open space in a balcony, patio or yard. 2. Common Open Space: Common open space shall be provided at a ratio of 45 square feet per dwelling unit, but shall be no less than 300 square feet. Common open space shall have a minimum horizontal dimension of 25 feet. 3. Common open space is typically accomodated as a courtyard over the parking structure and/or located on roof decks. 4. Common open space shall include furniture such as benches, play structures, bike racks, games (chess tables, bocce ball, etc.), picnic tables. 5. Community swimming pools (not the Recreation Center) may be counted toward the common open space requirement. 6. Both private and common roof decks and terraces are encouraged. 7. If the project developer provides common open space on the second level or higher, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. per dwelling unit, but not to less than 6' x 6'. This reduction may not be used in combination with other reductions for private open space. 8. Common Areas over structures (including roof decks and terraces) shall provide structural integrity and appropriate design for container gardening and irrigation. F. Landscape Standards: As defined by the building type in which the unit is located. G. Frontage Guidelines: As defined by the building type in which the unit is located, H. BuildintSize and Massing; As defined by the building type in which the unit is located. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-59 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 - 10.18 Mixed -Use Mixed -Use buildings combine two or more distinct uses into a single structure or group, typically residential in combination with neighborhood -serving commercial, service or office uses. Mixed-use buildings benefit a community by activating the public realm and providing goods and services within walking distance of dwellings. Mixed -uses are generally stacked vertically, with dwellings over ground floor commercial. A podium building type with a subterranean garage, retail space at street level and several stories of residential flats above is a common example of a mixed-use building. Different uses may also occur side-by-side, such as rowhouses with a commercial or office use at the end of a row or at a street corner. A. DejelgpmenLStandrds: 1. Commercial, assembly or office uses shall occur at the ground floor and shall have direct access from the street frontage or a public plaza or park. 2. Multi-level uses are allowed if the levels share an entry at the street. 3. Individual tenants in non-residential uses should have distinct entries at street level. B. Lot Size: Not applicable to this building type. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN C. Access: 1. Dwelling units above street level uses are typically accessed via internal common corridors. 2. Entries to upper level residential units are through a common lobby and directly from the garage. 3. Rowhomes in mixed-use blocks shall have entries at street level facing the lot frontage or common open space. Stoops are encouraged, except at required accessible units for the disabled. 4. The common garage is accessed by no more than two secured openings from a driveway or alley, not directly from the street. D. Parking; 1. Required parking quantity shall be calculated based on the cumulative requirements of each use. 2. A reduction for shared parking between uses may be allowed if justified through an approved shared parking analysis, at the discretion of the Director of Community Development. 3. Parking provided for multiple uses, including residential, may be located in the same common garage structure or area. 4. Reserved residential parking shall be secured separately from parking provided for other uses. 5. Private residential garages may be allowed to satisfy a portion of the enclosed parking requirement, provided they are located along the edge of the common garage, under the footprint of the residential floors, and are accessed from an alley or motor court. 6. Unenclosed off-street residential and office parking shall be covered with a trellis or solar panels. 7. Free-standing private garages are not permitted to serve mixed-use buildings. 8. Dwelling units shall have direct access through the building to a common parking garage. Services: 1. Common refuse and recycling bins shall be provided in an enclosed room within the common garage. 2. Residential buildings greater than three stories should have trash and recycling chutes to a trash room. 3. An area for organic waste bins shall be provided outside the building and shall be covered by an opaque fence and roof. 4. See Section 10.9 and the City of Temecula Waste and Recycling Guidelines for trash room and waste bin enclosure requirements. 5. The commercial and residential bin requirements should be calculated separately for the areas of each use, per the requirements of the City of Temecula Waste and Recycling Guidelines and as approved by the Planning Director and the franchise hauler. 6. Compactors are encouraged to reduce the quantity of bins and resultant space needed. 7. Air conditioner compressors shall be located on the roof and screened from view from the street, public areas or other buildings with a parapet or mechanical equipment screen. 8. Utilities shall be screened from view from the street and shall be located in building recesses or closets with decorative gates and fencing for security. ffin SPEC!FiC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-61 (DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 10-62 E. Open Space (see Section 8 for an explanation of private and common open space) 1. Private Open Space: 100% of dwelling units in mixed-use buildings shall have at least 60 square feet of private open space in a balcony, patio or yard. 2. Common Open Space: Common open space shall be provided at a ratio of 50 square feet per dwelling unit, but shall be no less than 300 square feet. 3. Common open space shall have a minimum horizontal dimension of 25 feet. 4. Common open space is typically accomodated as a courtyard over the parking structure and/or located on roof decks. 5. Common open space shall include furniture such as benches, play structures, bike racks, games (chess tables, bocce ball, etc.), picnic tables. 6. Community swimming pools (not the Recreation Center) may be counted toward the common open space requirement. 7. Both private and common roof decks and terraces are encouraged. 8. If the project developer provides common open space on the second level or higher, then the minimum area of private open space may be reduced by 20 s.f. per dwelling unit. This reduction may not be used in combination with other reductions for private open space. 9. Common Areas over structures (including roof decks and terraces) shall provide structural integrity and appropriate design for container gardening and irrigation. F. landscape Standards: 1. Trees shall be included in common areas, green spaces, alleys and motor courts for shade and to soften building massing. 2. Shrub massings shall be used to provide visual interest and plant diversity. 3. Turf shall be used only as a recreational element in common areas and is not allowed in areas less than 8' wide. G. Frontage Guidelines; 1. See Sections 9.4 and 10.4 for applicable street frontage requirements. 2. Architectural and landscape elements should be used to delineate public, semi -private and private space. 3. Stoops, balconies, canopies and entry marquees may project into required street setbacks. H. Building Size and Massing: 1. Buildings may be four to five stories. 2. Massing shall be broken into multiple components resulting in an overall pedestrian scale. 3. Each use shall be distinctly expressed on the building exterior through scale, materials, detailing and ornament appropriate to each use. 4. Provide multiple off -setting planes at each facade. 5. Vary roof lines. 6. Other design guidelines in this chapter shall apply. I. Accessory Dwellings: Accessory dwellings are not allowed in the mixed-use building type. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN 10.19 Iconic Tower An Iconic Tower is featured in Village C, where it can be see from most of the Altair community and from Main Street in Old Town. A. Development Standards: 1. See Figure 10-40. 2. A commercial use may be located at the base of the tower. 3. There shall only be one iconic tower. B. Building Size Massing: 1. Tower height will be between 50 feet and 75 feet. 2. Proportions shall emphasize verticality. 3. Tower may be attached to a building or may be free-standing. DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS Parking, services, open space, landscape standards, frontage guidelines and accessory dwelling regulations do not apply to this building type. SLOPED ROOF OF METAL OR TILE CLOCK OR SIGNATURE ARTWORK STONE OR BRICK VENEER ON ALL OR PORTION OF WALLS ON ALL SIDES REVEALS AND NARROW OPENINGS — DEEP OPENINGS WITH WRAPPED VENEER FINISH TO MAKE WALLS APPEAR THICK TOWER SHALL BE DESIGNED AS A 3-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENT TO BE VIEWED FROM ALL EXPOSED SIDES. CONCEPTUAL. IMAGE ONLY; ACTUAL DESIGN MAY VARY. IATfl-iiSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 10-63 (DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 — 10-54 10.20 Civic Buildings / Nature Center Civic buildings are located at the Civic Site, where a Nature Center is proposed (see Section 3.13). This category does not include community buildings, such as recreation centers and clubhouses that are described in Section 10.22. A. Development Standards: 1. The nature center at the Civic Site must be sensitive to the adjacent natural open space and the Pechanga Origin Area/ Traditional Cultural Place (TCP) site to the south. 2. The scale, materials and style of civic buildings should be appropriate for a public facility and should be an asset to the community. 3. Materials at the nature center shall be sturdy, fire-resistant and complementary to the natural setting, with massing and details appropriate to those materials, as seen in the "PARKitecture style" of many buildings in National Parks of the West. 4. Integrated indoor and outdoor spaces are encouraged. 5. Attached or detached shade structures that are appropriate to the building style are encouraged. 6. The building and key outdoor spaces should be arranged to maximize and/ or frame views that have historic or regional significance. Educational installations, such as plaques or artwork, are appropriate to explain these vistas. NATURE CENTER AT SAN ELIJO LAGOON. ENCINITAS, CALIFORNIA D. Lot Size: Not applicable to this building type. C. Access: 1. Building entries will typically be at the ground floor and should be apparent to visitors. 2. Pedestrian access must be provided from a public way, from public transportation, and from off-street parking. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANt, �� .a D. Parking: 1. Surface parking must be landscaped per Section 10.6.12 and Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.24.050.H. Solar panels on canopy structures may be substituted for required trees in the same ratio. 2. See Section 3.13 for additional parking standards. E. Services: 1. Loading zones shall be provided per Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.24.060. Delivery and loading areas shall be screened from view from the street. 2. A single area for refuse, recycling and organic waste bins shall be provided and shall be screened by an opaque fence or wall and covered. 3. Additional refuse and recycling receptacles shall be distributed along trails and in parking areas. Receptacles shall have an integral lid or be otherwise designed to prevent wind-blown trash and to keep animals out. A combined refuse / recycling receptacle is preferred. 4. See Section 10.9 for enclosure and access requirements for trash collection. 5. Utilities shall be grouped and screened from view from the street, trails or common areas. F. Open Space Common open space will be provided as described in Section 3.13. Spaces should facilitate gatherings and the interaction of visitors with staff and with the surrounding environment. G. Landscape Standards: See Section 10.6.11 (Civic / Community) as well as the corresponding plant lists in Appendix A. H. Frontage Guidelines: 1. See Section 9.4 for applicable street and garden frontage types. 2. The nature center should provide a public front on all sides, not just a single facade. 2. Frontages for civic buildings should be of a larger scale than residential frontages to convey a greater sense of importance. 3. Architectural elements should characterize social institutions, rather than residences. Spaces that comprise civic frontages are public and should celebrate building entry. 4. Arcades, colonnades, entry courts and shopfronts are appropriate to civic buildings such as a nature center. They also provide shade and help to integrate the building into the landscape. Building Site and Massing 1. Buildings may be two stories maximum. 2. Floor plates of an individual building should not exceed 15,000 sf. 3. Individual buildings should be well-proportioned. Massing that sprawls horizontally, as in a large 1 -story building, does not present the proper stature of a civic building. Avoid tower forms that compete with the Iconic Tower at Altair's core. J. Accessory Dwelling A park ranger's residence is permitted, subject to City design review. =PI SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-65 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 - 10.21 School Buildings The educational buildings at the School Site will ultimately be designed and developed by the Temecula Valley Unified School District with public input. However, the guidelines and standards included in this Specific Plan should be followed to ensure that the school architecture complements the community of Altair and supports the underlying principles of smart growth, compact design, walkability and strong neighborhood identity. See Section 3.12 for further information regarding the site. A. Development Standards: 1. The School Site should be planned as a campus. There should be a clear integration of functional elements within each campus. Multiple buildings are preferred to reduce the overall scale and to create active space between buildings. 2. The relationship between buildings on a campus is as important as the buildings themselves. Buildings should refer to eachother to maintain a cohesive aesthetic. Buildings should be arranged to form outdoor rooms for shared use by occupants. 3. The scale, materials and style of school buildings should be appropriate for a public facility and should be an asset to the community. 5. Integrated indoor and outdoor spaces are encouraged. 6. Materials shall be durable, timeless, and shall give edifices a sense of importance, with massing and details appropriate to those materials. Brick and stone veneers are encouraged, as are metal roofs B. Lot Size; Not applicable to this building type. C. Access: 1. Building entries will typically be at the ground floor and should be apparent to students and visitors. 2. There should be a sense of formality to entering the buildings and /or the campus. 3. Clearly defined pedestrian access must be provided from a public way, from public transportation, and from off-street parking. D. Parking: 1. Surface parking must be landscaped per Section 10.6.12 and Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.24.050.H. Solar panels on canopy structures may be substituted for required trees in the same ratio. 2. See Sections 3.12 for additional parking standards. E. Services: 1. Loading zones shall be provided per Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.24.060. Delivery and loading areas shall be screened from view from the street. 2. A single area for refuse, recycling and organic waste bins shall be provided for each campus and shall be screened by an opaque fence or wall and covered. 3. See Section 10.9 for enclosure and access requirements for trash collection. 4. Utilities shall be grouped and screened from view from the street or common areas. November 2017 Mir SPECIFIC PLAN?Jjl ALEX G SPANOS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS F. Open Space: Common open space will be provided as described in Section 3.12. Spaces should facilitate education and recreation programs and the interaction of students. G. Landscape Standards: See Sections 10.6.9 (School) as well as the corresponding plant lists in Appendix A. H Fr9ntage Guidelines: 1. See Section 9.4 for applicable street frontage types. 2. Frontages for educational buildings should be of a larger scale than residential frontages to convey a greater sense of importance. 3. Architectural elements should characterize educational institutions, rather than residences. Spaces that comprise school frontages are public and should celebrate building entry. 4. Arcades, colonnades and entry courts are appropriate to educational buildings. They also provide shaded exterior common spaces to facilitate civic engagement. 5. Frontages should be designed to tie buildings together and create a single theme for the campus. For instance, buildings can be grouped around an entry court with an arcade linking them together. I, Building Size and Massing: 1. Buildings may be two stories maximum. 2. Individual buildings should be well-proportioned. Massing that sprawls horizontally, as in a large 1 -story building, does not present the proper stature of a school building. 3. Avoid tower forms that compete with the Iconic Tower at Altair's core. 1._ Accessory Dwellings: Not applicable. ffl(SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 10-67 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 10 10.22 Community Buildings The main community buildings at Altair are located in Village C around its central Plaza that anchors the western end of the Main Street axis to the Temecula Civic Center, These include a Recreation Center with pool to the west of Altair Vista and a Community Center / Clubhouse east of Altair Vista at the high point of the Village C Park. Smaller community buildings may also occur in the other villages, such as at neighborhood pools and parks. A. Development Standards: 1- The combined community buildings at Village C should frame and define the central Plaza and promontory steps that anchor the Main Street axis. The two buildings should relate to each other to form a cohesive whole. 2. Community buildings should be four-sided, due to their prominent and central location, The Community Center, especially, must have facades addressing the Plaza and Altair Vista as well as the Park. The Park facade may be slightly different in character to engage terraces into the Park and to take advantage of the expanding views. 3. Community buildings should be used to negotiate grade changes, nestling into hillsides, with entries on multiple levels where possible. The Recreation Center, in particular, shall be a two-story structure forming the north edge of the promontory steps, with building entries at the top and bottom landings of these steps and a publicly accessible elevator. 4. Community Buildings should combine interior and exterior space through such design ele- ments as courtyards, terraces, colonnades, roof overhangs and permeable walls with large openings. B. Lok$ix : Not applicable to this building type. C. Access: 1, Building entries should occur on all at -grade levels and should be apparent to visitors. 2. Pedestrian access must be provided from the common circulation network and from off- street parking. D. Parking: 1. Per Table 10-3. This ratio assumes that most users of Community facilities will be residents who will walk or bike to the facility. 2. Surface parking must be landscaped per Section 10.6.12 and Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.24.050.H. Solar panels on canopy structures may be substituted for required trees in the same ratio. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANM E. 1. Services: Loading zones shall be provided per Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.24.060. Delivery and loading areas shall be screened from view from the street. 2. An area for refuse, recycling and organic waste bins shall be provided and shall be screened by an opaque fence or wall and covered. 3. See Section 10.9 for enclosure and access requirements for trash collection. 4. Utilities shall be grouped and screened from view from the street or common areas. 5. Mechanical equipment such as cooling towers and water heaters should be located on the building roof and screened from view from the street or from above by parapets, equipment screens or trellises. F. Open Space: Open space requirements do not apply to this building type. However, community buildings are typically adjacent to or within shared open spaces and should be integrated into these landscapes through stepped massing, courtyards, arcades or low walls. G. Landscape Standards: See Sections 10.6.11 (Civic / Community) as well as the corresponding plant lists in Appendix A. H. Frontage Guidelines: 1. See Section 9.4 for applicable street frontage types. 2. Frontages for community buildings should be of a larger scale than residential frontages to convey a greater sense of importance. 3. Architectural elements should characterize social institutions. Residential elements such as porches and pitched roofs may also be appropriate, but should be at a larger scale. 4. Arcades, colonnades and entry courts are appropriate to community buildings and provide shaded indoor/outdoor space for passive recreation. 5. A community building sets the aesthetic tone for the village where it is located. The main Recreation Center and Club House, in particular, should be stylistically similar or of similar materials to establish Altair's architectural image. Building Size and Massing: 1. Buildings may be one to three stories tall. 2. Floor plates of individual buildings should not exceed 40,000 sf. 3. Individual buildings should be well-proportioned. Massing that sprawls horizontally, as in a large 1 -story building, does not present the proper stature of a civic building. Avoid tower forms that compete with the Iconic Tower at Altair's core. J. Accessory Dwellings: Not applicable. 1NSPECIFIC PLAN', November 2017 DEVELOPMENT 10 STANDARDS 10-69 IMPLEMENTATION c IMPLEMENTATION The methodology for the implemenation of the Altair Specific Plan is provided in accordance with Government Code 65451 of the California Planning law, which requires "a program of implementation measures including regulations, programs, public works projects, and financing measures necessary to carry out" the specific plan. The following elements compose the Implementation Program: 1. Adoption of the Specific Plan and General Plan Amendment 2. Administration of the Specific Plan 3. Development Agreement 4. Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and Mitigation + Monitoring Program S. Master Tentative Tract Map 6. Master Conceptual Grading Plan 7. Discretionary Approvals 8. Individual Tentative and Final Maps 9. Finish Grading Plans and Improvement Plans 10. Financing Strategies 11. Maintenance Program The Altair Specific Plan will be adopted by Ordinance of the City of Temecula City Council. Adoption of the Specific Plan defines land use and development standards for the project area which shall supersede current zoning regulations. 11.1 Regulations that Administer the Specific Plan 11.1.1 Development in the Altair Specific Plan area shall be regulated by this document in combination with the City of Temecula General Plan and Title 17 of the Temecula Municipal Code (referred to as the City of Temecula Development Code). Unless otherwise regulated in this Specific Plan, the following Articles of the City of Temecula Development Code shall apply: Chapter 17.01 General Provisions Chapter 17.03 Administration of Zoning Chapter 17.04 Permits, except 17.04030 Horne occupation permits does not apply. A home occupation permit is not required for accessory commercial uses in residential zones (i.e. live/work). Chapter 17.06.050(I.)Family Day Care Home Facilities Chapter 17.06.060 Landscape Standards Chapter 17.16 Specific Plan Zoning District Chapter 17.26 Covenants for Easements Chapter 17,34 Definition of Terms Chapter 8.48 Heritage Tree Ordinance Chapter 17.32 Water Efficient Landscape Design I SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 IMPLEMENTATION 11 The City shall enforce the provisions of the Altair Specific Plan and City Development and Subdivision Codes for all projects located wholly or partially within the Altair Specific Plan area limits, in accordance with the State of California Government Code, Subdivision Map Act and Local Subdivision Ordinance. In case of conflict with directives or restrictions in other documents, the requirements of this specific plan shall apply. Where regulation is not provided in this Specific Plan, the provisions of the Development Code shall prevail. 11.1.2 Minor modifications to the approved Specific Plan which will not detract from the general intent of the plan may be approved by the Planning Director. Such modifications may include, among other allowances: 1. Changes in the size of planning districts (i.e. Villages) not exceeding 20 percent of their gross area and not increasing the overall density of the project. 2. Transfer of density between planning districts, with limitations as described in Section 11.5. 3. Changes to the alignment of pedestrian and/or bicycle paths, or utility networks from that shown in the Specific Plan figures, as long as intended linkages are maintained. 4. Modifications to the orientation of buildings and site elements such as yards, walls, walkways, landscaping or parking from that shown in typical examples. 5. Plant material substitutions, as long as they are consistent with the Landscape Development Standards. 6. Variations of materials, color, architectural styles or design details from those shown in the examples. 7. Reductions from required setbacks not to exceed 15 percent. 8. Future adoption of a Signage Program. 9. Phasing that differs from the Conceptual Phasing Plan and the Phasing Summary in this Specific Plan, as long as the infrastructure and community facilities needs of Altair are met. Any changes to the approved Phasing Plan shall require review and approval from the Planning, Public Works and Fire Departments. 10. The Planning Director has the option to allow up to 10% of the required parking stalls to be compact stalls with minimum dimensions of eight feet wide by sixteen feet long, when utilized with electric vehicle charging stations or extensive bike rack systems above the minimum requirements. 11. Exceptions to fence height and material standards at sports fields and dog parks. 11.1.3 Development plans for individual projects (i.e. by Merchant Builders) within the Altair Specific Plan area shall be submitted to the City of Temecula and reviewed by several departments under the following sequential process: 1. Master Developer Consultation With Guest Builder: Guest Builders submit architectural, civil and landscape plans, elevations, sections, renderings and material/color sample boards to the Master Developer. Necessary design revisions are made following consultation. Guest Builders must have approval from the Master Developer prior to making a Pre -Application Submittal to the City of Temecula. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANT/ 11 IMPLEMENTATION 2. Standard Pre -Application Submittal: Following Master Developer approval, a pre -application submittal is made to the City. This free review is intended to provide a more efficient Development Plan review and public hearing process. Applications are reviewed by the Planning, Public Works, Fire, Building and Safety, and Police Departments to assist in providing critical design feedback. The review period is two weeks. Any revisions made during the pre -application process shall be reviewed with the Master Developer prior to Development Plan Submittal to the City. The pre- application submittal should include the following: A. Site plan to include common open space calculation, size and location B. Conceptual architecture plans and elevations C. Private open space calculation, locations and dimensions D. Pedestrian circulation exhibit. E. Trash exhibit. Show garage dimensions and bin locations in single-family residential projects, refuse / recycling enclosure locations, dimensions, materials and cover design in multifamily and commercial development. Show collection route with clearances. See Section 10.10. F. Dimensioned parking exhibit and calculation. See Table 10-3. G. Utilities screening and location exhibit (AC units, electric meters, FDC/PIV, etc...) H. Sign location and size parameters; show dimensioned envelope where signage will occur. Include proposed sign materials and illumination method. See Section 10.5. I. Frontage exhibit. See Figure 9.2 for street and garden frontage orientation. Provide 3-dimensional diagram showing frontage type per Section 9.4 and compliance with build -to line regulations in Section 10.4 and Table 10.2. 3. Development Plan Approval: Development plans and related documents, such as tract maps, grading plans, architectural and engineering drawings are reviewed by the appropriate departments for compliance with requirements and guidelines of this specific plan, The Temecula Municipal Code, conditions of approval and other applicable codes and regulations. Fees are charged for Development Plan review. For Development Plan Approval, City staff must make the following findings: 1. The proposed use is in conformance with the General Plan, Specific Plan, Development Agreement, EIR and MMRP and with all applicable requirements of State law and other Ordinances of the City. 2. The overall development of the land is designed for the protection of the public health, safety and general welfare. 4. Conditions Of Approval govern utilization of the Development Permit and list infrastructure improvements and other requirements necessary for the project or benefitting the community. 5. Planning Commission Approval of each Development Plan is required in order to obtain a Development Permit. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 11-3 IMPLEMENTATION 11 PkvAe( STRIIrs wac Srn[(TS arr-9t[ smLTS Altair Novombur 2017 SPECIFIC MiKuLminala 11 IMPLEMENTATION Once the Development Permit has been granted, builders may proceed with Plan Check, in which construction documents are reviewed for compliance with requirements and guidelines of this specific plan, conditions of approval and all applicable City, state and federal codes, regulations and standards. Building permits are then issued after approval of construction documents and collection of securities and Development Impact Fees (DIF), as outlined in the Development Agreement. 11.2 Capital Improvements Several capital projects are needed for the successful implementation of the Altair Specific Plan. The projects are listed and detailed in the Development Agreement between the Master Developer and the City of Temecula (see Section 11.7). These projects include: Western Bypass Road connecting SR -79 South (Temecula Parkway) to Rancho California Road via Vincent Moraga Drive. Improvements to Rancho California Road at its intersection with the Western Bypass Bridge over Murrieta Creek between Western Bypass and Temecula Parkway Storm water management system Water system improvements Sewer system improvements B Street intersection with Pujol Street and with the Western Bypass Pedestrian promenade at the west end of Main Street (west of Pujol Street) 11.3 Phasing Altair will be developed in multiple phases, with the advancement of circulation, utilities and other infrastructure as necessary for each phase. Relocation of substantial quantities of earth, particularly in grading of the Western Bypass Corridor, is an important consideration in the phasing schedule to avoid soil export and subsequent re -grading. The north parcels at Villages A and B are anticipated to comprise the first phase of development. Phasing will subsequently continue southward, village by village, as indicated in Figure 11-2 Phasing Plan. The process of developing the site, village by village, will be commensurate with market demand. The Development Agreement between the Master Developer and the City of Temecula outlines the on-site and off-site infrastructure improvements that must be complete at certain development thresholds within each phase. Phasing may occur out of sequence, as long as the infrastructure required for that phase is completed. NMSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 11-5 IMPLEMENTATION 11 PHASING SUMMARY PINK ISP r ft wKMU MW Mb "v we "y. so IM/ MN, wa1 wr �4 p • gi KIM am t... ALAI 7 Y m.• Intal Intal T of »� oci r Mil MN 41// w IWa Y to as ac= MA, PHASING MAP TRACT MAP\ NO. 36959.1 NORTH PHASE \, • 1 1 kvt�� ,MAP.TRACT MAP � NO. 36959.2 1 CENTRAL PHASE !�� � _D TRACT MAP 11111112:e67 / E ii 41644 NO. 36959-3 1 m © SOUTH PHASE 1 �/ 1111t e 1 &:Ilc 7/S A , � 1 aF IB \ C y ` f /to s/411, TRACT MAP NO. 36959 CIVIC PHASE rap. IMO, GRAPHIC SCALE 11.1.!,!0!5111) uo Figure 11-2 Altair Conceptual Phasing Plan November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANFJ 11.4 Maintenance 11 IMPLEMENTATION Maintenance shall generally be the responsibility of the property owners within the Altair development, except at public roads and any spaces dedicated to the City of Temecula. Included in this project are parks, parkways and public areas that beautify the development. The future maintenance of these common areas into perpetuity shall be the responsibility of the Home Owner's Association (HOA) established by the development. There will be a Master HOA for spaces shared by the entire community and sub-HOA's within each village or planning district. Common area landscaping and open areas will be developed in conjunction with the project. The maintenance of these areas will also be the responsibility of the Home Owner's Association. See Figure 11-3 Developer Responsibility Map. The following areas will be maintained by the City: • Western Bypass Corridor, including the Class 1 Bikeway where it is in the public right of way. The main portion of the Class 1 Bikeway is on private property and will be maintained by the Master HOA. • the north portion of Altair Vista from Coromell Trail to the Western Bypass • "B" Street south • "C" Street • Village C Park • Grand Stair • Plaza at west end of Main Street (Main Street Transition) The School site will be maintained by the Temecula Valley Unified School District (TVUSD) after ownership of the property is transferred to the District. If the TVUSD declines to accept the dedication, then the property will be maintained by the respective property owners and the Master HOA, as applies. 11.5 Density Transfer Transfer of dwelling units is permitted between districts in the specific plan area with the following limitations: A. The total number of dwelling units in the specific plan area shall not exceed 1,750 units. B. No planning area may exceed the target quantity of dwelling units by more than 20%. C. Transfer must not cause significantly increased or new environmental impacts. D. Circulation, infrastructure and utility systems must be adequate for the altered density distribution. E. Applications for density transfer shall include a Project Residential Unit Reconciliation Report comparing the approved number of units to the proposed quantity for each planning area, including the remaining permitted quantity of dwelling units. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 f1=T IMPLEMENTATION 11 L Master Developer Constructed, Master Developer Constructed, Master HOA Maintained Master Developer Constructed, Sub HOA Maintained Master HOA Maintained Deeded to Guest Builder, Deeded to Guest Builder, Private Roads: Master Developer Responsible for Curb to Curb Street Improvements, Master HOA Maintained Public Roads: Master Developer Responsible for Curb to Curb Street Improvements, City of Temecula Maintained Master Developer Road Frontage Improvements, Deeded to the City of Temecula for Maintenance Master Developer Constructed Pedestrian Corridor Improvements, Master HOA Maintained Master Developer Park Improvements, Deeded to the City of Temecula for Maintenance Master Developer Park Improvements, Easement Granted to the City of Temecula for Maintenance Master Developer Park Improvements on Land Owned and Maintained by the City of Temecula Master Developer Park Improvements, Master HOA Maintained Master Developer Recreation Center, Master HOA Maintained Guest Builder Constructed, Sub HOA Maintained Map November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANE 11 IMPLEMENTATION 11.6 Lot Reconfiguration or Consolidation Lots within the Altair Specific Plan area may be consolidated, subdivided or otherwise adjusted as allowed by the Subdivision Ordinance of the City of Temecula and other applicable codes. Such adjustments do not require an amendment this Specific Plan, as long as the resultant lot(s) comply with the intent and guidelines of this Specific Plan. All lots shall meet the minimum lot dimensions outlined in Section 10, Development Standards. This Specific Plan does not limit construction of buildings over lot lines of contiguous Tots under the same ownership. 11.7 Financing Strategies Funding for the construction of the infrastructure and facilities at Altair may be provided by a variety of potential sources, such as Developer Financing; Development Impact Fees (DIF); Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fees (TUMF); Federal, State or Local Grant Funding; or revenue from any Community Facilities District, Assessment District, Infrastructure Financing District, Gasoline Taxes, or the General Fund. In several instances including but not limited to the construction of the Western Bypass Corridor and Bridge, the sewer facilities, parks, etc., the developer shall utilize fee credits and/or reimbursements from the various agencies, including the City of Temecula, to directly off -set the costs expended by the developer. Some of these credits and reimbursements are outlined in the Development Agreement described below. The Master Developer and the City of Temecula will enter into a Development Agreement for Altair Specific Plan and Related Entitlements to enable adequate and timely funding of the infrastructure necessary to Altair's success. The Agreement will outline public and private improvement cost responsibilities, project related costs, credits and/or reimbursements and corresponding agencies. The Development Agreement lays out the timing of infrastructure improvements relative to project phasing. A Community Finance District (CFD) will be formed which will include special taxes to fund public infrastructure related to the project as well as the projected annual deficit for the cost of City Services. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 11-9 IMPLEMENTATION 11 11.8 Services Deficit Fiscal Impact Payments A. The City and owners estimate that the increased costs to the City of providing public safety and other municipal services to the area resulting from the General Plan Amendment, adoption of the Specific Plan, and change of zone for the Project will substantially exceed the municipal revenue from the Project ("City Services Deficit"). The City has received a Fiscal Impact Analysis, dated as of September, 2017 ("FIA"), documenting the City Services Deficit. The owners of the property within the Project, and their successors of interest, shall pay the City the sum of Two Hundred Thirty -Seven Dollars (S237.00) per residential dwelling unit within the Project area that is an Occupied Residential Property, each year as mitigation for the City Services Deficit, with an increase in such payment each fiscal year in an amount of five and six -tenths percent (5.6%) of the previous year's payment. B. The owners and their successors to the property within the Project may fulfill this obligation through the levy of an annual special tax of a community facilities district established by the City pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982, Government Code Section 53311, et seq.; provided, however, the obligation of each owner and their successors to pay the City Services Deficit payment under this obligation remains an obligation of the owners and their successors regardless of the financing mechanism used to pay it and regardless of whether there is a financing mechanism to pay it. 11.9 Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee A. In order to facilitate local wildlife conservation efforts, each Occupied Residential Property in the Specific Plan area shall pay Forty -Three Dollars ($43.00) per dwelling unit per year, to be increased each fiscal year by a percentage equal to two percent (2%) of the prior year's payment, to fund the Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee for Wildlife Conservation Costs. B. For the purposes of this provision, "Occupied Residential Property" means an assessor's parcel in the Specific Plan area for which a building permit for residential construction and a certificate of occupancy or final inspection has been issued. C. For the purposes of this provision "Wildlife Conservation Costs" means: (1) The initial six million dollars ($6,000,000.00) of the Initial Wildlife Conservation Fee and the Wildlife Conservation Fee shall be held in an account by the City for the purposes of acquiring one hundred (100) acres of conservation lands within the Special Linkage Area south of the Property and/or in Riverside County and within ten (10) miles of the Property. RCA shall acquire such land and City shall reimburse RCA for the cost of its land purchase and associated closing costs, with interest, from the initial $6,000,000.00. The land acquisitions shall be in accordance with the RCA's equivalency standards for the acquisition of land submitted to the City prior to the City Council's approval of the Project. Once this objective has been satisfied, then the CITY shall use such funding November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN(.1 11 IMPLEMENTATION thereafter for one or more of the conservation activities described below in subsections (2), (3) or (4). The interest rate for the reimbursement shall be simple annual interest at the rate equal to the average interest rate paid on deposits in the State Local Agency Investment Fund, Government Code Sections 16429.1 to 16429.4, during the year prior to July 1 of each year. (2) An engineering feasibility study to be prepared by the CITY in conjunction with the RCA within the Interstate 15 freeway Special Linkage Area south of the Property whose purpose is to evaluate locations and initiate engineering for a wildlife overcrossing or undercrossing across the Interstate 15 freeway in order to allow wildlife (including mountain lion) to safely travel between the Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve and the Palomar Mountain regions; and/or (3) Reimbursement to the RCA of its costs, with interest, for the acquisition of lands within the Special Linkage Area south of the Project for conservation (the interest rate for the reimbursement shall be simple annual interest at the rate equal to the average interest rate paid on deposits in the State Local Agency Investment Fund, Government Code Sections 16429.1 to 16429.4, during the year prior to July 1 of each year); and/or (4) Other wildlife conservation efforts, (1) within Riverside County; and (ii) within ten (10) miles of the Project Site undertaken by the City or RCA. D. The owners and their successors to the property within the Project may fulfill this obligation through the levy of an annual special tax of a community facilities district established by the City pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982, Government Code Section 53311, et seq.; provided, however, the obligation of each owner and their successors to pay the Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee payment under this obligation remains an obligation of the owners and their successors regardless of the financing mechanism used to pay it and regardless of whether there is a financing mechanism to pay it. 11.10 Severability If any section, subsection, sentence, clause phrase or portion of this specific plan, or any future amendments or additions hereto, is for any reason held to be invalid or unconstitutional by the decision of any court of competent jurisdiction, such decision shall not affect the validity of the remaining portions of this specific plan, or any future amendments or additions hereto. The City hereby declares that it would have adopted these requirements and each sentence, subsection, clause, phrase or porton or any future amendments or additions thereto, irrespective of the fact that any one or more sections, subsections, clauses, phrases, portions or any future amendments or additions thereto may be declared invalid or unconstitutional. r>ri SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 APPENDIX Altair Appendix -Plant Lists (Refer to various Specific Plan Sections for Design Intent Descriptions of each area) NOTE: Plant species identified in Table 6-2 of the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) shall not be used in areas adjacent to the MSHCP corridor and/or native open space. Natural (Permanent) Slopes: Scientific Name Common Name Trees - Shade QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS CHRYSOLEPIS QUERCUS ENGLEMANN1I QUERCUS LOBATA Trees - Accent CEANOTHUS ARBOREUS CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS CERCOCARPUS BETULO/DES FRAXINUS DIPETALA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOL!A PRUNUS ILICIFOLIA 1LICIFOL!A QUERCUS BERBERIDIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS ARCHTOSTAPHYLOS GLAUCA ARTEMISIA CAL1FORNICA BACCHARIS PILULARIS CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOL1US CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS ALBA' ENCELIA FARINOSA EPILOBIUM CANUM SSP. CANUM KECKIELLA ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA MIMUL US AURANTIACUS OPUNTIA LITTORALIS PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAMNUS CAL1FORNICA =VI SPECIFIC PLAN COAST LIVE OAK CANYON OAK ENGELMANN OAK VALLEY OAK ISLAND CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD MOUNTAIN MA-IOGONY CALIFORNIA ASH TOYON HOLLYLEAF CHERRY SCRUB OAK LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE NARROWLEAF MILKWEED BIGBERRY MANZANITA CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH COYOTE BRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD BRITTLE BUSH CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON MONKEY -FLOWER COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON COFFEEBERRY November 2017 Water SoCaI Use Native L X L X L X L X L X L X VL X L X L X VL X L X L X L X VL X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X A-1 A-2 Altair Appendix -Plant Lists (Refer to various Specific Plan Sections for Design Intent Descriptions of each area) NOTE: Plant species identified in Table 6-2 of the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Pion (MSHCP) shall not be used in areas adjacent to the MSHCP corridor and/or native open space. Natural (Permanent) Slopes: Scientific Name Trees - Shade QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS CHRYSOLEPIS QUERCUS ENGLEMANNII QUERCUS LOBATA Trees - Accent CEANOTHUS ARBOREUS CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS CERCOCARPUS BETULOIDES FRAXINUS DIPETALA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA PRUNUS ILICIFOLIA ILICIFOLIA QUERCUS B£RBERIDIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS ARCHTOSTAPHYLOS GLAUCA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHARIS PILULARIS CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOLIUS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS CERCIS OCCIDENTAL'S ALBA' ENCELIA FARINOSA EPILOBIUM CANUM SSP. CANUM KECKIELLA ANTIRH/NNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA MIMULUS AURANTIACUS OPUNTIA LITTORALIS PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA Common Name COAST LIVE OAK CANYON OAK ENGELMANN OAK VALLEY OAK ISLAND CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD MOUNTAIN MAHOGONY CALIFORNIA ASH TOYON HOLLYLEAF CHERRY SCRUB OAK LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE NARROWLEAF MILKWEED B!GBERRY MANZANITA CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH COYOTE BRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD BRITTLE BUSH CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA Water SoCaI Use Native L L L L L L VL L L VL L L L VL L L L L L L L L L YELLOW PENSTEMMON L HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON L MONKEY -FLOWER L COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR L PENSTEMON L COFFEEBERRY L November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANI'I Temporary Slopes: Seed Mix AMBROSIA PSILOSTACHYA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA CAMISSONIOPSIS CHEIRANTHIFOLIA CLARKIA PURPUREA CORETHROGYNE FJLAGINIFOLIA DISTICHLIS SPICATA STRICTA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM ERIOPHYLLUM CONFERTIFLORUM ESCHSCHOLZIA CALIFORNICA GALIUM ANGUSTIFOLI UM ISOCOMA MENZIES!! LUPINUS BICOLOR SALVIA APIANA SALVIA MELLIFERA STIPA PULCHRA Seed Mix Supplemental Products CONWED 1000 WOOD FIBER ECOLOGY CONTROLS M-BINDER/TACK BIOSOL FORTE 7-2-1 ORGANIC FERTILIZER AM -120 MYCORRHIZAL INOCULUM TRI -C SOLUBLE HUMATE Pure Live Seed Lbs./Acre WESTERN RAGWEED CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH SUN CUP FOUR -SPOT CLARK!A CALIFORNIA -ASTER SALTGRASS BUCKWHEAT GOLDEN -YARROW CALIFORNIA POPPY NARROW -LEAVED BEDSTRAW GOLDENBUSH MINIATURE LUPINE WHITE SAGE BLACK SAGE PURPLE NEEDLEGRASS 0.50 1.00 0.20 0.20 0.10 1.00 2.00 0.70 1.50 0.50 0.50 2.00 0.50 1.00 3.00 Application Rate 2000 LBS/ACRE 200 LBS/ACRE 800 LBS/ACRE 60 LBS/ACRE 1 LBS/ACRE NOTE: THIS LIST 15 NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. NSPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 APPENDIX A-4 Hiking Trails, Bikeways Scientific Name Trees - Shade QUERCUS AGRIFOL!A QUERCUS CHRYSOLEPIS QUERCUS ENGLEMANNI! QUERCUS LOBATA Trees - Accent CEANOTHUS ARBOREUS CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS CERCOCARPUS BETULOIOES FRAXINUS DIPETALA HETEROMELES ARBUT!FOL IA PRUNUS ILICIFOLIA ILICIFOLIA QUERCUS BERBERIDIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS ARCHTOSTAPHYLOS GLAUCA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHAR!S PILULARIS CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOLI US CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS "ALBA' ENCELIA FARINOSA EPILOBIUM CANUM SSP. CANUM KECKIELLA ANTIRH!NNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOL!A MIMUL US AURANT/ACUS OPUNTIA LITTORAL'S PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA RHUS INTERG!FOL!A SALVIA APIANA SALVIA MELLIFERA XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Groundcovers AOENOSTEMA FASCICULATUM 'NICOLAS' ARTEMESIA CALIFORNICA 'CANYON GRAY' Common Name COAST LIVE OAK CANYON OAK ENGELMANN OAK VALLEY OAK ISLAND CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD MOUNTAIN MAHOGONY CALIFORNIA ASH TOYON HOLLYLEAF CHERRY SCRUB OAK LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMI SE NARROWLEAF MILKWEED BIGBERRY MANZANITA CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH COYOTE BRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD BRITTLE BUSH CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA YELLOW PENSTEMMON L HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON L MONKEY -FLOWER L COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON COFFEEBERRY LEMONADEBERRY WHITE SAGE BLACK SAGE MISSION MANZANITA Water SoCaI Use Native L X L X L X L X L X L X VL X L X L X VL X L X L X L X VL X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X X X X L X L X L X L X VL X L X L X VL X X PROSTRATE CHAMISE CANYON GRAY SAGEBRUSH November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANFJlIT- BACCHARIS PILULARIS 'PIGEON POINT' ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM 'DANA POINT' ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM Vines LONICERA SUBSPICATA VITIS CALIFORNICA Seed Mix AMBROSIA PSILOSTACHYA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA CAMISSONIOPSIS CHEIRANTHIFOLIA CLARKIA PURPUREA CORETHROGYNE F!LAGINIFOL!A DISTICHLIS SPICATA STRICTA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM ERIOPHYLLUM CONFERTIFLORUM ESCHSCHOLZIA CALIFORN!CA GALIUM ANGUSTIFOLIUM ISOCOMA MENZIES!! LUPINUS BICOLOR SALVIA APIANA SALVIA MELLIFERA STIPA PULCHRA Seed Mix Supplemental Products CONWED 1000 WOOD FIBER ECOLOGY CONTROLS M-BINDER/TACK BIOSOL FORTE 7-2-1 ORGANIC FERTILIZER AM -120 MYCORRHIZAL INOCULUM TRI -C SOLUBLE HUMATE DWARF COYOTE BUSH DANA POINT BUCKWHEAT BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT L VL L L L CHAPARRAL HONEYSUCKLE L CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE L Pure Live Seed Lbs./Acre 0.50 1.00 0.20 0.20 0.10 1.00 2.00 0.70 1.50 0.50 0.50 2.00 0.50 1.00 3.00 WESTERN RAGWEED CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH SUN CUP FOUR -SPOT CLARKIA CALIFORNIA -ASTER SALTGRASS BUCKWHEAT GOLDEN -YARROW CALIFORNIA POPPY NARROW -LEAVED BEDSTRAW GOLDENBUSH MINIATURE LUPINE WHITE SAGE BLACK SAGE PURPLE NEEDLEGRASS Application Rate 2000 LBS/ACRE 200 LBS/ACRE 800 LBS/ACRE 60 LBS/ACRE 1 LBS/ACRE NOTE: SEED MIX MAY BE OMITTED WHEN FULL PLANT COVERAGE IS OBTAINED THROUGH CONTAINER STOCK. NOTE: THIS LIST IS NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. AODITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED !F APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 A-5 Key Pedestrian Walkways Scientific Name Trees - Shade ACACIA STENOPHYLLA ALBIZIA JULIBR1SS/N ARBUTUS 'MARINA' CERCIDIUM 'DESERT MUSEUM' CHITALPA x TASHKENTENSIS GEIJERA PARVIFLORA LAURUS NOBILIS 'SARATOGA' OLEA EUROPAEA 'SWAN HILL' PINUS ELDAR/CA PISTACHIA CHINENS1S POPULUS FREMONT!! 'NEVADA' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS ENGLEMANNI! QUERCUS ILEX QUERCUS VIRGINIANA 'HERITAGE' RHUS LANCEA Trees - Accent ARBUTUS UNEDO CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS CHILOPS1S LINEAR'S 'WARREN JONES' CITRUS SPP. LAGERSTROEMIA INDICA HE TEROMEL ES ARBUTIFOLIA PRUNUS ILICIFOLIA 1LICIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ADENOSTOMA SPARSIFOLIUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPP_ ARISTIDA PURPUREA ARTEMISIA CAL!FORNICA BACCHARIS PILULARIS BACCHARIS SAROTHROIDES BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA BUDDLEIA MARRUBIIFOLIA Common Name SHOESTRING ACACIA SILK TREE MARINA ARBUTUS PALO VERDE CHITALPA AUSTRALIAN WILLOW SWEET BAY FRUITLESS OLIVE AFGHAN PINE CHINESE P1STACHE WESTERN COTTONWOOD COAST LIVE OAK ENGELMANN OAK HOLLY OAK SOUTHERN LIVE OAK AFRICAN SUMAC STRAWBERRY TREE WESTERN REDBUD W. JONES DESERT WILLOW ORGANGE, LEMON, LIME, ETC. CRAPE MYRTLE TOYON HOLLYLEAF CHERRY LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE RED SHANKS/RIBBONWOOD NARROWLEAF MILKWEED CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS MANZANITA PURPLE THREE AWN CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH COYOTE BRUSH DESERT BROOM DESERT MARIGOLD WOOLLY BUTTERFLY BUSH November 2017 Water SoCaI Use Native L M M L X L M L L L M M X L X L X L M L L L L M M L X VL X L X L X VL X VL X L X L L L X L X L X L X L X L L SPECIFIC PLANFJ BULBINE FRUTESCENS CALLIANDRA CALIFORN!CA CALLIANDRA ERIOPHYIA CALLISTEMON VIM. 'LITTLE JOHN' CEANOTHUS CRASSI FOL l US CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS CISTUS SPP. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM COREOPSIS AUR!CULATA 'NANA' COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. ELAEAGNUS PUNGENS ENCELIA FARINOSA ECHINOCACTUS GRUSONHI EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPH!LA HYGRO. 'BLUE BELLS' EUPHORBIA MILL! 'RED! -RED' FEIJOA SELLOW)ANA GALVESIA SPECIOSA GREVILLEA SPP. GAURA LINDHE!MERI HESPERALOE PARVIFLORA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA ILEX VOMITORIA KECKIELLA ANT!RHJNNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA LANTANA SPP. LAVANDULA SPP. LEUCOPHYL!UM FRUTESCENS LIGUSTRUM JAPONICUM 'TEXANUM' LOTUS SCOPARIUS MAHONIA NEVINII MIMUL US AURANTIACUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS MYRTUS COMMUNIS OPUNTIA LITTORALS OPUNTIA SANTA-RITA 'TUBAC' PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS PODOCARPUS MACROPHYLLUS 'MAKI' RHAPHIOLEPIS 'MAJESTIC BEAUTY' RHAPHIOLEPIS UMBELLATA 'MINOR' RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA RHUS !NTERGIFOLIA RHUS OVATA RIBES SPP. 7M SPECIFIC PLAN BULBINE BAJA DUSTER FAIRY DUSTER LITTLE JOHN BOTTLEBRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON SILVERBERRY BRITTLE BUSH GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH RED EUPHORBIA PINEAPPLE GUAVA ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON GREVILLEA GUARA RED/YELLOW YUCCA TOYON YAUPON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON LANTANA LAVENDER TEXAS RANGER JAPANESE PRIVET DEAR WEED NEVIN MAHONIA MONKEY -FLOWER DEER GRASS MYRTLE COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PURPLE PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON SHRUBBY YEW PINE MAJESTIC BEAUTY YEDDO HAWTHORN COFFEEBERRY LEMONADEBERRY SUGAR BUSH CURRENT November 2017 L L VL M L X L L X L L L L L L L X L L X L L M L X L M L L X L L X L X L L L M VL X L t X M X M L X L L X M M M L X i X L X M X APPENDIX A -t APPENDIX A-8 SALVIA APIANA SALVIA CHAMAEDROIDES SALVIA CLEVELAND!! SALVIA GREG!! SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SALVIA MELLIFERA SALVIA TRIDENT SANTOLINA SPP. SIMMONDSIA CHINENSIS TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE LA MINA' WESTRINGIA FRUTICOSA XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Groundcovers BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ELYMUS TRITICO!DES ENCELIA CAL!FORN!CA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRAL!SCAE SENECIO SERPENS Vines FICUS PUMILA MACFADYENA UNGUIS-CATI PARTHENOCISSUS TR!CUSPIDATA VITIS CALIFORNICA WHITE SAGE BLUE SAGE CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE PURPLE SAGE BLACK SAGE HYBRID SAGE LAVENDER COTTON JOJOBA GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA COAST ROSEMARY MISSION MANZANITA BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEANOTHUS DYMONDIA BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT BLUE LYME GRASS TRAILING ROSEMARY KLEINIA BLUE CHALKSTICKS CREEPING FIG CAT'S CLAW BOSTON IVY CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE VL X i X L L L L X L L VL X L i X L L X L L L L L X L X L X L X L L L M L M L X NOTE: THIS LIST IS NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN Drainage Draws, Bioswales, Retention/Detention/Water Quality Basins Scientific Name Trees - Shade PLATANUS ACERIFOLJA `BLOODGOOD`** PLATANUS ACERIFOLIA 'COLUMBIA'** PLATANUS RACEMOSA 'ROBERTS' POPULUS FREMONT!! 'NEVADA' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA SALIX LASIOLEPIS Common Name LONDON PLANE TREE LONDON PLANE TREE CALIFORNIA SYCAMORE WESTERN COTTONWOOD COAST LIVE OAK ARROYO WILLOW* (* WET AREAS ONLY) Water SoCaI Use Native M M M X M X L X H X ** Use near roads or hardscape areas only, otherwise use native California Sycamore. Trees - Accent SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs/ Grasses ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS ARTEMISIA DOUGLASIANA BACCHARIS SALICIFOLIA JUNCUS MEXICANUS JUNCUS PATENS JUNCUS X1 PHOI DES LEYMUS CONDENSATUS 'CANYON PRINCE' MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS RIBES SPP. ROSA CALIFORNICA RUBUS URSINUS VERBENA LASIOSTACHYS Seed Mix ACHILLEA M!LLEFOLIUM AGROSTIS PALLENS AMBROSIA PSILOSTACHYA ARTEMISIA DOUGLASIANA CLAYTONIA PERFOLIATA DESCHAMPSIA DANTHONJOIDES GRACILIS ELYMUS TRITICOIDES HORDEUM BRACHYANTHERUM JUNCUS BUFONIUS MIMULUS GUTTATUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS OENOTHERA EL4TA HOOKER!! SPECIFIC PLAN BLUE ELDERBERRY NARROWLEAF MILKWEED MUGWORT MULE FAT MEXICAN RUSH CALIFORNIA GRAY RUSH !RIS -LEAVED RUSH BLUE LYME GRASS DEER GRASS CURRENT CALIFORNIA ROSE CALIFORNIA BLACKBERRY WESTERN VERAIN L X L M M M M M M M M M M M X X X X X X X X X X X X Pure Live Seed Lbs./Acre COMMON YARROW SEASHORE BENT GRASS WESTERN RAGWEED CALIFORNIA MUGWORT MINER'S LETTUCE ANNUAL HAIR GRASS BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS MEADOW BARLEY TOAD RUSH COMMON MONKEYFLOWER DEERGRASS EVENING PRIMROSE November 2017 1.00 3.00 0.50 0.20 0.20 0.50 1.00 2.00 0.10 0.10 0.30 0.50 A-9 APPENDIX A-10 - PLANTAGO INSULARIS FESTUCA MICROSTACHYS TRIFOLIUM OBTUSIFLORUM Seed Mix Supplemental Products CONWED 1000 WOOD FIBER ECOLOGY CONTROLS M-BINDER/TACK BIOSOL FORTE 7-2-1 ORGANIC FERTILIZER AM -120 MYCORRHIZAL INOCULUM TRI -C SOLUBLE HUMATE DESERT PLANTAIN SMALL FESCUE CLAMMY CLOVER 5.00 5.00 3.00 Application Rate 2000 LBS/ACRE 200 LBS/ACRE 800 LBS/ACRE 60 LBS/ACRE 1 LBS/ACRE NOTE: SEED MIX MAY BE OMITTED WHEN FULL PLANT COVERAGE IS OBTAINED THROUGH CONTAINER STOCK. NOTE. TOPS OF SLOPES AND DRYER AREAS SHALL TRANSITION TO THE NATURAL SLOPES PLANT PALETTE. NOTE: THIS LIST I5 NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK Roundabouts Scientific Name Common Name Trees - Shade CERCIDIUM 'DESERT MUSEUM' QUERCUS AGR!FOL/A Shrubs AGAVE SPP ARISTIDA PURPUREA BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA BULBINE FRUTESCENS CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS C!STUS SPP. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM COREOPSIS AURICULATA 'NANA' COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ECHINOCACTUS GRUSONII EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPHILA HYGRO_ 'BLUE BELLS' ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM EUPHORBIA MILL! 'RED1-RED' GA L VESIA SPECIOSA HESPERALOE PARV!FLORA ILEX VOMITORIA LANTANA SPP. LAVANDULA SPP. LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' LOTUS SCOPARIUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS OPUNTIA LITTORALS OPUNTIA SANTA-RITA 'TUBAC' SALVIA CLEVELAND!! SALVIA GREGII SANTOLINA SPP. TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE LA MINA' JfllriSPECIFIC PLAN PALO VERDE COAST LIVE OAK CENTURY PLANT PURPLE THREE AWN DESERT MARIGOLD BULBINE CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON CALIFORNIA ENCELIA GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH BUCKWHEAT RED EUPHORBIA ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON RED/YELLOW YUCCA SACC YAUPON LANTANA LAVENDER BLUE L YME GRASS DEAR WEED DEER GRASS COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PURPLE PRICKLY PEAR CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE LAVENDER COTTON GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA November 2017 Water SoCaI Use Native L X L X L L X L L L L L L L L L X L L X L L X L L X L L L L L X VL X M X L X L L L L L L X APPENDIX APPENDIX Groundcovers BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRALISCAE SENECIO SERPENS DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEANOTHUS DYMONDIA CALIFORNIA ENCELIA TRAILING ROSEMARY KLEINIA BLUE CHALKSTICKS L L L L X L L L NOTE: THIS LIST IS NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANK Entry Statements Scientific Name Trees - Shade PLATANUS ACERIFOLIA 'BL OODGOOO' * * PLATANUS ACERIFOLIA 'COLUMBIA'** PLATANUS RACEMOSA 'ROBERTS' POPULUS FREMONT!! 'NEVADA' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA SALIX LASIOLEPIS ** Common Name LONDON PLANE TREE LONDON PLANE TREE CALIFORNIA SYCAMORE WESTERN COTTONWOOD COAST LIVE OAK ARROYO WILLOW* (* WET AREAS ONLY) Water SoCaI Use Native M M M M L H Use near roads or hardscape areas only, otherwise use native California Sycamore. Trees - Accent ARBUTUS UNEDO CERCIS OCCIDENTAL'S CHILOPSIS LINEAR'S 'WARREN JONES' HETEROMELES ARBUT!FOLIA PRUNUS ILICIFOLIA ILICIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ADENOSTOMA SPARS!FOLIUM AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPP. ARISTIDA PURPUREA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS SAROTHROIDES BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA BUDDLEIA MARRUBIIFOLIA BULBINE FRUTESCENS CALLIANDRA CALIFORNICA C4LL!ANDRA ERIOPHYIA CALLISTEMON VIM. 'LITTLE JOHN' CEANOTHUS CRASS!FOLIUS CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS CISTUS SPP. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM . =PISPECIFIC PLAN STRAWBERRY TREE WESTERN REDBUD W. JONES DESERT WILLOW TOYON HOLLYLEAF CHERRY LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE RED SHANKS/RIBBONWOOD CENTURY PLANT MANZANJTA CULTIVARS MANZAN'TA PURPLE THREE AWN CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DESERT BROOM DESERT MARIGOLD WOOLLY BUTTERFLY BUSH BULBINE BAJA DUSTER FAIRY DUSTER LITTLE JOHN BOTTLEBRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY November 2017 X X X X L L L L X VL X L X L X VL X VL X L L L X L X L X L L X L L L L VL M L X L L X L L APPENDIX A-13 A -t4 COREOPSIS AURICULATA 'NANA' COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. ELAEAGNUS PUNGENS ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ENCELIA FARINOSA ECHINOCACTUS GRUSONIf EPILOBI UM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPHILA HYGRO. 'BLUE BELLS' ERIOGONUM FASC!CULATUM EUPHORBIA MILL! 'RED! -RED' FEIJOA SELLOWIANA GALVESIA SPECIOSA GREVILLEA SPP. GAURA L!NDHEIMER! HESPERALOE PARVIFLORA HETEROMELES ARBUT1FOL!A ILEX VOMITORIA KECKIELLA ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA LANTANA SPP. LAVANDULA SPP. LEUCOPHYLIUM FRUTESCENS LIGUSTRUM JAPONICUM 'TEXANUM' LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE` LOTUS SCOPARI US MAHONIA NEVIN!! MIMULUS AURANTIACUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS MYRTUS COMMUNIS OPUNTIA LITTORAL'S OPUNTIA SANTA-RITA 'TUBAC' PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS PODOCARPUS GACILIOR RHAPHIOLEPIS 'MAJESTIC BEAUTY' RHAPHIOLEPIS UMBELLATA 'MINOR' RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA RHUS INTERGIFOL!A RHUS OVATA RIBES SPP. SALVIA APIANA SALVIA CHAMAEDROIDES SALVIA CLEVELANDII SALVIA GREGII SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON SILVERBERRY BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BRITTLE BUSH GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH BUCKWHEAT RED EUPHORBIA PINEAPPLE GUAVA ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON GREVILLEA GUARA RED/YELLOW YUCCA TOYON YAUPON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON LANTANA LAVENDER TEXAS RANGER JAPANESE PRIVET BLUE LYME GRASS DEAR WEED NEVIN MAHONIA MONKEY -FLOWER DEER GRASS MYRTLE COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PURPLE PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON FERN PINE (HEDGE FORM) MAJESTIC BEAUTY YEDDO HAWTHORN COFFEEBERRY LEMONADEBERRY SUGAR BUSH CURRENT WHITE SAGE BLUE SAGE CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE PURPLE SAGE November 2017 L L L L L X L X L X L L X L L X L M L X L M L L X L L X L X L L L M L X VL X L L X M X M t X L L X M M M L X L X L X M X VL X i X L t L SPECIFIC PLANrJ SALVIA MELLIFERA SALVIA TRIDENT SANTOLINA SPP. SIMMONDSIA CHINENSIS TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA L!LACINA 'DE LA MINA' WESTRINGIA FRUTICOSA XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Groundcovers BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRALISCAE SENECIO SERPENS Vines FICUS PUMILA MACFADYENA UNGUIS-CATI PARTHENOCISSUS TR1CUSP!DATA VITIS CALIFORNICA BLACK SAGE HYBRID SAGE LAVENDER COTTON JOJOBA GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA COAST ROSEMARY MISSION MANZANITA DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEANOTHUS DYMONDIA CALIFORNIA ENCELIA TRAILING ROSEMARY KL E1 NIA BLUE CHALKSTICKS CREEPING FIG CAT'S CLAW BOSTON IVY CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE L X L L VL X L L X L L X L L L L X L L L M L M L X NOTE: THIS LIST IS NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT, SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 A-15 APPENDIX Park and Recreation Areas Scientific Name Trees - Shade ACACIA STENOPHYLLA ALBIZIA JULIBRISSIN ARBUTUS 'MARINA' CERCIDIUM 'DESERT MUSEUM' CHITALPA x TASHKENTENSIS GEIJERA PARVIFLORA LAURUS NOBILIS 'SARATOGA' OLEA EUROPAEA 'SWAN HILL' PINUS ELDARICA PISTACHIA CHINENSIS PLATANUS ACERIFOLIA 'BLOODGOOD' * * PLATANUS ACERIFOLIA 'COLUMBIA'** PLATANUS RACEMOSA 'ROBERTS' POPULUS FREMONTII 'NEVADA' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS ENGLEMANNII QUERCUS ILEX QUERCUS VI RGI NIANA 'HERITAGE' RHUS LANC£A Common Name SHOESTRING ACACIA SILK TREE MARINA ARBUTUS PALO VERDE CHITALPA AUSTRALIAN WILLOW SWEET BAY FRUITLESS OLIVE AFGHAN PINE CHINESE PISTACHE LONDON PLANE TREE LONDON PLANE TREE CALIFORNIA SYCAMORE WESTERN COTTONWOOD COAST LIVE OAK ENGELMANN OAK HOLLY OAK SOUTHERN LIVE OAK AFRICAN SUMAC Water SoCaI Use Native L M M L X L M L L L M M M M X M X L X L X L M L ** Use near roads or hardscape areas only, otherwise use native California Sycamore. Trees - Accent ARBUTUS UNEDO CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS CHILOPSIS LINEARIS 'WARREN JONES' CITRUS SPP. HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA PRUNUS ILICIFOLIA ILICIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ADENOSTOMA SPARSIFOLIUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPP. ARISTIDA PURPUREA STRAWBERRY TREE L WESTERN REDBUD L W. JONES DESERT WILLOW L ORGANGE, LEMON, LIME, ETC. M TOYON L HOLLYLEAF CHERRY VL LAUREL SUMAC L BLUE ELDERBERRY L CHAMISE RED SHANKS/RIBBONWOOD NARROWLEAF MILKWEED CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS MANZANITA PURPLE THREE AWN November 2017 VL VL L L L L L SPECIFIC PLANK ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS SAROTHROIDES BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA BUDDLEIA MARRUBIIFOLIA BULBINE FRUTESCENS CALLIANDRA CALIFORNICA CALLIANDRA ERIOPHYIA CALLISTEMON VIM. 'LITTLE JOHN' CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOLI US CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS CISTUS SPP. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM COREOPSIS AURICULATA 'NANA' COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. EL4EAGNUS PUNGENS ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ENCELIA FARINOSA ECHINOCACTUS GRUSONII EPILORIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPHILA HYGRO. 'BLUE BELLS' ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM EUPHORBIA MILLI 'REDI-RED' FEIJOA SELLOWIANA GALVESIA SPECIOSA GREVILLEA SPP. GAURA LINDHEIMERI HESPERALOE PARVIFLORA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA ILEX VOMITORIA KECKIELLA ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELL4 CORDIFOLIA LANTANA SPP. LAVANDULA SPP. LEUCOPHYLIUM FRUTESCENS LIGUSTRUM JAPONICUM 'TEXANUM' LEYMUS COND. `CANYON PRINCE' LOTUS SCOPARIUS MAHONIA NEVINII MIMULUS AURANTIACUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS MYRTUS COMMUNIS OPUNTIA LITTORAL'S i SPECIFIC PLAN CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DESERT BROOM DESERT MARIGOLD WOOLLY BUTTERFLY BUSH BULBINE BAJA DUSTER FAIRY DUSTER LITTLE JOHN BOTTLEBRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON SILVERBERRY BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BRITTLE BUSH GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH BUCKWHEAT RED EUPHORBIA PINEAPPLE GUAVA ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON GREVILLEA GUARA RED/YELLOW YUCCA TOYON YAUPON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON LANTANA LAVENDER TEXAS RANGER JAPANESE PRIVET BLUE LYME GRASS DEAR WEED NEVIN MAHONIA MONKEY -FLOWER DEER GRASS MYRTLE COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR November 2017 L X L L X L L L L VL M L X L L X L L L L L L L X L X L X L L X L L X L M L X L M L L X L L X L X L L L M L X VL X L L X M X M L X APPENDIX A-17 APPENDIX OPUNTIA SANTA-RITA 'TUBAC' PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS PODOCARPUS GACILIOR RHAPHIOLEPIS 'MAJESTIC BEAUTY' RHAPHIOLEPIS UMBELLATA 'MINOR' RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA RHUS INTERGIFOLIA RHUS OVATA RIBES SPP. SALVIA AP!ANA SALVIA CHAMAEDROIDES SALVIA CLEVELAND!! SALVIA GREGI! SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SALVIA MELLIFERA SALVIA TRIDENT SANTOLINA SPP. SIMMONDSIA CHINENS!S TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE LA MINA' WESTRING!A FRUTICOSA XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Gro undcovers BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ENCEL!A CALIFORNICA ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRALISCAE SENECIO SERPENS Vines FICUS PUMILA MACFADYENA UNGUIS -CAT! PARTHENOC!SSUS TR!CUSPIDATA VITIS CALIFORNICA PURPLE PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON FERN PINE (HEDGE FORM) MAJESTIC BEAUTY YEDDO HAWTHORN COFFEEBERRY LEMONADEBERRY SUGAR BUSH CURRENT WHITE SAGE BLUE SAGE CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE PURPLE SAGE BLACK SAGE HYBRID SAGE LAVENDER COTTON JOJOBA GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA COAST ROSEMARY MISSION MANZANITA DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEANOTHUS DYMONDIA CALIFORNIA ENCELIA TRAILING ROSEMARY KLEINIA BLUE CHALKST!CKS CREEPING FIG CAT'S CLAW BOSTON !VY CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE L L X M M M L X L X L X M X VL X L X L L L L X L L VL X L L X L L X L L L L X L L L M L M L X NOTE: THIS LIST 15 NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN School Scientific Name Trees - Shade ACACIA STENOPHYLLA ALBIZIA JULIBRISSIN ARBUTUS 'MARINA' CERCIDIUM 'DESERT MUSEUM' CHITALPA x TASHKENTENSIS GEIJERA PARVIFLORA LAURUS NOBILIS 'SARATOGA' OLEA EUROPAEA 'SWAN HILL' PINUS ELDARICA PISTACHIA CHINENSIS PLATANUS ACERI FOL IA 'BL OODGOOD' * * PLATANUS ACERI FOL IA 'COLUMBIA' * * PLATANUS RACEMOSA 'ROBERTS' POPULUS FREMONT!! 'NEVADA' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS ENGLEMANNII QUERCUS ILEX QUERCUS VIRGINIANA 'HERITAGE' RHUS LANCEA Common Name SHOESTRING ACACIA SILK TREE MARINA ARBUTUS PALO VERDE CHITALPA AUSTRALIAN WILLOW SWEET BAY FRUITLESS OLIVE AFGHAN PINE CHINESE PISTACHE LONDON PLANE TREE LONDON PLANE TREE CALIFORNIA SYCAMORE WESTERN COTTONWOOD COAST LIVE OAK ENGELMANN OAK HOLLY OAK SOUTHERN LIVE OAK AFRICAN SUMAC Water SoCal Use Native L M M L X L M L L L M M M M X M X L X L X L M L ** Use near roads or hardscape areas only, otherwise use native California Sycamore. Trees - Accent ARBUTUS UNEDO CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS CHILOPSIS LINEARIS 'WARREN JONES' CITRUS SPP. HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA PRUNUS ILICIFOL/A ILICIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ADENOSTOMA SPARSIFOLIUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPP. ARISTIDA PURPUREA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA SPECIFIC PL/'N STRAWBERRY TREE WESTERN REDBUD W. JONES DESERT WILLOW ORGANGE, LEMON, LIME, ETC. TOYON HOLLYLEAF CHERRY LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE RED SHANKS/RIBBONWOOD NARROWLEAF MILKWEED CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS MANZANITA PURPLE THREE AWN CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH November 2017 L L L M L VL L L VL VL L L L L L L A-19 BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS SAROTHROIDES BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA BUDDLE!A MARRUBIIFOLIA BULBINE FRUTESCENS CALLIANDRA CALIFORNICA CALLIANDRA ERIOPHY!A CALLISTEMON VIM. 'LITTLE JOHN' CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOLIUS CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS CISTUS SPP. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM COREOPSIS AURICULATA 'NANA' COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. ELAEAGNUS PUNGENS ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ENCELIA FARINOSA ECHINOCACTUS GRUSONI! EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPHILA HYGRO. 'BLUE BELLS' ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM FEIJOA SELLOWIANA GALVESIA SPECIOSA GREVILLEA SPP. GAURA LINDHEIMERI HESPERALOE PARVIFLORA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA ILEX VOMITORIA KECKIELLA ANTIRH!NNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA LANTANA SPP. LAVANDULA SPP. LEUCOPHYL!UM FRUTESCENS LIGUSTRUM JAPONICUM 'TEXANUM' LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' LOTUS SCOPARIUS MAHONIA NEVINJI MIMUL US AURANTIACUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS MYRTUS COMMUNIS OPUNTIA LITTORALIS OPUNTIA SANTA-RITA `TUBAL' PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DESERT BROOM DESERT MARIGOLD WOOLLY BUTTERFLY BUSH BULBINE BAJA DUSTER FAIRY DUSTER LITTLE JOHN BOTTL EBRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON SILVERB£RRY BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BRITTLE BUSH GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH BUCKWHEAT PINEAPPLE GUAVA ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON GREVILLEA GUARA RED/YELLOW YUCCA TOYON YAUPON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON LANTANA LA VENDER TEXAS RANGER JAPANESE PRIVET BLUE LYME GRASS DEAR WEED NEVIN MAHONIA MONKEY -FLOWER DEER GRASS MYRTLE COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PURPLE PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON L L X L L L L VL M L X L L X L L L L L L L X L X L X L L X i L X M i X L M L L X L L X L X L L L M L X VL X L L X M X M L X L L X November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANT] PODOCARPUS GACILIOR RHAPHIOLEPIS 'MAJESTIC BEAUTY' RHAPHIOLEPIS UMBELL4TA 'MINOR' RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA RHUS INTERGIFOLIA RHUS OVATA RIBES SPP. SALVIA A PIA NA SALVIA CHAMAEDROIDES SALVIA CLEVELAND!, SALVIA GREGII SALVIA LEUCOPHYLIA SALVIA MELLIFERA SALVIA TRIDENT SANTOLINA SPP. SIMMONDSIA CHINENSIS TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE L4 MINA' WESTRINGIA FRUTICOSA XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Groundcovers BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRALISCAE SENECIO SERPENS Vines FICUS PUMILA MACFADYENA UNGUIS -CA TI PARTHENOCISSUS TRICUSPIDATA VITIS CALIFORNICA FERN PINE (HEDGE FORM) MAJESTIC BEAUTY YEDDO HAWTHORN COFFEEBERRY LEMONADEBERRY SUGAR BUSH CURRENT WHITE SAGE BLUE SAGE CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE PURPLE SAGE BLACK SAGE HYBRID SAGE LAVENDER COTTON JOJOBA GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA COAST ROSEMARY MISSION MANZANITA DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEANOTHUS DYMONDIA CALIFORNIA ENCELIA TRAILING ROSEMARY KL £I NIA BLUE CHALKSTICKS CREEPING FIG CAT'S CLAW BOSTON IVY CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE M M M L X L X L X M X VL X L X L L L L X L L VL X L L X L L X L L L L X L L L M L M L X NOTE: THIS LIST IS NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. �— •:. SPEC! FIC PLAN November 2017 A-21 Villages A, B, C, D, E, F, G Scientific Name Trees - Shade ACACIA STENOPHYLLA ALBIZIA JULIBRISSIN ARBUTUS 'MARINA' CERCIDIUM 'DESERT MUSEUM' CHITALPA x TASHKENTENSIS GEIJERA PARVIFLORA LAURUS NOBILIS 'SARATOGA' OLEA EUROPAEA 'SWAN HILL' PINUS ELDARICA PISTACHIA CHINENSIS POPULUS FREMONT!! 'NEVADA' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS ENGLEMANNII QUERCUS ILEX QUERCUS VIRGINIANA 'HERITAGE' RHUS LANCEA Trees - Accent ARBUTUS UNEDO CERCIS OCCIDENTAL1S CHILOPSIS LINEARIS 'WARREN JONES' CITRUS SPP. HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA LAGERSTROEMIA INDICA MAGNOLIA G. 'LITTLE GEM' PRUNUS ILICIFOLIA ILICIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ADENOSTOMA SPARSIFOLIUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS AGAVE AMERICANA ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPP, ARISTIDA PURPUREA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHARIS PILULARIS BACCHARIS SAROTHROIDES A-22 Common Name SHOESTRING ACACIA SILK TREE MARINA ARBUTUS PALO VERDE CHITALPA AUSTRALIAN WILLOW SWEET BAY FRUITLESS OLIVE AFGHAN PINE CHINESE PISTACHE WESTERN COTTONWOOD COAST LIVE OAK ENGELMANN OAK HOLLY OAK SOUTHERN LIVE OAK AFRICAN SUMAC STRAWBERRY TREE WESTERN REDBUD W. JONES DESERT WILLOW ORGANGE, LEMON, LIME, ETC. TOYON CRAPE MYRTLE LITTLE GEM MANGOLIA HOLLYLEAF CHERRY LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMI SE RED SHANKS/RIBBONWOOD NARROWLEAF MILKWEED CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS MANZANITA PURPLE THREE AWN CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH COYOTE BRUSH DESERT BROOM November 2017 Water SoCaI Use Native L M M L X L M L L L M M X L X L X L M L L L L M L X M M VL X L X L X VL X VL X L X L L L X L X L X L X L X SPECIFIC PLANrI BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA BUDDLEIA MARRUBIIFOLIA BULBINE FRUTESCENS CALLIANDRA CALIFORNICA CALLIANDRA ER/OPHYIA CALL!STEMON VIM. 'LITTLE JOHN' CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOLIUS CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS CISTUS SPP. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM COREOPSIS AUR!CULATA 'NANA' COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. DODONAEA VISCOSA ELAEAGNUS PUNGENS ENCELIA FAR!NOSA ECHINOCACTUS GRUSONI! EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPHILA HYGRO. 'BLUE BELLS' EUPHORBIA MILII 'REDI-RED' FEIJOA SELLOWIANA GALVESIA SPECIOSA GREVILL£A SPP. GAURA LINDHEIMERI HESPERALOE PARVIFLORA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA ILEX VOMITORIA KECKIELLA ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA LANTANA SPP. LAVANDULA SPP. LEUCOPHYLIUM FRUTESCENS LIGUSTRUM JAPONICUM 'TEXANUM' LOTUS SCOPARI US MAHONIA NEVIN!1 MIMULUS AURANTIACUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS MYRTUS COMMUNIS OPUNTIA LITTORALIS OPUNTIA SANTA-RITA 'TUBAC' PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS PODOCARPUS MACROPHVLLUS 'MAKI' RHAPHIOLEPIS 'MAJESTIC BEAUTY' RHAPHIOLEPIS UMBELLATA 'MINOR' RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA • fr:fi SPECIFIC PL A% DESERT MARIGOLD WOOLLY BUTTERFLY BUSH BULBINE BAJA DUSTER FAIRY DUSTER LITTLE JOHN BOTTLEBRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON HOPSEED BUSH S!L VERBERRY BRITTLE BUSH GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH RED EUPHORBIA PINEAPPLE GUAVA ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON GREVI L L EA GUARA RED/YELLOW YUCCA TO VON YAUPON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON LANTANA LAVENDER TEXAS RANGER JAPANESE PRIVET DEAR WEED NEVIN MAHONIA MONKEY -FLOWER DEER GRASS MYRTL E COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PURPLE PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON SHRUBBY YEW PINE MAJESTIC BEAUTY YEDDO HAWTHORN COFFEEBERRY November 2017 L L L L VL M L X L L X L L L L L L L L X L L X L L M L X L M L L X L L X L X L L L M VL X L L X M X M L X L L X M M M L X APPENDIX A-23 A-24 RHUS INTERGIFOLIA RHUS OVATA RIBES SPP. SALVIA APIANA SALVIA CHAMAEDROIDES SALVIA CLEVELAND!! SALVIA GREGII SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SALVIA MELLIFERA SALVIA TRIDENT SANTOL!NA SPP. SIMMONDSIA CHINENSIS TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA LILACINA 'DELA MINA' WESTRINGIA FRUTICOSA XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Groundcovers BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ELYMUS TRIT!COIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRALISCAE SENECIO SERPENS Vines FICUS PUMILA MACFADYENA UNGUIS -CA TI PARTHENOCISSUS TRICUSPIDATA VITIS CALIFORNICA LEMONADEBERRY SUGAR BUSH CURRENT WHITE SAGE BLUE SAGE CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE PURPLE SAGE BLACK SAGE HYBRID SAGE LAVENDER COTTON JOJOBA GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA COAST ROSEMARY MISSION MANZANITA BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEA NO THUS DYMONDIA BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT BLUE LYME GRASS TRAILING ROSEMARY KLEINIA BLUE CHALKSTICKS CREEPING FIG CAT'S CLAW BOSTON IVY CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE L X L X M X VL X L X L L L L X L L VL X L L X L L X L L L L L X L X L X L X L L L M L M L X NOTE: THIS LIST IS NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN Civic/ Community Scientific Name Trees - Shade ACACIA STENOPHYLLA ALBIZIA JULIBRISSIN ARBUTUS 'MARINA' CERCID!UM 'DESERT MUSEUM' CHITALPA x TASHKENTENSIS GEIJERA PARV!FLORA LAURUS NOBILIS 'SARATOGA' OLEA EUROPAEA 'SWAN HILL' PINUS ELDARICA P!STACH!A CHINENS!S POPULUS FREMONT!! 'NEVADA' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS ENGLEMANN!I QUERCUS ILEX QUERCUS VIRGINIANA 'HERITAGE' RHUS LANCEA Trees - Accent ARBUTUS UNEDO CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS CHILOPSIS LINEARIS 'WARREN JONES' CITRUS SPP. HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA MAGNOLIA G. 'LITTLE GEM' PRUNUS ILICIFOLIA ILICIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAUR!NA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCJCULATUM ADENOSTOMA SPARSI FOL l UM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS AGAVE AMERICANA ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPP. ARISTIDA PURPUREA ARTEMISIA CAL!FORNICA BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS SAROTHROIDES BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA =1,1SPECIFIC PLN Common Name SHOESTRING ACACIA SILK TREE MARINA ARBUTUS PALO VERDE CHITALPA AUSTRALIAN WILLOW SWEET BAY FRUITLESS OLIVE AFGHAN PINE CHINESE PISTACHE WESTERN COTTONWOOD COAST LIVE OAK ENGELMANN OAK HOLLY OAK SOUTHERN LIVE OAK AFRICAN SUMAC STRAWBERRY TREE WESTERN REDBUD W. JONES DESERT WILLOW ORGANGE, LEMON, LIME, ETC. TO YON LITTLE GEM MANGOLIA HOLLYLEAF CHERRY LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE RED SHANKS/RIBBONWOOD NARROWLEAF MILKWEED CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS MANZANITA PURPLE THREE AWN CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DESERT BROOM DESERT MARIGOLD November 2017 Water SoCa) Use Native L M M L X L M L L L M M X L X L X L M L L L L M L X M VL X L X L X VL X VL X L X L L L X L X L X L L X L A-2$ BUDDLEIA MARRUBIIFOLIA BULBINE FRUTESCENS CALLIANDRA CALIFORNICA CALLIANDRA ERIOPHY!A CALLISTEMON VIM. 'LITTLE JOHN' CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOLIUS CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS C!STUS SPP. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM COREOPSIS AURICULATA 'NANA' COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. DODONAEA VISCOSA ELAEAGNUS PUNGENS ELYMUS TRIT!COIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ENCELIA FARINOSA ECHINOCACTUS GRUSONII EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPHILA HYGRO. 'BLUE BELLS' ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM EUPHORBIA MILLI 'REDI-RED' FEIJOA SELLOWIANA GALVESIA SPECIOSA GREVILLEA SPP. GAURA LINDHEIMERI HESPERALOE PARVIFLORA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA ILEX VOMITORIA KECKIELLA ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA LANTANA SPP. LAVANDULA SPP. LEUCOPHYLIUM FRUTESCENS LIGUSTRUM JAPONICUM 'TEXANUM' LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' LOTUS SCOPARI US MAHONIA NEVIN!! MIMULUS AURANTIACUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS MYRTUS COMMUNIS OPUNTIA LITTORALIS OPUNTIA SANTA-RITA 'TUBAC' PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS PODOCARPUS GACILIOR A-26 WOOLLY BUTTERFLY BUSH BULBINE BAJA DUSTER FAIRY DUSTER LITTLE JOHN BO7TLEBRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON HOPSEED BUSH SILVERBERRY BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BRITTLE BUSH GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH BUCKWHEAT RED EUPHORBIA PINEAPPLE GUAVA ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON GREVILLEA GUARA RED/YELLOW YUCCA TOYON YAUPFIND ON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON LANTANA LAVENDER TEXAS RANGER JAPANESE PRIVET BLUE LYME GRASS DEAR WEED NEVIN MAHONIA MONKEY -FLOWER DEER GRASS MYRTLE COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PURPLE PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON FERN PINE (HEDGE FORM) November 2017 L L L VL M L X L L X L L L L L L L L X L X i X L L X L L X L M L X L M L L X L L X L X L L L M L X VL X L L X M X M L X L L X M d SPECIFIC PLAN II PODOCARPUS MACROPHYLLUS 'MAKI' RHAPHIOLEPIS 'MAJESTIC BEAUTY' RHAPHIOLEPIS UMBELLATA 'MINOR' RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA RHUS !NTERGIFOLIA RHUS OVATA RI BES SPP. SALVIA APIANA SALVIA CHAMAEDROIDES SALVIA CLEVELANDII SALVIA GREG!, SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SALVIA MELLIFERA SALVIA TRIDENT SANTOLINA SPP. SIMMONDSIA CHINENSIS TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE LA MINA' WESTRINGIA FRUTICOSA XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Groundcovers BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRALISCAE SENECIO SERPENS Vines FICUS PUMILA MACFADYENA UNGUIS-CATI PARTHENOC1SSUS TRICUSPIDATA VITIS CALIFORNICA SHRUBBY YEW PINE MAJESTIC BEAUTY YEDDO HAWTHORN COFFEEBERRY LEMONADEBERRY SUGAR BUSH CURRENT WHITE SAGE BLUE SAGE CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE PURPLE SAGE BLACK SAGE HYBRID SAGE LAVENDER COTTON JOJOBA GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA COAST ROSEMARY MISSION MANZANITA BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEANOTHUS DYMONDIA BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT BLUE LYME GRASS TRAILING ROSEMARY KLEINIA BLUE CHALKSTICKS CREEPING FIG CAT'S CLAW BOSTON IVY CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE M M M L X L X L X M X VL X L X L L L L X L L VL X L L X L L X L L L L L X L X L X L X L L L M L M L X NOTE: THIS LIST 15 NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. 17162M r _ -- - - SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 A-27 APPENDIX Street Types: Western Bypass Corridor 1 and 2 Scientific Name Trees - Shade PLATANUS ACERI FOL 1A 'BLOODGOOD' * * PLATANUS ACERI FOLIA 'COLUMBIA' * * PLATANUS RACEMOSA 'ROBERTS' POPULUS FREMONT!' 'NEVADA' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS CHRYSOLEPIS QUERCUS ENGLEMANNII QUERCUS LOBATA Common Name LONDON PLANE TREE LONDON PLANE TREE CALIFORNIA SYCAMORE WESTERN COTTONWOOD COAST LIVE OAK CANYON OAK ENGELMANN OAK VALLEY OAK Water SoCaI Use Native M M M X M X L X L X L X L X ** Use near roads or hardscape areas only, otherwise use native California Sycamore. Trees - Accent CEANOTHUS ARBOREUS CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS CERCOCARPUS BETULOIDES FRAXINUS DIPETALA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA PRUNUS !LICIFOLIA IL!C!FOLIA QUERCUS BERBERIDIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ADENOSTOMA SPARSIFOLIUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPP. ARISTIDA PURPUREA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHARIS SAROTHROIDES BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOLIUS CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS DASYLIRION SPP. ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ENCELIA FARINOSA ISLAND CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD MOUNTAIN MAHOGONY CALIFORNIA ASH TOYON HOLLYLEAF CHERRY SCRUB OAK LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE RED SHANKS/RIBBONWOOD NARROWLEAF MILKWEED CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS MANZANI TA PURPLE THREE AWN CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH DESERT BROOM DESERT MARIGOLD HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS DESERT SPOON BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BRITTLE BUSH L X L X VL X L X L X VL X L X L X L X VL X VL X L X L L L X L X L X L X L 1. X L L X L L X L X L X November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN.; EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM GALVESIA SPECIOSA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA KECKIELLA ANTIRHlNNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' LOTUS SCOPARIUS MIMULUS AURANTIACUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS OPUNTIA LITTORAL'S PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA RHUS INTERGIFOUA RHUS OVATA RIBES SPP. SALVIA APIANA SALVIA CHAMAEDROIDES SALVIA CLEVELAND!' SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SAL VIA MELLIFERA SALVIA TRIDENT SIMMONDS!A CHINENSIS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE LA MINA' XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Groundcovers BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. BACCHARIS PILULARIS ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM Vines VITIS CALIFORNICA CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BUCKWHEAT ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON TOYON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON BLUE LYME GRASS DEAR WEED MONKEY -FLOWER DEER GRASS COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON COFFEEBERRY LEMONADEBERRY SUGAR BUSH CURRENT WHITE SAGE BLUE SAGE CLEVELAND SAGE PURPLE SAGE BLACK SAGE HYBRID SAGE JOJOBA CEDROS !SLAND VERBENA MISSION MANZANITA DWARF COYOTE BRUSH COYOTE BRUSH BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE L X L X L X L X L X L X L X VL X L X M X L X L X L X L X L X M X VL X L X L L L X L VL X L X L X L L X L X L X L X L X NOTE: THIS LIST IS NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED 8Y THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 APPENDIX A-29 Street Types: B Street South and C Street Scientific Name Trees - Shade QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS ENGLEMANNII Trees - Accent CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA PRUNUS ILICIFOLIA 1LICIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ADENOSTOMA SPARSIFOLIUM AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPP. ARISTIDA PURPUREA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHARIS SAROTHROIDES BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOLIUS CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS DASYLIRION SPP. ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ENCELIA FARINOSA EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM GALVESIA SPECIOSA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA KECKIELLA ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' LOTUS SCOPARIUS MIMULUS AURANTIACUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS OPUNTIA LITTORAL'S PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA A-30 Common Name COAST LIVE OAK ENGELMANN OAK WESTERN REDBUD TOYON HOL L YL EAF CHERRY LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE RED SHANKS/RIBBONWOOD CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS MANZANITA PURPLE THREE AWN CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH DESERT BROOM DESERT MARIGOLD HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS DESERT SPOON BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BRITTLE BUSH CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BUCKWHEAT ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON TO YON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON BLUE LYME GRASS DEAR WEED MONKEY -FLOWER DEER GRASS COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON COFFEEBERRY November 2017 Water SoCaI Use Native L X L X L L X VL X L X L X VL X VL X L L L X L X L X L X L L X L L X L L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X VL X L X M X L X L X L X SPECIFIC PLANr1 RHUS INTERGIFOLIA RHUS OVATA RIBES SPP. SALVIA APIANA SALVIA CHAMAEOROIDES SALVIA CLEVELANDII SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SALVIA MELLIFERA SALVIA TRIDENT SIMMONDSIA CH!NENSIS VERBENA LILAC!NA 'DE LA MINA' XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Groundcovers BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. BACCHARIS PILULARIS ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM Vines VMS CALIFORNICA LEMONADEBERRY SUGAR BUSH CURRENT WHITE SAGE BLUE SAGE CLEVELAND SAGE PURPLE SAGE BLACK SAGE HYBRID SAGE JOJOBA CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA MISSION MANZANITA DWARF COYOTE BRUSH COYOTE BRUSH BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE L X L X M X VL X L X L L L X L VL X L X L X L c X L X L X L X L X NOTE: THIS LIST 1S NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. ---411111W-1111111 �_-•-aria SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 APPENDIX Street Type: Coromell Trail — Split Lanes, Separate Trail, no Parking Scientific Name Trees - Shade PLATANUS ACERIFOL!A 'BLOODGOOD`** PLATANUS ACER!FOL IA 'COLUMBIA'** PLATANUS RACEMOSA 'ROBERTS' POPULUS FREMONT!! 'NEVADA' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS CHRYSOLEPIS QUERCUS ENGLEMANN!I QUERCUS LOBATA Common Name LONDON PLANE TREE LONDON PLANE TREE CALIFORNIA SYCAMORE WESTERN COTTONWOOD COAST LIVE OAK CANYON OAK ENGELMANN OAK VALLEY OAK Water SoCaI Use Native M M M X M X L X L X L X L X ** Use near roads or hardscape areas only, otherwise use native California Sycamore. Trees - Accent CEANOTHUS ARBOREUS CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS CERCOCARPUS BETULOIDES FRAXINUS DIPETALA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA PRUNUS ILICIFOL!A IL!CIFOLIA QUERCUS BERBERIDIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ADENOSTOMA SPARSIFOLIUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPP. ARISTIDA PURPUREA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHARIS SAROTHROIDES BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA CEANOTHUS CRASS!FOLIUS CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS DASYLIRION SPP. ELYMUS TRITICO!DES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ENCELIA FARINOSA A-32 ISLAND CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD MOUNTAIN MAHOGONY CALIFORNIA ASH TOYON HOLLYLEAF CHERRY SCRUB OAK LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE RED SHANKS/RIBBONWOOD NARROWLEAF MILKWEED CENTURY PLANT MANZANI TA CULTIVARS MANZANITA PURPLE THREE AWN CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH DESERT BROOM DESERT MARIGOLD HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS DESERT SPOON BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BRITTLE BUSH November 2017 L X L X VL X L X L X VL X L X L X L X VL X VL X L X L L L X L X L X L X L L X L L X L L X L X L X SPECIFIC PLANFJ EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM GALVES)A SPECIOSA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA KECKIELLA ANT!RHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' LOTUS SCOPARI US MIMULUS AURANTIACUS MUHLENBERGIA RJGENS OPUNTIA L!TTORALIS PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA RHUS INTERGIFOLIA RHUS OVATA RIBES SPP. SALVIA APIANA SALVIA CHAMAEDROIDES SALVIA CLEVELAND!! SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SALVIA MELLIFERA SALVIA TRIDENT SIMMONDSIA CHINENSIS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE LA MINA' XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Groundcovers BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. BACCHARIS PILULARIS ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ERIOGONUM FASC!CULATUM Vines VOTIS CAL!FORNJCA CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BUCKWHEAT ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON TOYON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON BLUE LYME GRASS DEAR WEED MONKEY -FLOWER DEER GRASS COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON COFFEEBERRY LEMONADEBERRY SUGAR BUSH CURRENT WHITE SAGE BLUE SAGE CLEVELAND SAGE PURPLE SAGE BLACK SAGE HYBRID SAGE JOJOBA CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA MISSION MANZANITA DWARF COYOTE BRUSH COYOTE BRUSH BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE L X L X L X L X L X L X L X VL X L X M X L X L X L X L X L X M X VL X L X L L L X L VL X L X L X L L X L X L X L X L X APPENDIX NOTE: THIS LIST 15 NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 A-33 APPENDIX A-34 Street Type: Altair Vista - Landscaped Parkways with Parking one side and Altair Vista (Public) — Split Lanes with No Parking Scientific Name Trees - Shade ACACIA STENOPHYLLA CERCIDIUM 'DESERT MUSEUM' LAURUS NOBILIS 'SARATOGA' OLEA EUROPAEA'SWAN HILL' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS ILEX RHUS LANCEA Shrubs AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARISTIDA PURPUREA BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA BULBINE FRUTESCENS CALLIANDRA CALIFORNICA CALLIANDRA ERIOPHYIA CALLISTEMON VIM. 'LITTLE JOHN' CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CISTUS SPP. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM COREOPSIS AURICULATA 'NANA' COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ECHINOCACTUS GRUSONII EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPHILA HYGRO. 'BLUE BELLS' ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM EUPHORBIA MIL!! 'RED! -RED' GALVESIA SPECIOSA GREVILLEA SPP. GAURA LINDHEIMER! HESPERALOE PARVIFLORA ILEX VOMITORIA KECKIELLA ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA LANTANA SPP. LAVANDULA SPP. LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' Common Name SHOESTRING ACACIA PALO VERDE SWEET BAY FRUITLESS OLIVE COAST LIVE OAK HOLLY OAK AFRICAN SUMAC CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS PURPLE THREE AWN DESERT MARIGOLD BULBINE BAJA DUSTER FAIRY DUSTER LITTLE JOHN BOTTLEBRUSH CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON CALIFORNIA ENCELIA GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH BUCKWHEAT RED EUPHORBIA ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON L GREVILLEA L GUARA M RED/YELLOW YUCCA L YAUPON L YELLOW PENSTEMMON L HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON L LANTANA L LAVENDER L BLUE LYME GRASS L Water SoCaI Use Native L L X L L L X L L L L L X L L L VL M L L L L L L L X L L X L L X L X X X X November 2017 SPECIFIC PLAN MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS MYRTUS COMMUNIS PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAPHIOLEPIS UMBELLATA 'MINOR' SALVIA CLEVELANDII SALVIA GREG!! SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SALVIA TRIDENT SANTOLINA SPP. SIMMONDSIA CHINENS!S TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE LA MINA' Groundcovers BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRALISCAE SENECIO SERPENS DEER GRASS MYRTLE PENSTEMON YEDDO HAWTHORN CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE PURPLE SAGE HYBRID SAGE LAVENDER COTTON JOJOBA GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEANOTHUS DYMONDIA BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT BLUE LYME GRASS TRAILING ROSEMARY KLEINIA BLUE CHALKSTICKS M X M L X M L L L L L VL X L L X L L L L L X L X L X L X L L L NOTE: THIS LIST IS NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 APPENDIX A-35 APPENDIX A-36 Street Type: Altair Vista and A Street - Urban Parkways with Parking one side Scientific Name Trees - Shade ACACIA STENOPHYLLA CERCIDIUM 'DESERT MUSEUM' LAURUS NOBILIS 'SARATOGA' OLEA EUROPAEA 'SWAN HILL' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS ILEX RHUS LANCEA Shrubs AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARISTIDA PURPUREA BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA BULBINE FRUTESCENS CALLIANDRA CALIFORNICA CALLIANDRA ERIOPHYIA CALLISTEMON VIM. 'LITTLE JOHN' CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CISTUS SPP. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM COREOPSIS AURICULATA 'NANA' COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ECHINOCACTUS GRUSONII EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPHILA HYGRO. 'BLUE BELLS' ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM EUPHORBIA MIL11 'RED! -RED' GALVESIA SPECIOSA GREVILLEA SPP. GAURA LINDHEIMERI HESPERA L OE PARV1 FL ORA ILEX VOMITORIA KECKIELLA ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOL!A LANTANA SPP. L4VANDULA SPP. LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS Common Name SHOESTRING ACACIA PALO VERDE SWEET BAY FRUITLESS OLIVE COAST LIVE OAK HOLLY OAK AFRICAN SUMAC CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS PURPLE THREE AWN DESERT MARIGOLD BULBINE BAJA DUSTER FAIRY DUSTER LITTLE JOHN BO TTLEBRUSH CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON CALIFORNIA ENCELIA GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH BUCKWHEAT RED EUPHORB!A ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON GREVILLEA GUARA M RED/YELLOW YUCCA L YAUPON L YELLOW PENSTEMMON L HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON L Water SoCaI Use Native L L X L L L X L L L L L X L L L VL M L L L L L L L X L L X L L X L L X L X X X x LANTANA LAVENDER BLUE LYME GRASS DEER GRASS November 2017 L L L M SPECIFIC PLANA MYRTUS COMMUNIS PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAPHIOLEP!S UMBELLATA 'MINOR' SALVIA CLEVELANDI! SALVIA GREGII SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SALVIA TRIDENT SANTOLINA SPP. SIMMONDSIA CHINENSIS TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE LA MINA' Groundcovers BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRAUSCAE SENECIO SERPENS NOTE: THIS LIST 1S NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. PLANNING DEPARTMENT. SPECIFIC PLAN MYRTL E PENSTEMON YEDDO HAWTHORN CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE PURPLE SAGE HYBRID SAGE LAVENDER COTTON JOJOBA GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEANOTHUS DYMONDIA BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT BLUE LYME GRASS TRAILING ROSEMARY KLEI N!A BLUE CHALKST!CKS M L X M L L L L L VL X L L X L L L L L L L L L L L APPENDIX ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE Nov.mb.r 2017 A-37 APPENDIX A-38 ,a Street Type: B Street North - Landscaped Parkways with No Parking Scientific Name Trees - Shade ACACIA STENOPHYLLA CERCIDIUM 'DESERT MUSEUM' LAURUS NOBILIS 'SARATOGA' OLEA EUROPAEA 'SWAN HILL' QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS ILEX RHUS L4NCEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPP. ARISTIDA PURPUREA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHARIS SAROTHROIDES BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA BULBINE FRUTESCENS CALLIANDRA CALIFORNICA CALLISTEMON VIM. 'LITTLE JOHN' CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CISTUS SPF. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM COREOPSIS AURICUL4TA 'NANA' COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. ENCELIA CALIFORNICA EPILOBIUM SPP. (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPHILA HYGRO. 'BLUE BELLS' ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM EUPHORBIA MLN 'RED! -RED' GALVESIA SPECIOSA GREVILLEA SPP. GAURA LINDHEIMERI HESPERALOE PARVIFLORA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA ILEX VOMITORIA KECKIELLA ANTI RHI NNOI DES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA Common Name SHOESTRING ACACIA PALO VERDE SWEET BAY FRUITLESS OLIVE COAST LIVE OAK HOLLY OAK AFRICAN SUMAC CHAMISE CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS MANZANITA PURPLE THREE AWN CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH DESERT BROOM DESERT MARIGOLD BULBINE BAJA DUSTER LITTLE JOHN BOTTLEBRUSH CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON CALIFORNIA ENCELIA CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH BUCKWHEAT RED EUPHORBIA ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON GREVILLEA GUARA RED/YELLOW YUCCA TDYON YAUPON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON November 2017 Water SoCaI Use Native L L X L L L X L L VL X L L L X L X L X L X L L L M L L L L L L L X L X L L X L L X L M L L X L L X L X SPECIFIC PLANRI LANTANA SPP. LAVANDULA SPP. LEUCOPHYL 1 UM FR U TES CENS LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' MIMULUS AURANTIACUS MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS MYRTUS COMMUNIS PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAPHIOLEPIS UMBEL LATA 'MINOR' RHAMNUS CAL!FORNICA RHUS INTERGIFOLIA RHUS OVATA SALVIA CLEVELAND!! SALVIA GREG!! SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SALVIA TRIDENT SANTOLINA SPP. SIMMONDSIA CHINENSIS TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE L4 MINA' WESTRINGIA FRUTICOSA XYLOCOCCUS BICOLOR Groundcovers BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRALISCAE SENECIO SERPENS Vines FICUS PUMILA MACFADYENA UNGUIS-CATI PARTHENOCISSUS TRICUSPIDATA VITPS CALIFORNICA LANTANA LAVENDER TEXAS RANGER BLUE LYME GRASS MONKEY -FLOWER DEER GRASS MYRTLE PENSTEMON YEDDO HAWTHORN COFFEEBERRY LEMONADEBERRY SUGAR BUSH CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE PURPLE SAGE HYBRID SAGE LAVENDER COTTON JOJOBA GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA COAST ROSEMARY MISSION MANZAN!TA BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEANOTHUS DYMONDIA BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT BLUE LYME GRASS TRAILING ROSEMARY KL EI NIA BLUE CHALKSTICKS CREEPING FIG CAT'S CLAW BOSTON IVY CALIFORNIA WILD GRAPE L L L L X L X M X M L X M L X L X L X L L L L L VL X L L X L L X L L L L L X L X L X L X L L L M L M L X NOTE: THIS LIST I5 NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED IF APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT. =0.11r • SPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 ND A -39 A-39 APPENDIX Street Type: Altair Vista - One-way Street with Parking one side Scientific Name Trees - Shade ACACIA STENOPHYLLA CERCIDIUM 'DESERT MUSEUM' LAURUS MOBIL IS 'SARATOGA' OLEA EUROPAEA 'SWAN HILL' QUERCUS AGR1 FOL IA QUERCUS ILEX RHUS LANCEA Shrubs AGAVE SPP. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS CULTIVARS ARISTIDA PURPUREA BAILEYA MULTIRADIATA BULBINE FRUTESCENS CALLIANDRA CALIFORNICA CALLIANDRA ERIOPHYIA CALLISTEMON VIM, 'LITTLE JOHN' CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS CISTUS SPP. CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM COREOPSISAUR!CULATA 'NANA' COREOPS1S LANCEOLATA DASYLIRION SPP. ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ECHINOCACTUS GRUSONI! EPILOBIUM SPP, (ZAUSCHNERIA) EREMOPHILA HYGRO. 'BLUE BELLS' ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM EUPHORBIA MILI! 'RED! -RED' GALVESIA SPECIOSA GREVILLEA SPP. GAURA LINDHEIMERI HESPERALOE PARVIFLORA ILEX VOMITORIA KECKIELLA ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORD!FOLIA LANTANA SPP. LAVANDULA SPP. LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' MUHLENBERGIA RIGENS A-40 Common Name SHOESTRING ACACIA PALO VERDE SWEET BAY FRUITLESS OLIVE COAST LIVE OAK HOLLY OAK AFRICAN SUMAC CENTURY PLANT MANZANITA CULTIVARS PURPLE THREE AWN DESERT MARIGOLD BULBINE BAJA DUSTER FAIRY DUSTER LITTLE JOHN BOTTLEBRUSH CEANOTHUS ROCKROSE BUSH MORNING GLORY DWARF COREOPSIS COREOPSIS DESERT SPOON CALIFORNIA ENCELIA GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA BLUE BELLS EMU BUSH BUCKWHEAT RED EUPHORBIA ISLAND BUSH SNAPDRAGON GREVILLEA GUARA RED/YELLOW YUCCA YAUPON YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON L LANTANA L LAVENDER L BLUE LYME GRASS L DEER GRASS M Water SoCaI Use Native L L X L L L X L L L L L X L L L VL M L L L L L L L X L L X L L X L L X L M L L L X X X X November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANrIf MYRTUS COMMUNIS PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAPHIOLEPIS UMBELLATA 'MINOR' SALVIA CLEVELAND!! SALVIA GREGI! SALVIA LEUCOPHYLLA SALVIA TRIDENT SANTOLINA SPP. SIMMONDSIA CHINENSIS TEUCRIUM CHAMAEDRYS VERBENA LILACINA 'DE LA MINA' Groundcovers BACCHARIS 'CENTENNIAL' BACCHARIS PILULARAIS CVS. CEANOTHUS CULTIVARS DYMONDIA MARGARETAE ELYMUS TRITICOIDES ENCELIA CALIFORNICA ERIOGONUM FASCICULATUM LEYMUS COND. 'CANYON PRINCE' ROSEMARINUS 'PROSTRATUS' SENECIO MANDRALISCAE SENECIO SERPENS MYRTLE PENSTEMON YEDDO HAWTHORN CLEVELAND SAGE AUTUMN SAGE PURPLE SAGE HYBRID SAGE LAVENDER COTTON JOJOBA GERMANDER CEDROS ISLAND VERBENA BENTENNIAL BACCHARIS DWARF COYOTE BRUSH CEANOTHUS DYMONDIA BEARDLESS WILD RYEGRASS CALIFORNIA ENCELIA BUCKWHEAT BLUE LYME GRASS TRAILING ROSEMARY KLEINIA BLUE CHALKST!CKS M L X M L L L L L VL X L L X L L L L L X L X L X L X L L L NOTE: THIS LIST I5 NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. ADDITONAL SPECIES MAY BE ADDED 1F APPROVED BY THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT, NISPECIFIC PLAN November 2017 APPENDIX APPENDIX A-42 Street Type: Altair Vista Culvert and A Street Bridge - Contiguous Sidewalks with no Parking These areas do not have landscaping since they are bridges or faux bridges (culverts.) Street Type: Alley — 24' Width See Village Plant lists. November 2017 SPECIFIC PLANfl Altair Appendix -Plant Lists (Refer to various Specific Plan Sections for Design Intent Descriptions of each area) NOTE: Plant species identified in Table 6-2 of the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) shall not be used in areas adjacent to the MSHCP corridor and/or native open space. Natural (Permanent) Slopes: Scientific Name Trees - Shade QUERCUS AGR!FOLIA QUERCUS CHRYSOLEPIS QUERCUS ENGLEMANNII QUERCUS LOBATA Trees - Accent CEANOTHUS ARBOREUS CERCIS OCCIDENTAL'S CERCOCARPUS BETULOIDES FRAXINUS DIPETALA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA PRUNUS ILIC!FOLIAILICIFOLIA QUERCUS BERBERIDIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) LAURINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS ARCHTOSTAPHYLOS GLAUCA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHARIS PILULARIS CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOLIUS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS CERCIS OCCIDENTAL'S ALBA' ENCELIA FARINOSA £PILOBIUM CANUM SSP. CANUM KECKIELLA ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOL!A MIMULUS AURANTIACUS OPUNTIA LITTORAL'S PENSTEMON HETEROPHYL L US RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA SPECIFIC PLAN Common Name COAST LIVE OAK CANYON OAK ENGELMANN OAK VALLEY OAK ISLAND CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD MOUNTAIN MAHOGONY CALIFORNIA ASH TOYON HOLLYLEAF CHERRY SCRUB OAK LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE NARROWLEAF MILKWEED BIGBERRY MANZANITA CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH COYOTE BRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD BRITTLE BUSH CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON MONKEY -FLOWER COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON COFFEEBERRY November 2017 Water SoCaI Use Native L L L L X X X X L X L X VL X L X L X VL X L X L X L X VL X L X L X i X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X A-43 APPENDIX Altair Appendix -Plant Lists (Refer to various Specific Plan Sections for Design Intent Descriptions of each area) NOTE: Plant species identified in Table 6-2 of the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) shall not be used In areas adjacent to the MSHCP corridor and/or native open space. Natural (Permanent) Slopes: Scientific Name Trees - Shade QUERCUS AGRIFOLIA QUERCUS CHRYSOLEPIS QUERCUS ENGLEMANNII QUERCUS LOBATA Trees - Accent CEANOTHUS ARBOREUS CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS CERCOCARPUS BETULOIDES FRAXINUS DIPETALA HETEROMELES ARBUTIFOLIA PRUNUS ILICIFOLIA ILICIFOLIA QUERCUS BERBERIDIFOLIA RHUS (MALOSMA) L4URINA SAMBUCUS NIGRA CAERULEA Shrubs ADENOSTOMA FASCICULATUM ASCLEPIAS FASCICULARIS ARCHTOSTAPHYLOS GLAUCA ARTEMISIA CALIFORNICA BACCHARIS PILULARIS CEANOTHUS CRASSIFOLIUS CEANOTHUS TOMENTOSUS CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS 'ALBA' ENCELIA FARINOSA EPILOBIUM CANUM SSP. CANUM KECKIELL4 ANTIRHINNOIDES KECKIELLA CORDIFOLIA MIMULUS AURANTIACUS OPUNTIA LITTORALIS PENSTEMON HETEROPHYLLUS RHAMNUS CALIFORNICA Common Name COAST LIVE OAK CANYON OAK ENGELMANN OAK VALLEY OAK ISLAND CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD MOUNTAIN MAHOGONY CALIFORNIA ASH TOYON HOLLYLEAF CHERRY SCRUB OAK LAUREL SUMAC BLUE ELDERBERRY CHAMISE NARROWLEAF MILKWEED BIGBERRY MANZANITA CALIFORNIA SAGEBRUSH COYOTE BRUSH HOARYLEAF CEANOTHUS RAMONA CEANOTHUS WESTERN REDBUD BRITTLE BUSH CALIFORNIA FUCHSIA YELLOW PENSTEMMON HEART -LEAVED PENSTEMMON MONKEY -FLOWER COASTAL PRICKLY PEAR PENSTEMON COFFEEBERRY November 2017 Water SoCaI Use Native L X L X L X L X L X L X VL X L X L X VL X L X L X L X VL X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X L X SPECIFIC PLANrJI ORDINANCE NO. 18-02 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT WITH AMBIENT COMMUNITIES FOR THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN #15 ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Procedural Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. On November 24, 2014, Rob Honer, representing Ambient Communities filed Planning Application Nos. PA14-0158, a General Plan Amendment; PA14-0159, a Specific Plan; PA14-0160, a Tentative Tract Map; and PA14-0161, a Development Agreement. These applications (collectively "Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. B. The proposed Project consists of a change in the General Plan designation on the proposed Project site from Industrial Park (IP), Open Space (OS), Medium Density Residential (M), High Density Residential (H), and Hillside Residential (HR) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) for the Altair Specific Plan. The Altair Specific Plan is a series of standards and regulations that will govern all development on the property. These standards and regulations address land use standards, a form based code, setbacks, building height, and parking requirements. Together, these regulations and standards seek to ensure cohesiveness in the design and aesthetic appearance of the proposed Project site, and compatibility with the surrounding community. In addition to the proposed General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan, the proposed Project also includes a Tentative Tract Map and a Development Agreement. C. The proposed Project was processed including, but not limited to, a public notice in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including the California Environmental Quality Act. D. An Environmental Impact Report (EIR), Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, and Statement of Overriding Considerations were prepared for the proposed Project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act and the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines ("CEQA"). Thereafter, City staff circulated a Notice of Completion indicating the public comment period and intent to adopt the EIR as Ords 18-02 1 required by law. The public comment period commenced via the State Clearing House from May 2, 2016 through June 17, 2016. The City published a Notice of Availability for the Draft EIR in the San Diego Union Tribune, a newspaper of general circulation within the City. A Notice of Availability was also sent to adjacent property owners indicating a review period of May 2, 2016 through June 17, 2016. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Department of Community Development, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590; the Ron H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located 41000 County Center Drive; and the City of Temecula website. E. On November 15, 2017, the Planning Commission considered the Final Environmental Impact Report ("EIR"), Planning Application Nos. PA14-0158, a General Plan Amendment; PA14-0159, a Specific Plan; PA14-0160, a Tentative Tract Map; and PA14-0161, a Development Agreement, at a duly noticed public hearing as prescribed by law, at which time the City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to, and did testify either in support of, or in opposition to, this matter. F. Following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearing, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution No. 17-43 "A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT A RESOLUTION CERTIFYING THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPTING FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPTING A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPTING A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR THE ALTAIR PROJECT, CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007)." G. Following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearings and due consideration of the proposed Project, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution No. 17-46 "A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT AN ORDINANCE ENTITLED 'AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT WITH AMBIENT COMMUNITIES FOR THE ALTAIR SPECIFIC PLAN #15 ON APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210- 049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007)." H. On December 12, 2017, the City Council of the City of Temecula considered the proposed Project and the EIR, Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, and Ords 18-02 2 Statement of Overriding Considerations, at a duly noticed public hearing at which time all interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. The City Council considered all the testimony and any comments received regarding the proposed Project and the EIR, Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, and Statement of Overriding Considerations prior to and at the public hearing. I. Following the public hearing, the Council adopted Resolution No. 17-86 "A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA CERTIFYING THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPTING FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPTING A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPTING A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR THE ALTAIR PROJECT, CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 270 ACRES, GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH AND WEST OF THE INTERSECTION OF RIDGE PARK DRIVE AND VINCENT MORAGA; WEST OF PUJOL STREET AND MURRIETA CREEK; AND NORTH OF SANTA MARGARITA RIVER (APNS 922-210-049, 940-310-013, 940-310-015, 940-310-016, 940-310-044 THROUGH 940-310-048, AND 940-320-001 THROUGH 940-320-007)." Resolution No. 17-86 and the findings therein are hereby incorporated by this reference as set forth in full. J. All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Ordinance have occurred. Section 2. Legislative Findings. The City Council in approving the Development Agreement with Ambient Communities for the Altair Specific Plan hereby makes the following findings: A. The Development Agreement complies with the requirements of California Government Code Sections 65865 through 65869.5 in that the Development Agreement specifies in detail and contains the following: 1. Provisions in Section 9.1 requiring periodic review at least every twelve months, at which time the Applicant shall be required to demonstrate good faith compliance with the terms of the Development Agreement (California Government Code Section 65865.1). 2. Duration of the Development Agreement, as specified in Section 2.3 of the Agreement as being twenty (20) years (Government Code Section 65865.2). 3. The permitted uses of the property, the density and intensity of use, the maximum height and size of the proposed buildings, and provisions for reservation or dedication of land for public purposes in Sections 2, 3, and 7-10 of the Specific Plan (which is incorporated into the Development Agreement and herein by this reference) and in Section 4 of the Development Agreement (Government Code Section 65865.2). Ords 18-02 3 4. Terms and conditions in Section 11 of the Specific Plan (which is incorporated into the Development Agreement by reference), and in Sections 2-4 of the Development Agreement, that require the developer to construct all necessary public improvements necessary to access and improve the property for the proposed use (Government Code Section 65865.2). B. Pursuant to Section 65867.5, the provisions of the Development Agreement are consistent with the City's General Plan and the following goals and policies: The Development Agreement is consistent with the City's General Plan, as amended. The Development Agreement will allow for the construction of up to 1,750 new homes for a range of household sizes, income, and demographics. The Land Use Element identifies the objective for this area which is to "provide complimentary land uses to Old Town that increase the vitality of the area; to increase the range of the housing opportunities west of 1-15; and to encourage sensitive site and building design given the topography of the area." The Development Agreement will allow for the construction of a range of multifamily and detached housing types within walking distance of Old Town that will result in a vibrant combination of uses for the aggregate planning areas. The Development Agreement will satisfy two of the four implementation measures listed in LU -22 of the Land Use Element Implementation Program: "[p]roviding infill residential opportunities within the area and the adjacent Westside Specific Plan to create a nighttime population for the area," and "[I]ocating additional public and community facilities within and surrounding the Old Town area." The Development Agreement is also consistent with Goal 2 of the Circulation Element of the General Plan which is to create a "regional transportation system that accommodates the safe and efficient movement of people and goods to and from the community." The Development Agreement will require the developer to construct a significant portion of the Western Bypass Corridor project connecting SR -79 (Temecula Parkway) to Rancho California Road via Vincent Moraga Drive. The Development Agreement is also consistent with Goal 1 of the Housing Element which is to "provide a diversity of housing opportunities that satisfy the physical, social, and economic needs of existing and future residents of Temecula." Single-family detached houses represent 80% of the existing housing stock in the City. The Development Agreement will allow for the construction of a mixture of housing which is needed in the City. Among other policies in the Housing Element, the Development Agreement implements Policy 1.2 of the Housing Element which is to "[e]ncourage residential development that provides a range of housing types in terms of cost, density and type, and provides the opportunity for local residents to live and work in the same community by balancing jobs and housing types." Ords 18-02 4 It also implements Policy 1.3 which is to "[rjequire a mixture of diverse housing types and densities in new developments around the village centers to enhance their people orientation and diversity." The Development Agreement will allow development predominantly east of the Western Bypass, preserving the western portion of the property as natural open space, thus consistent with Policy 1.5 of the Housing Element which is to "[e]ncourage the use of clustered development to preserve and enhance important environmental resources and open space, consistent with sustainability principles." Further findings of consistency between the Specific Plan, which the Development Agreement implements, and the General Plan can be found in Section 2.6 of the Specific Plan, which is hereby incorporated by this reference. The Development Agreement complies with the goals and objectives of the General Plan by providing extraordinary public benefits in the form of public infrastructure, parks, trails, and a 55 -acre civic site for public use to justify the increased density associated with the Altair Specific Plan and Development Agreement. C. Pursuant to Section 65867.5(c), a Development Agreement that includes a subdivision shall not be approved unless the agreement provides that any tentative map prepared for the subdivision will comply with the provisions of Government Code section 66473.7. Section 3.7.5 of the Development Agreement provides that any tentative map prepared for the proposed Project shall comply with Califomia Government Code Section 66473.7. Section 3. Consistency with General Plan. On December 12, 2017, the City Council adopted Resolution No. 17-87, which amended the Land Use Element and Circulation Element of the General Plan, in conformity with Government Code section 65300.5. Therefore, the foregoing amendments outlined in this Ordinance are consistent with the goals and policies of the General Plan for the City of Temecula. Section 4. Approval of the Development Agreement. The City Council hereby approves the Development Agreement between the City of Temecula and Temecula West Village, LLC, in substantially the form presented to the City Council and authorizes the Mayor to execute the Development Agreement on behalf of the City. Upon execution by all parties, an original shall be kept on file in the Office of the City Clerk. Section 5. Severability. If any portion, provision, section, paragraph, sentence, or word of this Ordinance is rendered or declared to be invalid by any final court action in a court of competent jurisdiction, or by reason of any preemptive legislation, the remaining portions, provisions, sections, paragraphs, sentences, and words of this Ordinance shall remain in full force and effect and shall be interpreted by the court so as to give effect to such remaining portions of the Ordinance. Ords 18-02 5 Section 6- Effective Date. This Ordinance shall take effect thirty (30) days after its adoption. Section7. Notice of Adoption. The City Clerk shall certify to the adoption of this Ordinance and cause it to be published in the manner required by law, PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 9th day of January, 2018. Matt Rahn, Mayor ATTEST: Randi Johl, City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Randi Johl, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Ordinance No. 18-02 was duly introduced and placed upon its first reading at a meeting of the City Council of the City of Temecula on the 12th day of December, 2017, and that thereafter, said Ordinance was duly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the Wh day of January, 2018, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Ords 18-02 6 Randi Johl, City Clerk RECORDING REQUESTED BY: CITY OF TEMECULA AND WHEN RECORDED MAIL TO: CITY OF TEMECULA 41000 Main Street Temecula, CA 92590 Attention: City Clerk Exempt from recording fees pursuant to Govt. Code Sections 6103 and 27383 Development Agreement between City of Temecula and Temecula West Village, LLC DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT THIS DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT (the "Agreement") is entered into as of January 9, 2018 ("Agreement Date"), by and between TEMECULA WEST VILLAGE, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (hereinafter "OWNER"), and the CITY OF TEMECULA, a municipal corporation. organized and existing under the laws of the State of California (hereinafter "CITY"), pursuant to the authority of Sections 65864 through 65869.5 of the California Government Code (the "Development Agreement Legislation") and Article XI, Section 2 of the California Constitution. RECITALS This Agreement is predicated upon the following facts: A. These Recitals refer to and utilize certain capitalized terms which are defined in this Agreement. The parties intend to refer to those definitions in conjunction with the use thereof in these Recitals. B. The Development Agreement Legislation authorizes the CITY to enter into binding development agreements with persons having legal or equitable interests in real property for the development of such property in order to, among other matters: ensure high quality development in accordance with comprehensive plans; provide certainty in the approval of development projects so as to avoid the waste of resources and the escalation in the cost of housing and other development to the consumer; provide assurance to the applicants for development projects that they may proceed with their projects in accordance with existing policies, rules and regulations and subject to conditions of approval, in order to strengthen the public planning process and encourage private participation in comprehensive planning and reduce the private and public economic costs of development; and provide for economic assistance to OWNER for the entitlements authorizing development related improvements. C. OWNER is the owner of certain real property within the City of Temecula, the County of Riverside, State of California (the "Property"), as more particularly described in Attachment 1 attached hereto and made a part hereof. OWNER desires to develop the Property in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement, the applicable regulations of the City of Temecula and those regulations of other agencies exercising jurisdiction upon the project. The Scope of Development of the Property as contemplated by this Agreement is described in the Agreement in Section 1.4. D. OWNER has applied for, and the CITY has approved, the Development Plan Approval(s) and OWNER and CITY have entered into this Agreement in order to create a beneficial project and a physical environment that will conform to and complement the goals of the CITY, create a development project sensitive to human needs and values, facilitate efficient traffic circulation and develop the Property. As part of the process of granting this Entitlement, the City Council of the CITY (hereinafter the "City Council") has required the preparation of an environmental review and has certified the Specific Plan EIR as regards to any significant effects arising from the Development and has otherwise carried out all requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act ("CEQA") of 1970, as amended. -2- E. The following actions were taken with respect to this Agreement and the Project: 1. On November 15, 2017, following a duly noticed and conducted public hearing, the City Planning Commission recommended that the City Council approve the Development Plan Approvals and this Agreement; 2. On December 12, 2017 after a duly noticed public hearing and pursuant to CEQA, the City Council adopted Resolution No. 17-86 certifying the Altair Specific Plan EIR for this Agreement and the Project and approving a Statement of Overriding Considerations and a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program; 3. On December 12, 2017, after a duly noticed public hearing, the City Council introduced Ordinance No. 18-01 and on January 9, 2018 adopted Ordinance No. 18-01 approving Altair Specific Plan No. #15; 4. On December 12, 2017, after a duly noticed public hearing, the City Council introduced Ordinance No. 18-02 and on January 9, 2018 adopted Ordinance No. 18-02 approving and authorizing the execution of this Agreement, the original of which is on file in the Office of the City Clerk. F. The CITY has engaged in extensive studies and review of the potential impacts of the Project as well as the various potential benefits to the CITY by the development of the Project and concluded that the Project is in the best interests of the CITY and that its provisions are consistent with the City's General Plan and each component thereof. G. In consideration of the substantial public improvements and benefits to be provided by OWNER and the Project, in further consideration of the implementation of the Altair Specific Plan and in order to strengthen the public financing and planning process and reduce the economic costs of development, by this Agreement, the CITY intends to give OWNER assurance that OWNER can proceed with the development of the Project for the Term of this Agreement pursuant to the terms and conditions of this Agreement and in accordance with the CITY's General Plan, ordinances, policies, rules and regulations existing as of the Effective Date as described in the Agreement. In reliance on the CITY's covenants in this Agreement concerning the Development of the Property, OWNER has and will in the future incur substantial costs in site preparation and the construction and installation of major infrastructure and facilities in order to make the Project feasible. H. Pursuant to Section 65867.5 of the Development Agreement Legislation, the City Council has found and determined that: (i) this Agreement and the Development Plan Approvals implement the goals and policies of the CITY's General Plan, and the Altair Specific Plan provides balanced and diversified land uses and imposes appropriate standards and requirements with respect to land development and usage in order to maintain the overall quality of life and the environment within the CITY, (ii) this Agreement is in the best interests of and not detrimental to the public health, safety and general welfare of the CITY and its residents; (iii) adopting this Agreement is consistent with the CITY's General Plan and each element thereof; (iv) constitutes a present exercise of the CITY's police power; and (v) this Agreement is being entered into -3- pursuant to and in compliance with the requirements of Section 65867 of the Development Agreement Legislation. I. The CITY and OWNER agree that it may be beneficial to enter into additional agreements or to modify this Agreement with respect to the implementation of the separate components of the Project when more information concerning the details of each component is available, and that this Agreement should expressly allow for such contemplated additional agreements or modifications to this Agreement. AGREEMENT NOW, THEREFORE, pursuant to the authority contained in the Development Agreement Legislation, as it applies to the CITY, pursuant to Article XI, Section 2 of the California Constitution, and in consideration of the foregoing recitals of fact, all of which are expressly incorporated into this Agreement, the mutual covenants set forth in this Agreement and for the further consideration described in this Agreement, the parties agree as follows: 1. Definitions. The following words and phrases are used as defined terms throughout this Development Agreement and each defined term shall have the meaning set forth below. 1.1 Acquisition Price. "Acquisition Price" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.3. of this Agreement. 1.2 Authorizine Ordinance. The "Authorizing Ordinance" means Ordinance No. 18- 02 approving this Agreement. 1.3 Central Phase. "Central Phase" refers to the Central Phase of the Project as defined in the Development Plan. 1.4 CEOA. "CEQA" refers to the California Environmental Quality Act as referenced in Recital D of this Agreement. 1.5 CITY. The "CITY" means the City of Temecula, a California municipal corporation, duly organized and existing under the Constitution and laws of the State of California, and all of its officials, employees, agencies and departments. 1.6 CITY Property. "CITY Property" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.1. of this Agreement. 1.7 City Council. "City Council" means the duly elected and constituted city council of the CITY. 1.8 Contributions. "Contributions" means City capital improvement and development impact fees and other cash contributions by Owner for City capital improvements required pursuant to the Project's conditions of approval or this Agreement. -4- 1.9 Development. "Development" or "Develop" or "Developing" means the improvement of the Property for purposes consistent with the Project's land use authorization as set forth in the Development Plan, including, without limitation: grading, the construction of infrastructure and public facilities related to the Off-site Improvements and On-site Improvements, the construction of structures and buildings and the installation of landscaping. 1.10 Development Agreement Lestislation. The "Development Agreement Legislation" means Sections 65864 through 65869.5 of the California Government Code as it exists on the Effective Date. 1.11 Development Fees. "Development Fees" means Development Impact Fees as defined hereunder imposed on the Development as conditions of development as more particularly set forth in Section 4.2. 1.12 Development Impact Fees. Except as set forth herein and for purposes of this Agreement, Development Impact Fees (sometimes referred to in this Agreement as "DIF") shall mean individually and in the aggregate, the City's currently adopted DIF as established in Chapter 15.06 of the Temecula Municipal Code at the rate then in effect at the time required for payment, subject to the provisions of Section 4. 1.13 Development Plan. The "Development Plan" consists of this Agreement, the Development Plan Approval(s), the Existing Regulations, and those Future Development Approvals, if any, contemplated, necessary, and requested by OWNER and approved by the CITY to implement the land uses authorized by the Project. 1.14 Development Plan Approval(s). "Development Plan Approval(s)" means the approvals of the City Council and other governmental agencies and other actions and agreements described in Attachment 6 hereto, including those amendments to this Agreement made in accordance with Section 3.9., those amendments to the Development Plan Approvals made in accordance with Section 3.8., and those Future Development Approvals made in accordance with Section 3.10. 1.15 Development Transferee. "Development Transferee" means a person or entity that expressly assumes the obligations of a Master Developer under this Agreement pursuant to Section 2.5. hereof. 1.16 Effective Date_ . "Effective Date" means the date the Authorizing Ordinance becomes effective. 1.17 Eligible Public Facilit(v)(ies). "Eligible Public Facilit(y)(ies)" means those facilities of the City and other public agencies that are eligible to be financed through the CFD as described in Section 4.5.2. 1.18 End User. "End User" has the meaning set forth in Section 2.5.2. of this Agreement. 1.19 Escrow Holder. "Escrow Holder" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.1.(iv) of this Agreement. -5- 1.20 Estoppel Certificate. "Estoppel Certificate" has the meaning set forth in Section 10.5. of this Agreement. 1.21 Existing Regulations. "Existing Regulations" means those written ordinances, rules, regulations, policies, or other written actions of the CITY, other than the Development Plan Approval(s) in effect on the Effective Date, which govern the permitted uses of the Property, building heights, the size of structures, the density and intensity of use of the Property, the timing, fees, and conditions to Development, exactions, assessments, the procedures for, and types of, permits required for the Development, the design, improvement and construction standards and specifications applicable to the Property and the infrastructure required for the Development. By way of enumeration, and not limitation, the Existing Regulations include those portions of the items identified on Attachment 5 which apply to the Property. The CITY has certified two (2) copies of each of the documents listed on Attachment 5. The CITY has retained one (1) set of the certified documents and has provided OWNER with the second (2nd) set. 1.22 Future Development Approvals. "Future Development Approvals" means those entitlements and approvals that are made in accordance with Section 3.10. By way of enumeration, and not limitation, the Future Development Approvals include actions such as development plan review, tentative maps, final maps, use permits, variances, grading permits, occupancy permits and building permits. 1.23 Habitat Restoration Property. "Habitat Restoration Property" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.1. of this Agreement. 1.24 Habitat Restoration Property Option. "Habitat Restoration Property Option" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.1. of this Agreement. 1.25 Habitat Restoration Property Option Notice. "Habitat Restoration Property Option Notice" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.1.(iv) of this Agreement. 1.26 Habitat Restoration Purchase Price. "Habitat Restoration Property Option Purchase Price" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.1.(v) of this Agreement. 1.27 Habitat Restoration Property Option Term. "Habitat Restoration Property Option Term" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.1.(ii) of this Agreement. 1.28 Hillside Escarpment PSA. "Hillside Escarpment PSA" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.4.5.(iii) of this Agreement. 1.29 Improved Portion. "Improved Portion" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.3. of this Agreement. 1.30 Indemnified Partv(ies). "Indemnified Party(ies)" has the meaning set forth in Section 6. of this Agreement. 1.31 Indenmifvin2 Party(ies). "Indemnifying Party(ies)" has the meaning set forth in Section 6. of this Agreement. -6- 1.32 Lender. "Lender" has the meaning set forth in Section 15.2. of this Agreement. 1.33 Master HOA. "Master HOA" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.4.4.(ii) of this Agreement. 1.34 Mello -Roos Act. "Mello -Roos Act" means the Mello Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982, as amended, being California Government Code Section 53311 et seq. 1.35 Merchant Builder. "Merchant Builder" means a buyer, assignee, or transferee of one or more individual lots or tracts of the Project, acquiring such lots or tracts with the intention of developing, improving, or using such lots or tracts for development and/or resale. 1.36 MSHCP. "MSHCP" means the Riverside County Multi -Species Habitat Conservation Plan. 1.37 Nature Center Conservation Easement Parcel. "Nature Center Conservation Easement Parcel" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.4.3.(i)(a) of this Agreement. 1.38 Nature Center Open Space Parcel. "Nature Center Open Space Parcel" is depicted on Attachment 4 of this Agreement. 1.39 Nature Center Parcel. "Nature Center Parcel" is depicted on Attachment 4 of this Agreement. 1.40 Nature Center Phase. "Nature Center Phase" refers to the Nature Center Phase of the Project as defined in the Development Plan and will consist of the Nature Center Road Parcel, the Nature Center Parcel, the Nature Center Open Space Parcel and the Nature Center Conservation Easement Parcel, all as depicted on Attachment 4 hereto. 1.41 Nature Center Road Parcel. "Nature Center Road Parcel" is depicted on Attachment 4 of this Agreement. 1.42 North Phase. "North Phase" refers to the North Phase of the Project as defined in the Development Plan. 1.43 Occupied Residential Property. "Occupied Residential Property" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.2.(iii) of this Agreement. 1.44 Off-site Improvements. "Off-site Improvements" means the improvements set forth on Attachment 2 and as more specifically described in the Development Plan. 1.45 On-site Improvements. "On-site Improvements" means physical infrastructure improvements or facilities that are or will be located on the Property as described in the Development Plan. Certain On-site Improvements may be specifically addressed in this Agreement, which are identified on Attachment 3. All other On-site Improvements will be dependent upon the Development and the required Future Development Approvals. -7- 1.46 Operating Memorand(a)(um). "Operating Memorand(a)(um)" has the meaning set forth in Section 3.9.5. of this Agreement. 1.47 OWNER. "OWNER" is initially TEMECULA WEST VILLAGE, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company registered to do business in California, and others who subsequently are assigned the rights and obligations of OWNER as Master Developer(s) pursuant to Section 2.5. hereof. 1.48 Planning Commission. "Planning Commission," means the duly appointed and constituted planning commission of the CITY. 1.49 Project. "Project" means the development of the Property as set forth in the Development Plan Approval(s). 1.50 Proiect EIR. "Project EIR" means that final environmental impact report prepared for the Project and this Development Agreement, as certified on December 12, 2017 by Resolution No. 17-86. hereof. 1.51 Property. "Property" means that certain real property described in Attachment 1 1.52 RCA. "RCA" has the meaning set forth in Section 3.4.4.(ii) of this Agreement. 1.53 Reserved Authority. "Reserved Authority has the meaning set forth in Section 5.2. of this Agreement. 1.54 Second Default Notice. "Second Default Notice" has the meaning set forth in Section 15.2.3. of this Agreement. 1.55 Services Deficit. "Services Deficit" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.7.(i) of this Agreement. 1.56 South Phase. "South Phase" means the South Phase of the Project as defined in the Development Plan. 1.57 Special Tax A. "Special Tax A" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.2. of this Agreement. 1.58 Special Tax B. "Special Tax B" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.2. of this Agreement. 1.59 Special Tax C. "Special Tax C" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.2. of this Agreement. 1.60 Specific Plan. "Specific Plan" means the Altair Specific Plan, approved by Ordinance No. 18-01 adopted by the City Council on January 9, 2018, and as thereafter amended from time to time in accordance with Section 3.8. of this Agreement. Any reference in this -8- Agreement to a Planning Area shall mean the Planning Areas set forth in the Specific Plan as adopted or as amended. 1.61 Superpad Improvements. "Superpad Improvements" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.3.(ii) of this Agreement. 1.62 SWPPP Costs. "SWPPP Costs" shall mean the costs required to comply with the Chapter 18.18 of the Temecula Municipal Code, as currently exists or may hereafter be amended, and the applicable permits issued by the State Water Resources Control Board and the applicable Regional Water Quality Control Board with jurisdiction over the City, as currently exists or may hereafter be amended or approved, including without limitation, the "Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan," erosion and sediment control measures, and NPDES mitigation measures. 1.63 Transferred Property. "Transferred Property" has the meaning set forth in Section 2.5.3. of this Agreement. 1.64 TUMF. "TUMF" means the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee established pursuant to Chapter 15.08 of the Temecula Municipal Code and the City Council resolutions adopted pursuant thereto. 1.65 Unimproved Portion. "Unimproved Portion" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.5.3.(ii) of this Agreement. 1.66 Western Bypass Bridge. "Westem Bypass Bridge" has the meaning set forth in the Development Plan. 1.67 Western Bypass Bridge Phase. "Western Bypass Bridge Phase" means the Westem Bypass Bridge Phase of the Project as defined in the Development Plan. 1.68 Western Bypass Road. "Western Bypass Road" has the meaning set forth in the Development Plan. 1.69 Wildlife Conservation Costs. "Wildlife Conservation Costs" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.4.5.(v)(a) of this Agreement. 1.70 WRCOG. "WRCOG" has the meaning set forth in Section 4.2.1. of this Agreement. 2. General Provisions. 2.1 Binding Covenants. The provisions of this Agreement to the extent permitted by law, constitute covenants which shall run with the Property for the benefit thereof, and the benefits and burdens of this Agreement shall bind and inure to the benefit of the parties and all successors in interest to the parties hereto. 2.2 Interest of OWNER. OWNER represents that OWNER has a legal interest in the Property that satisfies California Government Code Section 65865(b). -9- 2.3 Term. This Agreement shall become effective on the Effective Date, and shall have a term (the "Term") of twenty (20) consecutive calendar years. The Term shall terminate at 11:59 p.m. of the day preceding the twentieth (20th) anniversary of the Effective Date, subject to specific extensions, revisions, and termination provisions of this Agreement. The Term shall be extended by the mutual agreement of the Parties for one (1) period of ten (10) years subject to the Westem Bypass Road and Western Bypass Bridge being constructed and fully dedicated to the CITY within the initial twenty (20) year Term. The final day of this Agreement's regulation of the Property shall change subject to and upon the facts and terms relating to a specific extension(s), force majeure, revision(s), and termination provisions of this Agreement. Notwithstanding the foregoing, in the event that a court of competent jurisdiction takes any action that stays or delays the Effective Date, and subsequently enters after all appeals or time to appeal have been exhausted, a final judgment or issuance of a final order directed to the CITY to set aside, withdraw, or abrogate the approval of the City Council of this Agreement, then this Agreement shall be deemed to have no force or effect upon either party. 2.4 Termination. This Agreement shall be deemed terminated and of no further effect upon the occurrence of any of the following events: 2.4.1 Termination occurring pursuant to any specific provision of this Agreement, including, without limitation, a termination in the event of default; 2.4.2 The completion of the total build -out of the Development pursuant to the terms of this Agreement and the CITY's issuance of all required occupancy permits and acceptance of all dedications and improvements required to complete Development; or 2.4.3 The lapse of the Term as set forth in Section 2.3. The termination of this Agreement shall not affect any right or duty arising independently from entitlements issued by the CITY or other land use approvals approved prior to, concurrently or subsequent to the approval of this Agreement, except as may be provided in this Agreement. To provide notice to all, and not as a condition of the effectiveness of a termination of the Agreement, the parties agree to execute and record terminations of or releases of this Agreement as may be requested by either party. 2.5 Transfers and Assignments. 2.5.1 Restrictions on Transfers of OWNER's Rights and Obligations as Master Developer. OWNER acknowledges and agrees that there are very significant public improvements required for the Project and that the completion of those public improvements will require coordination of CITY, OWNER and any Development Transferees of the Property or any portion thereof. It is essential that any transfer of the Property or a portion of the Property to Development Transferees be completed in such a way that the public improvements will be completed as provided in the Development Plan Approvals and this Agreement. OWNER shall not sell, assign, or otherwise transfer all or any portion of its interests in the Property together with all its right, title and interest in this Agreement, or the portion thereof which is subject to the transferred portion of the Property, to any Development Transferee until such time as the public and private improvements required by the Development Plan Approval(s) and this Agreement have -10- been accepted by the City unless the City has approved the transfer pursuant to this Section. City shall not unreasonably withhold, condition or delay consent to the transfer provided that: (1) the Development Transferee has specifically assumed in writing the obligations, or a portion of the obligations of the OWNER, to design, construct, install and finally complete the public and private improvements required by the Development Plan Approvals and this Agreement; (2) the Development Transferee has substantially equivalent experience and financial capacity as OWNER to complete the public and private improvements required by the Development Plan Approval(s) and this Agreement; and (3) the Development Transferee has obtained replacement bonds, accepted by the City for the public and private improvements required by the Development Plan Approval(s) and this Agreement (in which event, the City shall release the OWNER's corresponding Public Improvement bonds). In the event of any sale, assignment, or other transfer to a Development Transferee pursuant to this Section, (i) OWNER shall notify the City at least sixty (60) days prior to the transfer of the name of the Development Transferee, together with the corresponding entitlements being transferred to such Development Transferee; (ii) submit to the CITY for review the agreement between OWNER and Development Transferee pertaining to such transfer providing that the Development Transferee shall be liable for the performance of those obligations of OWNER under this Agreement which relate to the Transferred Property, if any, or shall confirm that the OWNER and all Development Transferees shall remain jointly liable for the design and construction of public and private improvements required by the Development Plan Approval(s) and this Agreement; and (iii) submit to the CITY such further information as the CITY may reasonably need to complete its review and consent to the transfer. 2.5.2 Right to Transfer or Assign to End User. OWNER and any Merchant Builder, shall, without the consent of the CITY or any other party, have the right from time to time and on such number of occasions as it chooses, to sell, assign or otherwise transfer individual lots on final maps approved on the Property or any portion thereof, to any retail purchaser intending to occupy the unit as his or her principal residence ("End User") at any time during the Term of this Agreement. Absent an express written assumption of the obligations or rights hereunder as reasonably approved by the CITY, upon the sale, assignment, or other transfer to an End User of one or more individual lots, this Agreement shall terminate with respect to such lots without the execution or recordation of any further documentation. For purposes of documentation only, the transferor/assignor shall provide CITY with written notice of the name of the End User, that assumed rights or obligations hereunder, together with a description of the assumed rights and obligations. 2.5.3 Right to Assign to Merchant Builder. OWNER shall, without the consent of the CITY or any other party, have the right from time to time and on such number of occasions as it chooses to sell, assign or otherwise transfer its interest in a portion of the Property together with some or all of its rights and obligations under this Agreement with respect to the portion of the Property which is subject to transfer (the "Transferred Property"), to any Merchant Builder at any time during the Term of this Agreement. Any transfer or assignment must be pursuant to a sale, assignment or other transfer of an interest of such OWNER in a portion of the Property and shall be subject to the following criteria and conditions: (i) the transferor/assignor shall notify the CITY at least twenty (20) days prior to the transfer of the name of the Merchant Builder, together with the corresponding rights and obligations, if any, being transferred to such Merchant Builder; (ii) all Off -Site and On -Site Improvements required for the issuance of building permits for the property being conveyed to the Merchant Builder, other than specific tract improvements, pursuant -11- to the Development Approvals, shall have been completed (or shall be expressly assumed in writing by such Merchant Builder and such assumption is approved in writing by the CITY, pursuant to the criteria set forth in Section 2.5.1.); and (iii) the agreement between the transferor/assignor and Merchant Builder pertaining to such transfer shall provide, and OWNER shall give CITY notice of such provision, which obligations of OWNER under this Agreement the Merchant Builder shall be liable to perform, and acknowledging those obligations OWNER retains. 2.5.4 Rights and Duties of Successors and Assigns. Any, each and all of the lawful successors and assigns of OWNER, except for End Users, shall have all of the same rights, benefits, duties and obligations of OWNER under this Agreement. All entities holding title to a portion of the Property, except for End Users, shall be jointly liable for the design and construction of the Public Improvements for that portion of the Property as set forth in this Agreement, except as may be approved by Section 2.5.1. of this Agreement or as may be modified in an Operating Memorandum pursuant to Section 3.9.5. 3. Development and Control of Development. 3.1 Project. While this Agreement is in effect, OWNER shall have the vested right to implement the Development authorized by the Development Plan Approval(s) for the Development and the CITY shall have the right to control the Development in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Development Plan Approval(s) and this Agreement. Except as otherwise specified in this Agreement, the Existing Regulations shall control the Future Development Approvals and all On-site Improvements and Off-site Improvements and appurtenances in connection therewith to the extent not specifically controlled by the Development Plan Approval(s) and this Agreement. 3.2 Timing of Development. Except as otherwise set forth in this Agreement or in the Development Plan, regardless of any future enactment, by initiative, or otherwise, OWNER shall have the discretion to develop the Development in one phase or in multiple phases at such times as OWNER deems appropriate within the exercise of its subjective business judgment and as the same is in accordance with the Development Plan. Specifically, the CITY agrees that OWNER shall be entitled to apply for and receive permits, maps, occupancy certificates and other entitlements to develop and use the Property at any time, provided that such application is made in accordance with this Agreement and the Existing Regulations. The parties hereto expressly reject the holding of Pardee Construction Company v. City of Camarillo, 37 Ca1.3d 465 (1984), as regards any authority regulating the phasing of the Development and authorize the phasing of the construction on the Property to be consistent with the Development Plan. 3.3 Restrictions on Timing of Development. OWNER responsibility for the construction of the Off -Site Improvements and the On -Site Improvements contemplated by the Development Plan is more particularly described below and set forth in Attachments 2 and 3 attached hereto. Such On -Site Improvements and Off -Site Improvements required by the Development Plan shall be constructed in the following five (5) phases: (i) North Phase; -12- (ii) Central Phase; (iii) South Phase; (iv) Nature Center Phase; and (v) Western Bypass Bridge Phase. On -Site Improvements and Off -Site Improvements within the North Phase of the Development shall be the first On -Site Improvements and Off -Site Improvements constructed by OWNER. Development of the Property generally shall be constructed sequentially from north to south. Any modifications to such general sequence of Development of the Property shall be established pursuant to one or more Operating Memoranda pursuant to Section 3.9.5. of this Agreement. 3.4 Entitlements. Permits and Approvals - Cooperation. 3.4.1 Processing. CITY agrees that it shall accept and expeditiously process, pursuant to CITY's regular procedures, OWNER's applications for amendments to this Agreement, amendments to the Development Plan Approval(s) and the Future Development Approvals. 3.4.2 Further Mitigation. In connection with the completion of the Project, OWNER shall be responsible for the satisfaction of any mitigation measures required by the Specific Plan EIR and the Development Plan Approvals. In the event that OWNER files an application for a Future Development Approval, CITY will review that application in accordance with the Existing Regulations and CEQA (if and only to the extent required by CEQA). 3.4.3 Other Permits. The CITY further agrees to reasonably cooperate with OWNER, at no cost to the CITY, in securing any County, State and Federal permits or authorizations which may be required in connection with development contemplated by the Development Plan. This cooperation shall not entail any economic contribution by the CITY. 3.4.4 Litigation. (i) The CITY agrees to reasonably cooperate with OWNER in all reasonable manners in order to keep this Agreement in full force and effect. If any legal action is instituted by a third party or other governmental entity or official challenging the Development Plan Approval(s) or Future Development Approvals, the parties agree to cooperate in the defense of the action. CITY shall defend its interests under this Agreement using attorneys of its own sole selection and OWNER agrees that OWNER shall be responsible for all of CITY'S costs, including, but not limited to, attorneys' fees, costs, expert witnesses, travel, exhibits, displays and the like. Within thirty (30) days of the filing of such litigation OWNER shall deposit with the CITY the sum of thirty thousand dollars ($30,000.00) as security for the reimbursement of CITY's legal fees. OWNER shall reimburse CITY its costs within thirty (30) calendar days' of receipt of any invoice(s) requesting payment for such costs. OWNER shall replenish the deposit should CITY draw upon it within thirty (30) days of written notice from the CITY supported by detailed backup documentation showing how such deposit has been utilized. (ii) The MSHCP is overseen by the Westem Riverside County Regional Conservation Authority, a Joint Powers Agency formed under Government Code section 6500 et seq. ("RCA"). The RCA has not, to date, granted any approval of the Project. The City and OWNER have consulted with the RCA regarding the Project's consistency with the MSHCP. -13- While that consultation would not constitute an approval of the Project and thus should not subject RCA to any legal action, the OWNER or any successor -in -interest shall defend, indemnify, and hold harmless the RCA or its Board, agents, officers, officials, and employees from any petition for writ of mandate, or other claim, action or proceeding to attack, set aside, void, or annul any approval of the Project or related to the approval of the Project, that names the RCA, including, but not limited to, any associated costs, damages, attorney fees awards and administrative and legal expenses incurred by the RCA related to such actions, including but not limited to costs associated with California Public Records Act requests submitted to the RCA related to the Project and for the purposes of the action. The RCA shall promptly notify the OWNER and CITY of any such claim, action, or proceeding and shall reasonably cooperate in the defense. If the RCA fails to promptly notify the OWNER and CITY of any such claim, action, or proceeding or fails to reasonably cooperate in the defense, the OWNER shall not, thereafter, be responsible to defend, indemnify or hold harmless the RCA. The obligations imposed by this condition include, but are not limited to, the following: the OWNER shall pay all reasonable legal services expenses the RCA incurs in connection with any such claim, action or proceeding, whether it incurs such expenses directly, whether it is ordered by a court to pay such expenses, or whether it incurs such expenses by providing legal services through RCA legal counsel. The OWNER and CITY agree that all litigation pleadings in the action filed jointly with or on behalf of the RCA will be subject to review, revision, and approval by RCA legal counsel. 3.4.5 Acquisition of Off -Site Property for Public Improvements. (i) To the extent the OWNER or a Development Transferee does not have sufficient title or interest in the real property to be improved to permit an Off -Site Improvement to be made, the OWNER or Development Transferee shall make a good faith effort to acquire the required property in a timeframe calculated to allow for the orderly development of the Project. If the OWNER or Development Transferee is unable to acquire the required property, the CITY shall consider in good faith the acquisition of the required property in accordance with the provisions of Government Code Section 66462.5. Both parties acknowledge and agree that the acquisition of real property in accordance with the California Eminent Domain law requires more time than the suggested timeframes of Section 66462.5 allow and, therefore, the parties hereby waive these time constraints. The parties further acknowledge and agree that that the City cannot exercise its power of eminent domain unless and until a Resolution of Necessity has been duly adopted by the City Council pursuant to law. This Agreement is neither a commitment nor an announcement of an intent by the City to acquire any or all of the property required for Off -Site Improvements. (ii) OWNER and CITY shall develop: (1) a list of rights of way that will be needed for the Public Improvements required by the Development Plan Approvals and this Agreement; (2) the then current ownership of such rights of way; (3) the time required for possession of the rights of way for the completion of the Public Improvement; and (4) the time by which OWNER shall have completed its good faith effort to acquire the right of way. OWNER and CITY shall cooperate so as to maximize the ability to construct the Public Improvements in a timely manner. (iii) OWNER and CITY shall enter into an agreement contemplated by Government Code Section 66462.5 for each Public Improvement in substantially the form of -14- Attachment 7. OWNER shall deposit with the CITY the actual costs reasonably estimated by the CITY for initiating such proceedings and each stage thereof. To the extent that funds from the Community Facilities District financing as described in Section 4.5.2. are designated for and available for the acquisition of right of way, OWNER shall provide the City with written authorization pursuant to the Acquisition Agreement between the CITY and OWNER entered into as part of the Financing to use the CFD funds in this manner. (iv) Subject to the following, if the CITY is unable to acquire the required right of way property by negotiation or condemnation within the timeframe provided for in this Agreement, the CITY shall not use such failure as grounds to deny Future Development Approvals, except for building permits for the Project, to the extent that the Future Development Approval is conditioned upon completion of that Public Improvement despite the fact that the Off - Site Improvement has not been completed, subject to OWNER compliance with the terms of this Agreement, including, without limitation, Section 3.4.5. Further, the CITY's obligation to continue to issue Future Development Approvals as provided for in this Section is contingent upon: (i) the applicable OWNER or Development Transferee having made a timely submittal of the improvement plans required for the respective Off -Site Improvement to the CITY; and (ii) consistent with Government Code Section 66462.5, the OWNER or Development Transferee entering into an agreement with the CITY to reimburse the CITY for costs incurred by the CITY in acquiring the required property; and (iii) so long as OWNER or Development Transferee has deposited with CITY an amount equal to the CITY's calculation of the costs reasonably necessary to acquire the real property, and (iv) Owner or Development Transferee has entered into an Operating Memorandum with CITY for such public work subject to all legal requirements and to construct the Off -Site Improvement(s) which are uncompleted within a time period reasonably approved by the CITY and OWNER. 3.5 Rules. Regulations and Official Policies. The Existing Regulations, as defined in Section 1.21 of this Agreement, shall govern the Development and Future Development Approvals except as otherwise specified in the Development Plan, the Development Plan Approvals, or in Section 3.6. of this Agreement. 3.6 Reserved Authority of the CITY. 3.6.1 Limitations., Reservations and Exceptions. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Agreement, and specifically Section 3.5., the following land use regulations shall apply to the Development: (1) Processing fees and charges of every kind and nature adopted by the CITY pursuant to state law for the costs related to processing applications City-wide or such fees and charges as may be agreed to by the parties for Future Development Approvals. (ii) Procedural regulations consistent with this Agreement relating to hearing bodies, petitions, applications, notices, findings, records, hearings, reports, recommendations, appeals and any other matters of procedure. (iii) Changes adopted by the City Council in the Uniform Building Code, Uniform Fire Code, Uniform Plumbing Code, Uniform Mechanical Code, or National Electrical -15- Code, Uniform Housing Code, Uniform Administrative Code and Uniform Code for the Abatement of Dangerous Buildings and similar uniform codes as required by and in accordance with the authority granted to the CITY under State law. (iv) Regulations that are not in conflict with the Development Plan Approvals and this Agreement. (v) Regulations that are in conflict with the Development Plan Approval(s) provided OWNER has given written consent to the application of such regulations to the Development. (vi) Federal, State, County, and multi jurisdictional laws and regulations which preempt local regulations, or mandate the adoption of local regulations, and are in conflict with the Development Plan Approvals. (vii) Land use regulations adopted by the CITY after the Effective Date, in connection with any Future Development Approvals, necessary to protect the safety, or health, or both, of the residents or occupants of the Property, or the residents or people in the CITY, or both. 3.6.2 Future Discretion of CITY. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Section, this Agreement shall not prevent CITY, in acting on Future Development Approvals, from applying land use regulations which do not conflict with the Development Plan Approvals and the intent of this Agreement, nor shall this Agreement prevent CITY from denying or conditionally approving any Future Development Approval on the basis of the land use regulation not in conflict with the Development Plan Approval(s) and the intent of this Agreement. 3.6.3 Modification or Suspension by Federal, State, County, or Multi - Jurisdictional Law. In the event that Federal, State, County, or multi jurisdictional laws or regulations, enacted after the Effective Date, prevent or preclude compliance with one or more of the provisions of this Agreement, such provisions of this Agreement shall be modified or suspended as may be necessary to comply with such Federal, State, County, or multi jurisdictional laws or regulations; provided, however, that this Agreement shall remain in full force and effect to the extent it is not inconsistent with such laws or regulations and to the extent such laws or regulations do not render such remaining provisions reasonably impractical to enforce. 3.6.4 Intent. CITY acknowledges that OWNER has reasonably entered into this Agreement and will proceed with the Development of the Property on the assumption that CITY has adequately provided for the public health, safety and welfare through the Land Use Regulations. In the event that any future, unforeseen public health or safety emergency arises, CITY agrees that it shall attempt to address such emergency in such a way as not to impact the Development in accordance with the Development Plan Approval(s), and if that is not possible, to select that option for addressing the emergency which has the least adverse impact on the Development in accordance with the Development Plan Approval(s). 3.6.5 Regulation by Other Public Agencies. It is acknowledged by the Parties that other public agencies not subject to control by CITY may possess authority to regulate aspects of the Development, and this Agreement does not limit the authority of such other public agencies. -16- 3.7 Vested Right. By entering into this Agreement and relying thereupon, OWNER is obtaining the vested rights to proceed with the Development anticipated by the Project in accordance with the terms and conditions of this Agreement, and in accordance with, and to the extent of, the Development Plan Approval(s). By entering into this Agreement and relying thereupon, the CITY is securing certain public benefits which enhance the public health, safety and welfare, a partial listing of which benefits is set forth in Section 4.1. The CITY therefore agrees to the following: 3.7.1 No Conflicting Enactments. Except as provided in this Section 3., the CITY shall not enact a rule, regulation, ordinance, policy, permit or other measure, nor take any action applicable to the Project or the Property, which govems the rate, timing, scope intensity, use, density, manner, or sequencing of the Development, or any part thereof and which is inconsistent or in conflict with the Development Plan Approval(s). By way of enumeration, and not limitation, any law, action or inaction, whether by specific reference to the Project, this Agreement or otherwise, shall be considered to conflict if it: (i) Restricts the Vested Rights described in the Agreement or in any way limits or reduces the rate, timing, scope, intensity use, density, manner, or sequencing of the Development or otherwise requires any reduction or increase in the number, size, height or square footage of lot(s), structures, buildings or other improvements, modifies the standards and specifications applicable to the infrastructure required for the Development or requires additional dedications, exactions, fees or mitigation other than that provided for in the Agreement; (ii) Is consistent with Section 3.7.1.(i) hereof, but is not uniformly applied by the CITY to all substantially similar development within the CITY; or (iii) Imposes a new permit requirement or procedure not already part of the Existing Regulations. 3.7.2 Consistent Enactments. By way of enumeration and not limitation, the following types of enactments shall be considered consistent with this Agreement and Existing Regulations and not in conflict: (i) Transfers of units or permitted uses pursuant to an Operating Memorandum pursuant to Section 3.9.5. hereof; (ii) Changes in the phasing of the development pursuant to an Operating Memorandum pursuant to Section 3.9.5. hereof; and (iii) Any enactment authorized by this Agreement. 3.7.3 Initiative Measures. It is the intent of OWNER and the CITY that no moratorium or other limitation (whether relating to the development of all or any part of the Project and whether enacted by initiative or otherwise) affecting parcel or subdivision maps (whether tentative, vesting tentative or final), site development permits, precise plans, site development plans, building permits, occupancy certificates or other entitlements to use approved, issued or granted within the CITY, or portions of the CITY, shall apply to the Project to the extent such moratorium or other limitation would restrict OWNER's right to develop the Development -17- authorized by the Development Plan in such order and at such rate as OWNER deems appropriate as limited or regulated by this Agreement. The CITY agrees to cooperate with OWNER in all reasonable manners in order to keep this Agreement in full force and effect. In the event of any legal action instituted by a third party or other governmental entity or official challenging the validity of any provision of this Agreement, the parties hereby agree to cooperate in defending such action. In the event of any litigation challenging the effectiveness of this Agreement, or any portion hereof, this Agreement shall remain in full force and effect while such litigation, including any appellate review, is pending. 3.7.4 Consistency Between This Agreement, the Development Plan Approval(s) and Existing Regulations. To the extent a conflict exists or develops between the Existing Regulations and the Development Plan Approval(s), the Development Plan Approval(s) shall be controlling. To the extent a conflict exists or develops between this Agreement and any other Development Plan Approval(s), this Agreement shall be controlling. 3.7.5 Map Act Consistency. As required by California Government Code Section 65867.5, any tentative map prepared for the Project shall comply with California Government Code Section 66473.7. 3.8 Future Amendments to Development Plan Approval(s). The following rules apply to future amendments to the Development Plan Approval(s), except that Section 3.9.5. shall control with respect to a non -substantive adjustment of this Agreement and Section 3.10. shall control with respect to Future Development Approvals: 3.8.1 Owner's Written Consent. Except as expressly set forth within this Agreement, a Development Plan amendment will not alter, affect, impair or otherwise impact the rights, duties and obligations of the parties under this Agreement unless the OWNER has consented in writing to the Development Plan amendment. If the OWNER consents to the Development Plan amendment, the consent shall be documented in an Operating Memorandum. 3.8.2 Concurrent Development Agreement Amendment. Any Development Plan amendment requiring amendment of this Agreement shall be processed concurrently with an amendment to this Agreement. 3.8.3 Effect of Amendment. To the extent an amendment to the Development Plan Approval(s) is approved in accordance with Section 3.8.1., the amendment shall constitute for all purposes a Development Plan Approval and shall be treated as if it were in existence on the Effective Date. 3.9 Amendment of Development Agreement. 3.9.1 Initiation of Amendment. Either CITY or OWNER may propose an amendment to this Agreement. An operating memorandum, as defined below, is not an amendment of this Agreement. 3.9.2 Changes Requiring an Amendment. Unless otherwise required by law, neither an amendment to the Development Plan Approval(s) nor the approval of a Future Development Approval shall require an amendment of this Agreement unless the amendment: -18- (i) Materially alters the permitted uses of the Property as a whole in a manner inconsistent with the procedures established in the Specific Plan; (ii) Increases the density or intensity of use of the Property as a whole; (iii) Increases the maximum height and size of permitted buildings. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary herein, an amendment of this Agreement is not required if OWNER pursues entitlements, permits or approvals pursuant to a waiver of vested rights. 3.9.3 Procedure. The procedure for proposing and adopting an amendment to this Agreement shall be the same as the procedure required for entering into this Agreement in the first instance, including without limitation compliance with CEQA and public hearings before the Planning Commission and City Council pursuant to the Development Agreement Legislation. 3.9.4 Consent. Any amendment to this Agreement shall require the written consent of both the CITY and the OWNER whose portion of the Property would be materially affected by the amendment. No amendment to all or any provision of this Agreement shall be effective unless set forth in writing, signed by duly authorized representatives of the CITY and the applicable OWNER, and adopted pursuant to legal requirements imposed on CITY. An amendment of this Agreement does not require the consent of a Development Transferee unless the rights, duties, or obligations of the Development Transferee are affected. To the extent the consent of an OWNER that did not initiate the amendment is necessary, the OWNER shall consent to the amendment if, as determined in that OWNER's reasonable business judgment, that proposed amendment will not have a material adverse impact on the Development of that OWNER's portion of the Property. 3.9.5 Operatine Memoranda. The parties acknowledge that refinements and further development of the Project may demonstrate that changes are appropriate with respect to the details and performance of the parties under this Agreement. The parties desire to retain a certain degree of flexibility with respect to the details of the Development Plan and with respect to those items covered in general terms under this Agreement. If and when the parties and, if applicable, a Development Transferee, mutually find that non -substantive changes, adjustments, or clarifications are appropriate to further the intended purposes of this Agreement, and such are not materially inconsistent with the Development Plan Approval(s), they may, unless otherwise required by law, effectuate such changes, adjustments, or clarifications without amendment to this Agreement through one or more operating memoranda ("Operating Memorand(a)(um)") mutually approved by the City Manager, or designee, on behalf of the CITY and by any corporate officer or other person designated for such purpose in a writing signed by a corporate officer on behalf of OWNER, which, after execution, shall be attached hereto as addenda and become a part hereof. Unless otherwise required by law or by the Development Plan Approval(s), no such changes, adjustments, or clarifications shall require prior notice or hearing, public or otherwise. Nothing herein shall authorize the delegation of authority to the City Manager, or designee, contrary to California or Federal Law. CITY shall record all Operating Memoranda and thereafter shall attach the recorded instrument to the CITY's original Agreement and shall provide OWNER a duplicate copy. -19- 3.10 Future Development Approvals. 3.10.1 Exercise of CITY Discretion. In connection with Future Development Approvals or any other actions which the CITY is expressly permitted to make under this Agreement relating to the Project, the CITY shall exercise its discretion or take action in a manner which complies and is consistent with the Development Plan Approval(s) and the Existing Regulations. 3.10.2 Concurrent Development Agreement Amendment. Any Future Development Approval requiring amendment of this Agreement, as provided for in Section 3.9. hereof, shall be processed concurrently with an amendment to this Agreement. 3.10.3 Effect of Future Development Approvals. Except as expressly set forth within this Section 3.10., a Future Development Approval will not alter, affect, impair or otherwise impact the rights, duties and obligations of the parties under this Agreement. To the extent a Future Development Approval is approved in accordance with Section 3.10.1. and 3.10.2., the Future Development Approval shall constitute for all purposes a Development Plan Approval and shall be treated as if it were in existence on the Effective Date. 4. Obligations of the Parties. 4.1 Benefits to CITY. The direct and indirect benefits the CITY (including, without limitation the existing and future residents of the CITY) will receive pursuant to the implementation of the Agreement generally include, but are not limited to, the following: 4.1.1 Growth Management. The Project conforms to the CITY's effort to manage growth through the use of, among other things, comprehensive planning and design, Project -wide continuity of landscaping and architectural design, design standards and layout concepts exceeding the CITY's standards for residential development, and the village -center concept. In addition, the Project is based on a "Smart Growth" design, which aims to enhance the quality of life, preserve the natural environment, and save public funds over time through efficient utilization of infrastructure. Among other things, smart growth principles include, without limitation, a mix of land uses, well-designed compact neighborhoods, a variety of transportation choices, preserve open spaces, natural beauty, and environmentally sensitive areas, and unique neighborhood identities. 4.1.2 Traffic and Circulation. Traffic and Circulation elements of the Project conform to the proposed regional plan under consideration by the County of Riverside and to the CITY's General Plan, and are designed to reduce the impact of the average daily trips generated by the Project on arterial roads and thoroughfares by, among other things, encouraging the use of streets internal to the Project for school related trips. The Project is located within close proximity of the CITY's employment centers as well as nearby regional transportation infrastructure including the Interstate 15 freeway and regional bus routes. Traffic and circulation elements of the Specific Plan also provide for the following regional facilities needed by the CITY to reduce traffic impacts: (a) Western Bypass Road (a regional, four -lane arterial roadway); (b) Western Bypass Bridge (which connects the Western Bypass Road to Temecula Parkway and the Interstate 15 freeway); and (c) Coromell Trail, formerly known as First Street (a secondary arterial roadway -20- that provides vehicular access between Old Town Temecula, the Project's proposed elementary school, and the Western Bypass Road). 4.1.3 Schools. The provision of sites for new schools and the construction of such schools on an "up front" basis rather than "as needed" and phased to coincide with the build out of the Project, which early provision and construction will assist local school districts in meeting current area needs as well as creating adequate capacity for future needs. Specifically, approximately seven (7) acres has been set aside to be dedicated to the Temecula Valley Unified School District for a new elementary school to serve the Project and adjacent neighborhoods. The school site is ideally located to provide convenient access for all attendees and will accommodate up to approximately seven hundred thirty (730) students. 4.1.4 Parks and Recreation. The public parks and other recreational facilities to be dedicated, conveyed and/or constructed as provided for herein exceed the CITY's requirements for open space and parks, and contribute to meeting the need for open space and parks in the area, parking for existing CITY facilities, a potential for joint -use facilities with adjacent schools, and lighted parks and recreational facilities. In this regard, the Specific Plan is designed not only to serve its residents, but also to contribute to the parks and recreational amenities of Old Town Temecula and the entire Temecula community. These amenities include: (a) approximately three (3) miles of paved bike routes, and two (2) miles of walking trails, all onsite and interwoven through all villages and opens spaces in the Project, and which connect to adjacent communities and regional trail systems; (b) eighteen (18) acres of parks, trails and community spaces; (c) two (2) community centers including a recreation center with outdoor pool and spa, and fitness and exercise rooms, and a two-tiered clubhouse with a multi-purpose room with kitchen and rest rooms; and (d) up to fifty-five (55) acres from the Nature Center Phase. 4.1.5 Conservation Efforts. Recognizing the significance of land conservation, the Specific Plan will conserve approximately eighty-seven (87) acres onsite. OWNER will conserve eight (8) acres off site, for a total of ninety-six (96) acres conserved. In addition, and as more specifically described below in this Agreement, Development of the Project has no presently known adverse impact on area habitat in light of the prior long-term use of the Property as open space. 4.1.6 Cultural Impacts. The Project site's cultural, historical significance has been analyzed, the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians have been consulted and, presently, implementation of the Specific Plan does not impact any known significant cultural resources. 4.2 Development Impact Fees. The presently adopted Development Impact Fees ("DIF"), as defined in Section 1.12. herein, and currently charged by the CITY shall be imposed upon Development within the jurisdiction of this Agreement. The CITY hereby agrees that neither the Property nor the Development shall be subject to any new or expanded fees or charges applicable to development, provided however, that the City shall be entitled to revise the actual Development Impact Fee rates, and OWNER shall pay the DIF at the rate then in effect at the time required for payment of DIF. The DIF is comprised of several components, each corresponding to different elements of the On -Site Improvements and Off -Site Improvements. The individual component and the credit, if any, is set forth hereunder. -21- 4.2.1 Street Improvement DIF Component. OWNER shall pay the street component of DIF at such time as payment of DIF is required by Chapter 15.06 of the Temecula Municipal Code as it now exists or may hereafter be amended. The OWNER is obligated to construct certain On -Site Improvements and Off -Site Improvements pursuant to the Development Approval(s) and this Agreement. Certain of these On -Site Improvements and Off -Site Improvements are for street improvements that are listed in the DIF Nexus Study, approved by the City Council as described in Resolution No. 97-94 and Chapter 15.06 of the Temecula Municipal Code ("DIF Eligible Street Improvements"). In consideration of the OWNER's completion of construction of DIF Eligible Street Improvements pursuant to the Development Plan Approval(s), CITY shall reimburse OWNER such DIF Eligible Street Improvements in an amount equal to the actual costs of design, property acquisition and construction costs insured by the OWNER in completing the DIF Eligible Street Improvements minus the OWNER's fair share contribution for the On -Site and Off -Site Public Improvements for street improvements that serve the Project and mitigate its impacts. OWNER may apply to the Director of Public Works for reimbursement of these costs and provide such information and documentation requested by the Director of Public Works as necessary to establish the amount of such reimbursement. The Director of Public Works shall determine the amount of reimbursement pursuant to this subsection and CITY shall pay to OWNER the reimbursement required by this subsection within thirty (30) days following OWNER's submission of OWNER's application or notify the OWNER's application or notify the OWNER of any objections to the information provided or amount of reimbursement requested. There shall be no credit to OWNER for the Street Improvement component of DIF. OWNER shall not be eligible for any DIF reimbursement for any On -Site and Off -Site Public Improvements for which OWNER has also received credit or reimbursement from TUMF. CITY and OWNER understand and agree that the Off -Site Improvements to Vincent Moraga Drive, between Rancho California Road and the Western Bypass Road, as contemplated by the Specific Plan qualifies for credit toward satisfying the Street Improvement Component of the DIF or for credit or reimbursement pursuant to TUMF, but not both. CITY and OWNER understand and agree that the decision to pursue credit for such improvements from either DIF or TUMF shall be at the sole discretion of the OWNER following final design approval of such improvements. In the event OWNER determines to pursue credit from TUMF, OWNER and the CITY agree to work together and cooperate in good faith to insure that OWNER and CITY receive the appropriate credit toward, and/or reimbursement from TUMF, provided, however, OWNER understands and acknowledges that while the Western Riverside Council of Governments ("WRCOG") in its capacity as the local government agency responsible for TUMF currently designates Vincent Moraga Drive as an improvement eligible for TUMF credits or reimbursement, in the future may not have sufficient funds for such reimbursement or may assign one of the facilities a low priority for reimbursement, all actions outside the actual control of the CITY. 4.2.2 Traffic Sienal DIF Component. OWNER shall pay the traffic signal component of DIF at such time as payment of DIF is required by Chapter 15.06 the Temecula Municipal Code as it now exists or may hereafter be amended. The OWNER is obligated to construct certain On -Site Improvements and Off -Site Improvements pursuant to the Development Approval(s) and this Agreement. Certain of these On -Site Improvements and Off -Site Improvements are for traffic signals that are listed in the DIF Nexus Study, approved by the City Council as described in Resolution No. 97-94 and Chapter 15.06 of the Temecula Municipal Code -22- ("DIF Eligible Traffic Signals"). In consideration of the OWNER'S completion of construction of DIF Eligible Traffic Signals pursuant to the Development Plan Approval(s), CITY shall reimburse OWNER such DIF Eligible Traffic Signals in an amount equal to the actual costs of design, property acquisition and construction costs incurred by the OWNER in completing the DIF Eligible Traffic Signals minus the OWNER'S fair share contributions for the On -Site and Off -Site Public Improvements for traffic signals that serve the Project and mitigate its impacts. There shall be no credit to OWNER for the Traffic Signal component of DIF. OWNER shall not be eligible for any DIF reimbursement for any On -Site and Off -Site Public Improvements for which OWNER has also received credit or reimbursement from TUMF. OWNER may apply to the Director of Public Works for reimbursement of these costs and provide such information and documentation requested by the Director of Public Works as necessary to establish the amount of such reimbursement. Director of Public Works shall reasonably determine the amount of reimbursement pursuant to this subsection and City shall pay to OWNER the reimbursement required by this subsection within thirty (30) days following OWNER'S submission of OWNER'S application or notify the OWNER of any objections to the information provided or amount of reimbursement requested. There shall be no credit to OWNER for the Traffic Signal component of DIF. 4.2.3 Street Improvement and Traffic Signal Fair Share Costs. Pursuant to the Traffic Impact Analysis conducted by the CITY's traffic engineer, five (5) road segments and intersections have been identified to warrant fair share payments to the CITY by OWNER. A third -party cost to complete estimate has been prepared which estimates one hundred percent (100%) of the offsite intersection and road segment cost at $731,450 for which OWNER's Fair Share Payment is $90,016. Three of the five road segments and intersections are located near the Project and pursuant to the Development Plan, OWNER will construct one hundred percent (100%) of, (i) Convert Ridge Park Drive to Right-In/Right-Out, (ii) construct two new stop signs at the intersection of Pujol and First Street, and (iii) construct a signalized intersection at Pujol and First Street. The total estimated cost to construct these three improvements is $291,450 which is greater than OWNER's Fair Share Payment. Therefore, OWNER's net fair share payment obligation results is a credit for the Street System Component of DIF of $201,434. 4.2.4 Park and Recreation DIF Component. In consideration of the parks and recreational facilities to be constructed by OWNER pursuant to the Development Plan Approval(s) and Section 4.4.4.(i) and (iii) of this Agreement, OWNER is hereby granted a credit for one hundred percent (100%) of the of the Park and Recreation Component of the DIF. 4.2.5 Open Space and Trails DIF Component. In consideration of the OWNER's obligation pursuant to the Development Plan Approval(s) and Section 4.4.4.(ii) of this Agreement to dedicate and construct trails and open space, OWNER is hereby granted a credit for one hundred percent (100%) of the Open Space and Trails Component. 4.2.6 CFD Financing of DIF -Eligible Facilities. In the event the proceeds of the CFD financing described in Section 4.5.2. are used to pay 100% of the costs of constructing of a DIF eligible On -Site or Off -Site Public Improvement, the OWNER shall not receive DIF credit or reimbursement for such CFD -funded public improvements. However, the proceeds of a CFD -23- financing may be used to pay such costs in excess of the amount of DIF or TUMF credit or reimbursement to be received by Owner for the On -Site or Off-site Public Improvements. 4.3 Future Development Approvals Review. Future Development Approvals will be reviewed in a manner consistent with the general review procedures of the CITY accorded the particular type of Future Development Approval being sought and necessary conditions imposed in a manner consistent with this Agreement. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary, the health, safety and general welfare based mitigation measures arising from the Future Development Approvals shall not be limited by this Agreement. 4.4 Related Real Property Conveyances; Conditions to Development Agreement. 4.4.1 Intent of the Parties. The CITY and OWNER agree that the timely completion and performance of the real estate transactions and the related agreements described hereafter are a material component of the consideration each party has relied upon in its respective decision to enter into this Agreement. OWNER and the CITY, individually and collectively, represent that neither party would have entered into this Agreement but for the promises of the other to transfer the interests in real property described hereunder to the other party and to enter into the related agreements. Further, OWNER and the CITY, individually and collectively, agree that the failure of any one of the conveyances or related agreements to be completed or performed in a timely manner will be an event of default under Section 10. of this Agreement. 4.4.2 Liens, Encumbrances and Environmental Conditions. All real property dedicated to the CITY pursuant to this Agreement shall be free and clear of any and all matters of record (excepting all non -delinquent taxes and assessments), including but not limited to, deeds of trust, liens, or other encumbrances of record unless such items of record are approved in writing by the CITY. Further the real property shall be warranted to be free of any known environmental conditions that would prevent, restrict or cause the CITY to fund hazardous material/contamination/toxic remediation activities so as to allow the real property to be used as intended by the CITY. OWNER warrants and represents to the CITY that as of the Effective Date of this Agreement, OWNER has conducted preliminary studies of the properties it will convey to the CITY and has found no environmental conditions that would prevent, restrict or cause the CITY to fund hazardous material/contamination/toxic remediation activities so as to allow the real property to be used as intended by the CITY. OWNER shall provide the CITY copies of all reports, investigations and analysis that discuss the environmental condition of the real property. 4.4.3 Disposition of the Nature Center Phase. (i) Configuration and Use of the Nature Center Phase. (a) The Nature Center Phase ultimately shall consist of four separate legal parcels comprised of the following: (i) approximately one (1) acre of roadways serving the Nature Center Phase (the "Nature Center Road Parcel"); (ii) approximately sixteen (16) acres for a nature center (the "Nature Center Parcel"); (iii) approximately three (3) acres of open space (the "Nature Center Open Space Parcel"); and (iv) approximately thirty-five (35) acres of ungraded open space upon which a conservation easement in favor of the RCA or an entity that has a Management MOU with the RCA (the "Conservation Easement") shall be recorded and -24- maintained (the "Nature Center Conservation Easement Parcel"). The four parcels are described and depicted on Attachment 4. (b) If no legal action (based on CEQA or otherwise) is filed against all or any portion of the Project within the applicable statutes of limitation, the CITY hereby waives any and all rights to seek a specific plan amendment to change the use of all or any portion of the Nature Center Phase. (c) If a legal action or actions (based on CEQA or otherwise) is filed against all or any portion of the Project within the applicable statutes of limitation, then such Nature Center Parcel may be combined with the Nature Center Open Space Parcel and the combined parcel may be utilized for any other civic use as may be determined by the CITY in its sole and absolute discretion following the approval of a specific plan amendment for such purpose. Such approval of a Specific Plan Amendment must occur within six months of a lawsuit being filed, at which time RCA's consistency determination is automatically revoked for the entire project. (ii) CITY's Acquisition of the Nature Center Phase. CITY shall acquire the Nature Center Phase upon the date that is sixty (60) days following the completion of all of the following: (a) CITY's Approval of the Development Plan Approvals. The CITY's approval of the Development Plan Approvals and either (a) the expiration of any and all applicable statutes of limitation or other similar time periods with no legal action or challenge of any kind being filed against the Property, the Project or the CITY or OWNER and related in any way to the Property or the Project, or (b) the resolution of any such legal action or challenge filed against the Property, the Project or the CITY or OWNER and related in any way to the Property or the Project, in a manner mutually acceptable to CITY and OWNER. (b) CITY's Formation and Funding of the CFD(s). The CITY's formation and funding of the CFD(s) consistent with the terms and provisions of Sections 4.5.2. and 4.5.3. of this Agreement, and either (i) the expiration of any and all applicable statutes of limitation or other similar time periods with no legal action or challenge of any kind being filed against the CFD(s), the Property, the Project, the CITY or the OWNER in any way related to the CFD(s), the Property or the Project, or (ii) the resolution of any such legal action or challenge filed against the CFD(s), the Property, the Project, the CITY or the OWNER in any way related to the CFD(s), the Property or the Project, in a manner mutually acceptable to CITY and OWNER consistent with the terms of this Agreement. (c) Creation of the Four (4) Separate Legal Parcels Comprising the Nature Center Phase and Recordation of the Conservation Easement. CITY's approval of a parcel map, lot split or other legal and appropriate action to create the four (4) separate legal parcels comprising the Nature Center Phase and recordation of the Nature Center Conservation Easement, all as described in Section 4.4.3.(i) above. The four parcels are described and depicted on Attachment 4. -25- (d) Completion of Superpad Improvements on the Improved Portion of the Nature Center Phase. The completion by OWNER of the Superpad Improvements as defined in Section 4.5.3. below on the Improved Portion of the Nature Center Phase. (iii) Obligations of the Parties Following the CITY's Acquisition of the Nature Center Phase. Following CITY's acquisition of the Nature Center Phase, CITY shall be responsible for and shall expressly assume (in the documentation memorializing the closing of the acquisition of the Nature Center Phase), any and all remaining conditions of approval in any way related to the Development of the Nature Center Phase. 4.4.4 Parks, Trails and Recreational Facilities. OWNER is required pursuant to the Development Plan Approval(s) to dedicate certain acreage of the Project to the City for use as public parks, trails, open space and recreational facilities. Additionally OWNER has agreed to dedicate additional land and as described below, to construct, at its sole expense, the improvements for certain public parks and facilities, and to devote certain acreage of the Project for use as recreational facilities for the residents of the Project. OWNER's dedication and/or construction of such public parks and facilities and private recreational facilities shall be as set forth below. All real property shall be conveyed as provided for in Section 4.4.5. OWNER shall demonstrate the condition of title pursuant to CLTA title insurance policies, without exemptions, in amount equal to the fair market value of the land. (i) 5 -Acre Park and Grand Staircase. OWNER agrees to convey fee title to the CITY and improve per the conditions in the Development Plan the five (5) acre park available for use by the public centrally located and connected to Old Town via a monumental "grand staircase". Not less than thirty (30) days prior to the formal submittal of the design to the CITY, OWNER and the Director of Community Development shall have the a pre -meeting to discuss the design of the five -acre park and Grand Staircase. The design of the five -acre park and Grand Staircase shall be approved by the Director of Community Development. The five -acre park and Grand Staircase shall be completed to the satisfaction of the Director of Public Works. It shall be accepted for maintenance by the CITY promptly following the one (1) year maintenance and establishment period as determined by the Director of Public Works; provided, however, the five -acre park and the Grand Staircase shall not be open to the public until after CITY acceptance thereof for maintenance. (ii) Pedestrian and Bicycle Trail System. OWNER agrees to improve per the conditions in the Development Plan a pedestrian and cycling network available to the public to be interwoven through all villages and active open space throughout the Project and which shall connect to adjacent communities and regional trails systems. The design of these improvements shall be approved by the Director of Community Development. Following the completion of the improvement to the satisfaction of the Director of Public Works, those portions of the pedestrian and bicycle trails system located on OWNER's property shall be conveyed to, and maintained by, the Project master homeowner's association ("Master HOA"), and following completion of the improvement to the satisfaction of the Director of Public Works and expiration of the one (1) year maintenance period, those portions located in the CITY right-of-way shall be conveyed to, and maintained, by the CITY; provided, however, these trail improvements shall not be open to the public until after CITY acceptance thereof for maintenance. Owner shall indemnify the CITY for any claims or lawsuits relating to the use of the trails maintained by the Master HOA pursuant to -26- Section 6., Indemnification, of this Agreement provided that, subject to the approval of the City Manager, OWNER may satisfy this obligation by assigning the indemnification obligation to the Master HOA and requiring the Master HOA to procure and maintain liability insurance in an amount and with terms reasonably acceptable to the City Manager of the CITY. The indemnification obligation of this Section shall survive termination of this Agreement unless assigned to the Master HOA. (iii) Recreation Center and Clubhouse. OWNER agrees to improve per the conditions in the Development Plan Approval(s) a recreation center with an outdoor pool and spa, and fitness and exercise rooms, and a two-tiered clubhouse with a multipurpose room, kitchen and restrooms, to be available to residents of the Project to be located at the highest elevation of the 5 -acre park described in Section 4.4.4.(i). The recreation center and clubhouse will be conveyed to, and maintained by, the Master HOA. (iv) Quimby Credits. In consideration of OWNER's obligations to improve and convey to the CITY the parkland and trails referenced above in subsections (i) and (ii), the CITY hereby agrees to credit OWNER's obligations under the CITY's subdivision/Quimby parkland acreage requirements as satisfied in full and CITY shall not exact any further contribution from OWNER. In the event that the OWNER fails to convey all or portions of the parkland and trails referenced in this subsection, OWNER shall pay to the CITY the Quimby Fee required for the Project in the amount of Six Million Six Hundred Thousand Dollars ($6,600,000.00) or a portion thereof based such parkland and trails as actually conveyed to the City. Receipt of such payment shall not constitute a waiver of any of CITY's rights to enforce the terms of this Agreement or the Development Plan Approval(s). OWNER shall not be eligible for any Quimby Fee Credits for any On -Site and Off -Site Public Improvements that OWNER has constructed using the proceeds from CFD financing. (v) Schedule of Completion of Park and Recreation Improvements. The park and recreation improvements, and components thereof, described in this Section 4.4.4. shall be completed to the satisfaction of the Director of Community Development in accordance with the schedule set forth in Attachment 3, Description and Timing of On -Site Improvements. (vi) Prior to issuance of grading permit, the RCA shall review and approve for conformance with the Urban Wildlands Interface Guidelines the design of the applicant's Urban Wildlands Interface measures (fencing, lighting, access control, plant palette, drainage, etc.) for development adjacent to all conservation areas (Western Bypass, Villages A and G, and Nature Center). The Nature Center trails shall be reviewed and approved by the RCA and Wildlife Agencies for compliance with Urban Wildlands Interface Guidelines and MSHCP Section 7.4.2., Conditionally Compatible Uses. 4.4.5 Open Space Acquisifion and Conservation. OWNER agrees to contribute to and construct several conservation features as part of the Project that will further aid in the conservation of sensitive habitats and the enhancement of wildlife movement and genetic diversity of mountain lions in the region. These conservation features are: (i) Onsite Conservation. OWNER shall convey to the RCA for permanent conservation Lot 8 of Tentative Tract Map 36959-1, Lot 25 of Tentative Tract Map -27- 36959-2, Lot 20 of Tentative Tract Map 36959-3, and Lots 8 and 9 of Tentative Tract Map 36959, consisting of approximately 84.60 acres. Lot 10 of Tentative Tract Map 36959 may also be conveyed to the RCA subject to the provisions in Section 4.4.3. herein, which would then result in approximately 87.20 acres. (ii) Slope Restoration. OWNER shall restore with native upland vegetation approximately twenty (20) acres of slopes along the Western Bypass as described on Attachment 8 which are not needed for fuel modification in areas that abut the existing MSHCP conservation areas, as well as those contemplated by the Development Plan Approval(s). Such restoration shall occur concurrently with the phased construction of the Western Bypass and shall be temporarily irrigated and maintained by OWNER until such time as they are offered for dedication to the HOA. OWNER shall convey at no charge such slopes to the HOA for conservation purposes on or before the earlier to occur of the date six (6) months after the maintenance bond for the restoration described in this subsection is released by the CITY, and the date of acceptance of the land dedication by the HOA. OWNER shall not be entitled to any fee credits in connection with such slope restoration. (iii) Conservation of 8.97 Acres. OWNER acquired, at its expense, 8.97 acres located on the hillside escarpment adjacent to the Project for conservation as described on Attachment 9 pursuant to an existing Purchase and Sale Agreement ("Hillside Escarpment PSA") and will convey this property to the RCA for Two Hundred Thirty -Five Thousand Dollars ($235,000.00) for conservation purposes prior to the issuance of the first grading permit for the Project. (iv) Conservation of 65.06 Acres. On or before the issuance of the first grading permit for the Project, OWNER shall complete the purchase, at its expense, of 65.06 acres located south of the Project as described on Attachment 10 pursuant to an existing Purchase and Sale Agreement and convey this property to the Regional Conservation Authority ("RCA") at no cost. OWNER shall prepare and submit to the RCA an equivalency analysis of this land prior to the City Council's adoption of the ordinances and resolutions approving the General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan for the Project and this Agreement. (v) Additional Funding for Wildlife Conservation Efforts. OWNER shall pay to the CITY the following: (i) on or before the issuance of the first (1st) building permit for the Project, the sum of Five Hundred Thousand Dollars ($500,000.00) (the "Initial Wildlife Conservation Fee") less the cost of the land purchase and associated closing costs described in 4.4.5.(iv) above; and (ii) as provided in Section 11.9 of the Specific Plan and Section 4.5.2. of this Agreement, an annual payment of $43 per Occupied Residential Property, in perpetuity, with an increase in such payment each fiscal year in an amount of two percent (2%) of the prior year's fee (the "Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee"). (a) The proceeds of the Wildlife Conservation Fee shall be used for the following purposes ("Wildlife Conservation Costs"): (1) The initial six million dollars ($6,000,000.00) of the Initial Wildlife Conservation Fee and the Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee shall be held in an account by the City for the purposes of acquiring one hundred (100) acres of conservation lands -28- within the Special Linkage Area south of the Property and/or in Riverside County and within ten (10) miles of the Property. RCA shall acquire such land and CITY shall reimburse RCA for the cost of its land purchase and associated closing costs, with interest, from the initial $6,000,000.00. The land acquisitions shall be in accordance with the equivalency standards for the acquisition of land submitted to the RCA and CITY prior to the City Council's approval of the Project. Once this objective has been satisfied, then the CITY shall use such funding thereafter for one or more of the conservation activities described below in subsections (2), (3) or (4). The interest rate for the reimbursement shall be compound interest at the rate equal to the average interest rate paid on deposits in the State Local Agency Investment Fund, Government Code Sections 16429.1 to 16429.4, during the year prior to July 1 of each year. Pursuant to Section 4.5.2. below and Section 11.9 of the Specific Plan, OWNER, its successors to the property within the Project, including End Users, shall fulfill this obligation of the Specific Plan with the proceeds of Special Tax C of the CFD(s), provided, however, that the obligation under this Section and Section 11.9 of the Specific Plan remains regardless of the financing mechanism used to pay it or whether there is a financing mechanism to pay it. (2) An engineering feasibility study to be prepared by the CITY in conjunction with the RCA along Interstate 15 between the Property and the San Diego County Line whose purpose is to evaluate locations and initiate engineering for a wildlife overcrossing or undercrossing across the Interstate 15 freeway in order to allow wildlife (including mountain lion) to safely travel between the Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve and the Palomar Mountain regions; and/or (3) Reimbursement to the RCA of its costs, with interest, for the acquisition of lands south of the Project for conservation (the interest rate for the reimbursement shall be compound annual interest at the rate equal to the average interest rate paid on deposits in the State Local Agency Investment Fund, Government Code Sections 16429.1 to 16429.4, during the year prior to July 1 of each year); and/or (4) Other wildlife conservation efforts, (i) within Riverside County; and (ii) within ten (10) miles of the Project Site undertaken by the CITY or RCA. (b) Pursuant to Section 11.9 of the Specific Plan, OWNER, its successors to the property within the Project, including End Users, shall be obligated to pay the Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee. Pursuant to Section 4.5.2. below the OWNER, its successors to the property within the Project, including End Users, may fulfill this obligation for paying the Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee with the proceeds of Special Tax C of the CFD(s). (c) OWNER shall not be entitled to any fee credits in connection with such conservation funding. (vi) Agency Permits and Assumption of Western Bypass Bridge Obligations. OWNER and CITY understand and agree that: (a) CITY had previously obtained all of the agency permits necessary for construction of the Western Bypass Bridge; (b) some of these agency permits for the Western Bypass Bridge have expired; and (c) the Western Bypass Bridge shall be constructed in connection with the Development Plan. The CITY shall remain the -29- applicant for such agency permits, but OWNER shall have the obligation to update the bridge plans to meet current conditions and renew or reobtain the permits for construction of the Westem Bypass Bridge. CITY shall use its best efforts to cooperate with OWNER in updating the bridge plans and renewing or reobtaining the permits for the construction of the Western Bypass Bridge. Once OWNER (with CITY's cooperation) has renewed or reobtained the permits for the Western Bypass Bridge, OWNER shall continue to have full responsibility for the plans, keeping the environmental permits current and construction of the Western Bypass Bridge. In connection with the assumption of such obligations, OWNER shall be responsible to accomplish the enhancement of approximately one and one tenth (1.1) acres of land owned by the City in Murrieta Creek or on other real property owned by the CITY. In the event such mitigation obligation consists of enhancing the CITY's property in Murrieta Creek, the CITY shall not be entitled to any compensation for the enhancement of such property, but all costs and expenses of such enhancement shall be borne solely by OWNER. If upon completing subsurface testing (paid for by OWNER), it is determined that restoration mitigation in Murrieta Creek is not feasible due to the presence of rock, then CITY shall provide the necessary land elsewhere, at CITY'S cost, for OWNER to complete the restoration at OWNER's cost as described above. Further, if CITY is not able to provide additional land, CITY and OWNER may consider the purchase of mitigation credits and negotiate in good faith each Party's share of such cost. (vii) MSHCP Fee Credits for Onsite Conservation. OWNER and CITY understand and agree that: (i) OWNER will be preserving onsite approximately 84.63 acres of open space; (ii) as a result of such onsite preservation OWNER may qualify for fee credit consistent with RCA Resolution 2016-003; and (iii) CITY shall cooperate with OWNER to receive such credit as and when due and owing. 4.4.6 Smart Shuttle/Bike Share Prosram. In consideration of the CITY'S performance of the terms of this Agreement, OWNER agrees to participate with the Riverside Transportation Authority (RTA) and CITY to further a "Smart Shuttle" or "bike share" program. OWNER's participation shall consist of providing funding in the amount of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars (5150,000,00) to further the Smart Shuttle or bike share program as defined in an agreement between the CITY and RTA. Payment shall be made the earlier of, (i) on or before the issuance of the first (1st) building permit for the South Phase, or (ii) issuance of the 950th building permit for the Project. If, following the issuance of such permit, the "Smart Shuttle" or "bike share" program is successful and well-received by the public and CITY desires to continue such program, OWNER and/or the HOA shall cooperate in good faith with CITY to identify potential future funding sources for such program including, without limitation, governmental grants from the State of California, WRCOG and/or the RTC, as well as potential funding from the HOA. 4.5 CITY ObliEations. 4.5.1 OWNER's Option to Purchase CITY Land for Habitat Restoration and Pond Turtle Habitat. (i) Habitat Restoration Property. (a) The CITY owns approximately thirty-two (32) acres of land south of Temecula Parkway, west of the I-15 freeway and adjacent east and north of Murrieta -30- Creek (the "CITY Property") that will be used, in part, as right of way and habitat buffers for the reconstruction of the I-15/Temecula Parkway Interchange ("Interchange"). The amount of acreage and the configuration of the right of way and habitat buffers needed for the Interchange has not been fully established by the CITY and the resources agency. Primarily due to development of the Western Bypass Road, the Development Plan impacts 1.24 acres of riparian/riverine habitat which needs to be created elsewhere for the Project's Determination of Biological Equivalent Superior Preservation. The resource agencies (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, California Department of Fish & Wildlife and Regional Water Quality Control Board) prefer mitigation to occur within the same watershed and as close to the impact site as possible. In addition, the California Department of Fish & Wildlife would like this area within Murrieta Creek conserved and enhanced to better accommodate the diminishing pond turtle habitat. (b) The OWNER and CITY shall negotiate in good faith the actual acreage up to 1.24 acres and the location of the property to be conveyed by way of conservation easement from CITY to OWNER for habitat restoration, provided, however, that the City Manager of CITY shall, in his discretion, determine whether such property should be conveyed by way of conservation easement to OWNER, and, if so, the City Manager shall, in his discretion., approve, in writing, the actual acreage, configuration, and location of such property to be conveyed by way of conservation easement ("Habitat Restoration Property"). OWNER acknowledges and agrees that the CITY may not be able to convey by way of conservation easement, or other conveyance, the Habitat Restoration Property to OWNER for habitat restoration in this area given the constraints of the Interchange improvements and, in such case, OWNER shall acquire the required property for habitat conservation elsewhere. (c) Therefore, the CITY hereby grants to OWNER an option to acquire by way of conservation easement the agreed-upon Habitat Restoration Property for the purpose of habitat restoration upon the terms and conditions set forth in this Section (the "Habitat Restoration Property Option"): (ii) Term of the Habitat Restoration Property Option. The term of the Habitat Restoration Property Option (the "Habitat Restoration Property Option Term") shall commence on the Effective Date and shall expire on the one (1) year anniversary of the Effective Date (unless sooner terminated pursuant to the provisions set forth below). (iii) Consideration of the Habitat Restoration Property Option. The Habitat Restoration Property Option is granted in consideration of the obligations and agreements undertaken by OWNER. (iv) Exercise of the Habitat Restoration Property Option. The Habitat Restoration Property Option may be exercised by OWNER in the event OWNER, during the Habitat Restoration Property Option Term, delivers to CITY and an institutional Escrow Holder selected by OWNER (the "Escrow Holder") written notice of OWNER's election to purchase the Habitat Restoration Property on the terms and conditions set forth herein (the "Habitat Restoration Property Option Notice") (in the event OWNER does not give timely CITY the Habitat Restoration Property Option Notice, the Habitat Restoration Property Option shall immediately terminate without further action by CITY). The Habitat Restoration Property Option Notice delivered to Escrow Holder also shall include a non-refundable deposit against the Habitat Restoration Property -31- Purchase Price (defined below) in the amount of One Hundred Dollars ($100.00), which shall be applicable to the Habitat Restoration Property Purchase Price. (v) Purchase and Sale. Provided the Habitat Restoration Property Option has been timely exercised as described above, CITY agrees to transfer the Habitat Restoration Property to OWNER, and OWNER shall pay to the CITY a purchase price for such transfer in the amount of its then fair market value as determined by an appraiser mutually acceptable to CITY and OWNER (the "Habitat Restoration Purchase Price"), payable in full upon close of escrow within sixty (60) days' of the Habitat Restoration Property Option Notice. The Conservation Easement Deed for the Habitat Restoration Property shall restrict the use of the Habitat Restoration Property to habitat restoration in accordance with the Project EIR. (vi) Memorandum of Habitat Restoration Property Option. A Memorandum of the Habitat Restoration Property Option shall be recorded against the CITY Property in a form mutually acceptable to CITY and OWNER. 4.5.2 Community Facilities District. (i) OWNER shall request in writing that the CITY establish one or more community facilities districts (each a "CFD") pursuant to the Mello Roos Act to finance infrastructure, public facilities and public services that may be required in connection with the Development Plan and the Development of the Property and shall vote in favor of each such community facilities districts. It is anticipated that three (3) annual special taxes will be authorized to be levied within each CFD, which shall be referred to herein as "Special Tax A," "Special Tax B," and "Special Tax C." (ii) Special Tax A will be authorized to be levied on all non - governmentally owned assessor's parcels within each CFD to fund, in order of priority: (a) administrative expenses of the CFD; (b) scheduled debt service on bonds for the CFD that are issued to fund eligible public facilities (including, as may be permitted by the City, public facilities in lieu of Contributions); (c) replenishment of a reserve fund for the bonds; and (d) on a pay as you go basis, eligible public facilities (including, as may be permitted by the City, public facilities in lieu of Contributions) including acquisition of the Nature Center Phase as described in Section 4.5.3. (iii) Special Tax B will be authorized to be levied on assessor's parcels in the CFD for which a building permit for residential construction and a certificate of occupancy or final inspection has been issued ("Occupied Residential Property") in an initial amount of Two Hundred Thirty Seven Dollars ($237.00) per dwelling unit per year, subject to the annual increases described below, to fund, in order of priority: (a) administrative expenses of the CFD; (b) replenishment of any applicable reserve fund; and (c) eligible CITY services in an amount equal to the Services Deficit pursuant to Section 11.8 of the Specific Plan and Section 4.7. below. The Maximum Special Tax B shall be increased each fiscal year, beginning with the fiscal year following the formation of the CFD, by a percentage equal to five and six tenths percent (5.6%) of the prior year's levy of the Maximum Special Tax. -32- (iv) Special Tax C will be authorized to be levied on Occupied Residential Property in the CFD in an initial amount of Forty Three Dollars ($43.00) per dwelling unit per year to fund, subject to the annual increases described below, in order of priority: (a) administrative expenses of the CFD; (b) replenishment of any applicable reserve fund; and (c) Annual Wildlife Conservation Fee for Wildlife Conservation Costs pursuant to Section 4.4.5.(iv). The Maximum Special Tax C shall be increased each fiscal year, beginning with the fiscal year following the formation of the CFD, by a percentage equal to two percent (2%) of the prior year's Maximum Special Tax C. (v) CITY agrees that the maximum effective tax rate for assessor's parcels within each CFD, including without limitation, Special Tax A, Special Tax B and Special Tax C, may not exceed two and one tenth percent (2.1%) of the reasonably expected value of the parcel with planned vertical improvements determined at the time of approval of the CFD and the Rate and Method of Apportionment. (vi) CITY agrees to use reasonable efforts to develop and implement the CFD(s) subject to public hearing and election requirements of applicable State and, if tax-exempt bonds are to be issued, Federal law, the Existing Regulations and the customary and reasonable industry standards for the development of such financings for CFD(s). OWNER and CITY acknowledge and agree that the establishment of a CFD for facilities and services and the issuance of bonds supported by the special taxes are dependent on many factors that are not known at this time. The viability of the financing, the amount of special taxes for debt service, and available bond proceeds will be dependent on several factors existing at the time the bonds are sold, including, but not limited to, the financial markets, interest on tax exempt financings, housing market, value of homes in the area, absorption rates for home sales in the area, bond underwriting criteria and ratings by bond -rating agencies. (vii) CITY agrees that upon receipt of OWNER'S written request and application and the deposit with CITY of sufficient funds to pay the CITY's costs to undertake the proceedings to establish any particular CFD, CITY shall conduct proceedings to establish the respective CFD(s) and OWNER shall cooperate in the conduct of such proceedings. OWNER acknowledges that this Agreement cannot obligate the City Council to establish the CFD(s) at the conclusion of those proceedings. 4.5.3 Acquisition of Nature Center Phase. (i) The CITY shall acquire the Nature Center Phase with proceeds of the CFD(s) as described in Section 4.5.2. (ii) Approximately eighteen (18) acres of the Nature Center Phase comprised of the Nature Center Road Parcel and the Nature Center Parcel (the "Improved Portion") shall be improved as roadways with respect to the Nature Center Road Parcel, and to a "Superpad Condition" with respect to the Nature Center Parcel, by the OWNER. "Superpad Condition" shall mean for the purposes of this Agreement: (a) consisting of grading and setting survey markers at the elevations shown on the CITY approved conceptual grading plan; (b) paved primary access to parking lot and secondary access off of Camino Estribo to the Nature Center Parcel; (c) irrigated slopes with landscaped of native vegetation; (d) constructed trails with decomposed granite and -33- look -out posts; (e) all wet and dry utilities to the site; (f) construct all interim and permanent storm drains including drainage for the trails; (g) all required work under the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan required by Chapter 18.18 of the Temecula Municipal Code; and (h) Water Quality Management Plan and installation of devices, basins and other facilities and work required by the Water Quality Management Plan. "Superpad Improvements" shall mean all of the construction and grading work required to be performed by the OWNER and described in (a) (h) in the preceding sentence. All plans referenced in the definition of Superpad Condition shall be approved by the CITY or its designated official. The remaining approximately thirty-seven (37) acres of the Nature Center Phase (comprised of the Nature Center Open Space Parcel and the Nature Center Conservation Easement Parcel) (the "Unimproved Portion") shall be acquired by the CITY in its "as is" condition and the Nature Center Conservation Parcel shall be subject to the Conservation Easement. (iii) Both the Improved Portion and the Unimproved Portion shall be acquired by the CITY as set forth in Section 4.4.3. and this Section for an acquisition price equal to the appraised value of the Nature Center Phase (by an MAI appraiser agreed to by the parties) with the Superpad Improvements based on the uses allowed on the Nature Center Phase by the Specific Plan at the time of the appraisal provided the appraisal is completed within six months prior to the date of conveyance (the "Acquisition Price"). (iv) The time for conveyance of the Nature Center Phase is described in Section 4.4.3. (v) The Acquisition Price for the Nature Center Phase shall be paid solely from the proceeds of Special Tax A and bonds issued by the CFD(s) that are secured by Special Tax A and no other CITY funds shall be used for such payments. 4.6 Public Art. OWNER shall comply with the requirements of public art requirements of Chapter 5.08 of the Temecula Municipal Code. 4.7 City Services Deficit Payment. (i) As described in Section 11.8 of the Specific Plan, the CITY estimates that the costs to the CITY of providing public safety and other municipal services to the Project will exceed the municipal revenue from the Project by a substantial amount ("Services Deficit") and the owners of the property within the Specific Plan Area are required to pay the Services Deficit in apportioned annual amounts. (ii) The OWNER, its successors to the properties within the Project, including End Users, shall pay to the CITY the sum of two hundred thirty-seven dollars ($237.00) per occupied residential dwelling unit within the Project each year with an increase in such payment each fiscal year in an amount of five and six -tenths percent (5.6%) of the previous year's payment. (iii) Pursuant to Section 4.5.2 above and Section 11.8 of the Specific Plan, OWNER, its successors to the property within the Project, including End Users, shall fulfill this obligation of the Specific Plan with the proceeds of Special Tax B of the CFD(s), provided, however, that the obligation under this Section and Section 11.8 of the Specific Plan remains -34- regardless of the financing mechanism used to pay it or whether there is a financing mechanism to pay it. 5. Further Assurances to OWNER Regarding Exercise of Reserved Authority. 5.1 Adoption of General Plan and Granting of Other Project Approvals. In preparing and adopting any general plan amendment, zoning district change and in granting the other Project Approvals, the CITY reserves its right to and shall consider the health, safety and welfare of the residents of the CITY. 5.2 Assurances to OWNER. The parties further acknowledge that the public benefits to be provided by OWNER to the CITY pursuant to this Agreement are in consideration for and reliance upon assurances that the Property can be developed in accordance with the Development Plan Approval(s) and this Agreement. Accordingly, while recognizing that the Development of the Property may be affected by exercise of the authority and rights reserved and excepted as provided in Sections 3.2. and 3.3. ("Reserved Authority") of this Agreement, OWNER is concerned that normally the judiciary extends to local agencies significant deference in the adoption of land use regulations, which might permit the CITY in violation of the Reserved Authority, to attempt to apply regulations which are inconsistent with the Project Approvals pursuant to the exercise of the Reserved Authority. Accordingly, OWNER desires assurances that the CITY shall not and the CITY agrees that it shall not further restrict or limit the development of the Property in violation of this Agreement except in strict accordance with the Reserved Authority. 5.3 Judicial Review. Based on the foregoing, in the event OWNER judicially (including by way of a reference proceeding) challenges the application of a future land use regulation as being in violation of this Agreement and as not being a land use regulation adopted pursuant to the Reserved Authority, OWNER shall bear the burden of proof in establishing that such rule, regulation or policy is inconsistent with the Existing Regulations and the Development Plan Approval(s) and the CITY shall thereafter bear the burden of proof in establishing that such regulation was adopted pursuant to and in accordance with the Reserved Authority and was not applied by the CITY in violation of this Agreement. 6. Indemnification. 6.1 OWNER Indemnification. Except to the extent of the active negligence or willful misconduct of the Indemnified Parties (as defined below), OWNER agrees to indemnify and hold harmless the CITY, the Temecula Community Facilities District, the Temecula Housing Authority, the Temecula Public Financing Authority, any community facilities districts organized by such entities, and their agents, officers, contractors, attorneys, and employees ("Indemnified Parties") from and against any claims or proceeding against the Indemnified Parties to set aside, void or annul the approval of this Agreement or any Development Plan Approval(s) or Subsequent Development Plan Approval(s) or actions taken thereto pursuant to this Agreement. Notwithstanding the provisions of this Agreement, OWNER's obligation pursuant to this Section is not a benefit or burden running with the land and shall not be assigned to any person without the prior, express written consent of the City. OWNER shall deposit the sum of Thirty Thousand Dollars ($30,000.00) toward the expected costs of defense, as reasonably determined by the City -35- Attorney, with the CITY within five (5) business days of notice from the CITY of the claim and shall add to the deposit within five (5) business days from the, written request of CITY. Without in any way limiting the provisions of this Section, the parties hereto agree that this Section shall be interpreted in accordance with the provisions of California Civil Code Section 2778 in effect as of the Effective Date. 6.2 OWNER Indemnification for Legal Challenge. Notwithstanding Section 6.1. above, and as a separate and distinct obligation of OWNER, OWNER agrees to indemnify and hold harmless the Indemnified Parties from and against each and every claim, action, proceeding, cost, fee, legal cost, damage, award or liability of any nature arising from alleged damages caused to third parties and alleging that the Indemnified Parties is or are liable therefor as a direct or indirect result of the CITY's approval of this Agreement or any Development Plan Approval(s) or Subsequent Development Plan Approval(s) pursuant to this Agreement. OWNER'S duties under this Section are solely subject to and conditioned upon the Indemnified Parties written request to OWNER to indemnify the Indemnified Parties. OWNER shall deposit the expected costs of defense, as reasonably determined by the City Attorney, with the City within five (5) business days of notice from the CITY of the claim and shall add to the deposit within five (5) business days from the request of the CITY. Without in any way limiting the provisions of this Section, the parties hereto agree that this Section shall be interpreted in accordance with the provisions of California Civil Code Section 2778 in effect as of the Effective Date. 6.3 Indemnification of RCA. The MSHCP is overseen by the Western Riverside County Regional Conservation Authority, a Joint Powers Agency formed under Government Code section 6500 et seq. ("RCA"). The RCA has not, to date, granted any approval of the Project. The CITY and OWNER have consulted with the RCA regarding the Project's consistency with the MSHCP. While that consultation would not constitute an approval of the Project and thus should not subject RCA to any legal action, the OWNER or any successor -in -interest shall defend, indemnify, and hold harmless the RCA or its Board, agents, officers, officials, and employees from any petition for writ of mandate, or other claim, action or proceeding to attack, set aside, void, or annul any approval of the Project or related to the approval of the Project, that names the RCA, including, but not limited to, any associated costs, damages, attorney fees awards and administrative and legal expenses incurred by the RCA related to such actions, including but not limited to costs associated with California Public Records Act requests submitted to the RCA related to the Project and for the purposes of the action. The RCA shall promptly notify the OWNER and CITY of any such claim, action, or proceeding and shall reasonably cooperate in the defense. If the RCA fails to promptly notify the OWNER and CITY of any such claim, action, or proceeding or fails to reasonably cooperate in the defense, the OWNER shall not, thereafter, be responsible to defend, indemnify or hold harmless the RCA. The obligations imposed by this condition include, but are not limited to, the following: the OWNER shall pay all reasonable legal services expenses the RCA incurs in connection with any such claim, action or proceeding, whether it incurs such expenses directly, whether it is ordered by a court to pay such expenses, or whether it incurs such expenses by providing legal services through RCA legal counsel. The OWNER and City agree that all litigation pleadings in the action filed jointly with or on behalf of the RCA will be subject to review, revision, and approval by RCA legal counsel. 6.4 Indemnification Procedures. Each Indemnifying Party shall retain settlement authority with respect to any matter concerning that Indemnifying Party provided that prior to -36- settling any such lawsuit or claim with respect to that Indemnifying Party, the Indemnifying Party shall provide the CITY and the other Indemnifying Parties with a minimum ten (10) business days written notice of its intent to settle such lawsuit or claim. If the CITY or the other Indemnifying Parties, in their discretion, do not desire to settle such lawsuit or claim, it may notify the applicable Indemnifying Party of the same, in which event the applicable Indemnifying Party may still elect to settle the lawsuit or claim as to itself, but the non -settling parties may elect to continue such lawsuit, at their cost and expense, so long as: (i) with respect to the CITY, the CITY'S decision is predicated upon a legitimate and articulated threat to either the exercise of its police powers or a risk of harm to those present within the CITY; or (ii) with respect to the other Indemnifying Parties, the decision is predicated upon a legitimate and articulated threat to the Development of that Indemnifying Party's property. 7. Relationship of Parties. The contractual relationship between the CITY and OWNER is such that OWNER is an independent contractor and not the agent or employee of the CITY. The CITY and OWNER hereby renounce the existence of any form of joint venture or partnership between them, and agree that nothing contained in this Agreement or in any document executed in connection with the Project shall be construed as making the CITY and OWNER joint ventures or partners. 8. Amendment or Cancellation of A2.reement. This Agreement may be amended or canceled in whole or in part only by mutual consent of the parties in the manner provided for in Government Code Section 65868. No amendment or modification of this Agreement or any provision hereof shall be effective unless set forth in writing and signed by duly authorized representatives of each party hereto. This provision shall not limit the CITY's or OWNER's remedies as provided by Section 10. 9. Periodic Review of Compliance with Agreement. 9.1 Periodic Review. The CITY and OWNER shall review this Agreement at least once every 12 -month period from the Effective Date. The CITY shall notify OWNER in writing of the date for review at least thirty (30) days prior thereto. Such periodic review shall be conducted in accordance with Government Code Section 65865.1. 9.2 Good Faith Compliance. During each periodic review, OWNER shall be required to demonstrate good faith compliance with the terms of this Agreement. OWNER agrees to furnish such reasonable evidence of good faith compliance as the CITY, in the exercise of its reasonable discretion, may require. If requested by OWNER, the CITY agrees to provide to OWNER, a certificate that OWNER or a successor or assignee is in compliance with the terms of this Agreement, provided OWNER reimburses the CITY for all reasonable and direct costs and fees incurred by the CITY with respect thereto. 9.3 Failure to Conduct Annual Review. The failure of the CITY to conduct the annual review shall not be an OWNER default. Further, OWNER shall not be entitled to any remedy for the CITY's failure to conduct this annual review. 9.4 Initiation of Review by City Council. In addition to the annual review, the City Council may at any time initiate a review of this Agreement by giving written notice to OWNER. -37- Within thirty (30) days following receipt of such notice, OWNER shall submit evidence to the CITY Council of OWNER's good faith compliance with this Agreement and such review and determination shall proceed in the same manner as provided for the annual review. The City Council shall initiate its review pursuant to this Section 9.4. only if it has probable cause to believe the CITY's general health, safety or welfare is at risk as a result of specific acts or failures to act by OWNER. 9.5 Administration of Agreement. Any final decision by the CITY staff concerning the interpretation and administration of this Agreement and Development of the Property in accordance herewith may be appealed by OWNER to the City Council, provided that any such appeal shall be filed with the City Clerk within thirty (30) days after OWNER receives written notice that the staff decision is final. The City Council shall render, at a noticed public hearing, its decision to affirm, reverse or modify the staff decision within thirty (30) days after the appeal was filed. 9.6 Availability of Documents. If requested by OWNER, the CITY agrees to provide to OWNER copies of any documents, reports or other items reviewed, accumulated or prepared by or for the CITY in connection with any periodic compliance review by the CITY, provided OWNER reimburses the CITY for all reasonable and direct costs and fees incurred by the CITY with respect thereto. The CITY shall respond to OWNER's request on or before ten (10) business days have elapsed from the CITY's receipt of such request. 10. Events of Default: Remedies and Termination. Unless amended or canceled as provided in Section 8., or modified or suspended pursuant to Government Code Section 65869.5 or terminated pursuant to this Section 10., this Agreement is enforceable by either party hereto. 10.1 Defaults by Owner. If the CITY determines on the basis of a preponderance of the evidence that OWNER has not complied in good faith with the terms and conditions of this agreement, the CITY shall, by written notice to OWNER, specify the manner in which OWNER has failed to so comply and state the steps OWNER must take to bring itself into compliance. If, within sixty (60) days after the effective date of notice from the CITY specifying the manner in which OWNER has failed to so comply, OWNER does not commence all steps reasonably necessary to bring itself into compliance as required and thereafter diligently pursue such steps to completion, then OWNER shall be deemed to be in default under the terms of this Agreement. The CITY may terminate this Agreement pursuant to Government Code Section 65865.1. OWNER agrees that its default hereunder is a conclusive representation that it is consenting to the cancellation of this Agreement. In event of default by OWNER, except as provided in Section 10.3., the CITY's sole remedy for any breach of this Agreement by OWNER shall be the CITY's right to terminate this Agreement. 10.2 Defaults by CITY. If OWNER determines on the basis of a preponderance of the evidence that the CITY has not complied in good faith with the terms and conditions of this Agreement, OWNER shall, by written notice to the CITY, specify the manner in which the CITY has failed to so comply and state the steps the CITY must take to bring itself into compliance. If, within sixty (60) days after the effective date of notice from OWNER specifying the manner in -38- which the CITY has failed to so comply, the CITY does not commence all steps reasonably necessary to bring itself into compliance as required and thereafter diligently pursue such steps to completion, then the CITY shall be deemed to be in default under the terms of this Agreement and OWNER may terminate this Agreement and, in addition, may pursue any other remedy available at law or equity, including specific performance as set forth in Section 10.3. 10.3 Remedies. 10.3.1 OWNER's Remedies. Due to the size, nature and scope of the Project, it will not be practical or possible to restore the Property to its natural condition once implementation of this Agreement has begun. After such implementation, OWNER may be foreclosed from other choices it may have had to utilize the Property and provide for other benefits. OWNER has invested significant time and resources and performed extensive planning and processing of the Project in agreeing to the terms of this Agreement and will be investing even more significant time and resources in implementing the Project in reliance upon the terms of this Agreement, and it is not possible to determine the sum of money which would adequately compensate OWNER for such efforts. For the above reasons, the CITY and OWNER agree that damages would not be an adequate remedy if the CITY fails to carry out its obligations under this Agreement and that OWNER shall have the right to seek and obtain specific performance as a remedy for any breach of this Agreement. Moreover, the CITY would not have consented to this Agreement if it were to be subject to damages for breach of this Agreement. Therefore, OWNER specifically agrees that it has no authority under this Agreement or otherwise to seek monetary damages against the CITY for any breach of this Agreement by the CITY, and agrees not to seek monetary damages against the CITY for breach of this Agreement. 10.3.2 CITY's Remedies. In the event of an uncured default by OWNER of the terms of this Agreement, CITY, at its option, may give notice of its intent to terminate or modify this Agreement pursuant to this Agreement and/or the Development Agreement Act, in which event the matter shall be scheduled for consideration and review by the City Council in the manner set forth in the Agreement or the Development Agreement Act. The CITY and OWNER further acknowledge that, if OWNER fails to carry out its obligations under this Agreement, the CITY shall have the right to refuse to issue any permits or other approvals which OWNER would otherwise have been entitled to pursuant to this Agreement. Therefore, the CITY's remedy of terminating this Agreement shall be sufficient in most circumstances if OWNER fails to carry out its obligations hereunder. Notwithstanding the foregoing, if the CITY issues a permit or other approval pursuant to this Agreement in reliance (explicitly stated in writing) upon a specified condition being satisfied by OWNER in the future, and if OWNER then fails to satisfy such condition, the CITY shall be entitled to specific performance for the sole purpose of causing OWNER to satisfy such condition. The CITY's right to specific performance shall be limited to those circumstances set forth above, and the CITY shall have no right to seek specific performance to cause OWNER to otherwise proceed with the Development of the Project in any manner. 10.4 Institution of Le2a1 Action. In addition to any other rights or remedies, OWNER or the CITY may institute legal action to cure, correct or remedy any default, to enforce any covenants or agreements herein, to enjoin any threatened or attempted violation hereof, or to obtain any other remedies consistent with the purpose of this Agreement. Such legal action shall be heard by a reference from the Riverside County Superior Court pursuant to the reference procedures of -39- the California Code of Civil Procedure Sections 638, et seq. OWNER and the CITY shall agree upon a single referee who shall then try all issues, whether of fact or law, and report a finding and judgment thereon and issue all legal and equitable relief appropriate under the circumstances of the controversy before him. If OWNER and the CITY are unable to agree on a referee within ten (10) days of a written request to do so by either party hereto, either party may seek to have one appointed pursuant to the California Code of Civil Procedure Section 640. The cost of such proceeding shall initially be borne equally by the parties. Any referee selected pursuant to this Section 10.4. shall be considered a temporary judge appointed pursuant to Article 6, Section 21 of the California Constitution. 10.5 Estoppel Certificates. Either party may at any time deliver written notice to the other party requesting an estoppel certificate (the "Estoppel Certificate") stating: 10.5.1 The Agreement is in full force and effect and is a binding obligation of the parties. 10.5.2 The Agreement has not been amended or modified either orally or in writing or, if so amended, identifying the amendments. 10.5.3 No default in the performance of the requesting party's obligations under the Agreement exists or, if a default does exist, the nature and amount of any default. A party receiving a request for an Estoppel Certificate shall provide a signed certificate to the requesting party within thirty (30) days' after receipt of the request. The City Manager or any person designated by the City Manager may sign Estoppel Certificates on behalf of the CITY. Any officer of OWNER may sign on behalf of OWNER. An Estoppel Certificate may be relied on by assignees and mortgagees. In the event that one party requests an Estoppel Certificate from the other, the requesting party shall reimburse the other party for all reasonable and direct costs and fees incurred by such party with respect thereto. 10.6 Local. State And Federal Laws. OWNER and its contractors shall carry out the design and construction of all private improvements on the Property and all Public Improvements in conformity with all applicable laws, including, without limitation, all applicable federal, state and local occupation, employment, prevailing wage, safety and health laws, rules, regulations and standards. Except to the extent of the active negligence or willful misconduct of the Indemnified Parties, OWNER agrees to indemnify, defend and hold the Indemnified Parties (as defined in Section 6.) harmless from and against any cost, expense, claim, charge or liability relating to or arising directly or indirectly from any breach by or failure of OWNER or its contractor(s) or agents to comply with such laws, rules or regulations. OWNER's indemnity obligations set forth in this Section shall survive the termination or expiration of this Agreement unless OWNER'S obligation has been transferred to another party pursuant to the provisions of this Agreement. 11. Waivers and Delays. 11.1 No Waiver. Failure by a party to insist upon the strict performance of any of the provisions of this Agreement by the other party, and failure by a party to exercise its rights upon a -40- default by the other party hereto, shall not constitute a waiver of such party's right to demand strict compliance by such other party in the future. 11.2 Third Parties. Non-performance shall not be excused because of a failure of a third person, except as provided in Section 11.3. 11.3 Force Maieure. A party shall not be deemed to be in default where failure or delay in performance of any of its obligations under this Agreement is caused by floods, earthquakes, other Acts of God, fires, wars, riots or similar hostilities, strikes and other labor difficulties beyond such party's control, government regulations (including, without limitation, local, state and federal environmental and natural resource regulations), voter initiative or referenda, moratoria (including, without limitation, any "development moratorium" as that term is applied in Government Code Section 66452.6) or judicial decisions. Notwithstanding the foregoing, OWNER is not entitled pursuant to this Section to an extension of time to perform because of past, present, or future difficulty in obtaining suitable construction financing or permanent financing for the Development, or because of economic or market conditions. In the event OWNER or CITY desires to invoke these Force Majeure provisions, the party shall notify the other party of a Force Majeure event within thirty (30) days of the event and include a detailed description of the Force Majeure event and how it affects that party's compliance with the terms of this Agreement. 11.4 Extensions. The Term of this Agreement and the time for performance by OWNER or the CITY of any of its obligations hereunder or pursuant to the Project Approvals shall be extended by the period of time that any of the events described in Section 11.3. exist and/or prevent performance of such obligations. In addition, the Term shall be extended for delays arising from the following events for a time equal to the duration of each delay which occurs during the Term: Litigation. The period of time after the Effective Date during which litigation related to the Development Plan Approval(s) or having the actual effect of delaying implementation of the Project is pending, including litigation pending on the Effective Date. This period shall include any time during which appeals may be filed or are pending. 12. Notices. All notices required or provided for under this Agreement shall be in writing and delivered in person or sent by certified mail, postage prepaid, return receipt requested or sent by an independent courier service with confirmation of delivery. Notices required to be given to the CITY shall be addressed as follows: CITY OF TEMECULA 41000 Main Street. Temecula, CA 92590 Attention: City Manager -41- With a copy to: Richards, Watson & Gershon 355 South Grand Ave., 40th Floor Los Angeles, CA 90071 Attention: Peter M. Thorson, City Attorney Notices required to be given to OWNER shall be addressed as follows: Temecula West Village, LLC 179 Calle Magdalena #201 Encinitas, CA 92024 Attention: Robert F. Anselmo With a copy to: Lieberg Oberhansley LLP 41911 Fifth Street, Suite 300 Temecula, CA 92590 Attention: Philip D. Oberhansley, Esq. A party may change its address for notices by giving notice in writing to the other party as required herein and thereafter notices shall be addressed and transmitted to the new address. 13. Attorneys' Fees. If legal action is brought by either party against the other for breach of this Agreement, including actions derivative from the performance of this Agreement, or to compel performance under this Agreement, the prevailing party shall be entitled to an award of its costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, and shall also be entitled to recover its contribution for the costs of the referee referred to in Section 10.4. above as an item of damage and/or recoverable costs, provided, however, that the attorney fees that may be awarded to the OWNER shall not exceed the hourly rate of attorneys employed by the CITY or the amount of attorney's fees and costs charged to the CITY in the litigation. 14. Recording. This Agreement and any amendment or cancellation hereto shall be recorded, at no cost to the CITY, in the Official Records of Riverside County by the City Clerk within the period required by Section 65868.5 of the Government Code. 15. Effect of Agreement on Title. 15.1 Effect on Title. OWNER and the CITY agree that this Agreement shall not continue as an encumbrance against any portion of the Property as to which this Agreement has terminated. -42- 15.2 Encumbrances and Lenders' Rights. 15.2.1 CITY Cooperation with Lender. OWNER and the CITY hereby agree that this Agreement shall not prevent or limit any owner of any interest in the Property, or any portion thereof, at any time or from time to time in any manner, at its or their sole discretion, from encumbering the Property, the improvements thereon, or any portion thereof with any mortgage, deed of trust sale and leaseback arrangement or other security device. The CITY acknowledges that any Lender (as hereinafter defined) may require certain interpretations of or modifications to the Agreement or the project and the CITY agrees, upon request, from time to time from OWNER, to meet with the property owner(s) and/or representatives of such Lenders to negotiate in good faith any such request for interpretation or modification through an amendment to this Agreement or an Operating Memorandum. The CITY further agrees that it will not unreasonably withhold its consent to any such requested interpretation or modification to the extent such interpretation or modification is consistent with the intent and purpose of this Agreement. A default under this Agreement shall not defeat, render invalid, diminish or impair the lien of any Lender. 15.2.2 Seniority of Agreement. This Agreement is and shall be senior and superior to the lien of any Mortgage and to all renewals, modifications, consolidations, replacements and extensions thereof; provided, however, CITY agrees that, CITY will attorn to and recognize the mortgagee of a mortgage or beneficiary of a deed of trust or holder of any other security interest in the Property or any portion thereof and their successors and assigns, including without limitation the purchaser at a judicial or non judicial foreclosure sale or a person or entity which obtains title by deed -in -lieu of foreclosure ("Lender") as an approved Development Transferee pursuant to Section 2.5.1. of this Agreement for the unexpired balance (and any extensions, if exercised) of the term of this Agreement upon the terms and conditions set forth herein. 15.2.3 Notice to Lender. The Lender shall, upon written request to the CITY, be entitled to receive a copy of any notice of Default (as defined in Section 10.1. hereof) delivered to OWNER. As a pre -condition to the institution of legal proceedings or termination proceedings, the CITY shall deliver to all Lenders who have requested such notice written notification of any default by OWNER in the performance of its obligations under this Agreement which is not cured within sixty (60) days (the "Second Default Notice") and shall allow the Lender(s) an opportunity to cure such defaults as set forth herein. The Second Notice of Default shall specify in detail the alleged default and the suggested means to cure it. After receipt of the Second Default Notice, each such Lender shall have the right, at its sole option, within sixty (60) days to cure such default to the satisfaction of the CITY or, if such default cannot reasonably be cured within that sixty (60) day period, to commence to cure such default and diligently proceed with such cure to the satisfaction of the CITY, in which case no default shall exist and the CITY shall take no further action. Notwithstanding the foregoing, if such default shall be a default which can only be remedied by such Lender obtaining possession of the Property, or any portion thereof, and such Lender seeks to obtain possession, such Lender shall have until sixty (60) days after the date obtaining such possession to cure or, if such default cannot reasonably be cured within such period, then to commence to cure such default. -43- 16. Severability of Terms. If any term, provision, covenant or condition of this Agreement shall be determined invalid, void or unenforceable, the remainder of this Agreement shall not be affected thereby if the tribunal finds that the invalidity was not a material part of consideration for either party. The covenants contained herein are mutual covenants. The covenants contained herein constitute conditions to the concurrent or subsequent performance by the party benefited thereby of the covenants to be performed hereunder by such benefited party. 17. Subsequent Amendment to Authorizing Statute. This Agreement has been entered into in reliance upon the provisions of the Development Agreement Legislation in effect as of the Agreement Date. Accordingly, subject to Sections 3.5. and 3.6. above, to the extent that subsequent amendments to the Government Code would affect the provisions of this Agreement, such amendments shall not be applicable to this Agreement unless necessary for this Agreement to be enforceable or required by law or unless this Agreement is modified pursuant to the provisions set forth in this Agreement and Government Code Section 65868 as in effect on the Agreement Date. 18. Rules of Construction and Miscellaneous Terms. 18.1 Interpretation and Governing Law. The language in all parts of this Agreement shall, in all cases, be construed as a whole and in accordance with its fair meaning. This Agreement and any dispute arising hereunder shall be governed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of the State of California. The parties understand and agree that this Agreement is not intended to constitute, nor shall be construed to constitute, an impermissible attempt to contract away the legislative and governmental functions of the CITY, and in particular, the CITY's police powers. In this regard, the parties understand and agree that this Agreement shall not be deemed to constitute the surrender or abnegation of the CITY's governmental powers over the Property. 18.2 Section Headings. All section headings and subheadings are inserted for convenience only and shall not affect any construction or interpretation of this Agreement. 18.3 Gender. The singular includes the plural; the masculine gender includes the feminine; "shall" is mandatory, "may" is permissive. 18.4 No Joint and Several Liability. Except for the obligations of OWNER to design, acquire, construct and install the public and private improvements described in this Agreement and except for the obligations of the OWNER to convey prope