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HomeMy WebLinkAbout012511 CC AgendaIn compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the office of the City Clerk (951) 694-6444. Notification 48 hours prior to a meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to that meeting [28 CFR 35.102.35.104 ADA Title II] AGENDA TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL A REGULAR MEETING CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 41000 MAIN STREET JANUARY 25, 2011 — 7:00 PM At approximately 9:45 P.M., the City Council will determine which of the remaining agenda items can be considered and acted upon prior to 10:00 P.M. and may continue all other items on which additional time is required until a future meeting. All meetings are scheduled to end at 10:00 P.M. 6:30 P.M. - Closed Session of the City Council/Temecula Redevelopment Agency pursuant to Government Code Section: 1) Conference with City Attorney pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9(a) with respect to one matter of pending litigation to which the City is a plaintiff. The title of the litigation is City of Temecula, et. al. v. Tovey/Shultz Construction, Inc., et. al., Riverside County Superior Court Case No. RIC 541908 (Old Town Community Theater construction litigation). 2) Conference with City Attorney pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9(a) with respect to one matter of pending litigation to which the City is a defendant. The title of the litigation is Alissa Gross etc. v. Landscape Structures, Inc., City of Temecula, et. al., Riverside County Superior Court Case No. RIC 538128. Public Information concerning existing litigation between the City and various parties may be acquired by reviewing the public documents held by the City Clerk. Next in Order: Ordinance: 11-02 Resolution: 11-09 CALL TO ORDER: Mayor Ron Roberts Prelude Music: Joshua Jurkosky and Ron Savitt Invocation: Pastor John Ruhlman of Life Church Flag Salute: Council Member Edwards ROLL CALL: Comerchero, Edwards, Naggar, Washington, Roberts 1 PRESENTATIONS/PROCLAMATIONS PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 30 minutes is provided so members of the public may address the Council on items that appear within the Consent Calendar or ones that are not listed on the agenda. Speakers are limited to two (2) minutes each. If you desire to speak to the Council on an item which is listed on the Consent Calendar or a matter not listed on the agenda, a pink "Request to Speak" form should be filled out and filed with the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. For all Public Hearing or Council Business matters on the agenda, a "Request to Speak" form must be filed with the City Clerk prior to the Council addressing that item. There is a five minute (5) time limit for individual speakers. CITY COUNCIL REPORTS Reports by the members of the City Council on matters not on the agenda will be made at this time. A total, not to exceed, ten (10) minutes will be devoted to these reports. CONSENT CALENDAR NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC All matters listed under Consent Calendar are considered to be routine and all will be enacted by one roll call vote. There will be no discussion of these items unless Members of the City Council request specific items be removed from the Consent Calendar for separate action. 1 Standard Ordinance and Resolution Adoption Procedure RECOMMENDATION: 1.1 Motion to waive the reading of the text of all ordinances and resolutions included in the agenda. 2 Action Minutes RECOMMENDATION: 2.1 Approve the action minutes of January 11, 2011. 3 List of Demands RECOMMENDATION: 3.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: 2 RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A 4 Approval of the fiscal year 2011-12 Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District (TVTBID) Advisory Board's Annual Report and Levy of an Assessment against Lodging Businesses within the TVTBID for fiscal year 2011-12 RECOMMENDATION: 4.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE REPORT OF THE ADVISORY BOARD FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011-12 IN CONNECTION WITH THE TEMECULA VALLEY TOURISM BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT (TVTBID) 4.2 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF INTENTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DECLARING ITS INTENTION TO LEVY AN ASSESSMENT AGAINST LODGING BUSINESSES WITHIN THE TEMECULA VALLEY TOURISM BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011- 12 AND FIXING THE TIME AND PLACE OF A PUBLIC HEARING THEREON AND GIVING NOTICE THEREOF 5 Roripaugh Ranch — Approval of Sixth Operating Memorandum RECOMMENDATION: 5.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE SIXTH OPERATING MEMORANDUM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT BETWEEN ASHBY USA LLC AND THE CITY OF TEMECULA FOR SUNWOOD RORIPAUGH RANCH LLC, BHT- RORIPAUGH WB99 LLC, AND WINGSWEEP CORPORATION, OWNERS OF LOT 7 OF FINAL TRACT MAP 29353-1, TRACT 29661-2, AND LOT 1 OF FINAL TRACT MAP 29353-1, RESPECTIVELY, WITHIN THE RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT 3 6 Second Amendment to the Agreement with Proactive Fire Design & Consulting, Inc. RECOMMENDATION: 6.1 Approve the Second Amendment with ProActive Fire Design & Consulting, Inc. for an additional amount of $29,000 to increase the existing contract amount to $59,000. 7 5 -Year Agreement for Animal Control and Sheltering Services between the City of Temecula and Animal Friends of the Valleys (aka L.E.A.F.) RECOMMENDATION: 7.1 Approve the five year Agreement for Animal Control and Sheltering Services between the City of Temecula and Animal Friends of the Valleys at a cost of $247,500 annually; 7.2 Authorize the City Manager to approve additional service not to exceed $30,000 annually. 8 Second Reading of Ordinance No. 11-01 RECOMMENDATION: 8.1 Adopt an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 11-01 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING AN AMENDMENT TO THE RORIPAUGH ESTATES SPECIFIC PLAN TO ALLOW AUTOMOBILE SERVICE STATIONS WITH OR WITHOUT A CAR WASH IN PLANNING AREA 10 UTILIZING THE DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL ZONING DISTRICT ******************** RECESS CITY COUNCIL MEETING TO SCHEDULED MEETINGS OF THE TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT AND THE CITY OF TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY ******************** 4 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT MEETING Next in Order: Ordinance: No. CSD 11-01 Resolution: No. CSD 11-01 CALL TO ORDER: President Jeff Comerchero ROLL CALL: DIRECTORS: Edwards, Naggar, Roberts, Washington, Comerchero CSD PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 15 minutes is provided so members of the public may address the Board of Directors on items that are not listed on the agenda or on the Consent Calendar. Speakers are limited to two (2) minutes each. If you decide to speak to the Board of Directors on an item not on the agenda or on the Consent Calendar, a pink "Request to Speak" form should be filled out and filed with the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. For all other agenda items, a "Request to Speak" form must be filed with the City Clerk Prior to the Board of Directors addressing that item. There is a five (5) minute time limit for individual speakers. Anyone wishing to address the Board of Directors should present a completed pink "Request to Speak" form to the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. CSD CONSENT CALENDAR 9 Action Minutes RECOMMENDATION: 9.1 Approve the action minutes of January 11, 2011. 10 Youth Work Experience Program Partnership RECOMMENDATION: 10.1 Approve the Memorandum of Understanding between Oasis Perris Youth Opportunity Center and the Temecula Community Services District to establish a youth employment work experience program. CSD DEPARTMENTAL REPORT 11 Community Services Department Monthly Report 5 CSD DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SERVICES REPORT CSD GENERAL MANAGERS REPORT CSD BOARD OF DIRECTORS REPORTS CSD ADJOURNMENT Next regular meeting: Tuesday, February 8, 2011, at 5:30 P.M., for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM., City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. 6 TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY MEETING Next in Order: Ordinance: No. RDA 11-01 Resolution: No. RDA 11-01 CALL TO ORDER: Chair Person Mike Naggar ROLL CALL: AGENCY MEMBERS: Comerchero, Edwards, Roberts, Washington, Naggar RDA PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 15 minutes is provided so members of the public may address the Redevelopment Agency on items that are not listed on the agenda or on the Consent Calendar. Speakers are limited to two (2) minutes each. If you decide to speak to the Board of Directors on an item not on the agenda or on the Consent Calendar, a pink "Request to Speak" form should be filled out and filed with the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. For all other agenda items, a "Request to Speak" form must be filed with the City Clerk Prior to the Board of Directors addressing that item. There is a five (5) minute time limit for individual speakers. Anyone wishing to address the Board of Directors should present a completed pink "Request to Speak" form to the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. RDA CONSENT CALENDAR 12 Action Minutes RECOMMENDATION: 12.1 Approve the action minutes of January 11, 2011. RDA DEPARTMENTAL REPORT 13 Redevelopment Department Monthly Report RDA EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS REPORT RDA AGENCY MEMBERS REPORTS RDA ADJOURNMENT Next regular meeting: Tuesday, February 8, 2011, at 5:30 P.M., for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM., City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. 7 RECONVENE TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING Any person may submit written comments to the City Council before a public hearing or may appear and be heard in support of or in opposition to the approval of the project(s) at the time of the hearing. If you challenge any of the project(s) in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing or in written correspondence delivered to the City Clerk at, or prior to, the public hearing. 14 An Appeal of the Planning Commission's approval of Planning Application Nos. PA08- 0241 and PA08-0242, Islamic Center of Temecula Valley, a two -Phase Development Plan and Conditional Use Permit for a two-story, 24,943 square foot structure on 4.32 acres within a VL zone at the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri RECOMMENDATION: 14.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DENYING THE APPEAL OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION'S DECISION AND APPROVING PLANNING APPLICATION NOS. PA08-0241 AND PA08- 0242, A TWO-PHASE DEVELOPMENT PLAN AND CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT FOR A TWO-STORY, 24,943 SQUARE FOOT RELIGIOUS FACILITY ON 4.32 ACRES WITHIN A VERY LOW (VL) RESIDENTIAL ZONE LOCATED AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF NICOLAS ROAD AND CALLE COLIBRI (APN 957-140-012) DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS 15 Planning Department Monthly Report 16 City Council Travel/Conference Report - December 2010 17 Public Works Department Monthly Report 18 Police Department Monthly Report CITY MANAGER REPORT CITY ATTORNEY REPORT ADJOURNMENT Next regular meeting: Tuesday, February 8, 2011, at 5:30 PM, for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM, City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. 8 NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC The agenda packet (including staff reports) will be available for viewing at the Main Reception at City Hall (41000 Main Street, Temecula) or at the Temecula Library (30600 Pauba Road, Temecula) after 4:00 PM the Friday before the City Council meeting. At that time, the packet may as well be accessed on the City's website — www.cityoftemecula.org Supplemental material received after the posting of the Agenda Any supplemental material distributed to a majority of the City Council regarding any item on the Agenda, after the posting of the Agenda, will be available for public review at the Main Reception at the Civic Center (41000 Main Street, Temecula — 8:00 — 5:00 PM). In addition, such material will be made available on the City's web — www.cityoftemecula.org — and will be available for public review at the respective meeting. If you have any questions regarding any item of business on the Agenda for this meeting, please contact City Clerk's Department — 951-694-6444. 9 CONSENT CALENDAR Item No. 1 Item No. 2 ACTION MINUTES TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL A REGULAR MEETING CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 41000 MAIN STREET JANUARY 11, 2011 — 7:00 PM The City Council meeting convened at 7:00 P.M. CALL TO ORDER: Mayor Ron Roberts Prelude Music: Susan Miyamoto Invocation: Pastor Gary Nelson of Calvary Chapel of Temecula Flag Salute: Council Member Comerchero ROLL CALL: Comerchero, Edwards, Naggar, Washington, Roberts PRESENTATIONS/PROCLAMATIONS Presentation of gavel to incoming Mayor Ron Roberts. Service Awards - Ron Roberts, Ron Guerriero, Felicia Hogan, and Stan Harter PUBLIC COMMENTS The following individuals addressed the City Council: • Robert Skiff • Fred Grindle • Chuck Rear • George Rombach • Suzanne Rombach • Wayne Hall • Randy Thompson • Mano Bakh • Lana Tomlinson • Jacqueline LeBeau CITY COUNCIL REPORTS Action Minutes\011111 1 CONSENT CALENDAR 1 Standard Ordinance and Resolution Adoption Procedure - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 1.1 Motion to waive the reading of the text of all ordinances and resolutions included in the agenda. 2 Action Minutes - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 2.1 Approve the action minutes of December 14, 2010. 3 List of Demands - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 3.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11-01 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A 4 City Treasurer's Report as of November 30, 2010 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 4.1 Approve and file the City Treasurer's Report as of November 30, 2010. 5 Inland Empire Heart Association Heart Fundraiser Walk (at the request of Mayor Roberts - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 5.1 Authorize the City to become a media sponsor for the Heart Association Fundraiser Walk. Action Minutes\011111 2 6 Approval of the Plans and Specifications and Authorization to Solicit Construction Bids for the Roripaugh Ranch Street Improvements - Phase I, Project No. PW09-02 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 6.1 Approve the plans and specifications and authorize the Department of Public Works to solicit construction bids for the Roripaugh Ranch Street Improvements — Phase I, Project No. PW09-02. 7 Tract Map No. 34698, located on the north side of Date Street at Lakeview Road, between Ynez Road and Margarita Road, within Harveston Specific Plan - Approved Staff Recommendation (4-0-1) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected approval with the exception of Council Member Comerchero who abstained RECOMMENDATION: 7.1 Approve Tract Map No. 34698 in conformance with the Conditions of Approval. 8 Acceptance of certain Public Streets into the City -Maintained System within Tract Map No. 25004 (located south of Murrieta Hot Springs Road and east of Seraphina Road - KB Homes) - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 8.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11-02 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ACCEPTING CERTAIN PUBLIC STREETS INTO THE CITY -MAINTAINED SYSTEM (WITHIN TRACT NO. 25004) 9 Acceptance of certain Public Streets into the City -Maintained System within Tract Map Nos. 31053, 31053-1, 31053-2, and 31053-3 (located southeasterly of the corner of Date Street and Ynez Road within the Harveston Subdivision — Meritage Homes) - Approved Staff Recommendation (4-0-1) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected approval with the exception of Council Member Comerchero who abstained RECOMMENDATION: 9.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: Action Minutes\011111 3 RESOLUTION NO. 11-03 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ACCEPTING CERTAIN PUBLIC STREETS INTO THE CITY -MAINTAINED SYSTEM (WITHIN TRACT NOS. 31053, 31053-1, 31053-2, AND 31053-3) 10 All -Way Stop Control - Sunny Meadows Drive and Corbie Street - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 10.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11-04 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ESTABLISHING AN ALL -WAY STOP CONTROL AT THE INTERSECTION OF SUNNY MEADOWS DRIVE AND CORBIE STREET 11 Urban Forestry Grant Program - "An Urban Forest for Every City" - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 11.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11-05 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA FOR FUNDING FROM THE URBAN FORESTRY GRANT PROGRAM ENTITLED, "AN URBAN FOREST FOR EVERY CITY", AS PROVIDED THROUGH PROPOSITIONS 40 AND 84 12 Approve a Maintenance Agreement for the Street Striping Program FY 2010-2011, Project No. PW09-04 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 12.1 Approve a $300,000 Maintenance Agreement with Pacific Striping, Inc. for the total cost of work associated with the First and Second Cycle of the bi-annual Citywide Street Striping Program for the Fiscal Year 2010-2011, Project No. PW09-04; 12.2 Authorize the City Manager to approve change orders not to exceed the contingency amount of $30,000, which is equal to 10% of the total agreement. Action Minutes\011111 4 13 Police Department Asset Forfeiture Account Purchases - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Comerchero; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 13.1 Approve the purchase of Police equipment for a total amount of $6,119 with asset forfeiture funds held by the County of Riverside Sheriff's Department. 14 Second Reading of Ordinance No. 10-15 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 14.1 Adopt an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 10-15 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING A ZONING AMENDMENT TO CHANGE THE ZONING OF A PARCEL LOCATED AT 42210 LYNDIE LANE FROM HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (H) TO COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL (CC) At 7:54 P.M., the City Council convened as the Temecula Community Services District and the Redevelopment Agency. At 7:59 P.M., the City Council resumed with regular business. PUBLIC HEARING 17 Specific Plan Amendment, Conditional Use Permit, and Development Plan for (Planning Application Nos. PA09-0246, PA09-0287, and PA09-0288) RECOMMENDATION: 17.1 Introduce and read by title only an ordinance entitled: - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Naggar; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval ORDINANCE NO. 11-01 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING AN AMENDMENT TO THE RORIPAUGH ESTATES SPECIFIC PLAN TO ALLOW AUTOMOBILE SERVICE STATIONS WITH OR WITHOUT A CAR WASH IN PLANNING AREA 10 UTILIZING THE DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL ZONING DISTRICT 17.2 Adopt a resolution entitled: - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Naggar made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Washington; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval Action Minutes\011111 5 RESOLUTION NO. 11-06 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING PLANNING APPLICATION NO. PA09-0287, A CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT TO ALLOW FOR THE OPERATION OF A 946 -SQUARE FOOT DRIVE-THRU CAR WASH AT THE EXISTING ARCO AM/PM GAS STATION LOCATED AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF WINCHESTER AND NICOLAS ROADS ADDRESSED AS 40212 WINCHESTER ROAD (APN 920-100-048) 17.3 Adopt a resolution entitled: - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Naggar made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Washington; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RESOLUTION NO. 11-07 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING PLANNING APPLICATION NO. PA09-0288, A DEVELOPMENT PLAN TO CONSTRUCT A 946 -SQUARE FOOT DRIVE-THRU CAR WASH AT THE EXISTING ARCO AM/PM GAS STATION LOCATED AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF WINCHESTER AND NICOLAS ROADS, ADDRESSED AS 40212 WINCHESTER ROAD (APN 920-100-048) 17.4 Adopt a resolution entitled: - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Naggar made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Washington; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RESOLUTION NO. 11-08 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ADOPTING A MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION, AND MITIGATION MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A 946 -SQUARE FOOT DRIVE-THRU CAR WASH AT THE EXISTING ARCO AM/PM GAS STATION LOCATED AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF WINCHESTER AND NICOLAS ROADS, ADDRESSED AS 40212 WINCHESTER ROAD (APN 920-100-048) CITY COUNCIL BUSINESS 18 Selection of 2011 City Council Committee Assignments RECOMMENDATION: 18.1 Appoint a member of the City Council to serve as liaison to each of the City Commissions and Committees: - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Naggar; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval Action Minutes\011111 6 Commission Liaison (One Member) Current Member Community Services Commission Comerchero Old Town Local Review Board Washington Planning Commission Naggar Public/Traffic Safety Commission Edwards 18.2 Appoint two members of the City Council to serve on each of the following Standing Committees: - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Naggar; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval Standing Committees Current Member(s) City Sustainability Program Committee Roberts, Washington Economic Development Committee Washington, Roberts RDA/Old Town Steering Committee (Suggest RDA Chairman be considered) Roberts, Naggar Finance Committee Naggar, Washington Infrastructure Beautification Committee Edwards, Naggar Joint City Council/TVUSD Committee Edwards, Washington Murrieta/Temecula Committee Naggar, Washington Public Works/Facilities Committee Edwards, Roberts Quality of Life/Temecula 2030 Master Plan Committee Roberts, Washington Southwest Cities Coalition Committee Edwards, Comerchero 18.3 Appoint member(s) of the City Council to serve on each of the following Representative Assignments (External Organizations): - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Naggar made the motion; it was seconded by Mayor Roberts; and electronic vote reflected approval with following abstentions: RCA Representative Riverside County Habitat Conservation Agency Board Riverside County Transportation Commission Riverside Transit Agency Representative WRCOG - Edwards, Washington - Edwards - Roberts & Comerchero - Comerchero & Edwards - Roberts & Washington Representative Assignments (External Organizations) Current Member(s) Animal Shelter Liaison/JPA Representative Edwards League of California Congress — 2011 Voting Delegate (Suggest Mayor and Mayor Pro Tem) Roberts, (Alternate Washington) National League of Cities Annual Congress — 2011 Voting Delegate (Suggest Mayor and Mayor Pro Tem) Roberts, (Alternate Washington) Military Liaison Representative - new Comerchero Murrieta Creek Representative deleted Pechanga Tribal Council Liaison Roberts, (Alternate Naggar) RCA Representative Edwards, (Alternate Washington) Action Minutes\011111 7 Rancho California Water District Liaison Comerchero, Roberts Riverside County Child Safety Commission (Suggest possible deletion) deleted Riverside County Habitat Conservation Agency Board Edwards Riverside County Transportation Commission Roberts, (Alternate Comerchero) Riverside Transit Agency Representative Comerchero, (Alternate Edwards) Temecula Sister City Liaison Roberts WRCOG/Zone Committee (relating to TUMF Program for WRCOG) (Suggest combining WRCOG & Zone Committee) Washington, (Alternate Roberts) Riverside County Child Safety Commission/School District Liaison — new Edwards 18.4 Appoint member(s) of the City Council to serve on each of the following Ad Hoc Subcommittees: - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Naggar made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Comerchero; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval Ad Hoc Subcommittees — (Can be one or two members) Current Member(s) Community Service Funding Ad Hoc Subcommittee Naggar, Washington Diaz Property Ad Hoc Subcommittee Naggar, Washington External Communications Ad Hoc Subcommittee Comerchero, Edwards Firestone Property Ad Hoc Subcommittee Comerchero, Naggar French Valley Parkway Interchange Ad Hoc Subcommittee Comerchero, Roberts Higher Education Ad Hoc Subcommittee Naggar, Washington Homeless Needs Ad Hoc Subcommittee Washington, Edwards Jefferson Corridor Ad Hoc Subcommittee - new Roberts, Comerchero Luxury Car Dealership Ad Hoc Subcommittee Washington, Roberts Military Ad Hoc Subcommittee (Suggest combining with Military Liaison added above) deleted Nicolas Valley Ad Hoc Subcommittee Roberts, Washington Old Town Civic Center Ad Hoc Subcommittee Comerchero, Roberts Old Town Gym Ad Hoc Subcommittee — new Comerchero, Washington Promenade Mall Ad Hoc Subcommittee Comerchero, Washington Ronald Reagan Sports Park Ad Hoc Subcommittee Edwards, Naggar Roripaugh Ranch Ad Hoc Subcommittee Comerchero, Roberts Santa Margarita Annexation Ad Hoc Subcommittee Edwards, Comerchero Action Minutes\011111 8 South Temecula Land and Transportation Ad Hoc Subcommittee Roberts, Washington Summerhouse Senior Housing Development Ad Hoc Subcommittee — changed title to Summerhouse Housing Development Ad Hoc Subcommittee Roberts, Washington Temecula Healthcare Ad Hoc Subcommittee Comerchero, Naggar Transit/Transportation Ad Hoc Subcommittee Roberts, Comerchero Wall of Honor Ad Hoc Subcommittee Comerchero, Edwards Youth Court Ad Hoc Subcommittee deleted Youth Master Plan Implementation Ad Hoc Subcommittee Naggar, Washington CITY MANAGER REPORT CITY ATTORNEY REPORT City Attorney Thorson advised that under the Brown Act, there was nothing to report from the Closed Session. ADJOURNMENT At 8:34 P.M., the City Council meeting was formally adjourned to Tuesday, January 25, 2011, at 5:30 PM, for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM, City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. Ron Roberts, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] Action Minutes\011111 9 Item No. 3 CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance DATE: January 25, 2011 SUBJECT: List of Demands PREPARED BY: Pascale Brown, Accounting Manager Leah Thomas, Accounting Specialist RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council: 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A BACKGROUND: All claims and demands are reported and summarized for review and approval by the City Council on a routine basis at each City Council meeting. The attached claims represent the paid claims and demands since the last City Council meeting. FISCAL IMPACT: All claims and demands were paid from appropriated funds or authorized resources of the City and have been recorded in accordance with the City's policies and procedures. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution List of Demands RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. That the following claims and demands as set forth in Exhibit A, on file in the office of the City Clerk, has been reviewed by the City Manager's Office and that the same are hereby allowed in the amount of $3,380,789.20 Section 2. The City Clerk shall certify the adoption of this resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 25th day of January, 2011. Ron Roberts, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 11- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 25th day of January, 2011, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk CITY OF TEMECULA LIST OF DEMANDS 12/29/2010 TOTAL CHECK RUN: 01/06/2011 TOTAL CHECK RUN: 01/13/2011 TOTAL CHECK RUN: 12/31/2010 TOTAL PAYROLL RUN: 01/06/2011 TOTAL PAYROLL RUN: TOTAL LIST OF DEMANDS FOR 01/25/2011 COUNCIL MEETING: DISBURSEMENTS BY FUND: CHECKS: 001 GENERAL FUND $ 869,891.39 165 AFFORDABLE HOUSING 427,423.66 190 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT 302,757.36 192 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL B 147.03 194 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL D 612.04 196 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. 4,914.90 197 TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND 13,783.39 210 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS FUND 849,044.37 280 REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY - CIP PROJECT 46,234.94 300 INSURANCE FUND 230,865.96 320 INFORMATION SYSTEMS 65,807.42 330 SUPPORT SERVICES 11,239.85 340 FACILITIES 26,764.42 460 CFD 88-12 DEBT SERVICE FUND 2,500.00 472 CFD 01-2 HARVESTON A&B DEBT SERVICE 3,216.45 473 CFD 03-1 CROWNE HILL DEBT SERVICE FUND 2,950.03 474 AD03-4 JOHN WARNER ROAD DEBT SERVICE 1,884.35 475 CFD03-3 WOLF CREEK DEBT SERVICE FUND 2,816.82 476 CFD 03-6 HARVESTON 2 DEBT SERVICE FUND 2,816.82 477 CFD- RORIPAUGH 25,952.46 501 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 1 SADDLEWOOD 2,827.66 502 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 2 WINCHESTER CREEK 2,369.94 503 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 3 RANCHO HIGHLANDS 166.70 504 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 4 THE VINEYARDS 654.83 505 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 5 SIGNET SERIES 2,401.34 506 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 6 WOODCREST COUNTRY 1,616.16 507 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 7 RIDGEVIEW 1,735.72 508 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 8 VILLAGE GROVE 1,826.30 509 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 9 RANCHO SOLANA 77.42 510 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 10 MARTINIQUE 133.98 511 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 11 MEADOWVIEW 257.81 512 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 12 VINTAGE HILLS 1,566.09 513 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 13 PRESLEY DEVELOP. 199.18 514 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 14 MORRISON HOMES 2,967.91 515 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 15 BARCLAY ESTATES 93.66 516 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 16 TRADEWINDS 190.59 517 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 17 MONTE VISTA 316.35 518 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 18 TEMEKU HILLS 16,900.43 519 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 19 CHANTEMAR 207.83 520 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 20 CROWNE HILL 9,218.55 521 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 21 VAIL RANCH 743.88 522 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 22 SUTTON PLACE 69.13 523 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 23 PHEASENT RUN 32.00 524 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 24 HARVESTON 372.31 525 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 25 SERENA HILLS 310.29 526 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 26 GALLERYTRADITION 56.99 527 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 27 AVONDALE 196.41 528 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 28 WOLF CREEK 536.77 529 SERVICE LEVEL"C'ZONE 29 GALLERY PORTRAIT 60.26 700 CERBT CALIFORNIA EE RETIREE-GASB45 4,588.22 001 GENERAL FUND $ 245,799.19 165 AFFORDABLE HOUSING 10,641.12 $ 401,496.28 686,139.30 1,856,682.79 22,720.53 413,750.30 $ 3,380,789.20 2,944,318.37 190 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT 92,188.11 192 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL B 143.96 194 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL D 903.67 196 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. 888.77 197 TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND 274.95 280 REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY - CIP PROJECT 6,541.97 300 INSURANCE FUND 1,392.96 320 INFORMATION SYSTEMS 41,375.05 330 SUPPORT SERVICES 5,931.66 340 FACILITIES 8,394.68 501 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 1 SADDLEWOOD 91.73 502 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 2 WINCHESTER CREEK 60.98 503 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 3 RANCHO HIGHLANDS 72.40 504 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 4 THE VINEYARDS 13.38 505 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 5 SIGNET SERIES 147.34 506 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 6 WOODCREST COUNTRY 26.58 507 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 7 RIDGEVIEW 37.97 508 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 8 VILLAGE GROVE 250.09 509 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 9 RANCHO SOLANA 2.03 510 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 10 MARTINIQUE 11.00 511 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 11 MEADOWVIEW 7.01 512 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 12 VINTAGE HILLS 166.70 513 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 13 PRESLEY DEVELOP. 35.65 514 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 14 MORRISON HOMES 20.69 515 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 15 BARCLAY ESTATES 17.71 516 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 16 TRADEWINDS 41.54 517 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 17 MONTE VISTA 3.51 518 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 18 TEMEKU HILLS 154.41 519 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 19 CHANTEMAR 82.80 520 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 20 CROWNE HILL 224.07 521 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 21 VAIL RANCH 378.88 522 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 22 SUTTON PLACE 9.05 523 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 23 PHEASENT RUN 9.92 524 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 24 HARVESTON 213.38 525 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 25 SERENA HILLS 68.56 526 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 26 GALLERYTRADITION 3.00 527 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 27 AVONDALE 9.92 528 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 28 WOLF CREEK 314.66 529 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 29 GALLERY PORTRAIT 6.01 700 CERBT CALIFORNIA EE RETIREE-GASB45 19,513.77 436,470.83 TOTAL BY FUND: $ 3,380,789.20 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 1 12/29/2010 8:27:55AM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 143008 12/22/2010 002185 POSTMASTER postage:"we've moved" postcards 756.00 756.00 143009 12/29/2010 005068 ADKISSON, CANDICE Employee Computer Loan Pgrm 612.34 612.34 143010 12/29/2010 009033 ALLEN, STEVEN L. photography svc: Civic Ctr 12/9 300.00 photography svc:winter wdrind 12/10 300.00 600.00 143011 12/29/2010 006915 ALLIE'S PARTY EQUIPMENT equip rental:tree lighting 12/2 610.10 610.10 143012 12/29/2010 012943 ALPHA MECHANICAL SERVICE HVAC svcs: city hall 80.00 80.00 INC 143013 12/29/2010 004240 AMERICAN FORENSIC NURSES DUI & DRUG SCREENINGS: POLICE 575.12 (AFN) DUI & DRUG SCREENINGS: POLICE 377.56 952.68 143014 12/29/2010 011954 BAKER & TAYLOR INC (88) book purchase: Library 1,959.68 1,959.68 143015 12/29/2010 000128 BROWN & BROWN OF CALIF INC 10/11 trvl grp gen liab #gp06302497 122,639.00 10/11 excs liab ins #843300 ironshore 41,713.00 10/11 trvl grp umb liab ins #GE06300161 20,805.00 10/11 trvl grp auto #8109158P917 19,127.00 143016 12/29/2010 004971 CANON FINANCIAL SERVICES, Dec copier leases: Library 2,836.52 INC 143017 12/29/2010 001264 COSTCO WHOLESALE supplies:bkfastw/Santa 12/11 220.95 supplies:Civic Ctr Opening 12/9 99.19 143018 12/29/2010 004192 DOWNS COMMERCIAL Fuel for City vehicles: TCSD 2,133.04 FUELING INC 204,284.00 2,836.52 320.14 Fuel for City vehicles: B&S 521.92 Fuel for City vehicles: Code Enf 385.11 3,040.07 143019 12/29/2010 002390 EASTERN MUNICIPAL WATER Dec 39569 seraphina rd 164.80 164.80 DIST 143020 12/29/2010 011203 ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANING Dec janitorial svc:park restrooms 5,315.00 5,315.00 143021 12/29/2010 001056 EXCEL LANDSCAPE (94) tree installations:crowne hill 8,030.00 8,030.00 143022 12/29/2010 003747 FINE ARTS NETWORK sttlmnt: Nutcracker Ballet Dec '10 44,604.05 44,604.05 143023 12/29/2010 011781 FIRE INNOVATIONS LLC misc fire tools: Stn 73 870.96 870.96 Pagel apChkLst Final Check List Page: 2 12/29/2010 8:27:55AM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description 143024 12/29/2010 011922 FIRST AMERICAN CORELOGIC Nov database subscr:Code Enf INC Amount Paid Check Total 12.00 12.00 143025 12/29/2010 003347 FIRST BANKCARD CENTER 013353 AMERICASPRINTER.COM AA printing Winterfest sheets/cards:ED 1,986.58 004811 HEWLETT PACKARD TT (10) pc adapters: Info Sys 998.42 009815 CARD QUEST INC TT (200) proximity cards: Info Sys 783.59 004811 HEWLETT PACKARD TT (26) computer power cords:IS 560.40 013353 AMERICASPRINTER.COM AA printing Winterfest sheets/card:ED 522.00 012915 LUCILLE'S BBQ SJ meal:closed council mtg 11/9 241.85 003964 OFFICE DEPOT BUSINESS SVS SJ utility cart: city clerk 217.49 DIV 002652 PAT & OSCARS RESTAURANT RJ meal:pin commission mtg 12/1 170.01 012112 PALUMBOS RISTORANTE SJ meal:closed council mtg 11/23 147.68 001048 ROSAS CANTINA TT refreshments: IS staff move 11/13 85.51 RESTAURANT 003964 OFFICE DEPOT BUSINESS SVS DIV TT wireless keyboard adapter: Info Sys 59.79 013969 NETWORK SOLUTIONS TT council domain @citycouncil.org 34.99 008669 VONS SJ refreshments:ethics trn 11/17 24.94 008956 PANERA BREAD TT refreshments:IS staff move 11-13 20.02 5,853.27 143026 12/29/2010 010326 G E MOBILE WATER, INC Dec power washer maint:Stn 73 57.00 Dec power washer rent:Stn 73 26.10 83.10 143027 12/29/2010 009608 GOLDEN VALLEY MUSIC sttlmnt: Merc Sunday Classics 5,400.00 5,400.00 SOCIETY 143028 12/29/2010 004406 IGOE & COMPANY INC Dec flex benefit plan pmt 515.00 515.00 143029 12/29/2010 013555 JJJ ENTERPRISES fire alarm sys maint: library 388.50 388.50 143030 12/29/2010 004546 KING, JAMES N. performance:NewYear's Eve 3,000.00 3,000.00 143031 12/29/2010 012065 LANCE, SOLL& LUNGHARD '10 FINAL ENGAGEMENT: FINANCE 508.00 508.00 LLC Page2 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 3 12/29/2010 8:27:55AM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor 143032 12/29/2010 003726 LIFE ASSIST INC 143033 12/29/2010 002634 LITELINES INC 143034 12/29/2010 012962 MILLER, MISTY 143035 12/29/2010 000973 MIRACLE RECREATION EQUIPMENT 143036 12/29/2010 002139 NORTH COUNTY TIMES 143037 12/29/2010 000262 RANCHO CALIF WATER DISTRICT 143038 12/29/2010 000268 RIVERSIDE CO HABITAT 143039 12/29/2010 001365 RIVERSIDE COUNTY OF 143040 12/29/2010 012251 ROTH, DONALD J. 143041 12/29/2010 009213 SHERRY BERRY MUSIC 143042 12/29/2010 000537 SO CALIF EDISON 143043 12/29/2010 001212 SO CALIF GAS COMPANY 143044 12/29/2010 010162 STEMRICH, CYNTHIA 143045 12/29/2010 009061 STURDIVANT, ANGELA P. (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total Medical Supplies: Paramedics 817.31 Medical Supplies: Paramedics 356.96 Medical Supplies: Paramedics 212.99 Medical Supplies: Paramedics 155.37 1,542.63 lighting supplies: old town 163.14 163.14 TCSD Instructor Earnings 514.50 514.50 PLAYGROUND EQUIP MAINT:VAR 1,462.78 1,462.78 PARKS- publication:advertising:OT quilt show 196.77 196.77 Dec var water meters:tcsd svc lev C 35,408.37 Dec 01-04-47210-0:TES pool SC -2 315.33 Nov 01-31-61237-2:calle elenita 28.57 35,752.27 Nov K -Rat payment 4,320.00 4,320.00 July -Sep '10 vector control svcs 6,378.37 6,378.37 TCSD Instructor Earnings 567.00 567.00 sttlemnt:Jazz @ the Merc 12/16 210.00 210.00 Nov 2-00-397-5059:comm svc util Nov 2-27-560-0625:32380 deerhollow Nov 2-30-296-9522:31035 rncho vista Dec 2-31-693-9784:26036 ynez TC1 Nov 2-29-974-7568:26953 ynez TC1 Nov 2-29-807-1226:28077 diaz PED Nov 2-30-099-3847:29721 ryecrest Nov 2-29-807-1093:28079 diaz PED 10,235.91 3,627.92 583.04 490.80 123.55 23.69 22.57 9.85 15,117.33 Dec 015-575-0195-2:FS #92 430.05 Dec 055-475-6169-5:PBSP 151.13 581.18 refund:sec dep:rm rental:CRC 250.00 250.00 TCSD Instructor Earnings 145.60 145.60 Page3 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 4 12/29/2010 8:27:55AM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143046 12/29/2010 013968 TEMECULA DANCE CO MAKE A sttlemnt:The Nutcracker 12/14-15 10,643.25 10,643.25 143047 12/29/2010 005970 TEMECULA VALLEY PLAYERS sttlemnt:A Christmas Carol:OT 8,146.78 8,146.78 143048 12/29/2010 010276 TIME WARNER CABLE Dec high speed internet:Civic Center 5,372.16 Dec high speed internet:FS #92 143049 12/29/2010 004145 TW TELECOM Dec City phones general usage 143050 12/29/2010 004794 VALLEY WINDS COMMUNITY Performance:holiday in Old Town - 143051 12/29/2010 004261 VERIZON Dec xxx-5072 general usage Dec xxx-0073 general usage Dec xxx-3143 gen usage:PD ovrind ofc Dec xxx-5473 gen usage:moraga rd Dec xxx-8573 general usage 102.32 5,474.48 5,688.08 5,688.08 400.00 400.00 1,593.16 87.47 54.03 36.07 36.07 1,806.80 143052 12/29/2010 004789 VERIZON ONLINE Dec Internet svcs:City Hall 269.99 269.99 143053 12/29/2010 006248 WALKER, JESSICA 143054 12/29/2010 000621 WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNCIL OF 143055 12/29/2010 008402 WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY 143056 12/29/2010 000348 ZIGLER, GAIL TCSD Instructor Earnings TCSD Instructor Earnings Nov '10 TUMF Payment Nov '10 MSHCP payment reimb:ofc supplies:civic ctr file rm 100.80 19.60 8,873.00 1,938.00 137.72 Grand total for UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA: 120.40 8,873.00 1,938.00 137.72 401,496.28 Page4 apChkLst Final Check List 12/29/2010 8:27:55AM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 5 49 checks in this report. Grand Total All Checks: 401,496.28 Pages apChkLst Final Check List Page: 1 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 1614 12/31/2010 000283 INSTATAX (IRS) Federal Income Taxes Payment 13,299.68 13,299.68 1615 12/31/2010 000444 INSTATAX (EDD) State Income Taxes Payment 3,897.65 3,897.65 1616 12/31/2010 000246 PERS (EMPLOYEES' PERS Retirement Payment 1,506.81 1,506.81 RETIREMENT) 1617 01/06/2011 000245 PERS - HEALTH I NSUR PERS Health Admin Cost Payment 80,043.01 80,043.01 PREMIUM 1618 01/06/2011 000389 NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT OBRA- Project Retirement Payment 1,818.54 1,818.54 SOLUTION 1619 01/06/2011 010349 CALIF DEPT OF CHILD Support Payment 553.84 553.84 SUPPORT 1620 01/06/2011 000642 TEMECULA CITY FLEXIBLE Child Care Reimbursement Payment 8,852.89 8,852.89 1621 01/06/2011 000246 PERS (EMPLOYEES' PERS ER Paid Member Contr Payment 122,742.20 122,742.20 RETIREMENT) 1622 01/06/2011 001065 NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT Nationwide Retirement Payment 13,910.17 13,910.17 SOLUTION 1623 01/06/2011 000283 INSTATAX (IRS) Federal Income Taxes Payment 77,355.34 77,355.34 1624 01/06/2011 000444 INSTATAX (EDD) State Disability Ins Payment 22,404.76 22,404.76 143057 01/06/2011 003552 AFLAC AFLAC Cancer Payment 3,260.81 3,260.81 143058 01/06/2011 005068 ADKISSON, CANDICE reimb:MPSC New Year's supplies 274.30 274.30 143059 01/06/2011 013844 AECOM TECHNICAL SERVICES Nov data svc:long cyn det basin 550.00 550.00 INC 143060 01/06/2011 009374 ALLEGRO MUSICAL VENTURES piano tuning: theater 170.00 170.00 143061 01/06/2011 006915 ALLIE'S PARTY EQUIPMENT equip rental:OT holidays 11/26 14.45 equip rental:winter wonderland 1,450.59 equip rental:Winterfest 12/11 144.93 1,609.97 Pagel apChkLst Final Check List Page: 2 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143062 01/06/2011 012943 ALPHA MECHANICAL SERVICE HVAC maint: parking garage 305.00 305.00 INC 143063 01/06/2011 004422 AMERICAN BATTERY battery supplies: PW Traffic 24.65 24.65 CORPORATION 143064 01/06/2011 013338 APPLE STORE Employee Computer Loan Program 2,000.00 2,000.00 143065 01/06/2011 013950 AQUA CHILL OF SAN DIEGO Jan drinking water svc:Civic Ctr 92.44 92.44 143066 01/06/2011 011954 BAKER & TAYLOR INC (14) book purchase: Library 259.26 259.26 143067 01/06/2011 003215 BARCLAYS LAW PUBLISHERS subsc:2599627 title 13 motor veh 328.00 328.00 143068 01/06/2011 013684 BLUE SHIELD OF CALIFORNIA COBRA SUBSIDY MEDICAL PAYMENT 978.89 978.89 143069 01/06/2011 004851 C B RANCH ENTERPRISES flower field excursion: MPSC 200.00 200.00 143070 01/06/2011 003138 CAL MAT PW patch truck materials 428.04 PW patch truck materials 214.56 PW patch truck materials 810.19 PW patch truck materials 410.36 1,863.15 143071 01/06/2011 010939 CALIF DEPT OF INDUSTRIAL elevator conveyance 139731:theater 225.00 225.00 143072 01/06/2011 001159 CALIF DEPT OF JUSTICE Nov fingerprinting svcs:HR/PD 2,750.00 2,750.00 143073 01/06/2011 006114 CASEY, MARGIE reimb:office supplies Info Sys 123.29 123.29 143074 01/06/2011 000137 CHEVRON AND TEXACO City vehicles fuel: CM 351.84 351.84 143075 01/06/2011 004405 COMMUNITY HEALTH Community Health Charities Payment 66.00 66.00 CHARITIES 143076 01/06/2011 000442 COMPUTER ALERT SYSTEMS ALARM MAINT SVC: MPSC 75.00 alarm maint svc: Fld Op Ctr 75.00 Jan -Mar alarm monitoring:citywide 4,920.00 5,070.00 143077 01/06/2011 012353 CONSTRUCTION TESTING Nov geotech svc: Civic Center 3,600.00 3,600.00 143078 01/06/2011 001264 COSTCO WHOLESALE misc supplies:emp recognition 739.27 739.27 Page2 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 3 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143079 01/06/2011 008810 CROSSTOWN ELECTRICAL & equip repair/maint: PW Traffic 552.00 552.00 DATA 143080 01/06/2011 003272 DAISY WHEEL RIBBON plotter supplies: info systems 312.50 312.50 COMPANY INC 143081 01/06/2011 012600 DAVID EVANS & ASSOCIATES NOV CNSLT SVC:BUTTERFIELD STG 2,119.08 2,119.08 INC RD 143082 01/06/2011 002990 DAVID TURCH & ASSOCIATES Nov -Dec lobbyist svcs: CM 7,000.00 7,000.00 143083 01/06/2011 003945 DIAMOND ENVIRONMENTAL Jan restroom svc:Veterans Pk 52.88 SRVCS 143084 01/06/2011 004192 DOWNS COMMERCIAL FUELING INC Jan restroom svc:Lng Cyn Pk Jan restroom svc:Riverton Pk Jan restroom svc:Redhawk Pk portable restrooms:light parade portable restrooms:light parade 52.88 52.88 52.88 705.69 5,298.00 Fuel for City vehicles: PW Traffic 260.31 Fuel for City vehicles: PW CIP Fuel for City vehicles: PW Maint Fuel for City vehicles: PW Lnd Dv Fuel for City vehicles: TCSD Fuel for City vehicles: Police 143085 01/06/2011 002982 FRANCHISE TAX BOARD SUPPORT PAYMENT 143086 01/06/2011 011967 FULL VALUE ENTERTAINMENT sttlmnt: Live at the Merc 12/17 143087 01/06/2011 011283 GABRIEL ROEDER SMITH & Aug cnslt svc:OPEB valuation COMPANY 6,215.21 181.03 1,231.81 197.49 116.92 51.14 2,038.70 50.00 50.00 112.00 112.00 6,126.00 Nov cnslt svc:OPEB valuation 258.00 Oct cnslt svc:OPEB valuation 654.00 Sept cnslt svc:OPEB valuation 3,681.00 10,719.00 143088 01/06/2011 013552 GANDS PRODUCTIONS LLC sttlmnt: Country at the Merc 12/18 618.00 618.00 143089 01/06/2011 009608 GOLDEN VALLEY MUSIC sttlmnt: Classics at the Merc Dec '10 1,579.50 1,579.50 SOCIETY 143090 01/06/2011 003792 GRAINGER Portable Generators: Citizen Corps 1,132.20 1,132.20 143091 01/06/2011 004188 HARRIS & ASSOCIATES Nov pavement rehab: citywide 44,433.75 44,433.75 Page3 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 4 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 143092 01/06/2011 001135 HEALTHPOINTE MEDICAL Emp industrial care svcs: HR 25.00 25.00 GROUP INC 143093 01/06/2011 003198 HOME DEPOT, THE res impry pgrm: Ortiz, Misel/Amy 364.00 364.00 143094 01/06/2011 002701 HUB INT'L INSURANCE Dec '10 special events premiums 293.34 293.34 SERVCS INC 143095 01/06/2011 000194 I CMA RETIREMENT -PLAN I CMA Retirement Trust 457 Payment 4,804.84 4,804.84 303355 143096 01/06/2011 013420 INGRAM LIBRARY SERVICES (7) BOOK PURCHASE: LIBRARY 278.73 INC 143097 01/06/2011 013695 INLAND EMPIRE SHRED IT (1) BOOK PURCHASE: LIBRARY (3) BOOK PURCHASE: LIBRARY (2) BOOK PURCHASE: LIBRARY (117) BOOK PURCHASE: LIBRARY (49) BOOK PURCHASE: LIBRARY 12/10 doc shred svc: City Hall 12/20 doc shred svc: Library 12/20 doc shred svc: CRC 41.17 19.47 12.22 803.14 371.56 35.00 15.00 15.00 1,526.29 65.00 143098 01/06/2011 006914 INNOVATIVE DOCUMENT Nov copier maint/usage:Library 630.07 SOLUTIONS Nov copier maint/usage:citywide 2,945.65 3,575.72 143099 01/06/2011 001407 INTER VALLEY POOL SUPPLY pool santizing chemicals:citywide 713.35 713.35 INC 143100 01/06/2011 004119 J T B SUPPLY COMPANY INC misc light supplies: PW Traffic 1,389.83 misc light supplies:PW Traffic 2,392.50 3,782.33 143101 01/06/2011 012883 JACOB'S HOUSE INC Jacob's House Charity Payment 200.00 200.00 143102 01/06/2011 013200 JAROTH INC Jan pay phone:RDA:OT bus depot 82.64 Jan pay phone:duck pond,library,crc 212.64 295.28 143103 01/06/2011 013788 KOA CORPORATION traffic study: Islamic Center 1,400.00 1,400.00 143104 01/06/2011 012422 KRONQUIST, MATHEW holiday lighting: Old Town 30,000.00 30,000.00 143105 01/06/2011 004062 KUSTOM SIGNALS INC (2) ProLaser radars: Police 6,365.50 6,365.50 143106 01/06/2011 012065 LANCE, SOLL& LUNGHARD STATE CONTROLLER'S RPT: FINANCE 1,250.00 1,250.00 LLC Page4 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 5 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143107 01/06/2011 004176 LEVEL 3 COMMUNICATIONS Dec Long distance & internet svcs 741.00 741.00 LLC 143108 01/06/2011 004905 LIEBERT, CASSIDY & Nov HR legal svcs for TE060-01 243.00 243.00 WHITMORE 143109 01/06/2011 013769 LIGHTSQUARED LP 12/14-1/13 satellite svc:CM/Fire 146.48 146.48 143110 01/06/2011 013971 LYN, MARGARET ROSE refund:sec dep:rm rm rental:CRC 250.00 250.00 143111 01/06/2011 003782 MAIN STREET SIGNS Misc signs: PW Maint 78.30 Misc signs: PW Traffic 495.90 574.20 143112 01/06/2011 004141 MAINTEX INC Cleaning & maint supplies:citywide 353.44 353.44 143113 01/06/2011 002664 MARCO INDUSTRIES INC EQUIP REPAIR & MAINT:CSD CAT 40 425.57 425.57 143114 01/06/2011 008864 MEJIA, CARILU refund:sec dep:rm rental:TCC 150.00 150.00 143115 01/06/2011 006571 MELODY'S AD WORKS INC. Reimbursements:old town marketing 379.92 Reimbursements:old town marketing 73.22 Jan marketing & promo srvcs:old town 1,500.00 1,953.14 143116 01/06/2011 003076 MET LIFE INSURANCE MetLife Dental Insurance Payment 7,594.30 7,594.30 COMPANY 143117 01/06/2011 009541 MEYER AND ASSOCIATES AUG CONSULTING SRVCS:BARN 3,901.99 3,901.99 RELOCATION 143118 01/06/2011 012580 MINUTEMAN PRESS Generic business cards:civic center 45.37 Printed envelopes:business license 783.34 828.71 143119 01/06/2011 001986 MUZAK -SOUTHERN Jan satellite music:old town 72.11 72.11 CALIFORNIA 143120 01/06/2011 002925 NAPA AUTO PARTS Auto parts & supplies: Sta 84 17.36 Auto parts & supplies: Sta 84 14.04 31.40 143121 01/06/2011 000727 NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION CODE BOOKS:BUILDING & SAFETY 155.56 155.56 ASSN 143122 01/06/2011 000718 NATIONAL RECREATION PARK 3/10-2/11 mbrshp dues:H.Parker 21539 145.00 145.00 ASSOC 143123 01/06/2011 013972 NAT'L PURCHASING 2011 membership dues: M. Vollmuth 90.00 90.00 INSTITUTE,INC Pages apChkLst Final Check List Page: 6 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor 143124 01/06/2011 005006 NBS GOVERNMENT FINANCE GROUP 143125 01/06/2011 002139 NORTH COUNTY TIMES 143126 01/06/2011 013072 NUNEZ, PAUL & MARIA 143127 01/06/2011 003964 OFFICE DEPOT BUSINESS SVS DIV 143128 01/06/2011 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE & SERVICE (Continued) Description CONT DISCLOSURE RPRTS:CFD 03-02 RORI PAU CONT DISCLOSURE RPTS: VAR. CFD'S Nov advertising:holidays in Old Town Nov advertising: TCSD credit: billing adjustment/TCSD refund:eng grad dep:apn957-170-014 Amount Paid Check Total 125.00 8,109.06 8,234.06 918.53 940.50 -490.50 1,368.53 3,000.00 3,000.00 Misc office supplies:pd old town 612.68 Office supplies: c. museum CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PW MAINT CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PW MAINT CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS:PW MAINT 143129 01/06/2011 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE & SERVICE City Vehicle Maint Svcs:Bldg & Safety 143130 01/06/2011 012833 PC MALL GOV, INC. Misc computer supplies:info sys Printer toners & cartridges:info sys Misc computer supplies:info sys 30.30 642.98 3,590.53 86.82 55.00 3,732.35 36.57 36.57 153.71 2,955.59 313.20 3,422.50 143131 01/06/2011 002331 PEP BOYS INC Vehicle Repair & Maint: PW Maint 143.38 143.38 143132 01/06/2011 003200 PIN CENTER, THE City seal lapel pins: city council 681.00 681.00 143133 01/06/2011 011660 PLANNET CONSULTING SEP-NOV CONSULTING SRVCS: CIVIC 1,000.00 1,000.00 CNTR 143134 01/06/2011 010338 POOL & ELECTRICAL Var pool supplies: CRC 293.85 293.85 PRODUCTS INC 143135 01/06/2011 013915 PREMIER COMMUNICATIONS Emergency Radios: Citizen Corps. 672.08 672.08 CORP 143136 01/06/2011 005820 PRE -PAID LEGAL SERVICES PrePaid Legal Services Payment 324.85 324.85 INC 143137 01/06/2011 013725 PROCRAFT INC RES IMPRV PRGM: RADABAUGH 900.00 900.00 143138 01/06/2011 011751 PUAHI'S POLYNESIAN refund:sec dep:rm rental:TCC 150.00 150.00 DANCERS INC 143139 01/06/2011 013909 R & M DEESE, INC Blue Tattletale Lights:pd traffic 761.80 761.80 Page6 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 7 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143140 01/06/2011 002612 RADIO SHACK INC Misc computer supplies:info sys 52.13 52.13 143141 01/06/2011 011020 RAGLAND, JACK refund:salsa & bachata 2605.101 50.00 50.00 143142 01/06/2011 000262 RANCHO CALIF WATER Dec water meters:30875 rancho vista 414.52 DISTRICT Nov var water meters:TCSD,PW Dec var water meters:Warbler Dr Oct water meters:Wolf Crk Dr N Nov var water meters:Fire Stns Dec var water meters:TCSD svc lev C 1,391.52 2,373.49 134.57 225.74 5,852.12 10,391.96 143143 01/06/2011 003591 RENES COMMERCIAL HERBICIDE APPLICATION: CITY LOTS 10,975.00 10,975.00 MANAGEMENT 143144 01/06/2011 002110 RENTAL SERVICE Rental of tools & maint:pw maint 58.99 58.99 CORPORATION 143145 01/06/2011 004498 REPUBLIC INTELLIGENT Traffic signal repair & maint:PW Traffic 4,630.08 4,630.08 143146 01/06/2011 000266 RIGHTWAY Portable restroom:old town event 10/9 60.88 Portable restroom:old town event 10/8 60.88 121.76 143147 01/06/2011 000406 RIVERSIDE CO SHERIFFS Santa's Parade patrol srvcs 12/3 7,577.68 7,577.68 DEPT 143148 01/06/2011 000220 ROBINSON PRINTING & Printing srvcs:civic center postcard 598.13 598.13 CREATIVE 143149 01/06/2011 004270 RUFFIAN SPECIALTIES Equip repair: stn 84 100.32 100.32 143150 01/06/2011 013827 RYAN MONTELEONE Street drain repair:rainbow cyn 8,500.00 8,500.00 EXCAVATION INC 143151 01/06/2011 008404 SAFE CHECKS Accounts payable checks: finance 1,180.83 1,180.83 143152 01/06/2011 007582 SAFEGUARD DENTAL & VISION SafeGuard Vision Plan Payment 781.83 781.83 143153 01/06/2011 013169 SCHINSKY, WILLIAM C. Nov exhibit id & cataloging:vail ranch 1,457.00 1,457.00 143154 01/06/2011 008529 SHERIFF'S CIVIL DIV - SUPPORT PAYMENT 725.18 725.18 CENTRAL 143155 01/06/2011 008529 SHERIFF'S CIVIL DIV - SUPPORT PAYMENT 200.00 200.00 CENTRAL Page:7 apChkLst 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 8 Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor 143156 01/06/2011 008529 SHERIFF'S CIVIL DIV - CENTRAL 143157 01/06/2011 008529 SHERIFF'S CIVIL DIV - CENTRAL 143158 01/06/2011 008529 SHERIFF'S CIVIL DIV - CENTRAL 143159 01/06/2011 009213 SHERRY BERRY MUSIC 143160 01/06/2011 009746 SIGNS BY TOMORROW 143161 01/06/2011 000645 SMART & FINAL INC (Continued) Description SUPPORT PAYMENT SUPPORT PAYMENT SUPPORT PAYMENT Jazz @ the Merc 12/23/10 Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc Public ntc posting srvc xx0241:Planning xx0275:Planning xx0293:Planning xx0263:Planning xx0210 Dec:Pln xx0287:Planning xx0210 Nov:Pln xx0327:Planning xx0345:Planning xx0320:Planning xx0325:Planning xx0194:Planning RECREATION SUPPLIES: C. MUSEUM Misc supplies:emp recognition luncheon MISC SUPPLIES: CIVIC CNTR GRAND OF MISC SUPPLIES: TREE LIGHTING/CIVIC MISC SUPPLIES:BRKFST W/SANTA RECREATION SUPPLIES: MPSC MISC SUPPLIES: DOG HOUSE PGRM Amount Paid Check Total 100.00 100.00 100.00 521.00 148.50 148.50 148.50 148.50 148.50 148.50 148.50 148.50 148.50 148.50 148.50 297.00 201.80 483.20 901.78 489.45 288.21 201.13 137.79 100.00 100.00 100.00 521.00 1,930.50 2,703.36 Page apChkLst Final Check List Page: 9 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor 143163 01/06/2011 000537 SO CALIF EDISON (Continued) Description Dec 2-31-404-6020:28771 OT frnt st Dec 2-14-204-1615:30027 frnt st rdio Dec 2-31-912-7494:28690 mercedes Dec 2-29-223-8607:42035 2nd st PED Dec 2-31-536-3226:28690 mercedes Dec 2-25-393-4681:41951 moraga rd Dec 2-28-629-0507:30600 pauba rd Dec 2-02-502-8077:43210 bus pk B Dec 2-00-397-5042:43200 bus pk #1 Dec 2-02-351-4946:Senior Center Dec 2-19-171-8568:41970 moreno rd Dec 2-18-937-3152:41950 moreno rd Dec 2-33-056-0681:28912 pujol tpp Dec 2-29-933-3831:43230 bus pk dr Dec 2-20-817-9929:28410 OT frnt st Dec 2-31-536-3481:41902 main st Dec 2-31-419-2873:43000 Hwy 395 Dec 2-29-657-2332:45538 redwood Dec 2-29-953-8082:31523 wolf vly rd Dec 2-29-953-8249:46497 wolf crk Dec 2-29-953-8447:31738 wolf vly rd Dec 2-29-807-1226:28077 diaz PED Dec 2-31-536-3655:41904 main st Dec 2-31-031-2616:27991 diaz PED Dec 2-29-657-2787:41638 winchester Dec 2-31-282-0665:27407 diaz PED Dec 2-00-397-5067:28684 harveston Dec 2-30-520-4414:32781 tem pkwy Dec 2-30-220-8749:45850 N wolf crk Dec 2-29-657-2563:42902 butterfield Dec 2-31-936-3511:46488 pechanga Dec 2-29-458-7548:32000 rncho calif Dec 2-29-295-3510:32211 wolf vly rd Dec 2-29-224-01 73:Fire Stns Dec 2-27-371-8494:42189 winchester Dec 2-32-903-8293:41000 main st Dec 2-21-981-4720:30153 tem pkwy tpp Dec 2-28-904-7706:32329 overind trl Amount Paid Check Total 1,820.78 35.50 1,467.96 526.46 771.39 301.43 5,445.55 1,205.34 4,233.45 753.03 84.82 472.36 125.66 1,593.03 218.44 741.60 22.62 20.38 27.18 24.02 24.02 46.46 954.85 22.57 21.84 24.76 2,047.48 451.09 637.04 179.86 44.40 283.10 1,018.03 2,153.91 26.78 11,675.35 44.48 49.23 39, 596.25 Page9 apChkLst 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 10 Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor 143164 01/06/2011 001212 SO CALIF GAS COMPANY 143165 01/06/2011 012087 SODEXO SERVICES 143166 01/06/2011 000519 SOUTH COUNTY PEST CONTROL INC 143170 01/06/2011 007762 STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY 143171 01/06/2011 012723 STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY 143172 01/06/2011 002366 STEAM SUPERIOR CARPET CLEANING 143173 01/06/2011 009937 SUPPLY CACHE, THE 143174 01/06/2011 013387 SWEEPING UNLIMITED INC 143175 01/06/2011 000305 TARGET BANK BUS CARD SRVCS (Continued) Description Dec 095-167-7907-2:30650 pauba rd Dec 101-525-1560-6:27415 enterprise Dec 129-535-4236-7:Civic Center Dec 196-025-0344-3:C. Museum Dec 133-040-7373-0:Maint Fac Dec 181-383-8881-6:Museum Dec 026-671-2909-8:Comm Theater Dec 021-725-0775-4:Senior Center Dec 060-293-3341-3:28922 pujol st Dec 125-244-2108-3:Library Dec 101-525-0950-0:Comm Ctr Dec 129-582-9784-3:43230 bus pk dr Dec 091-085-1632-0:TES pool Dec 091-024-9300-5:30875 rncho vista Nov senior nutrition pgrm: mpsc Pest control srvcs:old town 11/7 Pest control srvcs:harveston park 10/29 Pest control services:O.A.T.C. Dec pest control srvcs: facilities Mandatory Life Insurance Payment Voluntary Supp Life Insurance Payment Carpet & floor maint: theater FIRE EQUIPMENT: PREVENTION Dec sweeping srvcs:parking garage MISC SUPPLIES: C. MUSEUM MISC SUPPLIES: MPSC Misc supplies: Brkfst w/Santa Misc supplies: civic center grand Hospitality supplies: Theater MISC SUPPLIES: CLASSES & ACTIVITIES 143176 01/06/2011 001547 TEAMSTERS LOCAL 911 Union Dues Payment Amount Paid Check Total 276.55 429.24 3,469.92 98.43 124.68 145.28 513.90 289.96 38.35 536.68 178.64 283.45 15.29 3,538.55 560.00 84.00 84.00 48.00 641.00 9,081.26 653.90 385.00 532.50 500.00 41.52 113.61 152.45 80.99 21.63 30.97 9,938.92 560.00 857.00 9,081.26 653.90 385.00 532.50 500.00 441.17 4,772.00 4,772.00 Pagel 0 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 11 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description 143177 01/06/2011 012265 TEMECULA ACE HARDWARE hardware supplies:var park sites C/O 143178 01/06/2011 010679 TEMECULA AUTO REPAIR/RADIATOR Amount Paid Check Total 169.98 169.98 Vehicle Repair & Maint: Prevention 235.28 Vehicle Maintenance: Sta 84 69.95 Vehicle Repair & Maint: Prevention 235.28 540.51 143179 01/06/2011 010848 TEMECULA PLANTSCAPE Dec lease interior plantscape:library 200.00 200.00 143180 01/06/2011 013973 TEMECULA ROTARY Council Community Service Funding 500.00 500.00 143181 01/06/2011 010493 TEMECULA TOWNE CENTER Jan lease pmt: Police Mall Storefront 1,458.33 1,458.33 ASSOC LP 143182 01/06/2011 011736 TEMECULA TROPHY INC sign for civic center 16.31 16.31 143183 01/06/2011 006325 TEMECULA VALLEY ELKS refund:sec dep:rm rental:CRC 150.00 150.00 #2801 143184 01/06/2011 003067 TEMECULA VALLEY R V Equip repair & maint:police trailers 164.76 164.76 SERVICE 143185 01/06/2011 003941 TEMECULA WINNELSON Plumbing supplies: various park sites 43.02 COMPANY Facility supplies: pbsp 410.20 453.22 143186 01/06/2011 009579 THOMAS, LEAH ee computer purchase prgm 2,000.00 2,000.00 143187 01/06/2011 010276 TIME WARNER CABLE Jan high speed internet:41000 main st 3,642.75 Jan high speed internet:MPSC 44.95 Jan high speed internet:Library 524.70 Jan high speed internet:42081 main st 58.10 4,270.50 143188 01/06/2011 000319 TOMARK SPORTS INC Volleyball equip parts:CRC gym 114.58 114.58 143189 01/06/2011 001561 USA MOBILITY WIRELESS INC Dec paging/rental svcs:TCSD, PW 94.92 94.92 143190 01/06/2011 005460 U S BANK TRUSTEE & FISCAL AGENT 2,500.00 2,500.00 SRVCS:CFD 88-12 143191 01/06/2011 011659 ULINE INC Banner shipping boxes: Central Srvcs 200.78 200.78 143192 01/06/2011 011659 ULINE INC Heat sealer equip: Police 142.47 142.47 Pagel 1 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 12 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143193 01/06/2011 000325 UNITED WAY United Way Charities Payment 62.00 62.00 143194 01/06/2011 008977 VALLEY EVENTS INC EQUIP RENTAL: BRKFST W/SANTA 1,900.00 1,900.00 143195 01/06/2011 004261 VERIZON Dec xxx-9196 TCC-S.A.F.E. 169.60 Dec xxx-3526 gen usage:Fire Alarm 108.21 Dec xxx-2016 gen usage:Reverse 911 121.95 Dec xxx-5706 general usage 144.28 Dec xxx-2676 general usage 36.07 Dec xxx-5696 gen usage:sports comp 36.07 Dec xxx-6400 general usage 98.70 Dec xxx-5275 gen usage:Tem PD DSL 37.21 Dec xxx-0074 general usage 210.76 Dec xxx-6084 general usage 34.96 Dec xxx-3564 general usage 36.07 Dec xxx-0714 gen usage:PD Mall alarm 183.19 1,217.07 143196 01/06/2011 004789 VERIZON ONLINE Dec -Jan Internet svcs:Library 180.09 Dec -Jan Internet svcs:Tem PD DSL 42.99 223.08 143197 01/06/2011 001342 WAXIE SANITARY SUPPLY INC Misc maint supplies:civic center 1,706.83 Custodial supplies:civic center 1,730.10 3,436.93 143198 01/06/2011 011740 WEST COAST LIGHTS & equip maint/repair srvcs: Police 23.56 23.56 SIRENS INC 143199 01/06/2011 008530 WITMER ASSOCIATES INC City veh repair & maint: Sta 84 243.93 243.93 143200 01/06/2011 000348 ZIGLER, GAIL Reimb: Team PACE supplies 93.42 93.42 Grand total for UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA: 686,139.30 Page:12 apChkLst Final Check List 01/06/2011 4:23:47PM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 13 151 checks in this report. Grand Total All Checks: 686,139.30 Page:13 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 1 01/13/2011 1:44:04PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 1625 01/13/2011 013551 SUMMERHOUSE HOUSING Ph I (20) units/club/pool:Summerhouse 369,592.29 369,592.29 ASSOC 1626 01/13/2011 013984 CHARDONNAY ESCROW I NC 44760 Banana) Way #62 231745 42,800.00 42,800.00 143201 01/11/2011 003203 ARTISTIC EMBROIDERY MISC PROMO ITEMS:RECREATION 625.31 625.31 PGRM 143202 01/11/2011 003203 ARTISTIC EMBROIDERY embroidery svcs:special events 312.66 312.66 143203 01/11/2011 003203 ARTISTIC EMBROIDERY embroidery svcs:special events 699.69 699.69 143204 01/13/2011 013975 28500 PUJOL ST., L.P. refund:eng grad dep:LD03-147GR 995.00 995.00 143205 01/13/2011 004973 ABACHERLI, LINDI TCSD instructor earnings 680.00 680.00 143206 01/13/2011 013367 ACTIVE MICRO INC MISC TOOLS/EQUIP: PW TRAFFIC 255.33 MISC TOOLS/EQUIP: PW TRAFFIC 189.87 MISC TOOLS/EQUIP: PW TRAFFIC 54.94 MISC TOOLS/EQUIP: PW TRAFFIC 21.45 MISC TOOLS/EQUIP: PW TRAFFIC 1,352.28 1,873.87 143207 01/13/2011 004802 ADLERHORST INTERNATIONAL DEC TRAINING: POLICE K-9 RUDY 141.67 INC DEC TRAINING: POLICE K-9 CASPER 141.67 143208 01/13/2011 009374 ALLEGRO MUSICAL VENTURES piano tuning: theater 170.00 143209 01/13/2011 004240 AMERICAN FORENSIC NURSES JAN STAND BY FEE: POLICE 1,248.00 (AFN) DUI & DRUG SCREENINGS: POLICE 410.80 DUI & DRUG SCREENINGS: POLICE 283.34 170.00 410.80 2,069.60 143210 01/13/2011 001323 ARROWHEAD WATER INC BOTTLED WATER SVCS: CITY 543.52 543.52 FACILITIES 143211 01/13/2011 013976 ARTIGIANO CONSTRUCTION refund:eng grad dep:LD07-077GR 995.00 995.00 INC. 143212 01/13/2011 013983 ARTISAN LEGACY, INC. refund:eng grad dep:LD07-106GR 995.00 995.00 143213 01/13/2011 006594 B B K PERFORMANCE INC refund:eng grad dep:LD05-057GR 995.00 995.00 Pagel apChkLst Final Check List Page: 2 01/13/2011 1:44:04PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143214 01/13/2011 013977 BABB, PAUL M. refund:viol. dismissed:prkg cite #77586 305.00 305.00 143215 01/13/2011 011954 BAKER & TAYLOR INC (62) BOOK PURCHASE: LIBRARY 1,380.61 1,380.61 143216 01/13/2011 010962 BILBY, DAVID reimb:GFOA/CPFO pgrm fees 590.00 590.00 143217 01/13/2011 005716 BIRTH CHOICE OF TEMECULA Community Service Grant Funding 800.00 800.00 INC 143218 01/13/2011 006908 C C & COMPANY INC santa visit:high hopes dance 150.00 santa visit:mpsc holiday dance 150.00 300.00 143219 01/13/2011 003138 CAL MAT PW patch truck materials 214.56 PW patch truck materials 255.55 470.11 143220 01/13/2011 004971 CANON FINANCIAL SERVICES, Dec Copier Lease: Fire 182.55 182.55 INC 143221 01/13/2011 013978 CASSATT ACADEMY refund:eng grad dep:LD06-037GR 995.00 995.00 143222 01/13/2011 000447 COMTRONIX radio/antenna install:civic center 16,902.50 16,902.50 143223 01/13/2011 010650 CRAFTSMEN PLUMBING & plumbing repair: Stn 84 145.00 145.00 HVAC INC 143224 01/13/2011 008810 CROSSTOWN ELECTRICAL & equip repair/maint:PW Traffic 1,260.64 1,260.64 DATA 143225 01/13/2011 004123 D L PHARES & ASSOCIATES JAN LEASE:PD OLD TOWN OFFICE 2,828.70 2,828.70 143226 01/13/2011 003272 DAISY WHEEL RIBBON plotter supplies:info systems 41.33 41.33 COMPANY INC 143227 01/13/2011 001393 DATA TICKET INC Nov citation processing:police 1,337.05 1,337.05 143228 01/13/2011 006392 DAVCON DEVELOPMENT refund:eng grad dep:apn 921-810-032 33,976.80 33,976.80 143229 01/13/2011 003945 DIAMOND ENVIRONMENTAL Jan restroom svc: GOHS 52.88 52.88 SRVCS Page2 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 3 01/13/2011 1:44:04PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor 143230 01/13/2011 004192 DOWNS COMMERCIAL FUELING INC (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total Fuel for City vehicles: TCSD 1,354.42 Fuel for City vehicles: B&S 210.62 Fuel for City vehicles: Code Enf 328.51 Fuel for City vehicles: PW Traffic 122.60 Fuel for City vehicles: PW Lnd Dv 135.96 Fuel for City vehicles: PW CIP 210.85 Fuel for City vehicles: PW Maint 1,826.69 Fuel for City vehicles: Police 72.44 4,262.09 143231 01/13/2011 002390 EASTERN MUNICIPAL WATER Dec water meter:39656 Diego Dr 54.76 54.76 DIST 143232 01/13/2011 005880 EDGE DEVELOPMENT INC. release stop ntc: SW Dirt Exchange 8,921.87 8,921.87 143233 01/13/2011 004829 ELLISON WILSON ADVOCACY Jan advocacy cnslt: CM 3,500.00 3,500.00 LLC 143234 01/13/2011 009953 FEDERAL CLEANING Jan janitorial svc:pd mall office 625.00 625.00 CONTRACTORS 143235 01/13/2011 003347 FIRST BANKCARD CENTER 001060 HYATT RR meaI:NLC cf Denver 11/30-12/2 40.08 001060 HYATT RR htI:NLC cf Denver 11/30-12/2 498.33 006942 ONTARIO AIRPORT RR pkg:NLC cf Denver 11/30-12/2 54.00 006952 PAYPAL GR Verisign Payflow Pro Transaction 59.95 006952 PAYPAL HP Verisign Payflow Pro Transaction 157.60 007744 SUPERSHUTTLE RR shuttle:NLC cf Denver 11/30-12/2 22.00 007592 CAROLS RESTAURANT AT RR meal:Sister City (23) attendees 1,199.76 2,031.72 143236 01/13/2011 011121 FORM BASED CODES regist:weblink 1/1-3/31/11 Lariccia 50.00 50.00 INSTITUTE 143237 01/13/2011 011121 FORM BASED CODES regist:weblink 1/1-3/31 Lariccia 50.00 50.00 INSTITUTE 143238 01/13/2011 002982 FRANCHISE TAX BOARD 330383649 2010 Form 592 350.00 350.00 143239 01/13/2011 005311 H2O CERTIFIED POOL WATER Dec water maint: TS Fountain 175.00 SPCL. Dec pool maint svcs:CRC/TES 900.00 1,075.00 143240 01/13/2011 003198 HOME DEPOT, THE misc supplies:OT Boardwalk 356.32 356.32 Page3 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 4 01/13/2011 1:44:04PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143241 01/13/2011 004984 INDEPENDENT ROOFING NOV ROOF INSPECT:CIVIC CENTER 5,516.56 CONSULTANT 11/15-21 ROOF INSPECT:CIVIC CENTER 1,740.00 7,256.56 143242 01/13/2011 013420 INGRAM LIBRARY SERVICES (1) BOOK PURCHASE: LIBRARY 6.03 INC (2) BOOK PURCHASE: LIBRARY 85.13 91.16 143243 01/13/2011 013695 INLAND EMPIRE SHRED IT 12/20 doc shred svc: PD Old Town 15.00 15.00 143244 01/13/2011 012295 JAMESON MANAGEMENT INC Garage Door Repair: Stn 73 250.00 250.00 143245 01/13/2011 013077 JONES, DENNIS sttlmnt: performance 12/31 2,725.00 2,725.00 143246 01/13/2011 013979 JOY A DENTAL CORP refund:eng grad dep:LD05-116GR 995.00 995.00 143247 01/13/2011 002531 KATY FM RADIO radio broadcasting: OT Holidays 331.50 broadcast fee: OT Holidays 250.00 581.50 143248 01/13/2011 011910 L H ENGINEERING COMPANY DEC CONST:OLD TOWN STREET 1,760.00 1,760.00 INC IMPROV 143249 01/13/2011 013879 LAKESHORE LEARNING class supplies: tiny tots pgrm 74.27 74.27 MATERIALS 143250 01/13/2011 012065 LANCE, SOLL & LUNGHARD regist:GASB cf 1/26 Oceanside 50.00 50.00 LLC 143251 01/13/2011 003726 LIFE ASSIST INC Medical Supplies: Paramedics 46.32 Medical Supplies: Paramedics 137.58 Medical Supplies: Paramedics 406.43 Medical Supplies: Paramedics 464.65 Medical Supplies: Paramedics 151.62 Medical Supplies: Paramedics 75.81 1,282.41 143252 01/13/2011 013981 LOWRY, DAVID refund:eng dep 30180 Pala Rainbow 995.00 995.00 143253 01/13/2011 013982 M C I COMM SERVICE Dec xxx-0714 gen usage:PD mall alarm 18.75 18.75 143254 01/13/2011 004141 MAINTEX INC Cleaning & maint supplies: city fac's 357.57 357.57 143255 01/13/2011 004307 MARINE BIOCHEMISTS Dec water maint srvcs:Hary/Duck Pond 3,900.00 3,900.00 143256 01/13/2011 013311 MATERIAL HANDLING SUPPLY Forklift maint/repair:pw maint 143.14 143.14 INC Page4 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 5 01/13/2011 1:44:04PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143257 01/13/2011 000944 MCCAIN TRAFFIC SUPPLY INC NOV ENG SRVCS: TRAFFIC SIG SYNC 17,957.98 NOV ENG SRVCS:TRAFFIC SIG SYNC 6,802.45 24,760.43 143258 01/13/2011 013390 MILLER, JOSHUA TCSD Instructor Earnings 84.00 TCSD Instructor Earnings 143.50 227.50 143259 01/13/2011 001892 MOBILE MODULAR 12/19-1/17 modular rental: OATC 619.88 619.88 143260 01/13/2011 005887 MOFFATT & NICHOL 9/26-10/30 CONSULTING:FRENCH 325,020.11 325,020.11 ENGINEERS VLY/I-15 143261 01/13/2011 006077 N T H GENERATION prof services:Civic Center 2,600.00 2,600.00 COMPUTING INC 143262 01/13/2011 002925 NAPA AUTO PARTS Auto parts & supplies: Sta 84 75.56 Auto parts & supplies: Sta 84 13.62 Auto parts & supplies: Sta 84 94.31 183.49 143263 01/13/2011 005006 NBS GOVERNMENT FINANCE SPCL TAX ADMIN SRVCS:FINANCE 9,058.27 9,058.27 GROUP DEPT - 143264 01/13/2011 013872 NICHOLS, JANALYNN JOANN Innerstate dance grant recipient 100.00 100.00 143265 01/13/2011 008528 NICHOLS, MELBURG & NOV ENG SRVS:CIVIC CENTER PH II 41,861.78 ROSETTO NOV DSGN SRVCS: PRKG STRUCTURE 7,398.72 NOV ENG SRVS: CIVIC CENTER PH II 569.65 NOV ENG SRVS: CIVIC CENTER PH II 2,160.66 51,990.81 143266 01/13/2011 010273 NIXON PEABODY LLP Feb -Dec '10 legal services 21,747.56 21,747.56 143267 01/13/2011 002139 NORTH COUNTY TIMES Dec advertising: Temecula Presents 331.63 Dec legal advertising: City Clerk/Pln 453.60 785.23 143268 01/13/2011 012833 PC MALL GOV, INC. Misc computer supplies:info sys 119.63 Misc computer supplies:info sys 177.30 296.93 143269 01/13/2011 002498 PETRA GEOTECHNICAL INC Nov geotech srvcs:storm drain impv 2,972.50 2,972.50 143270 01/13/2011 013871 PHAM, JASMINE V. Innerstate dance grant recipient 200.00 200.00 143271 01/13/2011 010338 POOL & ELECTRICAL Var pool supplies: citywide 610.84 PRODUCTS INC Var pool supplies: citywide 44.02 654.86 143272 01/13/2011 002185 POSTMASTER Annual PO box fee payment: City Hall 1,160.00 1,160.00 Pages apChkLst 01/13/2011 1:44:04PM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 6 Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date 143273 01/13/2011 143274 01/13/2011 143275 01/13/2011 143276 01/13/2011 143277 01/13/2011 143278 01/13/2011 143279 01/13/2011 143280 01/13/2011 143281 01/13/2011 143282 01/13/2011 143283 01/13/2011 143284 01/13/2011 143285 01/13/2011 Vendor 004029 R J M DESIGN GROUP INC 013947 RADOSEVICH, PAULA 013866 RAL INVESTMENT CORP 000907 RANCHO TEMECULA CAR WASH 000271 RBF CONSULTING 002110 RENTAL SERVICE CORPORATION 004498 REPUBLIC INTELLIGENT 002412 RICHARDS WATSON & GERSHON 008928 RIGEL PRODUCTS & SERVICE 000352 RIVERSIDE CO ASSESSOR 001365 RIVERSIDE COUNTY OF 009213 SHERRY BERRY MUSIC 000645 SMART & FINAL INC 143286 01/13/2011 000537 SO CALIF EDISON 143287 01/13/2011 002503 SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY (Continued) Description NOV DSGN SRVCS:REDHAWK PARK IMPRV refund:Guitar Lessons 1760.204 Conference table: Civic Center Dec vehicle detailing srvcs:Var.City NOV ENG SRVCS: ULT. INTRCHG OCT ENG SRVCS: ULT. INTRCHG concrete mixer: PW Maint Equipment rental: TCSD Maint Install traffic signal pole: PW Nov 2010 legal services credit:billing adj/lack of documentation Equip repair & maint:pw maint Sept- Nov assessor maps: b&s dept. food handler's permit: O.T. holiday '10 Jazz @ the Merc 12/3/10 MISC SUPPLIES: DOG HOUSE PROGRAM MISC SUPPLIES: DOG HOUSE PROGRAI` MISC SUPPLIES: DOG HOUSE PROGRAI` Dec 2-30-066-2889:30051 rancho vista Dec 2-29-807-1093:28079 Diaz PED Dec 2-27-805-3194:Comm Theater Dec 2-29-479-2981:31454 Tem Pkwy Dec 2-31-031-2590:28301 rncho cal Dec 2-05-791-8807:31587 Tem Pkwy FY 10/11 emissions fee: Stn 84 Amount Paid Check Total 1,261.20 15.00 7,323.06 63.00 121,833.79 112,865.13 2,990.63 50.03 4,300.98 154,762.99 -622.45 82.71 27.00 177.00 513.00 72.12 112.54 134.72 23.30 22.77 3,198.90 127.39 60.50 7,876.34 109.00 1,261.20 15.00 7,323.06 63.00 234,698.92 3,040.66 4,300.98 154,140.54 82.71 27.00 177.00 513.00 319.38 11, 309.20 FY 10/11 operating fee: Stn 84 293.21 402.21 Page6 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 7 01/13/2011 1:44:04PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143288 01/13/2011 000519 SOUTH COUNTY PEST Dec pest control services: Stn 92 42.00 CONTROL INC Pest control services: Duck Pond 73.00 115.00 143289 01/13/2011 012652 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Jan gen usage:0141,0839,2593,9306 507.49 507.49 143290 01/13/2011 002015 STAR WAY PRODUCTIONS Audio srvcs:Old Town events 12/31 675.00 675.00 143291 01/13/2011 008023 STATER BROTHERS MARKETS refreshments: CERT Training 153.74 Rfrshmnts: Dinner w/Fire Fighters prgm 47.20 200.94 143292 01/13/2011 000305 TARGET BANK BUS CARD MISC SUPPLIES: CLASSES & 47.36 SRVCS ACTIVITIES Hospitality supplies: Theater 50.53 MISC SUPPLIES: SKATE PARK 65.02 162.91 143293 01/13/2011 000168 TEMECULA FLOWER CORRAL Display:civic center reception/sunshine 188.09 188.09 143294 01/13/2011 003677 TEMECULA MOTORSPORTS City vehicle repair & maint: Police 201.44 LLC City vehicle repair & maint: Police 108.74 City vehicle repair & maint: Police 73.77 383.95 143295 01/13/2011 004209 TEMECULA SUNRISE ROTARY Oct -Dec bus bench install & maint:PW 3,000.00 3,000.00 FOUND. 143296 01/13/2011 011736 TEMECULA TROPHY INC Emp recognition awards:HR 593.72 Recognition awards:csd 561.15 1,154.87 143297 01/13/2011 009194 TEMECULA VALLEY NEWS Dec advertising: Temecula Presents 143.20 143.20 143298 01/13/2011 003067 TEMECULA VALLEY R V Equip repair & maint: Police 1,473.39 SERVICE Equip repair & maint: Police 481.11 1,954.50 143299 01/13/2011 004274 TEMECULA VALLEY SECURITY Locksmith srvcs: civic center 200.00 CENTR Locksmith srvcs: civic center 252.91 452.91 143300 01/13/2011 003849 TERRYBERRY COMPANY Emp recognition awards:HR 4,009.48 4,009.48 143301 01/13/2011 003862 THYSSENKRUPP Elevator repair & maint:foc 148.50 148.50 ELEVATOR.BRNCH 37 143302 01/13/2011 013974 TORRES, CASSANDRA refund:Tiny Tots 1040.104 56.00 56.00 143303 01/13/2011 013980 TORRES, RAMSES refund:eng grad dep:LD06-152GR 995.00 995.00 Page:7 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 8 01/13/2011 1:44:04PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143304 01/13/2011 003031 TRAFFIC CONTROL SERVICE Misc traffic control supplies: PW Maint 43.23 INC Misc traffic control supplies: PW Maint Misc traffic control supplies: PW Maint Misc traffic control supplies: PW Maint 143305 01/13/2011 007766 UNDERGROUND SERVICE Dec undrgrnd svcs alert tickets:PW ALERT 143306 01/13/2011 004261 VERIZON Dec xxx-0049 gen usage:Comerchero Jan xxx-0590 gen usage:TCC alarm Jan xxx-7530 gen usage:Library Jan xxx-5180 gen usage:79S Irrig ctr Dec xxx-1999 general usage 66.61 1,496.84 1,496.84 225.00 37.34 82.43 367.25 40.83 40.73 3,103.52 225.00 568.58 143307 01/13/2011 004789 VERIZON ONLINE Jan SW DSL:PD:Jones, C. 39.95 39.95 143308 01/13/2011 012292 VIAMEDIA INC Dec cable commercial:Old Town holiday 3,162.00 3,162.00 143309 01/13/2011 001342 WAXIE SANITARY SUPPLY INC CLEANING SUPPLI ES: 654.02 C.MUS/THTR/PARKS Custodial supplies: civic center 723.38 Custodial supplies: civic center 728.26 Custodial supplies: var.city fac's 3,244.99 5,350.65 143310 01/13/2011 003730 WEST COAST ARBORISTS INC 11/16-30 tree trimming srvcs:pw maint 7,240.00 11/1-15 tree trimming srvcs:csd 1,780.00 Tree trimming & removal:signet 432.00 9,452.00 143311 01/13/2011 000339 WEST PUBLISHING CORP CA Penal Code '11 pamphlets: Police 180.79 180.79 143312 01/13/2011 013556 WESTERN AUDIO VISUAL ret. w/h pmt: civic center -9,629.39 AUDIO/VISUAL INTEGRATION:CIVIC CEN 96,293.99 86,664.60 143313 01/13/2011 000621 WESTERN RIVERSIDE Dec '10 TUMF Payment 275,063.00 275,063.00 COUNCIL OF 143314 01/13/2011 008402 WESTERN RIVERSIDE Dec '10 MSHCP payment 60,078.00 60,078.00 COUNTY 143315 01/13/2011 000341 WILLDAN ASSOCIATES INC Nov engineering srvs:pw traffic 2,080.00 2,080.00 143316 01/13/2011 000230 WILLDAN FINANCIAL Jan -Mar assessment eng srvcs:csd 5,666.65 5,666.65 SERVICES 143317 01/13/2011 004567 WITCHER ELECTRIC Electrical repair:rrsp ballfield 1,680.00 1,680.00 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 9 01/13/2011 1:44:04PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank : union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total 143318 01/13/2011 003776 ZOLL MEDICAL CORPORATION Medical Supplies: Paramedics 1,305.00 Medical Supplies: Paramedics 893.21 2,198.21 Grand total for UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA: 1,856,682.79 Page9 apChkLst Final Check List 01/13/2011 1:44:04PM CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 10 120 checks in this report. Grand Total All Checks: 1,856,682.79 Pagel 0 Item No. 4 CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance DATE: January 25, 2011 SUBJECT: Approval of the fiscal year 2011-12 Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District (TVTBID) Advisory Board's Annual Report and Levy of an Assessment against Lodging Businesses within the TVTBID for fiscal year 2011-12 PREPARED BY: David Bilby, Senior Debt Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council: 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE REPORT OF THE ADVISORY BOARD FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011-12 IN CONNECTION WITH THE TEMECULA VALLEY TOURISM BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT (TVTBID) 2. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF INTENTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DECLARING ITS INTENTION TO LEVY AN ASSESSMENT AGAINST LODGING BUSINESSES WITHIN THE TEMECULA VALLEY TOURISM BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011-12 AND FIXING THE TIME AND PLACE OF A PUBLIC HEARING THEREON AND GIVING NOTICE THEREOF BACKGROUND: In December of 2005, the City Council took the necessary actions and formed the Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District (TVTBID), Chapter 3.40 of the Temecula Municipal Code, to promote tourism in the Temecula Valley at the request of all the lodging businesses within the City. Thereafter, the City Council was authorized to undertake proceedings to annually levy assessments against lodging businesses within the TVTBID pursuant to the Parking and Business Improvement Area Law of 1989. On November 24, 2009, the City Council authorized staff to proceed with the preparation of a Resolution of Intention to increase the Assessment rate on all lodging businesses within the Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District from 2% to 4% of the rent charged by the operator per occupied room per night. On January 12, 2010, the City Council amended Section 3.40.030 of the Temecula Municipal Code increasing the assessment from 2% to 4% for all lodging businesses within the Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District. The primary purpose of the 4% assessment is to provide sufficient funding to support marketing activities promoting tourism for all lodging businesses in the District. As annually required, staff has prepared the necessary resolutions to approve the Annual Report and set a Public Hearing on the assessments, staff will prepare a final resolution confirming the assessments for fiscal year 2011-2012 to be brought forward at the scheduled Public Hearing on February 8, 2011. At the Public Hearing, testimony may be heard and protests may be made by any person with an interest in the proposed levy. After the Public Hearing, and in the absence of a majority protest, staff will proceed to levy the assessment for the fiscal year 2011-12 (March 1, 2011 through February 28, 2012) as authorized by City Council. FISCAL IMPACT: It is anticipated that the 4% annual assessment will result in the collection of approximately $939,087 in fiscal year 2011-12 which would be used by the CONVIS for the promotion of tourism. The City would receive up to 2% of the assessments, or approximately $18,782, to offset administrative costs. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution No. 11 - Resolution No. 11 - Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Report — Budget and Marketing Plan Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Report — Budget and Marketing Plan Bureau 2010-2011 Annual Bureau 2011-2012 Annual RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE REPORT OF THE ADVISORY BOARD FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011-12 IN CONNECTION WITH THE TEMECULA VALLEY TOURISM BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT (TVTBID) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare as follows: A. The Parking and Business Improvement Area Law of 1989, California Streets and Highways Code Section 36500 et seq., (the "Law") authorizes the City Council of the City of Temecula (the "City Council") to annually levy an assessment against businesses within a business improvement area for the purpose of promoting tourism, which is in addition to any assessments, fees, charges or taxes imposed in the City of Temecula (the "City"). B. Pursuant to the Law, the City Council enacted Chapter 3.40 of the Temecula Municipal Code, establishing the Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District in the City (the "TVTBID"). C. The Law requires the City Council to appoint an advisory board which shall prepare an annual report for each fiscal year for which assessments are to be levied and collected to pay the costs of the activities described in the report and which shall make recommendations to the City Council on the expenditure of revenues derived from the levy of assessments, on the classification of businesses, as applicable, and on the method and basis of levying the assessments. D. By Resolution No. 05-121, the City Council appointed the Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District Advisory Board to serve as the advisory board for the TVTBID (the "Advisory Board"). E. In accordance with Section 36533 of the Law, the Advisory Board has prepared and filed with the City Clerk, and the City Clerk has presented to the City Council, a report for fiscal year 2011-12 in connection with the proposed levy of an assessment against lodging businesses within the TVTBID entitled, "Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District 2011-12 Annual Marketing Plan Budget and Marketing Plan" (the "Report") and, by previous resolution, the City Council preliminarily approved the Report as filed. Section 2. The City Council has examined and reviewed the Report, and such report is hereby preliminarily approved as filed. Section 3. This resolution shall take effect immediately upon its adoption by the City Council, and the City Clerk shall certify to the vote adopting this resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 25th day of January, 2011. Ron Roberts, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 11- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 25th day of January, 2011, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DECLARING ITS INTENTION TO LEVY AN ASSESSMENT AGAINST LODGING BUSINESSES WITHIN THE TEMECULA VALLEY TOURISM BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT (TVTBID) FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011-12 AND FIXING THE TIME AND PLACE OF A PUBLIC HEARING THEREON AND GIVING NOTICE THEREOF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The Parking and Business Improvement Area Law of 1989, California Streets and Highways Code Section 36500 et seq., (the "Law") authorizes the City Council of the City of Temecula (the "City Council") to annually levy an assessment against businesses within a business improvement area for the purpose of promoting tourism, which is in addition to any assessments, fees, charges or taxes imposed in the City of Temecula (the "City"). Section 2. That pursuant to the Law, the City Council enacted Chapter 3.40 of the Temecula Municipal Code establishing the Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District in the City (the "TVTBID"). Section 3. That the Law requires the City Council to appoint an advisory board which shall prepare an annual report for each fiscal year for which assessments are to be levied and collected to pay the costs of the activities described in the report and which shall make recommendations to the City Council on the expenditure of revenues derived from the levy of assessments, on the classification of businesses, as applicable, and on the method and basis of levying the assessments. Section 4. By Resolution No. 05-121, the City Council appointed the Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District Advisory Board to serve as the advisory board for the TVTBID (the "Advisory Board"). Section 5. In accordance with Section 36533 of the Law, the Advisory Board has prepared and filed with the City Clerk, and the City Clerk has presented to the City Council, a report for fiscal year 2011-12 in connection with the proposed levy of an assessment against lodging businesses within the TVTBID entitled, "Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District 2011-12 Annual Marketing Plan Budget and Marketing Plan" (the "Report") and, by previous resolution, the City Council preliminarily approved the Report as filed. Section 6. The boundaries of the TVTBID are the boundaries of the City, and include all lodging businesses therein. Section 7. The City Council hereby declares its intention, in addition to any assessments, fees, charges or taxes imposed by the City, to levy and collect an assessment against lodging businesses within the TVTBID boundaries pursuant to the Law for fiscal year 2011-12 (March 1, 2011 to February 28, 2012). Such assessment is not proposed to increase from the assessment levied and collected in the TVTBID for fiscal year 2010-11. The proposed fiscal year 2011-12 TVTBID assessment is to be levied on all lodging businesses, defined in Temecula Municipal Code Section 3.40.020 to mean hotels, motels, and bed and breakfasts as defined in Temecula Municipal Code Section 3.20.040, within the TVTBID boundaries based upon four percent (4%) of the rent charged by the operator per occupied room per night. Extended stays, defined as stays of more than 30 consecutive calendar days, and those exempt persons, as defined in Municipal Code Section 3.20.040, will be exempt from the levy of the assessment. The assessments will not be included in gross room rental revenue for the purpose of determining the amount of the Transient Occupancy Tax imposed pursuant to Chapter 3.20 of the Municipal Code. New lodging businesses established within the boundaries of the TVTBID after the beginning of the 2011-12 fiscal year will not be exempt from the levy of the fiscal year 2011-12 assessment. The assessment shall be collected in monthly installments as set forth in Chapter 3.40 of the Municipal Code. Section 8. The revenues raised from the levy and collection of the assessment shall be used for marketing and promotions to increase tourism and market the Temecula Valley area as a tourist destination that benefits lodging businesses located and operating within the boundaries of the TVTBID as provided for in Chapter 3.40 of the Municipal Code, and shall not be used for any other purposes. The City shall retain two percent (2%) of the collected revenues to pay for collecting the assessments and administering the TVTBID. Section 9. The City Council hereby fixes the time and place for a public hearing on the proposed levy of the fiscal year 2011-12 assessment against lodging businesses within the TVTBID as follows: Time: 7:00 p.m. Date: February 8, 2011 Place: City of Temecula City Council Chambers 41000 Main Street Temecula, California. Section 10. At the public hearing the testimony of all interested persons regarding the levy of the assessment within the TVTBID for fiscal year 2011-12 will be heard. A protest may be made orally or in writing at the public hearing. A. Any protest pertaining to the regularity or sufficiency of the proceedings shall be in writing and clearly state the irregularity or defect to which objection is made. B. Every written protest must be filed with the City Clerk at or before the time fixed herein for the public hearing. Written protests may be delivered or mailed to the City Clerk, City of Temecula, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California, 92590. C. The City Council may waive any irregularity in the form or content of any written protest and at the public hearing may correct minor defects in the proceedings. A written protest may be withdrawn in writing at any time before the conclusion of the public hearing. D. Each written protest must contain a written description of the business in which the person signing the protest is interested, sufficient to identify the business and its address. If the person signing the protest is not shown on the official records of the City as the owner of the business, then the protest shall contain or be accompanied by written evidence that the person is the owner of the business. If the owner of the business is a corporation, LLC, partnership or other legal entity, the authorized representative for the entity shall be authorized to sign the protest. Section 11. If at the conclusion of the public hearing, there are of record, written protests (submitted and not withdrawn) by the owners of the businesses within the TVTBID that will pay fifty percent (50%) or more of the total assessments of the entire TVTBID, no further proceedings to levy the proposed fiscal year 2011-12 assessment, as contained in this Resolution, shall be taken for a period of one year from the date of the finding of a majority protest by the City Council. If the majority of written protests is only as to an improvement or activity proposed, then that type of improvement or activity shall not be included in the TVTBID. Section 12. Further information regarding the TVTBID may be obtained from the City Clerk, City of Temecula, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California, 92590. For a full and detailed description of the boundaries of the TVTBID, the activities to be provided for fiscal year 2011-12 and the proposed fiscal year 2011-12 assessment, reference is hereby made to the Report of the Advisory Board. The Report is on file in the office of the City Clerk and open to public inspection. Section 13. The City Clerk is instructed to provide notice of the public hearing by publishing this Resolution in a newspaper of general circulation in the City, at least seven days before the hearing. Section 14. This resolution shall take effect immediately upon its adoption by the City Council, and the City Clerk shall certify to the vote adopting this resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 25th day of January, 2011. Ron Roberts, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 11- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 25th day of January, 2011, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk 1111111111010000VOMIIVIIIIIIIIIIIII„, 11. "w MO SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA WINE COUNTRY Convention andI Visitors Bureau 2011-2012 marketing plan TVTBID budget and marketing plan Mar 11 - Feb 12 O CO CO 0 W 4) 0 N 0 N 0 CO 0 4) O f0 MV V O co 0) O^ O O O O C CD O V f0 1' V 0) f0 0) 1'- 4) O W s- 0 e- 47 1'- N O eF N M CO 4) 47 4) 0 CO 0 0 0 01 F- 1� N CO O V CO 0 CO O W 4] V CO W N 0 W N. O N O CO. N r m N N V V 4) N OI� 4) 4) 0 CO 0 CO 0 O) CO CO W W N V (00000(0 V W CO 0 W t` O O N O CO (71 ti N a- N N r V r V 4) N N CO 4) O4) 0 CO 0 CO 01 O CO 00(4) a (0000(0 et 0 O f� N N O N n " m ° O N N N M N M V N N CO N N N O 4) 4) 0 CO 0 CO 0 0) M CO O N 0 V CO 0 CO 0 W 4) V CO M 41 N + O 0 4) O N N O CO N O 4) .- N '7 r V LO [V W M N h N N- CD (00(0005(00)0)0 I� W 4) V CO 0 CO 0 0 1' V CO 4) O W W O 0) 0 1- O 4) CO O W N U 4) t` N r — V — V 4) N CO M N W O 4) O4) O O 4) O 01 CO CO M 4--• 0 CO `71-- M O V 0 O 4) V M 1-- c7 N N N 0 CO O O 4) No 00 N O) 4) N 4) N m W CO M V V h 4) )) O 4) O co O M O V CO CO O LO O O V coO coO N 50 N M "i:. - N V O 1-- CO 1-- O 4) N of CON N N N a 4) N Q V N I� N O 4) O co 0 0 0 V CO CO 4) 4) 0) O V (0000(0(0(0(0 ID N W 0 0 1� 0 4) N V CO N 0 W V N �- 1' V 4) N 0) M N I'IW 11') O 0C0 O co O N O V W ti .--.. 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V 4) N W CO M 171 0 t0 d 0 0 O r N o!I C O C 0 O U m > 0 m 7N C 0— E�1L 01 0 N I- I� M 4) 4) O O M O 4) O V M 0) N O N V f0 O CO O CO 4) 1-- CO 0 I� 545 N M O W t` O CO N 47 CO O 4I ' r N M r 1� r V 4) N W N N Total Income Dues & Subscriptions FAM Tours/Site Visits Event Hosting Office Supplies Personnel Costs Professional Fees Promotional Items Trade Show Participation Travel & Entertainment Total Expenses J 0 0 0 0 m 0 O 0 c 0 0 O U 0 0 D)� > 0 0 N CO LL 0 0 r 0 � e FmNm C7 Mar 11-Feb 12 O O 0 0 0 0 (0 0) CO f0 N 0 0 O 0 CO 0 O 0 t0 0 O LO 00 t0 O O CO 0 0 0 1 P) 10 r r x r x . 0 r 1 r- r r In csi 6 01 CVO O cocc* V V 01 co O co m 0 0 0 O CO ▪ • 0 O CO o M coo O O o (0 0 0 r 0 n M O O 10 oLCn 0 PI 0 - CO o VI 0 0 0 Oo co co O O 00 CO0 CO O CO M • 0 Cr O 1? O O CO o co o cc co O co ▪ n O r m r r O co ▪ O W O M ▪ O O O O 10 o O co • co O O O 0Li 0D Advertising - Website 0 9 0 LL Investment Revenue Membership Dues 0 1) vJ t? -4 0 m L 0 2 Sales -Publications co V 1 o IO M CO co 0) V o 0 )- M N ) o n c 0 LO 1- mco co a 0 CO C•I CO LO N 0 r 0) n n n ) 1 1 co r a Ln • V 10 L') CO 5) 0— 0) M000_ 1 10 1 CO r e d CO 1 IL) (0 cn co 0) 0 00 (1) CD i r M 1 0 n 03 f 1 CO 1 CO CO r0 N IL) 111 0 1 m r 1 1 CO Lo r- LO O ▪ • 1 1 r r 0 1 m 0- 1 M O 0) CO CO 0 CO 0) MN 4 r r a 0 n C0') r 1 1 0) 1 0 0) 1)) m m ro o Total Income Advertising -Website Dues & Subscriptions Event Hosting, Industry Sales Event Hosting, Local Community CV CV 0 n * + CO 0 N 0 Office Supplies Personnel Costs Professional Fees Promotional Items Operating Cost Telecommunications Travel & Entertainment 10 co0 co 0 0) <0n 10 CO co 0 0 Total Expenses Net Income `Proposed -Pending final confirmation of Pechanga Partnership Q 0 1 - Mar 11 - Feb 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Income Advertising-CIty Brochure/Rack Service FAM Tours/Site Visits Trade Show Participation 0 0 0 0 0 Total Expense Net Income *Proposed -Pending approval of continued City Partnership Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan Section IX Marketing Opportunity B Target Markets A. Temecula Valley Marketing Opportunity If the newly formed visitors bureau and the community can consistently increase room sales through the TVCVB's leadership and expanded marketing efforts, there can be significant revenue growth. Following are two scenarios based on 5 year projections that outline potential Retum on Investment (ROI) by the TVCVB's efforts. Scenario 1: Moderate Growth Scenario • Minimal new inventory is added. • Average Daily Rate increases at 3% annually. • Occupancy increases at approximately 1.5% annually, Scenario 2: Aggressive Growth • Minimal new inventory is added. • Average Daily Rate increases at 3% annually„ • Occupancy increases at about 3% annually. Scenario 1 5 Year Projection Hotel Rooms 1,666 1,766 1,866 Rooms Available 608,090 644,590 681,090 Occupancy 72% 73.5% 75.0% Rooms Sold 437,825 473,774 510,818 Incremental Rooms 0 35,949 37,044 ADR $100 $103.00 $106.09 Incremental Revenue $3,702,731.55 $3,929,982.05 Incremental Cost $437,825 $473,774 ROI $8.5 $8.3 Scenario 2 5 Year Projection Hotel Rooms 1,666 1,766 1,866 Rooms Available 608,090 644,590 681,090 Occupancy 72% 75.0% 78.0% Rooms Sold 437,825 483,443 531,250 Incremental Rooms 0 45,618 47,808 ADR $100 $103.00 $106.09 Incremental Revenue $4,698,623.10 $5,071,918.89 Incremental Cost $437,825 $483,443 ROI $10.7 $10.5 8MG 1,966 717,590 76.5% 548,956 38,139 $109.27 $4,167,535.11 $510,818 $8.2 1,966 717,590 81.0% 581,248 49,998 $109.27 $5,463,383.67 $531,250 $10.3 2,066 754,090 78.0% 588,190 39,234 $112.55 $4,415,804.38 $548,956 $8.0 2,066 754,090 84.0% 633,436 52.188 $112.55 $5,873,771.61 $581,248 $10.1 2,166 790,590 79.5% 628,519 40,329 $115.93 $4,675,219.03 $588,190 $7.9 2,166 790,590 87.0% 687,813 54,378 $115.93 $6,303,865.78 $633,436 $10.0 It should be noted that in either scenario it will be important for the destination to increase overall demand and focus TCVCB efforts to that end. Given Temecula Valley's new and exciting position in the marketplace, these scenarios may be understating the potential. On the other hand, acts of terrorism, economic uncertainty, increased competition as well as other issues may have a dramatic and negative impact on either scenario. 52 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan B. Target Markets 1. Geographic Markets Temecula Valley has excellent proximity to three major population markets including Orange County, Los Angeles and San Diego. Temecula Valley should focus on stimulating ovemight visits from FIT, group and business travelers originating from Orange County. Additionally San Diego and Los Angeles because of its close proximity offers significant opportunity. In addition to overnight leisure travelers from these markets it is believed that Temecula Valley also offers enough distance for business travelers and meeting and convention attendees to generate overnight stays. Based on information collected in the destination, the following target market summary for Orange County, San Diego and Los Angeles has been developed. 2004 Median Age 2004 Average Age Median Household Income Average Household Income Per capita income Casino Gambling Any casino gambling Activities on Domestic Vacation General sightseeing Attend event Shopping Play golf Bicycling Running/jogging Other outdoor sport/recreation Visit relatives/friends Visit spa Activities Participation in General Attend Arts & Cultural Events Gourmet Cooking/Fine Foods Bicycle frequently Golf Running/Jogging Wines Source: PCensus Table 12 Target Market Size and Characteristics Orange County 34.6 35.3 $63,748 $83,329 $27,722 San Diego Los Angeles 34.1 32.6 35 33 $50,995 $42,632 $67,814 $61,812 $24,651 $20,349 216,592 21.9% I 220,844 20.80% 643,613 458,058 20.8% 429,784 13.0% 1,261,120 179,461 8.2% 176,695 8.0% 503,683 332,413 15.1% 321,700 14.6% 925,514 65,299 3.0% 61,757 2.8% 168,025 48,059 2.2% 45,515 2.1% 111,963 35,262 1.6% 33,870 1.5% 91,635 165,907 7.5% 152,725 7.0% 445,928 330,289 15.0% 323,382 15.0% 936,532 32,339 1.5% 28,748 1.3% 809,569 (Households) 231,220 238,864 268,483 237,908 184,403 227,398 2420.0% 232,161 22.0% 1,201,130 2500.0% 240,343 23.5% 1,254,752 2800.0% 262,843 25.7% 1,388,807 2490.0% 204,547 20.0% 1,002,729 1930.0% 207,615 20.0% 975,918 2300.0% 219,888 4.5% 1,072,438 19.8% 17.4% 6.9% 12.7% 2.3% 1.5% 1.3% 6.1% 12.9% 1.1% 22% 23.40% 25.90% 18.70% 18.20% 20% As illustrated in the above table, in addition to high household incomes, each of these markets have a propensity to gamble, golf, enjoy wines, shop and attend arts and cultural events which include all the elements found in Temecula Valley. 53 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan Despite the size of these markets it is clear that Temecula valley does not have the financial resources to adequately cover all of the markets with media alone. As such the following table is developed to show the range of marketing options that might be used in each market. The bureau may choose to emphasize different tools and different levels depending upon the opportunity It should be noted that while the primary source of Temecula Valley's visitors arrive by automobile, there is significant air access into Ontario Airport with Southwest Airlines being the dominant carrier with approximately 50% of the passenger arrival market share. This offers excellent long-term potential for both group and FIT travel as Southwest provides access from a variety of Califomia markets. Illustrated below, Southwest Airlines is the dominant carrier that services the Ontario Airport. Table 13 Ontario Airport Carrier Market Share Airline Carrier Market Share Southwest 49% Delta 8.3% American West 7.3% American Airlines 7.2% United 5.B% Alaska 4.3% Continnental 3.8% Skywest 3.4% Northwest 2.5% Horizon Air 2.4% Other 5.2% Source: Ontario Airport 54 Orange County Los Angeles San Diego 1 Group 2, FIT Target Segments 1. Group 2, FIT 1. Group 2, FIT Marketing Tools Media Public Relations Promotions Sales Special Events Public Relations Promotions Sales Special Events Public Relations Promotions Sales Special Events It should be noted that while the primary source of Temecula Valley's visitors arrive by automobile, there is significant air access into Ontario Airport with Southwest Airlines being the dominant carrier with approximately 50% of the passenger arrival market share. This offers excellent long-term potential for both group and FIT travel as Southwest provides access from a variety of Califomia markets. Illustrated below, Southwest Airlines is the dominant carrier that services the Ontario Airport. Table 13 Ontario Airport Carrier Market Share Airline Carrier Market Share Southwest 49% Delta 8.3% American West 7.3% American Airlines 7.2% United 5.B% Alaska 4.3% Continnental 3.8% Skywest 3.4% Northwest 2.5% Horizon Air 2.4% Other 5.2% Source: Ontario Airport 54 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strata9lc tarketing Elan In terms of access markets, there are 51 daily non-stop flights between Oakland, Sacramento and San Jose into Ontario Airport with approximately 6,987 seats. This frequency and capacity offers Temecula Valley significant long-term growth opportunities. Table 14 Southwest Non -Stop Flights From Selected Markets Market FIIghtslDay Est Seats Oakland Sacramento San Jose Source; Sosrlliwwesl Airlines ItAip 2,603 7' 55 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan 2. Target Segments With regards to target markets, the TVCVB should target leisure (FIT) and group travelers as indicated below. A. FIT Travelers Based upon Temecula Valley's easily accessible location and wide range of activities, the following leisure segments should be targeted: • Youth (25-34) • Baby Boomers (35-54) • Active Mature Adults (55+) o Vacation/Getaway It should be noted that these targeted age groups of leisure travelers are highly receptive to visiting destinations that are convenient "easy to get to" getaways which Temecula Valley epitomizes. B. Groups While the individual properties and attractions primarily target their efforts at leisure travelers, the TVCVB will optimize its marketing efforts and resources by focusing on group and business travelers that can generate business for the destination during the mid -week. Following is a list of potential groups that should be targeted by the TVCVB: • Corporate & Incentive — (30-40%) Sales and reward based meetings • SMERF — (30-40%) Sports, Military, Educational, Religious and Fraternal groups • Associations — (10-20%) State or National Associations 56 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan Section X Marketing Strategies In order to achieve its stated goals and to establish an effective long-term competitive advantage, the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau must successfully implement three core strategies. These include destination branding, differentiating the destination, and facilitating the conversion of mid week room sales by the private sector. Temecula Valley Core Strategies A. BrandinglPositioning 1. AIDA (Awareness, Interest, Desire and Action) Being a new destination, Temecula Valley must create awareness and desire (by implement steps outlined in the advertising action plan) among its identified target segments. The basic AIDA model of Awareness, Interest, Desire and Action is one that can conceptually guide the marketing and sales efforts of the organization. Awareness Create Awareness of Temecula Valley, Interest Develop Interest in Temecula Valley. Desire Create Desire to visit Temecula Valley. Action Instill Action to visit Temecula Valley. The TVCVB needs to see its efforts as impacting the market through each of the above steps. This process should be viewed as strategic in nature since it takes time to build a brand. It is critical to understand that brand building is essentail for both FIT and group travel. Both segments have to have awareness and a positive perception of the destination in order to take action to visit the area. 57 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan 2. Brand Identity A brand is the way in which visitors perceive or distinguish a destination. Temecula Valley's brand, "Where you want to be...", helps to promote one, all-inclusive identity that integrates all of the destination's primary attributes — wine, history, golf, gaming, events - to create an indelible impression in the mind of the consumer. A brand not only serves to unify all of the assets/attributes of a destination under one identity. It also works to unify the community and encourage it to provide the highest quality standards and customer service that will further strengthen the brand and customer loyalty. 3. Brand Awareness and Customer Loyalty As time becomes increasingly scarce, consumers will first tum to highly visible brand names when planning a purchase. Consumers want an assurance of quality when they don't have the time, opportunity or ability to inspect alternatives. This positive behavior is reinforced by the constant visibility of a brand using mediums and communication efforts that reach the target segment. A brand representing leadership, success, quality and excitement can create a genuine connection with the consumer. Temecula Valley: "Where you want to be..." Wine • History • Golf • Gaming • Events Target Market Segments Brand Awareness: Educate Target Segments via TVCVB Communications Brand Recognition: Familiarity of the Temecula Valley brand leads to Recall & Preference These positive associations can motivate a buying decision that is both emotionally and functionally driven and is positively reinforced when the experience meets the expectation. As such, y r *VV'Wly the Temecula Valley CVB, lodging properties, attractions and all visitor oriented businesses should strive to consistently offer exceptional customer service ( by continually emphasizing service and developing effective customer service programs) beginning with the information gathering process to the actual visitor experience. The continual and dedicated commitment by each community member, TVCVB and business to provide a positive overall experience will help to build brand awareness, reinforce positive brand associations, and generate customer (brand) loyalty among target segments. Above all, a highly loyal customer base can be expected to generate repeat visitations and revenue flow. To effectively communicate the key benefits of visiting the destination, the Temecula Valley brand needs to be continually promoted in all marketing initiatives. As such, it is critical that the key points of differentiation that help to build the Temecula Valley brand continue to be interwoven and communicated through all aspects of the TVCVB and the private sector marketing efforts over the long-term. With only a limited budget (even with the added BID funds), the TVCVB can increase the visibility of its brand through the following marketing and promotional initiatives: o TVCVB website and collateral materials. o Logo exposure on all partner (private sector) promotional pieces, i.e., website, signage, brochures, etc. o Strategic partnerships with public and private sector inside and outside of Temecula Valley. o Public relations efforts that are targeted at key market segments and media. o Sales activities that represent the destination. 58 Temecula Valley Convention and Visite Bureau 4. Brand Extension SMG sees the opportunity to extend the existing Temecula Valley brand to a variety of market segments. Core Brand: "Where you want to be...Temecula Valley." Brand Extensions by Segment: Goff Temecula Valley. "The place you want to golf:"' Meetings Temecula Valley. "The place you want to meet." 5lrateglc Mn€ketk g Flan Leisure Temecula Valley. "The place you want to play: 59 Ter ula Valley Ccnvertion and Visitrtis bureau Strategic Marketing Pian B. Differentiate the Destination Part of successfully building the Temecula Valley brand and destination awareness is to clearly differentiate the experience in the mind of consumers and key group leaders, As such, Temecula Valley should differentiate its offerings from the competition through an emphasis of its key tourism assets, translating them into believable and meaningful benefits for its new and repeat target market segments. Key Points of Differentiation Tourism Asset: New Southern California Destination Consumer Benefit: New Experience As a burgeoning new destination tucked away in southwest California, Temecula Valley has the perfect blend of rural charm and metropolitan excitement unlike any other location in Southern California. This unique "boutique destination" offers award-winning wineries, diverse accommodations and group facilities, cultural events, 24-hour gaming and entertainment, and championship golf to suit a wide variety of preferences and budgets for leisure and business travelers, Weather Comfortable Environment Temecula Valley's geographic location provides idyllic weather with abundant sunshine and cool ocean breezes while the coast can be foggy and inland locations can be muggy smoggy and often oppressively hot. Easy Access Convenience, Easy to get to Highway access via Interstate 15 conveniently links Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties and all parts north to Temecula Valley, Additionally, Temecula Valley is located 1-1/2 hours away from four major airports making it easy to get to for out of state travelers as well. Southern California Wine Destination World -Class Wine Tasting As the only wine producing region in Southern California, Temecula Valley offers over 20 award-winning wineries set in an exquisite setting for the large Southern California populations to visit. Pechanga Resort & Casino 24-hour Entertainment The all-inclusive Pechanga Resort & Casino with its headline entertainment, 7 restaurants, 522 rooms and 200,000 square feet of casino provides 24-hour, Las Vegas -style gaming opportunities and excitement. Preserved Heritage Educational, Culture. History Temecula's Old Town features rich historical sites including several historical buildings, the Temecula Valley Museum, and over 640 antique dealers providing an educational and cultural experience that helps to tell the valley's distinctive and illustrious story. Special Events Culture, Attractions, Family -Oriented Temecula Valley boasts several year-round special events that have become major attractions for visitors of all ages. Many promote the area's arts and culture as well as primary tourism assets such as the Temecula Valley Balloon & Wine Festival and the Temecula International Film & Music Festival, 60 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategng Plan C. Generate Room Nights As was identified previously in this plan. the TVCVB is accountable for increasing room nights specifically in the mid week time frame and to a lesser degree on the weekends. To that end, the TVCVB must focus its efforts and measurements on activities that will generate the targeted room nights. Within this core strategy there are several key steps the TVCVB can take to ensure it focuses on generating room nights. 1. Target the Group Segment. As was identified in a number of community interviews, many felt the TVCVB should focus on generating mid week demand with targeted efforts at the group segment. As such, the TVCVB must develop targeted programs designed to attract this key segment. As was also identified in this plan, a 5 point increase in mid week occupancy could lead to approximately $2 million+ in lodging revenue alone. This, in turn, should also stimulate demand and revenues for the other parts of the tourism economy within the greater Temecula Valley area. 2. Increase Overnight visitation from Orange County and San Diego FIT visitors. In addition to attracting groups as a core strategy to increase occupancy levels, the TVCVB and the local community must develop and implement programs to increase overnight visitation from Orange County and San Diego. Develop Strategic Programs with Southwest Airlines via Ontario Airport. Another effective strategy to increase visitation is the longer term potential that Southwest Airlines offers. As was identified earlier in this report, the Ontario Airport provides a credible access option for both FIT and group travel to Temecula Valley. Given that Southwest Airlines is the dominant carrier, it is natural to seek out and develop a partnership with the carrier. 4. Drive Traffic via the Internet As can be seen below s core strategy to drive room night si through the website, the model below illustrates how all of the marketing efforts work together to do this. Competitive Strategy Sales [uuu_ pR Special Events Advertising Promotions Target Market Segments -- www.temeculacvb.org Link to lodging property/attraction Book Vacation Positive Experience - Collect Information - Measure Programs - Make Adjustments and Refinements u1 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan Section XI Marketing Tactics A. Sales Goal: Develop group sales programs that generate approximately 6,000 room nights mid week. Current Lodging Inventory: Property Name # Units Pct. Pechanga Embassy Suites Motel 6 Temecula Creek Inn Extended Stay Hamption Inn & Spa Holiday Inn Express South Coast Winery Resort & Spa Best Western Comfort Inn Ramada Inn Rodeway Inn Rancho Califomia Inn Palomar Inn Hotel Loma Vista B&B The Churon Inn The Castle B&B Total 522 31.8% 176 10.7% 135 8.2% 130 7.9% 107 6.5% 99 6.0% 90 5.5% 76 4.6% 74 4.5% 74 4.5% 70 4.3% 39 2.4% 24 1.5% 10 0.6% 10 0.6% 26 1.6% 4 0.2% 1666 101.6% Groups Target Segments: ❖ Corporate & Incentive — (30-40%) Sales and reward based meetings. • SMERF- (30-40%) %) Social, Military, Educational, Religious and Fratemal groups Associations — (10-20%) State or National Associations Sales Forecast: The sales forecast for group sales efforts is provided on the following page. 62 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan Temecula CVB Group Sales Segement Forecast Model 2006 Base 0 (assumed 2005-2006 base rooms) Protected Incremental growth in room night production 1ST Yr 2007 annual % 5.0% 2008 3.5% 2009 3.5% 2010 Basis 5986 299 6285 220 6505 228 6733 Association Corporate Incentive SMERF Gov Total National Statewide Regional 2007 Room Nights 0 1200 0 2386 0 2400 0 5986 ADR $120.00 $120.00 $120.00 $120.00 Segment Revenue $0 $144,000 $0 $286,320 $0 $288,000 $0 $718,320 2008 Room Nights 550 500 2550 150 2535 6285 ADR 3.00% 123.60 123.60 123.60 123.60 123.60 123.60 Segment Revenue 60 $67,980 661,800 6315,180 $18,540 $313,326 $0 0776,826 2009 Room Nights 550 500 2655 200 2600 6505 ADR 3.00% 127.31 127.31 127.31 127.31 127.31 Segment Revenue $0 $70,019 $63,654 $338,003 $25.462 $331,001 $0 $828,139 2010 Room Nights 600 500 2800 300 2533 6733 ADR 3.00% 131.13 131.13 131.13 131.13 131.13 Segment Revenue $0 $78,676 $65,564 $367,156 $39,338 $332,145 $0 $882,880 3 year growth Assumptions: $164,560 18.64% Temecula Hotel Community 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 rooms 1640 1640 1640 1640 1640 rooms available 598600 598600 598600 598600 598600 occupied rooms 430992 annual occupancy 72,00% CVB group rooms 5986 6285 6505 6733 CVB occ 1.00% 1.05% 1.09% 1,12% CVB grp rms/occ rms 1.39% midweek occ 40% Annual growth rate in rate runs flat at 3% Annual room inventory does not expand over forecast Annual occupied rooms will fluctuate up or down Annual ADR applied in flat basis to all segments, future actuals should be utilized Source: SMG Estimates 63 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan Segment Approach 1. Corporate and Incentive Market Focus: Small Group executive level board meeting/retreats and corporate education and training. • Develop meeting planner sales presentation kit that includes gross capacities, service levels, destination amenities and booking contact information. • Develop an annual newsletter to meeting planners highlighting new products and services. • Send out direct e-mail pieces to targeted group meeting planners from growth industries with destination updates on the Temecula Valley region, including hotels' value dates and new venues. • Conduct four annual sales blitzes to targeted origination markets (Orange County/Los Angeles), inviting hospitality members to present services/facilities to meeting planner prospects for corporate meetings. • Take membership within Southern CA chapters of MPI if sponsorship can be found. (MPI does require membership to sponsor new supplier candidates) • Identify and Assist corporate travel planners and meeting planners with organizing a minimum of 15 site tours of properties, attractions and outside activities that meet their needs and create the desire to bring their business to Temecula Valley- South West California. • Create one annual corporate meeting planner event in Temecula including golf toumament or barrel room wine tasting dinner, spa services and shopping tours. • Host site visits for target meeting planners. 2. SMERF Market Focus: Education, Social, Religious • Develop programs to target wine industry including wine seminars, master sommeliers and other pertinent industry education components. Integrate food education and cooking components into this segment approach. • Target key Sports organizations including soccer leagues, softball leagues and bicycle groups for consideration of Temecula during the pertinent seasons. • Consider wedding industry to targeted periods if the fit works between wineries and hotels. • Develop religious retreat segments as identified opportunities present themselves. 3. Association Market Focus: Regional Association Meetings • Target 50 qualified statewide and regional associations to consider the Temecula Valley as a potential meeting destination. • Create a second tier of 50 prospects for continued efforts. Emphasis will be placed on the markets that feed demand (So Cal and Sacramento) • Develop memberships with California ASAE and regional chapters in Southem CA demand generation areas of San Diego, Orange County and Los Angeles. • Work to establish site inspections for key potential prospects • Work to gain regional chapter meetings of broader National Association groups. 64 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan 4. Tour and Travel • Identify regional ground operators of coach and limousine services to facilitate small group tours built around wine country hospitality and accommodations with focus to off season and mid week demand generation. • Develop affinity tour groups such as vintage or collector car clubs, agricultural science or other identified targets Sales Action Plan 1. Tradeshows and Memberships Short Term: • Affordable Meetings -West, Target audience is corporate, association, incentive meeting planners • IT&ME-The Motivation Show, Chicago, IL. Target Audience is incentive and corporate meeting planners. San Jose June 2007 • North American Journeys, - January 2007, Los Angeles, CA. Target Audience is International and Domestic Tour Operators. • MPISCC (Meeting Professionals International Southem California Chapter), March 2007, Los Angeles. Target audience is corporate meeting planners. 2. Direct Sales Short Term: • Undertake monthly or quarterly sales calls within key segment demand generation markets to include day travel to prospect offices and occasional multi day sales missions • Host special sales receptions for corporate site decision makers at appropriate places and times to retain awareness and develop new relationships. One such event should be held in each Southern Ca regional market of San Diego, Orange County and Los Angeles. • Establish specific quota's for sales contacts to be made weekly and monthly within each segment targeted. Quotas must follow to segment priorities and goals. 3. Client Relations & Account Retention Short Term • Maintain relationships with current and past clients to secure repeat business and generate new opportunities for the region. Work with destination hotels to gain perspective of key accounts • List top 10 ten clients and actions to maintain their business. • Manage leads to a close by acting as liaison between client and hospitality partner to secure hospitality business into the Temecula Valley Region- South West California. • Qualify all details of potential business with an emphasis on determining key deciding factors. These deciding factors will be communicated to hospitality partners to secure the business in the Temecula Valley. • Develop a meeting planner section within the destination web site that provides for meeting information requests and response (integrate this with below web discussion) 65 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan • Respond to Internet inquires and qualified prospects by mailing out visitors guides, sales brochures and other sales materials. • Assist groups with hotel and non -hotel needs such as destination management companies, transportation, off-site venues, attraction, team building and all other hospitality services to maximize member benefits. • Build a dynamic group sales module into destination web site that provides initial detailed information for meeting planners to undertake preliminary research on capacities and facilities 4. Research New Markets Short Term: • Query Temecula Valley members to determine needs periods and targeted business scope. • Define and research sales sources to be used to generate new business. • Develop pre and post FAM/SITE tours for larger groups convening in So CA where appropriate 5. Direct Mall Mid Term: • Create a targeted and unique direct-mail piece that will be sent directly to pre -registered attendees for all trade shows locally to create interest in the Temecula Valley. 6. Industry Memberships Short Term • Join and maintain memberships in the following organizations for networking and new business opportunities: Society of Incentive Travel Executive( SITE), Religious and Conference Management Association (RCMA), Meeting Professionals International (MPI), California Society of Association Executive (CaISAE), Hospitality Sales & Marketing Association International (HSMAI), The goal will be for the TVCVB team and sales staff to attend chapter meetings from primary targeted regions. 7. Promotions Mid Term: • Introduce Temecula Valley tie in promotions to the leisure, religious, sports, fraternal groups utilizing affinity vehicles they align with • Place destination co-op advertising in selected tour brochures in conjunction with, members for group sales to corporate, association and, SMERF segments. • Develop on-line packaging programs to increase online sales. 8. Sales Measurements Short Term: • Develop tracking system for guest rooms, Food & Beverage, and meeting room revenue for all definite bookings that are consumed in 06 and record actual sales results against these goals as an ongoing monthly and annual measurement system of sales effectiveness. • Develop a tracking system for contracted bookings in the area of guest rooms, food & Beverage, and meeting room revenue for all definite bookings that are consumed in 05-06. 66 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan • Develop systems for tracking spending as a performance, measure to determine economic impact of group business booked in our region. • Conduct monthly sales meetings with members to address trends, targets selling and destination packaging for the Temecula Valley. • Invite individual members to weekly sales meetings to present and educate the Bureau staff and sales team on member promotions and provide business updates. • Partner with member to promote the Temecula Valley region by offering client educational tours, site inspections, and co- op trade show opportunities. 9. Other Short Term: • Develop a specific group sales budget including expected room night and revenue sales volume to community, record monthly actual sales results against such plan, develop an expense budget that breaks out resource spending against each segment and in a priority that ties to the revenue goals by segment and to strategic plan. (half of this is now presented above, the sales expense budget now gets created based upon segments and actions defined above) • Develop an appropriate sales material kit in conjunction with the private sector to present a unified destination presentation. (now previously covered -redundant) • Develop a Sales Committee from the private sector to assist and support the CVB sales efforts. (integrated in notion above in measurements) • Adapt the core Temecula creative message to the group meeting segment stretching the brand beyond the leisure travel segment and positioning the group/meeting benefits of the destination. • Encourage add-on days to meeting and conference visitors by presenting the destination as one that offers much to see and do beyond business. • Develop collateral support materials that can be used to get the attention of target segment decision makers. (covered above sections) • Implement specific communication programs to targeted publications and online media database resources that serve meetings and conference organizers. (this is the start of the PR action steps, it could be expanded and identified as such) • As part of the website, develop a meetings and conference section, in conjunction with the private sector, which is designed to direct meeting and conference planners to a final property. (integrate with above web site discussions) • Partner with local destination management companies to cooperatively solicit incentive business and third -party planners in targeted cities. (move to tour and travel and incentive sections above) 67 11111111 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan B. Brand Development and Promotion Short Term • Continue to include the TVCVB logo and positioning statement in every marketing effort including printed materials, print ads, trade show booth and online initiatives. • Develop specific message points that promote the key points of differentiation and primary tourism assets that help to build and promote the Temecula Valley brand over the long-term. Integrate supporting message points into all marketing programs that target meetings, groups and leisure travelers. • Educate and encourage local newspapers, magazines and media to use "Temecula Valley" brand name in their communications about the region to foster support by locals for destination wide tourism efforts implemented by TVCVB. Mid Term: • Encourage all BID partners, the City of Temecula, and tourism related businesses to include the Temecula Valley destination brand on their websites and appropriate printed materials in order to unify all destination tourism assets under one identity. • Build a photo library of the primary tourism attractions including wineries, golf courses, meeting facilities, Pechanga Resort & Casino, entertainment, Old Town, shopping and special events in order to support the brand and message points for both leisure and group market segments. • Obtain testimonials from satisfied meeting planners, group leaders and decision makers to use in specific marketing efforts to help build credibility for the destination among target market segment. Testimonials or quotes could be used in press releases, group/business print materials and TVCVB website pages. • Understand visitor perceptions about Temecula Valley brand through implementation of comprehensive visitor's survey. C. Visitor Data CollectionNisitor Database The collection of visitor data and the creation of a visitor database will be the lifeline for Temecula Valley marketing efforts. It is not cost effective to make an investment in visitor contact efforts (trade shows, advertising, etc.) without securing visitor data to keep that costly visitor contact informed about year-round activities and special events in Temecula Valley. Temecula Valley's future success is contingent upon ongoing, quality visitor relationship programs. The primary mechanisms for collecting visitor information and data include: Short Term: • Website/lntemet o Email capture system on TVCVB website o Online monthly newsletter with "forward newsletter" mechanism to encourage new readers/visitors o Online ads/promotions o Visitor's Guide online order form o Meeting Planner's Guide online order form • Print Advertising o Email leads collected via reader service mechanism sent to TVCVB from publication 68 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan o Leisure leads to TVCVB via 888# or website o Group sales leads to TVCVB sales staff • Trade Shows o Promotions (sign up/collection of emails) o Attendee surveys o Online newsletter sign up form • Promotions o Participant entry forms with email sign up form for online newsletter o Email sign ups on TVCVB website • Special Events o Online newsletter sign up form o Attendee surveys • Leads from TVCVB Partners o Reciprocal website links from BID members, City of Temecula, wineries, Pechanga, attractions, etc. that generate visitors to TVCVB website o Emails generated by partnerships, i.e., Southwest Airlines, CTTC, etc. • Visitor's Guide Orders (888#, website) • Meeting Planner's Guide Orders (888#, website) • Meetings and Groups sales leads Collecting visitor information will assist the TVCVB with more targeted programs over the long-term as well as help to obtain a visitor profile of current and potential guests. All visitor data will be directed to the online newsletter database where they will be continually educated about year-round activities, specials and events in Temecula Valley that will encourage new and repeat overnight visits. Specific meetings and groups sales leads will have additional customized sales activities. D. Website Enhancements (See complete Website Review located in Appendix of this report) Short Term: • Consider simplifying the Home Page in order to make it more user friendly and to achieve primary goals: collect emails, book a trip/rooms/packages, promote special events, and to order guides. • Consider restructuring navigation where repetitive to provide a clear and simple 'choice' for users, driving them to click on the links and take the CVB's desired action, be it to book a trip, request a guide or sign up for email newsletter. • Add unique title tags to all pages (while some pages have tags, not all do). • Add and maintain a blog to provide ongoing updated information to assist users and search engine rankings. • Consider purchasing a slightly more consumer -friendly URL like www.visittemecula.com, as the acronym "CVB" isn't as intuitive to someone researching travel. 69 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan • Test and fix all pages that do not render correctly in all browsers including Firefox and Netscape. • Consider streamlining the booking process with fewer options. If the goal is to encourage visitors to book a trip to Temecula Valley, consider having one option only and include lodging, cars and flights within the booking engine. Similarly, instead of offering multiple links (get a room, get some wheels) to the same booking engine, it may be Tess confusing for the user to simply offer the links to hotels, attractions, car, packages and deals that are currently on top of the ARES booking engine. • Revamp ad units on home page to feature one or two larger units that rotate. This provides greater value to the advertiser, potentially attracting more and should result in a cleaner look. • Set up an email capture system on every page in the navigation bar above the fold. Include a more in-depth system that allows the user to request a guide, provide geographic information and indicate email newsletter interests for segmentation purposes. • Investigate developing specialized newsletters and customized email updates based on interests (i.e. wine, recreation, meetings, groups, weddings, entertainment, events, lodging specials & packages). • Create a monthly online newsletter for all travelers to promote year-round activities and special events to the visitor database in order to encourage repeat visits, especially during the slower seasons. a. Include the TVCVB brand, key positioning message points and links to the BID members and attractions. b. Include a "forward newsletter" option to encourage new sign ups as a viral marketing tactic. c. Ensure the newsletter is of the highest quality before sending to the database. Make sure it is formatted correctly for HTML, text and AOL users and for different browsers. Make sure all the links work and that the copy has been edited for readability, spelling errors and relevant content for the specific visitor segment. Test the format before it is sent to the database. d. Ensure newsletter copy is free of spam alert words, i.e., Free, Spam, any words in all CAPITALS, etc. e. To ensure the newsletter complies with federal law (CAN -SPAM act), include an unsubscribe link and the TVCVB physical address and contact information in every newsletter. • Measure the newsletter based upon opened emails, click-throughs to specific TVCVB website pages, click-throughs to featured links, and increased user sessions on the TVCVB website. • Develop an online marketing strategy including search engine optimization, paid search, online advertising and email marketing campaigns. • Improve exposure for BID members on the lodging section (Places to Stay and Sleep) and improve usability for the end user by including a photo, copy and direct link to each property under each category like the Book Online page. • Assist meeting planners and provide better exposure for BID members and tourism businesses by improving the Conventions/Conferences section by including listing of each meeting facility with a link similar to Book Online page. • Update overall copy including current events, specials, promotions, etc. on an ongoing basis to provide continual updated information for new and repeat users. • Upgrade the Visitor's Guide and Meeting Planner's Guide Order forms to including brief survey questions about how the user found out about the website in order to track effectiveness of marketing efforts. Include a note next the email field that user will be added to monthly online newsletter database. 70 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan • Implement a reciprocal link strategy with BID members, attractions and businesses in Temecula Valley as well as outside of the area where it makes sense to improve search engine optimization and to build visitor database for ongoing visitor relationship programs. • Measure monthly user sessions, traffic to specific pages, referrers, page views, desired actions (i.e. email sign ups, guide orders) and exit links (click- throughs) to BID members and strategic partners in order to continually improve the site's usefulness and efficiency. • Conduct a thorough review of the website measurements compared to website layout/navigation system in order to determine if current website organization is achieving identified goals, i.e., links to BID members, bookings, etc. • Develop an online promotion to give away a trip to Temecula Valley for those visitors who participate in an Internet survey designed to gather emails, track advertising and brand building efforts and to develop a visitor profile study. E. Media Planning/Advertising Short Term: • Research and develop a print media plan to reach leisure travelers with targeted publications in specific Southem California regions such as Orange County and Los Angeles, and publications that cover the southwest and state of California. • Advertise in Southwest Airlines in-flight magazine and as a Featured Destination on southwest.com in order to reach air passengers into Ontario Airport and other Southem Califomia airports. • Develop local media plan including print and broadcast to promote year-round specials events to the local and surrounding areas of Temecula Valley. • Develop print ad creative that integrates the Temecula Valley brand, key message points and the appropriate call to action based upon target market segment and co-op participation. • Print ad call to action should include sales contact information, free guide, specific website landing pages and 888#. • Investigate signage and Visitor's Guide distribution at the Ontario Airport. • Research online advertising options (banner ads) for leisure and group markets based upon number of impressions. Mid Term: • Develop a print and online media plan to reach group and business travelers with publications/websites that cover the southwestem region of the United States and Califomia. • Negotiate value-added programs including free editorial, material distribution and website exposure such as free banner ads or online newsletter editorial as part of print media buys. • Research email newsletter sponsorships, advertorial and promotional opportunities with activity -specific websites such as golf, wine, meetings, etc. in order to reach targeted online audiences and to build TVCVB email database. • Develop an online geo-targeted ad program by selecting certain IP addresses based upon a predetermined geographic region, i.e., Orange County. 71 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan • To leverage TVCVB's print budget, consider developing co-op print ads with lodging properties and attractions for leading leisure magazines such as Sunset Magazine. • For meetings and group ads consider including testimonials from highly recognized decision makers to help legitimize the appeal and qualifications of Temecula Valley to meetings/groups/business travelers. • Develop a measurement system for print and online ads including generated sales leads, collected emails, 888#s, guide orders, etc. in order to track ROI and areas of improvement. • Implement a website conversion study to determine the number of users who click -through to the TVCVB website from the various online marketing efforts including newsletters and online ads. F. Public Relations 1. Out -of -Market Short Term: Develop (or hire a professional public relations firm/professional to develop) a comprehensive public relations program including print and online activities in order to maintain ongoing media relationships and to pitch story ideas. • Update online and traditional press kit and photography to ensure Temecula Valley brand and key message points are included and fully represented. Develop segmented media lists and talking points, including blog copy, for specific travel audiences: meetings, business, golf, wine, special events, gaming, etc. • Develop unique story ideas that capture the essence of Temecula Valley. Story angles could include the following: o Wine o Old Town o Gaming o Golf o Special Events o Outdoor Activities o Meetings o Value • Target appropriate media sources in Southem Califomia (Los Angeles, Orange County) primarily and Northern Califomia and outside Califomia secondarily. Specifically target the following types of publications: o Newspapers o Lifestyle & Epicurean Publications o Wine Publications o Wine Blogs o Wine Sections in Newspapers o Wire Services o Freelance Joumalists o Travel Writers o Radio & TV o Guide Books o Online Travel Sites o Online Meeting Sites o Online "Lifestyle" Sites such as wine and golf 72 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan • Distribute information to meetings and conference planner publications to position Temecula Valley as a viable meeting and conference destination. • Communicate with the California Travel and Tourism Commission (CTTC) and provide press kit and ongoing releases for possible inclusion in their press kit stories or marketing materials. • Create and manage monthly online traveler's newsletter to opt -in subscribers. • Write and distribute monthly press releases to targeted media. Include new releases on media website pages and update site pages on an ongoing basis. • Implement targeted media FAM trips with qualified travel writers to encourage coverage of Temecula Valley. • Attend media events such as the CTTC Media Reception and Marketplace in San Francisco. Mid Term: • Work with other visitor and convention bureaus in Southem Califomia on appropriate cooperative programs that bring in travel writers who want to visit the entire area. • Develop a proactive public relations disaster plan in case of emergencies that could hinder travelers. • Measure public relations activities and program results based upon generated coverage, ad equivalency and press clips. • Targeted promotions to locals to create awareness and education for tourism within Temecula 2. In -Market Short Temi: • Develop an ongoing email communication tool/system for BID members, City of Temecula, Chamber of Commerce and tourism business community to provide ongoing updates about public relations and marketing efforts and results. • Solicit ongoing information from BID members and local tourism businesses to obtain newsworthy information to feature in out -of -market press releases and the online monthly newsletter. Mid Term: • Develop a comprehensive plan to communicate with the local and regional media. Develop and distribute press releases about TVCVB marketing activities in order to increase awareness and support for tourism marketing efforts in Temecula Valley. Meet with local and regional media as needed to gain coverage and support of TVCVB tourism promotion efforts that can be reported and broadcast on a regular basis. • Develop power point presentation for funding partners that includes a review of marketing program, results and ROI measurement. 73 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan G. Visitor Information Short Term: • Continue to enhance the Temecula Valley Visitor's Guide, Meeting Planner's Guide, brochures and CD as sales tools for the entire region as new capital investments are added in order to continue to promote a sophisticated and unified destination. • Develop a comprehensive distribution plan for the Visitor's Guide to include corporate locations throughout Califomia and possibly the southwest, and in select California Welcome Centers utilizing Certified Folder distribution channels to reach leisure travelers. • Research distribution plan for the Meeting Planner's Guide in order to reach group/meetings/business decision makers. • Track distribution of guides by orders via 888#, online order forms, print ad leads, newsletter links, selected California Welcome Centers, corporate locations and trade shows. • Investigate distribution of the Visitor's Guide at Ontario and Orange County airports. Mid Term: • Develop integrated destination wide information system using kiosk technology (pictured below) designed to educate visitors, extend their stays and increase their spending while in Temecula Valley. • Investigate costs to create Visitor Centers in the wine country and Old Town that could either be staffed or include kiosks. • Measure the effectiveness and appeal of Temecula Valley printed and online visitor information with a visitor survey in order to identify necessary improvements or changes. H. Special Events/Promotions Short Term: • Create quarterly special event seasons that tie together aII of the various events occurring during the 3 month period to create a larger attraction and to help cross -sell events such as the Winter Special Events Promotion featuring the Winter Barrel Tasting, Good Old Days Car Show and the Bluegrass Festival. 74 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan • Support the development of a "Foodie" promotion that includes all of the restaurants, agricultural partners, wineries, farmer's markets, etc. to showcase the local and regional agriculture and cuisines. (Similar in nature to the Thursday evening street fair in San Luis Obispo.) • Feature quarterly Special Events and "Foodie" promotions on the website, in the online newsletter, press releases and ads. A great example is a weekly farmers market that brings together local farm produce with wines and local restaurant s and chefs. Mid Term: • Create "Foodie' Lodging Packages with all partners in order to encourage overnight visits during slower season. • Create quarterly Special Events Packages that include events, attractions, retailers and lodging properties in order to stimulate overnight visits during each quarter. • Measure promotional efforts by number of room nights generated, travel spending, attendance at featured seasonal events and attractions, collected visitor information, leads, requests for specific information and website visits and click- throughs. I. Strategic Partnerships Short Term: • Maintain strong partnerships with the City of Temecula and the Temecula Valley Winegrowers. • Investigate partnership with Southwest Airlines in order to reach air passengers traveling into the Ontario Airport and to develop a comprehensive travel partnership program that includes promotions, air packages, advertising, online exposure, sales programs, etc. • Investigate partnership opportunities with the CTTC in order to enhance Temecula Valley's exposure in its marketing efforts such as a location for filming or to participate in cooperative programs that reach out-of-state visitors. Mid Term: • Measure partner programs based upon website activity, generated visitor information, generated sales leads, guide distribution, bookings and travel spending impacts to determine effectiveness and ROI. 75 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Strategic Marketing Plan J. Research and Measurement In order to determine if the Temecula Valley marketing program is achieving long-term goals and objectives, it is imperative that the TVCVB creates a comprehensive system to measure the effectiveness of all marketing efforts. Temecula Valley marketing efforts have two levels of measurement. One measurement includes computing the performance and Retum on Investment (ROI) of the TVCVB marketing efforts. Efforts can be measured through website usage and various costs per analysis of specific activities, as well as tracking the leads sent to BID lodging properties and attractions. The other measurement includes calculating the ROI to the business community generated through travel spending. Temecula Valley lodging properties can measure revenues generated from tourism through the analysis of their T.O.T. collection reports. It should be noted that not all of the marketing efforts can have a designated ROI such as ads and public relations that are designed to build brand awareness. Building brand awareness is just as critical to long-term success as specific marketing efforts designed to drive a particular response that can be tracked. Brand building can be measured, however, through the monthly user sessions on the TVCVB website in which all Temecula Valley marketing efforts are designed to feed into. Short Term: • Establish an annual budget for a comprehensive research and measurement program in order to develop a baseline for measuring the results of specific marketing efforts, as well as areas of refinement and overall ROI. • Review annual increases in Temecula Valley T.O.T. collections, ADR, room nights sold, occupancy rates and travel spending in order to determine the impact of TVCVB marketing program on the local economy. • Conduct ongoing measurement of all marketing efforts to determine if programs are increasing visitations to the TVCVB website, links to BID lodging properties and ovemight bookings. • Invest in a comprehensive website reporting system in order to understand the website users behavior and to identify areas of improvement. The report should track user sessions, site paths, page views, top exit and entry pages, as well as the links (click throughs) from the TVCVB website to the BID lodging properties, attractions and partners. • Develop a special events survey in order to gather precise Information about the economic Impact of events. • Develop a visitor profile study in order to understand the visitor's perception, behavior and motivations as well as demographic data. Use the study findings to refine marketing messages and to better target marketing efforts to more efficiently reach the most lucrative visitor segments. • Encourage each tourism related business including wineries, lodging properties, attractions, special event promoters, etc., to collect visitor demographic information whenever possible in order to understand the Temecula Valley visitor demographics and economic impact. Mid Term: • Survey the tourism business community in order to understand their perception of the TVCVB marketing strategy and program in order to make refinements to specific efforts, and to identify if business levels have improved due to TCVCB efforts. • Establish benchmarks for measuring the ROI for each marketing effort such as a Cost Per Inquiry, Cost Per Visitor Contact/Sales Lead, Cost per Click -Through, Cost per Visitor Guide, etc. • Utilize and share the information with BID members and tourism business community in order to stimulate change and innovation for overall tourism efforts. 76 Temecula Valley Convention and SUM* MdtkudetvPIii Once a visitor database has reached a critical mass, develop and implement an online survey to determine if the print ads and other marketing efforts increased visits to the TVCVB website. 77 00111111111011111100:0110„: 1„„„00000„10,100 l0 0 0 00IH 111111111111111111111' ,1,1,1,1,1,1 000000000000000,000000 11111100000010,000, , uuuiuul 00 11111111111111111 01001111110 ))))),))))1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 0000 1000000000,00 00,0001101001011.0010100 0 ro jJ to w 0 4-' f0 CO W N ,-I 0 .--1 0 00000,00 000,001000,00,00 111101101j."1111' 01111 I�I11�� 11111111111111 1111111:::.„ 1°I'°oii la " I%8 1 m wI 1 VV 1110 111V1111111111111111111111111..f, f01111.1.1111--10„, 1.„). 111111111111111111 lllIIIA 000000000111111,111,11111111111,111,1111111 FISCAL 2011-2012 PROPOSED TRADE SHOW SCHEDULE AND BUDGET Est. 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N11110.11 m* 00 SOUTHERN ALIFORNIA WINE COUNTRY Convention and Visitors Bureau. u���YAIM"vll�� „11111111111111111 "" oMw.,, u�i V� �r ���wl�A'AHn M W w 'II 1111111111111111111111 ,'", 1111 mumu TABLE OF CONTENTS 2010-2011 TVTBID ANNUAL REPORT © Copyright 1 Executive Summary 2010 - 2011 Budget Marketing & Public Relations -Plan 3 Trade Show Schedule & Performance Media Plan Supporting Source Documents & Charts The Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau (TVCVB) is a non profit 501 c(6) funded by the Temec- ula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District, Pechanga, City of Temecula and a membership of over 140 tourism -related businesses. The TVCVB is the destination sales and marketing or- ganization. Our purpose is to stimulate economic growth and tourism in the Temecula Valley region by developing and marketing the destination to the meet- ing and travel markets. Our mission, as the tourism ex- perts in the Temecula Valley, is to run an effective busi- ness that increases awareness and measures the spend- ing in the Temecula Valley. Our Board of Directors is comprised of business owners and professionals who have experience and willingness to serve the community beyond the scope of their de- manding works schedules. Their volunteer responsibili- ties include steering company policy, financial over- sight, and determining the future course of the Bureau's mission. President &CEO Kimberly Adams VP Operations & Finance Carrie Penny VP Sales & Marketing Kathleen Fitzgerald Director Of Sales Leslie Mercado Public Relation/Marketing Betsy Lohse Finance/Booking Karen Ratkowski Visitors Center Specialist Pamela Locascio Becky Hess Membership Coordinator Leann Anderson Publication Contracted Support Nigro & Nigro. PC ARK Marketing Ashcraft Designs/Technology 2 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 r/rid )0110 I Executive Committee Chairman of the Board Denis Ferguson, Europa Village, LLC 1st Vice Chair John Kelliher, The Grapeline Wine Country Shuttle 2nd Vice Chair Cherise Manning, A Grape Escape Balloon Adventure Treasure Katherine Bailey, Bailey's Wine Country Escape Secretary Terri Delhamer, Keyways Vineyard & Winery Board of Directors Marlene Altieri: Melody Brunsting: Craig Clark: Jason Curl,: Tom DeMott, Melina Ferraez,: Darleen Henderson: Grant Channing Carlos Palma: Craig Puma: Mario Richmond: Joy Sarolia: Bill Seltzer: Jan Smith: Bill Wilson: Fairfield Inn & Suites— TID Melody's Ad Works Pechanga Resort & Casino Temecula Creek Inn-TID Embassy Suites -TID Promenade Temecula Hampton Inn & Suites-TID Pechanga Resort & Casino Palomar Inn Hotel The Bank- Mexican Restaurant Triple R Sports Group Quality Inn-TID Temecula Valley Golf School Inland Management Group Wilson Creek Winery u i iip;pu` economy. Our name Temecula best describes our FY 2010-2011, "Sun shining through the mist "and we did just that especially through this changing Our CVB Board and team worked smarter and more aggressively in our sales and marketing efforts pro- moting our destination. We replaced under perform- ing tradeshows and advertising with fresh new pro- grams and initiatives. Temecula is doing relativity well compared to our competitive set. Leisure travel is coming back with our consistent and long standing special event. How- ever our business travel is still down over 25%. The CVB entered our facial year with a 50% funding in- crease that allowed us to go from a 2% assessment to 4%. This increase could have not been executed at a better time for Temecula with the extreme competi- tion within the destination marketing industry. We are all competing for the drive markets of California and the Canadian traveler. Temecula continues to stay on the cutting edge and is seen as a mighty robust destination positioned be- tween the top three California markets. Temecula is our gold mind we need to continue to shine and mar- ket all the wonderful experiences Temecula has to offer. We are proud to share with you our results in direct sale, public relations, marketing and partnerships, and we look forward to even greater positive impact in 20 -2012, Kimberly 1 d'P' President & CEO, Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau 3 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 Temecula TID Assessment 1,200,000 — ......... L 1,029,377 1,000.000 Temecula Transient Occupancy Tax collected 3,000,000 2,500,000 2,017,726 2,000,000 y 1,500,000 1,000,000 tG lj 500,000 1,9 1.994 530,908 FY 07-08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Temecula Average Hotel Occupancy 59.5 59 55.5 56 57.5 57 56.5 56 59 FY 09-10 FY 10 11 e Occupancy Temecula Average Daily Rate 99 913 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 FY 09-10 95 FY 10-11 AOR The hospitality industry experienced ongoing chal- lenges in FY -2010-2011. Although the industry continues to be impacted by the Up Economy, posi- tive movement is occurring. Toward the second QTR the hotels started reporting growth (but slow) with increase over prior year number. Rates are still lagging and business meetings are below aver- age leisure travel is coming back. In FY 10-11, the CVB achieved 83.33% of its goal for potential room nights generated. 7,692 potential room nights generated against a goal of 4,082 (09/10 numbers). The CVB generated leads goal was slightly missed with 50 leads gener- ated against a goal of 60. The CVB Sales Department made positive strides in penetrating new markets such as association, wed- dings, religious and tour operator Business which generated a growing number of leads. The Sales Department experienced delay in the hir- ing of two newly approved positions for the 2010- 2011 TID year, due to funding cash flow and new hiring process. Both positions will be filled in first QTR of 2011. This impacted lead generation. /,r//G%T/(„, / 0 ,( PerMeasures /f P110%ie r9 LEADS GENERATED LEADS BOOKED BOOKED ROOM NIGHTS PROJECTED ECONOMIC IMPACT POTENTIAL ROOM NIGHTS 31 194,357 607 1,106,072 4,082 1lij000fiiii%% 50 190,638 908 2,019,467 7,692 4 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 (fl JJfllff�/ W��/, (// I„ ��„ 4 Il IN ,,1�4„1„! v ,i F'',� i `�i r ' 1 $V j I'I G ;u The 10-11 TID increased budget recourses impacted the CVB's trade show schedule, and multiple trade shows were included in our Sales and Marketing plan. In FY 10-11 the sales team participated in 22 trade shows, resulting in 20 Leads being generated, repre- senting over 1,600 potential room night and 30,000 attendees and nearly 5242,361 in projected economic impact for the Temecula Valley TID hotels, venues and event service providers. liar 1 4,': AOf+ The sales team hosted 39 meeting and event planner and preformed 3 site tours to familiarize planners with the Temecula Valley destination. Market seg- ments represented at these destination tours in- cluded corporate, social, association, tour & travel, film scouts and wedding. Mar 10 MPI SCC, Los Angeles, CA Mar '10 OC's Largest Mixer, Orange, CA Apr' 10 Successful Meetings University, Monterey, CA May '10 MPI Educational Conference, Newport Beach, CA Jun 'lo Festival of Brides, Temecula, CA Jun '10 HSMAI Affordable Meetings West, Long Beach, CA Jun 'lo Orange County Concierge Show, Orange County Jun '10 San Diego Concierge Show, San Diego, CA Jul 'to MPI World Education Conf., Vancouver, Canada rr Corporate Leisure Corporate Corporate Wedding Corporate Concierge Concierge Corporate Sep '10 Sep '10 Sep '10 Oct '10 Dec '10 Jan '11 Jan '11 Feb '11 Feb 11 Smart Meetings -The Smart Meeting, Phoenix, AZ Travel Media Showcase, Irvine, CA Mini Travel & Trade Show, Irvine, SD, Riverside, CA TVCC Business Expo, Temecula, CA CaISAE Seasonal Spectacular, Sacramento, CA Bay Area Travel Show, Santa Clara, CA RCMA Annual Conference, Tampa Bay, FL AAA Arizona, Glendale, AZ MPI San Diego Educ. Conf., San Diego, CA Corporate Media Leisure Leisure Association Leisure Religious Leisure Corporate In conjunction with on going sales calls, missions and tradeshows, the sales team initiated or was involved in special sales projects and events. These activities gen- erated lead opportunities ad increased the visibility of the Temecula Valley CVB to target audiences. Among these activities were: Temecula Valley Road Show -The sales team and TID sales task force team developed and implemented the CVB Road Show destination showcase event designed to present the Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country's meeting and event venues to meeting planners and tour operators. The premier program was presented in LA and Orange County and 35 planners attended. 20 CVB member hotels and partners venues exhibited at this event. Pechanga Resort & Casino Promotion— for the second year the CVB and hotel partners initiated and supports Pechanga's Rewards and coupon rack card program with partner hotel room booking. TID partnering hotels distributed over 22,000 coupon. Industry Networking Activities— The CVB sales team maintained its active participation in industry associa- tions and organizations as a means of promoting the Temecula Valley and interacting with clients and pros- pects in a very valuable way. Staff participated in spe- cial events and project with MPI , HSMAI and CaISAE ASAE. Membership Outreach & Support—The second Sales Educational Seminar was presented, to help members uncover and close business opportunities. Attendance was up over the previous year as many as 40 CVB members and attendees. In addition the sales team attended three Mega Mixers in the IE, OC and Temec- ula. 5 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 a.IWehdk oo..ed nm.ineyards. crpmalve .e.. ..ddo,.11.aUUYoohg h uak.re...ai ..r ..e.r.aaor rale, . MN .. r 001.000. 00001.0000.0000 Nato �. nYen.aw.r c.ftw. *w �k+.m mda.matm..nn .d. Y.0....Y mato . 6000M. YYd Ereasumfoard uel. c 4ad. n dew$rt. 0.dAws.r.l10,0Wyd,0ivdL 013.00.1741.1041,1104400.4* rw....6 .0.4.4 $wpw. 4.00.0000001 .P40,44 Yii.t ddh.dW MyAvarp aa+. a. .rea.milmamk. 10000, ,000100000.00$4040000010ra 60010 ''.f.. Temecula Valley So.m..ex ( ..FORMA WrosCourrrail 01.0 000 0.nr000 00 CU o 00G (Y8(0) YPp.xliga w0rycd�W .A{np}Cdnu lairtoq�LL.Y.Y. 6.tl�pFM 10444,019. 1od plan maw 1000000.00100.00040041000001 t�.r1., ert�n,.ray noY. an n�r+l Pit. e..arY>(p 00000000.00,00.es00000ep itt.00,00,00,04,00,000000.0400,0ttittitit.0.100,00 .00:0,000,00.000.0,00 »dy ke0006000• ew/ 00,0 a Vh.. pu..dm ems. dvt pe..sui e74r10.ti.r,4r...rr,r M...d,..I Smari Maeinp flam.n clavas. Sonhom Calbau Woo Crrrn.vy for n. any ol rarao v year-round KLM,.. and eburclancy of (17l1OI14 t 11' 11I11C)tll•Li• .S. 000110 000,000N10 S0 t t YEA. n9.10 01,60.1 f550d E 1 ,/ ET`x! �� ;'11J,,i4ifitI The TVCVB works hard to build professional relationship with media outlets and representatives in various markets to build and maintain awareness of the Temecula Valley as a travel destination. The CVB supplies the media with current information, editorial content, story ideas and imagery. Our activities generated over 2.3 million in in- kind press editorials, publication and on-line press. A total of 29 press releases were instated and researched the fiscal year. Additionally, the TVCVB serviced many re- leases from partners to media. Press Releases supported the Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country brand as a entertainment, wine, golf, history, meeting, wedding, sports and culinary destination. On behalf of the TVCVB and it's partners, media visits are secured to promote the destination, with the goal of se- curing valuable editorial coverage. The CVB supported over 231 Media Inquires and hosted 75 Media Partners and executed 10 CVB Media FAM. fib! h (^/a 6 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 t%rll153SI01J`'& L1S With the purpose of networking and building and building connections with travel and life- style media, members of the CVB marketing department attended the California Tour & Travel Commission (CTTC) media event in LA and San Francisco in February and September and Destination Day in Sacramento in April. Additional events included, Travel Media Showcase, SD, OC Press Club, SD, LA and Orange County Concierge events. T111 1 r ,1,)IT°� Through public relations efforts working with traditional and new media outlets, the TVCVB exceeded our expectation and goals, reaching an audience of more than 400,119,031 mil- lion potential visitors. Contributing partners, Inside Luxury Travel Channel, CTTC Life Time Channel "Valentine AD featuring Temecula, and Orbits. // /% y'rori /%i%i IMP RESSION5 N/A 400,119;031 PRESS RELEASES 1 MEDIA TOURS 2 10 MEDIA PLACEMENT 115 100 Due to the economy the CVB and Media buyer ARK Marketing was able to negotiate better advertising rates during FY 10-11 and increase the number of placements by 30%. Print campaigns were targeted to the California drive travel and meetings markets with presence to build the brand. Print advertising placed in the California Visitors Guide, Sunset, CTTC Drives, Smart Meeting, and MPI meetings publications. The CVB provided the editorial content to include sug- gested itineraries, TID and partner listings with prop- erty details, logos and images. An online campaign was launched targeted to the drive markets in Southern California for meeting and leisure travelers. New branding banner advertising was developed to maximize new sponge cell technol- ogy, adding room booking, Visitor Guides and Calen- dar of Event. (First media buy took place in August due to TID cash flow for increase funding). Strategic placement on top travel sites, Expedia, Trip Advisor, Multi Travel and Media Sites, CTTC Online, I&MI Do - It -Workbook, Smart Meeting, Meetings West, Sun- set.com and gocalifornia.com. "0"."7"'„ /0A) INQUIRE/FULLMENT VG CALL IN DIRECT MAIL E-MAIL WEBSITE-vlsltors i <f D l 1 f G The CVB utilized e -marketing to communicate regularly with members and meeting profes- sionals, potential visitors as well as to build brand loyalty. The e -marketing promotes new, upcoming events and special promotions as well as compliments our advertising and public relations outreach for hotels and member partners. The CVB increased the number of subscribers by 20% in FY 10-11. SUZign espongecell ADS U N Room offers from as it gets, to get to, ILIIMINO 4011 A �/�1, i/ ir 24,055 31,157 NUMBER OF PRINT PLACEMENT 25 7,113 7,117 10,000 25,000 941 2,840 67,953 54,464 8 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 40 NUMBER OF DIRECT E-MAILS 24,000 225,000 TOTAL REACH PRINT/E MAIL N/A 15,000,000 TOTAL VALUE OF MEDIA PLACED N/A 150,000 CO=OP MEDIA DOLLARS 30,000 20,000 •••••• ••••‘ ....................... 11111r, ',1',.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,11111111JJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjj11111.11111111111111111111,1,!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)))))))),1111111111111111111111111111111,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,11,111111111111111111111111111111111111111111,111111 11 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111jjiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii,f,,,„„„„„„„„„........................,;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;‘,,,,,,,,,,,,, 11111111 1111111111111111111111111 „„„v,,,,,,,rdi11111111111111111111 Ij'1'1111111111111'11'1( II 1111111111111111111111111111 '''•:•••••••.....fill.1.1111111111""""""""",111111111111111111111111111111,,111111111111111111111111111110,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,uini,1.• 1111111111111111111111111111111111111 .mm111111111111111,, „„„„„„„„„„, 111 ,6'111. • 1"11111111111111111"..1''''''''''''1"""""""""""",""""""""""J.:;r,",".1!1!1!1!1'!!'((((((("!"!",."!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",",z",.."""k",•",",1,•",",g3",•",•",..',..',..1,''",!,!,1,.1111)))))111111111111111111I 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111iiiJJJJJiiJJ1111111110110011111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 . ••,,,,;...,..,„.„„„.„.„.„.„6„," • 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111"""""""""""""""'":".7.77.77.7.77"""""""""""""""":":":"."""""""""""""""""""""""""""""1""""""""11111111111111111111.?.""lill.l."""""""',11.11.11.1:1:1.1.1.1... """""""""""""'":""•••••;;;;;;;;;;":".....":":"1":"1"::::::::::::":":":"":":":":":"""""""":":":":""""""""""""""7"1":" 6 IAA • •••• "1..."1"1"."""1":"":111. AFFORDABLE SPLURGE STAY & PLAY 11,4011111101110111111111,11111111111,111111111111111111111111111111011111111111?1111110 0111101,111,01 '41'11 ,141:10 141411111111111111111nuloouhllooll; 44004411111144441111111111111111111110111041401,10,11111101000100m 0001"1004011111 Tenc 1•'• 17, 1 0 n Ve aul Rodgers orizon Sin Blossoms my Wayne nd Pei r Yyr" Bei°.1111:1s-plivee- ro 01 w M8 4411 „, ••,: „„•• Id,' • omv.0.01.11" "'mu I .01 1111...14. p a 1001110011000000110,111001111,001tr,,,,,,,, 11111111,11111111( 100 11111111111111111 0110.1 II': "11'1111101 I; 1111111*1114 ) t',41 ,N4 4 ir 41,1t1 iT141". ' 1°11110111u 00001111 vouuvoi Starting from $7 ..40 11 1. lqh1^ 441 014, 1111.1'11,0,;,101112'!)/1;',',6k,')„1:1J 1164 Q KW .411, CAnne. AnOr 1,1 w OM 9 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 0.0t, kalorn PrOsuktrAM, d1„144M11 1010, 1r1urffs/IIS ta,po "MA "d^41^4.P^, "^^.^ nouqh vrim$.1} ^ auturrofest 1111111114 ,"4,111'111v. %///%%//j 10 0 istaillimmml r IN 10 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 `Y, 11, 11sn o r,J 111 foiNfril;LE The Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau contin- ues to stay on the for forefront of new technologies in so- cial media. The TVCVB utilizes social media to promote the Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country region, Temecula CVB partners and increase awareness of the Te- mecula Valley brand. bib 'I rtl� 1 Iei 1.. Promote the Temecula Valley region, the Temecula Valley part- ners and increase awareness of the Temecula Valley Brand by utilizing the Facebook Fan page, twitter accounts for both meet- ings and visitors. Encourage fans to join the CVB mailing list and visit the CVB website at www.visittemecula.org Promote the destination and increase leads for CVB Sales ser- vices by participating in Linkedln groups targeting meeting/ event planners, travel industry professionals and sporting pro- fessionals. The CVB has increased attendance at CVB events by promoting events on Facebook, twitter and blast marketing. Increase communication to CVB partners by posting on social media sites. CVB team uses Twitter and Facebook as a virtual visitors center to answer and post visitor questions and insider tips, promote partners attractions and recent press. Pitch media and optimize press release for social media in CVB Website, PRweb.com Post and utilize YouTubeVideo.com for member partners/ destination marketing. The Temecula Valley CVB educated partners on the bene- fits of social media through member partner workshops, monthly newsletter and a Trip Advisor presentation at our QTY meeting. 11 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 ulllr� �i i' �uuu 1 faceb oak It c f 6A �I1(El' S( N FACE BOOK,COM/visittemecula TWITTER.COM/ visitiemecula TWITTER/MEET YOUTUBE.com/ Temecula 349 664 N/A N/A 1693 1257 769 1,282 lf�rrrlfl/ff���' I i/iIl11 The official Temecula Valley, California visitor infor- mation portal is designed for consumers, travel trade, meeting planner, member and media. It fea- tures enhanced interactivity and functionality, in- cluding an interactive calendar of events, photo and video gallery. A booking engine processes reserva- tions and prominently visible on all Bureau web pages. 88 rooms booked in FY 10-11 on the CVB site. All online and print advertisement direct traffic to this site, which serves as a gateway to the official site. ®trpwd.-sor VidWa Tx0000I, CA' - °" # of WEB PAGES 125 ONLINE GUIDE/BROCHURE REQUEST # OF PEOPLE REGISTERED E -NEWS ONLINE PARTNERS ONLINE CO-OP INCOME 941 10,000 6 11,560 o(Iiiai/iiiiia/1" '//7/ ...,,w� �f�/rr0 pj�i��' ji TOTAL WEBSITE TRAFFIC # OF PAGE VIEWS # PAGE OF VISITS 132 3,000 15,600 2 4,265 1,1,111ed 1101. PROP, 40 67,953 54,464 N/A 172,218 2,91 2.91 ADVERAGE LENTH OF SESSION 3:00. 3:04 12 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 /,moi%%%%%% RR THE CVB produces publications essential to mar- keting the Temecula Valley as a destination for tourism and group business. In addition to their practical informational function, publications and collateral items also serve as call to action pieces and "new products" for the CVB to pro- mote through public relations and advertising. The Temecula Valley Visitor Guide is the regions official visitor information publication. In FY 10- 11 the CVB continues to partner with CVB Mem- ber partners and local vendors to produce this publication. The guide is designed to be an infor- mational piece distributed to potential visitors and consumers, as well as meeting planners, tour operators and media. The Visitors Guide is distributed at area hotels, attractions, travel and trade shows, California Welcome Center and throughout the state. The Visitors Guide has many features, including an area map, suggested itineraries, editorial em- phasis on the regions distinctive lifestyle, which includes our niche markets of food, wine, out- door activities, history, entertainment and the arts. The CVB also publishes a comprehensive meeting planner guide, and is used by the CVB sales department in their mar- keting to meeting event, tour operators and wedding plan- ners. To promote the Temecula Valley's unique niche mar- kets of wine, golf, history, entertainment, sports, weddings, the CVB distributed several brochures in FY 10-11. The newly designed Temecula Valley desti- nation map show cases our top three area assets, Pechanga Resort & Casio, Wine Country and Old Town Temecula. The CVB distributed 250,000 Temec- ula Valley maps in 1,500 locations within California. A new golf map/brochure was developed to market and promote extended stay golf, A sports map was designed to market to adult leagues and sporting parents/getaway, A wedding map was designed to promote wedding destination, extended stay and guest suggested itineraries. The new niche market brochure/map were distrib- uted to visitors and partners, through direct mail and trade show marketing. VISITOR GUIDES MEETING PLANNER GUIDE TEMECULA VALLEY SO CALWINE MAP GOLF MAP, WEDDING MAP SPORT MAP 60,000 45,000' 20,000 15,000 250,000 250,00& N/A N/A 2,5 se 11 vsigtif 1 11 13 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 i//sir moi/ //l!i////i/a ?Ji The Temecula Valley CVB collaborates with over 150 community partners, In marketing Temecula Valley as a destination, the CVB pro- vides services to all partners. Partners are re- ferred on a daily basis to consumers, media travel trade and meeting professionals. f /:1 r! R F.HT'il; ),l I-Ian,I Jill Ili Throughout the year, a variety of marketing opportunities are offered to CVB partners, in- cluding: participation in familiarization tours for meeting planners and media, inclusion in press releases, receipt of sales leads for group business, advertisement in CVB publications, participation in local networking functions, enhanced listings, access to promotional opportunities and tradeshow partici- pation. The CVB Meeting was held at the Old Town Commu- nity Theater. 100 partners and community stake- holders attended the meeting which featured high- lights by our 2009-2010 Chairman Denis Ferguson and President & CEO Kimberly Adams. The CVB and Winegrowers Association held four networking mix- ers for member partners in Wine Country. The CVB Sales Department held four Sales Happy Hours for tourism industry partners. The CVB hosted four QTR luncheons at member partner locations, topics in- cluded goal setting and motivation, hospitality and service, Sales tactics, and Trip Advisor experience feedback. The CVB successfully had over 75 members in attendance each event. 14 Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau TBID Annual Report of Activities preformed up to 11/2010 2010-2011 Members By Category APS AU10,[111:0 31Ww' & itlW o lalrr y r YI uu t��iir r ��11I6� uIII I u PF rFr; lid 4 TOTAL MEMBERS MEMBERSHIP DUES MEMBER EVENTS PRODUCTED EVENTS ATTENDED 0 10,450 \\f\r\~ \\+« ���/\/ƒ is\i!\^~ ~ ~ ] { \ ® \( lam` «�':u \ . « m may \\ \ TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION & VISITORS' BUREAU COMPILED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the Nine Month Period Ending November 30, 2010 R R o t, r s ., m N 'I, L a" a. a,A To The Board of Directors Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors' Bureau Temecula, California We have compiled the accompanying Statement of Financial Position of the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau as of November 30, 2010, and the related statements of activity and cash for the nine month period then ended, in accordance with Statements of Standards for Accounting and Review Services issued by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. A compilation is limited to presenting in the form of financial statements information that is the representation of the management. We have not audited or reviewed the accompanying financial statements and, accordingly, do not express an opinion or any other form of assurance on them. The management has elected to omit substantially all of the disclosures required by generally accepted accounting principles. If the omitted disclosures were included in the financial statements, they might influence the user's conclusions about the Organization's financial position, results of operations, and cash flows. Accordingly, these financial statements are not designed for those who are not informed about such matters. The supplementary information consists of a comparison of the annual budgeted amounts to the actual amounts and also the 2009/10 unspent carry forward balances of the grants for the nine month period then ended. We have compiled the supplementary information from information that is the representation of management of the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors' Bureau without audit or review. Accordingly, we do not express an opinion of any other form of assurance on the supplementary information. We are not independent with respect to the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors' Bureau. /Q20 72ir i /‘)e- Nigro ‘'G Nigro & Nigro, PC December 15, 2010 1 TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS' BUREAU STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION November 30, 2010 ASSETS Cash $ 279,851 Accounts Receivable 184,609 Advanced Wages 30 Inventory 4,311 Property and Equipment Furniture & Fixtures 7,881 Equipment 4,183 Less Accumulated Depreciation (7,824) TOTAL ASSETS $ 473,041 LIABILIT hS AND NET ASSETS LIABILITIES Deferred Revenue $ 29,961 Retirement Plan Payable 2,463 Payroll Taxes Payable 516 TOTAL LIABILII hS 32,940 NET ASSETS Unrestricted 98,012 Temporarily Restricted 342,089 TOTAL NET ASSETS 440,101 TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS $ 473,041 TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS' BUREAU STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES For the Nine Month Period Ending November 30, 2010 Temporarily Unrestricted Restricted Total REVENUES, GAINS, AND OTHER SUPPORT TID Funding $ $ 820,644 $ 820,644 City Marketing 54,807 54,807 Contribution 75,000 75,000 Program Service Revenues Membership Dues 9,150 9,150 Website Advertising 3,265 3,265 Merchandise Sales 925 925 Misc Income 121 Promotional Participation 100 100 Interest Income 340 340 Net Assets Released From Restrictions: Grant Restrictions Satisfied 600,011 (600,011) TOTAL REVENUES, GAINS, AND OTHER SUPPORT 688,912 275,440 964,352 EXPENSES Cost of Merchandise Sold 3,055 3,055 Program Services Advertising -Printed Marketing 247,812 247,812 Marketing Personnel Costs 120,244 120,244 Trade Show Participation 42,003 42,003 Advertising -Website 18,509 18,509 FAM Tours / Site Visits 16,249 16,249 Travel & Entertainment 6,883 6,883 Advertising -Media 5,394 5,394 Lodging 4,975 - 4,975 Dues & Subscription 3,065 3,065 Promotional Items 3,956 3,956 Operational Personnel Costs 117,756 117,756 Rent 39,398 - 39,398 Professional Fees 33,439 33,439 Insurance 7,285 7,285 Office Supplies 6,598 6,598 Printing 4,081 4,081 Credit Card Processing 2,725 2,725 Telephone 1,464 1,464 Miscellaneous 283 283 NET ASSETS, FEBRUARY 28, 2010 NET ASSETS, NOVEMBER 30, 2010 TOTAL EXPENSES 685,174 685,174 CHANGE IN NET ASSETS 3,738 275,440 279,178 94,274 98,012 66,649 160,923 $ 342,089 440,101 TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS' BUREAU STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS For the Nine Month Period Ending November 30, 2010 CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Increase in Net Assets Adjustments to reconcile change in net assets to net cash provided by operating activities: $ 279,178 (Increase) decrease in operating assets: Inventory 1,541 Accounts Receivable (105,382) Publication Receivable 895 Increase (decrease) in operating liabilities: Accounts Payable - Vendors (4,350) IRA Payable (145) Payroll Taxes Payable (262) Accounts Payable - Credit Cards (13,897) Deferred Revenue (14,807) NET CASH PROVIDED BY OPERATING ACTIVITIES 142,771 NET INCREASE IN CASH BEGINNING CASH FEBRUARY 28, 2009 ENDING CASH NOVEMBER 30, 2010 See accompanying accountants' report. A 142,771 137,080 279,851 Supplementary Information TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS' BUREAU GENERAL FUND For the Nine Month Period Ending November 30, 2010 Income Advertising - Website Promotional Participation Funding Investment Revenue Membership Dues Miscellaneous Sales -Publications Merchandise Sales Total Income Expense * Cost of Goods Sold Advertising - Printed Marketing Bank Fees / Credit Card Processing FAM Tours / Site Visits Insurance Personnel Costs -Operational Printing Professional Fees Promotional Items Rent Miscellaneous Telecommunications Total Expense Net Income Actual Thru 11/30/2010 Annual'Budget 3,265 $ 100 75,000 340 9,150 121 925 88,901 3,055 1,163 1,472 350 4,616 62,935 91 2,194 1,236 6,455 282 1,315 85,164 3,737 $ Over/(Under) Budget 24,000 $ 100,000 6,000 16,410 12,000 158,410 56,803 2,580 6,720 76,740 6,552 6,455 2,560 158,410 (20,735) 100 (25,000) 340 3,150 121 (16,410) (11,075) (69,509) 3,055 (55,640) (1,108) 350 (2,104) (13,805) 91 (4,358) 1,236 282 (1,245) WIN11111. *Pm * Cost of Goods Sold: Budget Includes all purchases (purchases sold and purchases in inventory) The inventory remaining at 11/30/10 is $ 4,311. See accompanying accountants' report. (73,246) 3,737 TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS' BUREAU TID FUND For the Nine Month Period Ending November 30, 2010 Accu; Thru 11/30/10 Income Funding $ 820,644 $ Publication Sales Total Income Expense Advertising / Marketing Operational Total Expense Net Income 820,644 355,903 122,652 478,555 Annual Budget $ Over/(Under) Budget glom 1,018,780 $ (198,136) 1,018,780 (198,136) 691,720 (335,817) 327,060 (204,408) 1,018,780 (540,225) 342,089 $ - $ 342,089 See accompanying accountants' report. TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS' BUREAU CITY MARKETING FUND For the Nine Month Period Ending November 30, 2010 Income City Funding Total Income Expense Advertising / Marketing Total Expense Net Income Actual Thru 11/30/10 Annu.IIL. 10,039 $ 10,039 10,039 10,039 Ilt et $ Over/(Under) Budget 40,000 $ (29,961) 40,000 (29,961) 40,000 (29,961) 40,000 (29,961) Deferred Revenue From 2010/11 Applied to Expenses Occurring in March to November 2010 Total Amount of Expense Related to 2010/11 Year Was $10,039. See accompanying accountants' report. 7 At Feb 28, 2010 FR Ef3 &3 O Lnk 00 00 n in m 00 V4 4 'ir 14, o. 01 o n 00 oo Total Income 00 00 0 0 M C d+ 1! 1-4 00 N 1-44 tO .54 • bo H Nt.W Uu to f D U OD 5 0J cu W U 0 d d '0 z At Feb 28, 2010 Mar '09 - Feb '10 0 3 et M H ba 1 ra OD 0 ec v g a. W u W 0al x IV U aQ 1 -r E- w °-� 0 o Q) N Z O U ea tiD b 0 N •v U y 0 Olo W O � O N ts E w x o m *1-‘ o H D iy 0 z N fR 0 rn N Total Income 0 ti ki 3 a� Ca 1 0 rrn N O O 0 in- L• su CN a cu CJ F5 O N N eti O 1-4O f O tom O a) cis .5 • N o d m b F+ O 0 cu zu" g o fJl Mar '10 - Feb 11 W N. Q O O n O (00 ((00 h (00 co S m co csi S 0 0 co 0 m O 0( 65,860 74,048 N. • 0 10 0 0 p0 0 p0p 0 0 S 0 10 0 0 (D CO 01p O V O S (mD O) coVof O ▪ ▪ O N r N of V V r (D N V g o 0 0 0 S 0 0 0 0 co S O • 0 N 0 0 • r N 0 r M N (9 M ro CO N Ed kr 0 O OOOOOO O (0 r 0 ? O O N 0 pV000 co of 6 O 100_ 10 S �T O O N O 0 N w (O N N N c N (0 c (1) vYi CO " O • O O N O W § 00 3 m N N M N Ol (0D a 0 2 0 0 0 8 S S S 0 0 1� 0 0 V 0 O N 0 CO 10 CD 00) ((1) N N < o Pl (7 IDD V 0 N 0 0 0 0 0 p0 0 S S co (0000 V 0 0 N O CO 0) 0 (( N N l7 M 7 co- o - 0 m 0 0O CO O pO O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ol r 0 Q O O N O 0 0 (00 10 N N r M r 0 m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 S 1(DD ((1 (00 00 7 0 0 N O m 01 P1 V r N N N NOD O) 11m� CO W 0 v 0 0 0 0 0 p0 0 0 S - (0 (D 0 V 0 0 N O CO CO CO Obi S r N a- Cr) r W 0) C CN 0 E h 0 0 0 0 N 0 0 0 f0 CO N N N N r 10 f0 1v. Q�0 0 0 0 0 O O (1 CO (n m 0 v 0 0 N O o 10 S 1 V c N N N of o • S 0 0 0 O S S O O 0O 1. • 10 (0 " O V O O N 1D O O p (0 OO) 10 r N 10 co N (7 '7 co Total Income Promotional Items Trade Show Participation Travel & Entertainment m 0 W 444 Total Expenses I4I I�I IZI l0l 00ss4 N 0 `° (44 Q 0 0 0 0 25 0 uu0 0 a N as O Y1 O sr N e O 0 pOp 0 0 O O O O Q N c0 O O 0 O O 00 N O S N 0 0 0 O O co 8 N O 0 O O N 8 N Ol O 8 0 0 0) O 0 o u0) $ o N O r O 0 8 Membership Dues O Merchandise Sales O Sales -Publications 0 CD CO U) IO 0) 12,500 16,500 N -c N Q 0 0 O 8 N (p X V h co v vi 0 11 m e ) u) 8 8 m 8 01 C 2 0 0 O C i • AdvertlsIng-Web.@e Event Hosting, Industry Sales Event Hosting, Local Community 8 N g CO g n co Y CO ID 0 u1 0 tV NQ Q N Q ^ co g Q + V N- CO N Sr n ID CO N R ' O n t0 CO N Promotional Items Operating Cost Telecommunications O a b O p Y) u7l m 0 8 I(0 N N 0 +qIN 0) llul 0 Total Expenses O r • m mNbbl UM 8a W®8^bbRb b og �m^o®8Co ��®o MUMMER o - o��o o _ _m ono m8mmw8 mo = EL, ta ®rr mm Him oir rv- P m NN mm mn.dtira mumiP mm PP �.i mmNm pl m �f m ol� m REMAR Ertl mPbb Nmm�nP W P F'EMcNai_N EPEAE _E ESU F^EmM$o ommq'72Eq E ER2i3, f l a EMIR NN r r r m Nni r .4 .ivi 88 <V EFIE mfe b»mamsrrN Cmi 253f »ED Nfm E8 EE WM E,TEHE Efb bmmomrrq $8 ®EW'mHmEE Minn N m Pr RER5N<ES mNm Eo WE r®mm�N Fag�m®o °�P� 88 �® a Pyr DEME b o s� r�EM®a asa�EP�w� 88 Qgvmm® vNo mP m m m NN N r v- 1 my m PP n ati nim �PPrvm 1 R _ r M ER f *IAM eo $< rti�am% _o »Wo o�Vb vbiP ubi�N RR Nnmwm ® _ _ _ _ �" I� h Nm cN m P NN P rq P m m PP N an Vv PP m Q m EE 1mdry m m»NN EE P mbmE m m NN c ErTEH8 »Q EME P'MR Quo ER8 mMm 1E �Mi 1,:4 m r E m E N v vcri Naim POESe N v` P 86 bV mbme m Ekf26'NFA oe MNmvt®8 O PaP m I� n b Visitors' Bureau R o V �m EER EH, MmmEYmP'N�y EF N Pm$ HA -PR r NN N r PP m mm P oo m b N 6 b WU �V[m9 HMV -3. ME RE uFNm�l� EE 'NN$®m NN NN r N � � m n w mN EEE WE If oe m N m P- (fN m Mm EE $ c V F m E m E M �m V m P' tE N N R m N P O EE P m m 8 ofD 0 I -I to 5 O c a V m y LL 0 3 C Wm w , o W $o2a O F N U a 0 0 0 0 Income Funding 0 00 o I • o o o O vv 0 00 o oo o o o 0 00 Nr vv Total Income Advertising - Media Trade Show Participation 0 0 0 0 Total Expense m 0 u 1.111111111111 000, 11 0.00 0 01010 i,10100,101 .10 111,10 0,1 011111111111)100 r. - A 0 8L = § 11111111111111111 00000000000000000;,, )U1 Jho 6. HOME PAGE *** l 7. NOTES Tue 9/7 EXPIRES 10/17 Komen N/A Labor Day is Mon 9/6 Mon 10/18 N/A Labor Day is Mon 9/6 Mon 11/8 or Sooner EXPIRES _ 12/ N/A Mon 11/29 Thanksgiving is Th 11/25 EXPIRES Fri 12/31 Mon 11/29 Thanksgiving is Th 11/25 EXPIRES Sun 1/2 Mon 1/3 Christmas is Sat 12/25 EXPIRES Mon 2/28 New Years is Sat 1/1 Mon 1/24 Valentine's Day is Mon 2/14 EXPIRES Tue 2/15 N/A Thanksgiving Th 11/25 Tue 2/22 New Years is Sat 1/1 EXPIRES after BG Fest1 MLK Jr. Day is Mon 1/17 N/A Mon 3/21 Est BG FESTSatSun3/19-20 EXPIRES after W Days Est W Days SatSun 5/14-15 N/A President's Day is M 2/21 Mon 5/16 Est Jazz Fst SatSun7/16-17 EXPIRES after Jazz Fest ALL Mon 7/11 Mon 7/18 7/18 HP Calendar Features EXPIRES Labor Day WkE OT Fri Nites & TVIFF Press Release DISTRIBUTION ** A) TemecutaCV8.r n/media/press-releases; B) News Blast:Travel Writers (Carolyn's list procedure) + MSWord doc and link; C) Post iftwa.com; D) PR Web Web Von for Consumers LINKED from HOME PAGE *** SeasonalFest graphic on Home Page links to content. Confirming content/punctuation w/ MS Word doc can help w/ ac -curacy 5. DISTRIBUTION ** ALL Tue 8/3 ALL Wed 10/6 ALL Tue 10/12 All but PRWeb Tue 9/7 ALL Mon 10/18 6 weeks lead time ALL Mon 11/15 ALL Mon 11/29 ALL Mon 11/29 ALL Mon 1/3 ALL Mon 1/24 All but PRWeb M 12/6 90 day lead time ALL Tue 1/18 45 day lead time ALL Mon 2/14 ALL Mon 3/7 All but PRWeb M 2/27 90 day lead time ALL Mon 4/4 60 day lead time ALL Mon 5/16 4. DRAFT to K Tue 7/27 Tue 9/28 Mon 10/4 V1 Mon 8/23 V2 Mon 10/11 oo 1 C 2 V1 Mon 11/22 V1 Mon 11/22 V2 Tue 12/21 e-1 V1 Mon 11/29 V2 Tue 1/11 N Mon 2/28 V1 Tue 2/22 V2 Mon 3/28 Mon 5/9 Tue 7/6 3. DIRECTION Week of 7/19 Week of 8/30 or b-4 Week of 9/20 or b-4 Week of 8/9 or b-4 Week of 10/4 or b-4 Week of 10/25 or b-4 Week of 11/1 or b-4 Week of 11/1 or b-4 Week of 12/13 Week of 1/3 Week of 11/15 or b-4 Week of 1/3 Week of 1/24 or b-4 Week of 2/14 or b-4 Week of 2/7 or b-4 Week of 3/21 or b-4 Week of 4/25 or b-4 Things To Do Week of 6/21 or b-4 2. STORY Announcement People Things To Do Announcement V1 Announcement V2 N O. O G! Q. New Year's Eve Things To Do V1 Things To Do V2 Valentine's Day Announcement V1 Announcement V2 Q 0 G7 a Things To Do Announcement V1 Announcement V2 W O. 0 Gl a 1. SEASON A. AutumnFest 2010 SEPT, OCT, NOV Wed 9/8 to Wed 11/24 Autumn begins Th 9/23 Thanksgiving is Th 11/25 0 N O N N m O N u_ CO LL LI z O :31Q In w ❑ a-1 am i_>c..)ze0- N ami I- C •— .0 L Christmas is Sat 12/25 New Years is Sat 1/1 MLK Jr. Day is Mon 1/17 Pres's Day is Mon 2/21 C. SpringFest 2011 MAR, APR, MAY Tue 3/01 to Tue 5/31 Spring begins Sun 3/20 Easter Sun 4/24 Mother's Day Sun 5/8 Memorial Day Mon 5/30 D. SummerFest 2011 JUN, JULY, AUG Wed 6/1 to Wed 9/7 Father's Day Sun 6/19 Summer begins Tue 6/21 Independence Day M 7/4 Labor Day Mon 9/5 TVCVB FISCAL 2010-2011 TRADE SHOW RECAP # Attendees *Est. Staff Hours Nv 0 2.1 Planner Trade Shows 2 O O 30 N ID -c 0 C CO 0 c m s,11 a m L E E m 3 A -452 Q O 0.w m 422W -4S E c Q 0-=,_0 c . v o i 3 v gv v c 3 c � N m m 1O$ O v 0 0 a 03 O e ; o y � `w m c m c E E 0 15 w E H N E-= = H m v a g5 -2u u vm n U 42m a H N — ?,:327, C 15 p+ 0 2.13 m v _c c n u N .490= o c E > > 2 w E °> s. V! 0 0 m 0 0 IO N O m N O co N Oo 0 0 0 W N e-1 .-i O. L d -C C 0 wm `>u2m o`g — c p m n E a 0 a> .,, c m Q c m.-'v oa... c E Y Uc m55 m25maE .EO22 IxC Wwu�NVC NLmm msmCOLL 0 §s-5, mem„,.. _r01> i c UUHMit”! yng0« ^'~LO C 1073', .2:� r-121141.1.4.! m� 3 m v !!!:!0N0a==0 0 1,1 ▪ YUPn L ICO 1O?m C O m« MIA 5 ~ E t :a, c Q 3 w,„. ...E m m m-59.1,117,115 s v 013v d0a r`m r::"1111 gm cY v3 .u▪ c =3 0o .y c0p E>Emm ri Y - O.0.. Eao cm Eo1ccO c0Npa- m vOO'a1 y c .., o0C -0 cLLHMI ` LL EOccE °A1522- er2_acE;! vwo_ ;WI lEEc`EoEmon 0 z -r, oaCmwma32 v . ma0c m2=gm ;-mo aE-oOE cO0 E y •+ C N d m`aca EE c« v m a Epm N a NCFmCCm— S L -E° E 8 Ln ill N N N O O a W O NE; =N 0 Successful Meetings N O b L} c Y � E E„ Q _ z E 3 0 0 299 o E N Q 7.27? -27.113"E p N v- J �^ C ` y 01 :842-8 p 0 0 t m m✓ n? CO S 0 a W o- m e m c>N t 3 ° w u,12m-cam E N t1 E 3 L m N Emoizg0E25 U p C C C CO u m .o m E - O w a E N° v o' u m 0 C 0 00 .0 9 E v c p E m m pa 0 0 0 0 p- m E v $ v « 14.210/ ▪ o Y v E .0 ti E 1 0 ,0.. /m. co m a e c y v n G- M -S m a O a 0 r = m 0 x 9 m c a> E E m 1° E y 3 w m' °� t c mi' r w S tw m m O C C E 0 Ia3ac8L9 — C 0 •O m 7°11' C m E_ L 0 w Et -.52 mm93N c v ma E. 0.> G w 0 t co t a 0.0 n c a 3„ 3 0-.E. 9 E 89 m N M O pOp O 14 n 0) N O O n ry .-1 ti ;I OO 1" 0 0▪ -= m “°, m m m 0 N 0 N 8 N O 4L 01 (00 Smart Meetings- The Smart Mart Smart Meetings -The Smart Meeting w O t a m Prepared by Leslie Mercado, Director of Sales Revision Date 11/15/10 TVCVB FISCAL 2010-2011 TRADE SHOW RECAP EEI From Leads ! ! k # tendees *Est. staff Hours § 0 2 k -4 ■ © 8 § mm k k EC k/, k\41 coE41 n 0 0 21 EN to 00 if /d 0 2 Bridal Shows erator Shows 0 0 01 k � § w Prepared by Leslie Mercado, Director of Sales Revklon Date 11/15/10 TVCVB FISCAL 2010-2011 TRADE SHOW RECAP EEI From Leads # Staff # Partners # Attendees *Est. 5 el 0 0 1 to N tt 1 Trade Shows Tota E E Q 0 0 o m J N r 0 H t m o m Z NJ o 0 L7 3 W 4 m y 01 m cv 0.- 3 o x oN in W v G 00 E CC 4-3 H v N W Q C �� d 7 ._° 1 W E u w c ;: I; 0 TRADE SHOW AND MAR Prepared by Leslie Mercado, Director of Sales Revision Date 11/15/10 MEDS. OBJECTIVES Target Audience • Corporate Travel- Individual and Group • Meetings Markets • Leisure Travel Demographic/Psychographic • Adults 35-64 • Weekday traveler 1,46 Geography • The Primary Trade area includes Los Angeles and Orange County for Leisure travel • National and International for Meetings Market Objectives The primary objective is to increase hotel room sales at all hotels throughout Temecula. Strategy/Tactics • Support each season (Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter) with a combination of print, online, social media and direct marketing. • Leverage the Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country brand by creating a series of advertising campaigns for online and print. • Increase online effectiveness through the use of new creative technology called "Spongecell." This allows traditionally static banner ads to come "alive" for interaction. These can include event calendars, short sizzle videos, hotel booking options and relevant content for the online viewer. Spongecell provides a "lift" to traditional flash ad click -through that ranges from 20-60%. • Create a social media plan and playbook for Twitter and Facebook. BUDGET ALLOCATION Social Media Print Direct Marketing Online Marketing Trade Show Marketing Creative Strategy and Design (Includes ad campaign concepts Spongecell and banner ad design) TOTAL 2 % Allocation 11.0 16.0 7.0 49.0 4.5 12.5 Budgeted Dollars $19,791.00 $28,173.00 $13,052.00 $87,137.00 $ 8,148.00 $22,508.00 100.0% $178,809 �h� �flfinu ,;O0uii )1 H SOCIAL MEDIA Ark Marketing will continue to increase audience engagement in existing social media outlets. A suggested campaign has been created under separate cover. Highlights of the plan include the following: • Build Facebook tabs • Update the `look' and `feel' of the Facebook page and offer multiple interaction opportunities • Provide all travel and information for the region • Engage audiences via monthly contest on Facebook and Twitter • Enter the location based social space via Foursquare • Create and execute Facebook ads • Feature a "Business of the Week" Once these upgrades and enhancements have been achieved, we will take the social media venue to the next level through collaboration with Petra Consulting. Working with Petra Consulting, Ark Marketing will assess the current social media offerings of the Temecula CVB and determine a plan to increase their social media effectiveness. The project will begin by completing a social media audit report, creating a social media engagement plan and playbook, and providing ongoing monthly success coaching and implementation. The Engagement Plan and Playbook includes a listening plan, social media playbook, social media outreach and metrics for each defined target segment. I.e.; wedding market, sports market, business traveler, meetings market, etc. The social media playbook will include an improvement opportunity with specific recommendations and content examples to help increase effectiveness of the designated social media properties. Included in the recommendations are time involved, tools to use and a three-month calendar excel spreadsheet with daily posts. Monthly trends will be tracked along with impact measurements. Real-time feedback will be provided on social media conversations with ideas on building more targeted relationships while energizing fans and influencers. PRINT Leisure Market A very limited amount of print is planned for this fiscal year through cooperative opportunities with the California Travel and Tourism Commission (CTTC), Sunset 3 uk V71`Uirk 'HT DVV`c diod;��DP�°� Magazine and the Inland Empire CVB. All of these opportunities connect the TVCVB with national and international leisure markets in a cost-efficient manner. CTTC- CMG Fall/Spring In November 2010- a special 24 -page California section will be inserted into the following U.S. magazines: • Travel+ Leisure- 150,000 circ. • Budget Travel- 200,000 circ. • Food & Wine- 200,000 circ. National Geographic Traveler- 150,000 circ. (Magazine inserts will target upscale households in key Western U.S. states along with select opportunity markets in other regions of the U.S.) Canada Newspaper Inserts: • Vancouver Sun- 100,000 circ. • Calgary Herald- 100,000 circ. • Edmonton Journal- 100,000 circ. • Toronto Star- 100,000 TOTAL CIRCULATION- 1,100,000 Sunset Magazine- SoCal Insider Sunset Magazine publishes a special section, four times a year, called "SoCal Insider." This section targets the most affluent readers in the Southern California area. In the November 2010 issue- Sunset focuses on the Annual Wine Awards, providing the perfect platform to deliver Temecula's unique message- the Southern California Wine Country. This year, Sunset Magazine will be writing and featuring an editorial about wine country within the SoCal Insider section. The TVCVB ad will be part of a full Temecula page that includes the TVWA, California Dreami_n and Pechanga as partners. This full-page ad will be surrounded by relevant editorial and will be seen by almost 525,000 readers through a circulation of 136,000. California Official State Visitors Guide & Travel Planner- 2011 Inland Empire Tourism Council Co-op Advertising Program Travelers turn to the guide throughout the year for its lifestyle -focused editorial and inviting design elements that make it easy to use. It inspires readers to explore and gives them fresh ideas on where to go and what to do with precious leisure time. Specific travel information is organized throughout each of the 12 California Tourism regions, and the print Guide works hand-in-hand with the VisitCalifornia.com web site. 9 hrhhh hr, As the main fulfillment piece for the CTTC's $50 million advertising budget, The California Official State Visitors Guide & Travel Planner is distributed world-wide and year-round, January — December each year. • 450,000 copies are distributed upon request in response to the CTTC's print, broadcast and online advertising. • 50,000 copies are distributed on newsstands for $2.99 a copy. • Plus bonus electronic distribution- users access the digital version of the Guide on VisitCalifornia.com all year long. The guide offers lead generation that is emailed bi-weekly throughout the year, enhanced listing in the Inland Empire section (name, address, 20 words, phone and URL), free ad and listing with links in the digital guide at visitcalifornia.com, and heavily discounted co-op rates. Meeting Market Smart Meetings Smart Meetings periodically offers cooperative partnerships with other companies within the Temecula area. This provides the TVCVB with the ability to market through the magazine using the TVCVB branding, while only paying a fraction of the cost. This opportunity was implemented in June 2010 and will be included for February 2011 as well. Smart Meetings- Site Solutions (print and online) The site solution package includes a 1/3 page, 4c ad within the Site Solutions publication -a special Meeting Planner supplement for the West Coast. This supplement is poly -bagged with Smart Meetings magazine and distributed to 31,500 subscribers the first week of December 2010. (Digital reply cards included.) Meeting Professionals International- Northern California. Chapter (MPINCC) The MPI Northern California Chapter is a publication that will be published in October 2010. The chapter includes more than 1,100 members and has been promoting the industry for 30 years. The MPINCC members approve and recommend facilities, products and services to California's leading companies and associations. The TVCVB has purchased a half -page ad in directory. ONLINE Leisure Market Three travel search sites were chosen to market the TVCVB. The focus will be on people planning their trip from Southern California; Los Angeles, Burbank and Orange County. 5 Olson 4y The TVCVB ad will be served up within targeted pages of the planned partnering websites during the time people are making their travel plans. Three different size banner ads will utilized on the travel sites. These include the 300 x 25o rectangle,160 x 600 sky scraper and the 728 x go leader board. Expedia.com The expedia.com flight schedule begins mid-September through mid-February 2011. Ads will be shown on the hotel search tab, the deals and offers tab and the hotel results tab. A total of 1.6 million impressions will be delivered throughout the flight, approximately 550,000 each season. TripAdvisor.com TripAdvisor.com hosts a special Temecula content section where the TVCVB appears. The page provides a picture of Temecula, the website address, the opportunity to email the TVCVB and download the official Visit Temecula guide. The ads will also appear in Special Wine Country content, special Southern California content, wine country with IP addresses in Southern California and throughout the Trip Advisor site for general bonus exposure. The flight will begin mid-September and run through mid-February for a total of 655,684 impressions. Multi Travel and Weather Sites A consortium of 50 travel and weather sites will be purchased as a package for the TVCVB's ads to run. Some sites included are travelandleisure.com, vacation.rentals.com, citysearch.com, foodchannel.com, frommers.com, hotels.com, hotwire.com, travelchannel.com. The flight will begin mid-September and run through mid-February for a total of almost two (2) million impressions. Only those website visitors from Los Angeles and Orange County will be served the ads. CTTC- CMG Fall/Spring As part of the Fall CTTC print campaign package, a new program enhancement launching in spring 2011 will provide the TVCVB the opportunity to showcase the Temecula destination in a highly interactive and engaging format. In addition to expanded advertorial content, including imagery, the TVCVB will be able to feature destination videos, calendars of events and/or itineraries, along with opportunities for consumers to order visitor guides, opt -in to receive destination emails or enter promotional sweepstakes. The CTTC will launch the digital guide with a Geo -targeted email in April/May to one million U.S people and a half -million Canadians. 6 ,aa�ll� auaQaa��,x e:�u as adu;a vv, R dahV' 000 The TVCVB will receive a 2 -page spread in this digital guide in addition to distribution through Zinio.com, the largest e -newsstand in the world. California's digital guide will sit alongside well-known magazines (more than 2,400 titles) and be available for download to consumers for free. The TVCVB will also receive a dedicated email to 25,00o geographically targeted consumers to increase program exposure and allow the TVCVB to customize promotional messaging and timing. Meeting Market Smart Meetings- Site Solutions (print and online) The online portion of the package includes the following: • Site Solution Digital edition emailed out to 38,000 meeting planners in December. • Two group email blasts sent out to 38,000 meeting planners in January and February 2011 with the TVCVB's smart deal. • Four months of Smart Deals to be included in the "Smart Deals" section of the smartmeetings.com website. On the Smartmeetings.com website, there is a section on the bottom right of the home page which features special deals from the featured destination. November 2010— February 2011. • Three months on the Smart Show Case Home Page. A picture with link is included on the home page. Once a visitor clicks the link, they are taken to a full- page micro site that includes information about the destination with live links to hotels, wineries and local tourism opportunities. November 2010, December 2010 and February 2011 I&MI Do -It -Yourself Workbook I&MI online Do -It -Yourself Workbook is used regularly by more than 15,000 registered qualified North American and international subscribers. The international DIY site has been up and running since January 2009. The domestic launch is October 2010. The TVCVB package provides three marketing approaches: 1) The DIY Workbook, 2) Temecula e -booklet and 3) Marketing campaign. The DIY Workbook allows planners to search for a CVB by state. Once the Temecula CVB comes on screen, the TVCVB will have two (2) full pages of information including a Welcome page. These pages can be downloaded to a planner's computer with a single click. (.pdf digital flipbook) An e -booklet will be created for Temecula. This is a self-contained online booklet that focuses on everything to do in Temecula and includes 4-6 other properties in a co-op arrangement. Once IMI has these properties committed to the project, an e -booklet will be created. These booklets are available for download to the planners desktop and are one of the most popular downloaded sections on the DIY website. The e -booklets are 7 HH?Ho, liAmon also emailed worldwide to over 14,000 registered meeting planners and MICE buyers through the IMI web marketing. The marketing campaign will include one email blast to the 14,000 IMI email subscribers with information about Temecula. Quarterly, the TVCVB will also be included in the IMI newsletter with relevant event and hospitality information. Meetings West The Meetings West website meetingsfocus.com is a premiere B to B content provider serving the meetings, convention and incentive market. It features destination articles, news and events, property listings, hot deals, educational and custom webinars, and videos. Meetingsfocus.com concentrates on attracting quality traffic by actively bringing the magazine subscribers online directly from the e -newsletters, promotions and webinar invitations. The monthly page views are 56,391 with 18,113 unique visitors. On the home page of the site, there is a "featured profile" section on the bottom right hand side. The TVCVB will be one of the featured destinations. Once a planner clicks on the link, it takes them to a page of information about Temecula. This includes an overview of Temecula, its properties, meeting space availability, a map of the area and any other relevant data. The website also offers a double -wide skyscraper ad (300 x 600) that runs throughout the site. A total of 8,000 impressions are guaranteed monthly and will run three specific months: October 2010, December 2010 and February 2011. DIRECT MARKETING- EMAIL Refer a Friend Campaign The "Refer a Friend" email campaign will be created to gather new email addresses and increase the number of people that are exposed to Temecula offerings. Contest Description An email is sent out to the TVCVB database asking people to refer a friend. Those who participate are sent to a landing page designed and hosted by Eagle Marketing to give the email addresses of their friends. For each name they provide, they are entered to win a monthly and grand prize (two referral names, two prize entries). They are also given an immediate prize of a 2for1 wine tasting coupon. The referred friends are then sent an email with a custom subject line (Audrey Patterson referred you )And those people receive a newly written email inviting them to join the TVCVB database, refer to their friends and visit Temecula. The eblasts will be sent out on 9/22,10/20 and 11/17/10. Prize for referring a friend: one free wine tasting coupon ($10.00 value) 8 �aAuaH Hs Monthly Prizes: Month 1: The Grapeline Wine tour and picnic lunch ($200.00 value), Month 2: hot air balloon ride ($300.00), Month 3: round of golf for 6 ($350.00 value) Grand Prize: 2 night stay, wine tasting, hot air balloon ride, dining coupon ($710.00 value) cxFaTISE Creative Strategy- PaintVox, Inc./ProsFromDover The branding guidelines are quite complete from the standpoint of brand presentation. However a communication platform is needed based on A. Target Audience B. Reason to believe C. Unique campaign device(s) D. Interpretation of guidelines into tangible and ownable advertising campaigns E. Competitive set (looking at what other options people have, and finding a way to put Temecula into the competitive set) Deliverables include 4-6 campaign concepts presented with copy and visuals in both print and online. Each campaign concept includes two-four ads represented in both print and online. For example, if PaintVox comes up with five (5) concepts, they may show three (3) executions for both print and online for each of the five concepts for a total of 3o visual ideas. Once the concepts are agreed upon, these concepts are then turned into actual online and print ads moving forward. Spongecell Spongecell is a new technology that allows online banner ads to come "alive." Spongecell provides interactive ad technology that converts engagement to participation. It helps advertisers increase engagement by creating ads that make it easy for messages to flow into calendars, mobile devices, social networks and email inboxes right from the ad unit. By offering more options than just a click through to move past engagement, Spongecell increases the yield from each impression. The TVCVB will be able to run their ads using the Spongecell technology for up to 3 million impressions. TRADE SHOW MARKETING Several of the trade shows offer marketing opportunities to talk to their attendees before, during and after the show. Opportunities consist of pre and post mailing lists, social media, promotional events, sponsorships and special signage. Each trade show is unique in its offerings and will be evaluated as information becomes available. A separate trade show list with opportunities is under separate cover. 9 F L MEDIA FLOWCH TEMECULA VALLEY CVB 2010-2011 FISC f10000 00000000100 000000' 1111111 J�ll�r°'�% I I1r�1l111�r' in 0 1 oloo IYI � wnW�nrdnu�� 1111.11111111111111111111111111111 flhlIIIIIIIIliiIIl��IN� !I@NI@I1I911111 2I W 7 TEMECULA VALLEY CVS 2010-2011 FISCAL MEDIA FLOWCHART ®® H 111101111 1111111111„ a 0 40 0 010 oil1111.. o INR71.1 I I�p I I I p 1 I: ul 1, 111111.1011111!!111 • 1414 •4 1•1111 11 O. IIII III II 1 II IIII hI III III �IIII m 1111111 1111111 �� 11111.1111111. IIII� �� VIII ��, IIII, II IIII IIII ,�I OUNTRY Convention and Visitors Bureau 2010 saw the Sales Department of the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau increase its activity from sales prospecting to trade shows attended. The increased efforts saw substantial rewards when it came to hotel occupancy, demand and revenue. Hotel room occupancy increased 4.2% over 2009 to 59.9%, with a de- mand for rooms increasing over 9% to 414,529 hotel rooms booked. Revenue also saw a healthy increase, up 5.7% to $38,408,440. Leads processed through the Sales Department also saw increases over 2009 for a total of 50 leads proc- essed, valued at $2,019,467. Of those leads, 21 became "Definite" bookings for an estimated economic impact of $190,638. Eight of the Leads remain "Active" and the TVCVB is working vigorously to actualize the business. The TVCVB continues to research new markets and increase interest in the Temecula Valley as a Leisure, Group, Corporate Meetings and Special Events Destination. January 2010 • Processed 4 leads with an estimated Economic Impact of $39,000 • Processed 1 definite booking with an Economic Impact of $9,200 • Sent out "Save the Date" to 175 meeting planners, tour operators and media for Spring FAM Tour April 8-10, 2010 • Sent post -show follow-ups to 72 planners from CaISAE trade show • Attended RCMA trade show in Ft. Worth, TX. Made 40 new contacts and working on 5 sales leads • Arranged site tour for Trilogy Financial Services • E -blast invitation to 4,500 potential leisure guests for upcoming LA Times & Travel Show February 2010 • Processed 4 leads with an estimated Economic Impact of $13,000 • Processed 2 definite bookings with Economic Impact of $5,300 • Sent out "Save the Date" to 100 additional meeting planners, tour operators and media for Spring FAM Tour April 8-10, 2010 • Sent post -show follow-ups to 43 planners from RCMA trade show • Attended LA Times Travel Show with 20,000 attendance. Distributed 2,500 visitor guides and maps and collected 300 emails • Processed 3 meeting planner requests via website • E -blast invitation to 1,620 meeting planners inviting them to visit our booth at the MPISCC trade show March 2010 • Processed 4 leads with estimated Econ. Impact of $46,417 • Processed 2 definite bookings with Econ. Impact of $6,420 • Sent out 280 FAM invitation to meeting planners, tour operators and media for Spring FAM Tour April 8-10, 2010 • Attended MPISCC Trade Show in Los Angeles • Sent post -show follow-ups to 15 planners from MPISCC show • Attended OC's Largest Mixer at the Orange County Fairgrounds. Distributed over 500 visitor guides and maps • Processed 6 meeting planner requests via website • Conducted Sales Task Force meetings and discussed planning of Spring FAM and upcoming sales efforts April 2070 • Processed 3 leads with estimated Econ. Impact of $556,310 • Processed 2 definite bookings with Econ. Impact of $8,613 • Held Spring FAM Tour April 8-10, 2010. Entertained 55 Meeting Planners and guests • Attended MPI San Diego Educational Conference & Trade Show • Sent post -show follow-ups to 6 planners from MPI San Diego trade show • Attended Successful Meetings University in Monterey with 16 scheduled appointments with targeted Meeting Planners • Processed I meeting planner request via website • Attended Sales Task Force meeting/Post Con for Spring FAM May 2070 • Processed 9 leads with estimated Econ. Impact of $276,998 • Processed I definite booking with Econ. Impact of $21,930 • E -blast sent to over 1,300 meeting planners promoting upcoming sales trade shows • Attended MPI Orange County Educ. Conference & Trade Show • Twitter E -blast to over 1,500 meeting planners, netting 30 new Twitter followers • Processed 5 meeting planner requests via website • Addition of new Sales Intern for the summer • 101 f June 2010 • Processed 13 leads with estimated Econ. Impact of $445,627 V I w i • Processed 2 definite bookings with Econ. Impact of $35,325 • E -blast sent to over 1,500 meeting planners inviting them to attend Af- fordable Meetings West trade show • Held Sales Happy Hour Event at The Bank—Mexican Restaurant • Held planning meeting for "Temecula on the Road" FAM trip • Attended Affordable Meetings West trade show in Long Beach; currently working on 5 RFP's obtained from the show • Processed 2 meeting planner requests via website July 2010 • Processed 6 leads with estimated Econ. Impact of $120,664 • Processed 2 definite bookings with Econ. Impact of $10,974 • E -blast sent to over 1,600 meeting planners, travel agents & media invit- ing them to Temecula On the Road event • Attended Sales Meetings with sales teams from Pechanga, Temecula Creek Inn & Embassy Suites • Held planning meeting for "Temecula on the Road" FAM trip • Attended MPI World Education Congress trade show in Vancouver, Canada; working on 7 leads obtained from the show • Held planning meeting for "Temecula on the Road" FAM trip • Attended MPI World Education Congress trade show in Vancouver, Canada; working on 7 leads obtained from the show August 2010 • Processed 1 lead with estimated Econ. Impact of $184,000 • E -blast sent to over 1,600 meeting planners, travel agents & media invit- ing them to Temecula On the Road event • Held Temecula On the Road FAM Tour in Orange County • Attended Successful Meetings Smart Mart in Orange County with 15 one -on-one appointments with meeting planners • Attended ASAE 20t0 Volunteer Orientation Meeting & Final Evening Event in LA • Attended Pechanga luncheon for TID Hotels • Attended HSMAI Meeting Planner Panel Luncheon in LA • Held Sales Task Force Meeting September 2010 • Processed 2 leads with estimated Economic Impact of $8,560 • Processed 3 Definite Bookings with an estimated Economic Impact of $39,341 • Sent E -Newsletter to 1,540 meeting & event planners U� !IfkIP� 1.IIFOIwRNit WINE COUNTRY Convention and Visitors Bureau • E -blast sent to over 870 area travel agents inviting them to the Mini Travel & Trade Shows in Riverside, Orange County and San Diego • Attended sales meeting at Pechanga Resort &Casino • Attended Passkey/GroupMax and MeetingMax Webinars • Participated at Urban Land Institute member reception at South Coast Winery Resort & Spa • Attended Successful Meetings Trade Show in Scottsdale, AZ, with 20 one-on-one appointments with meeting planners • Held Sales Happy Hour at The Edge Restaurant & Lounge • Participated at Mini Travel & Trade Shows in Riverside, Orange Count and San Diego and met with over 100 travel agents October 2010 • Processed 1 lead with estimated Economic Impact of $8,140 • Processed 2 Definite Bookings with an estimated Economic Impact of $5,742 • Attended meeting with Joy Sarolia of Quality Inn • Fulfilled 1 online Meeting Planner Guide Request • Added 1,463 new Sales Prospect Accounts to the CRM • Added 1,818 new Sales Prospect Contacts to the CRM • Followed up on 24 CRM Sales Accounts • Attended staff budget re -cap and budget planning meeting November 2010 • E -blast sent to over 1,500 meeting & event planners promoting upcoming trade shows: Seasonal Spectacular, RCMA World Conference Expo, Go West Summit & MPI Northern California Chapter Annual Conference & Expo • Held Sales Task Force meeting • Attended Passkey/GroupMax meeting • Attended MPI So. Cal. Chapter monthly Educational meeting • Held TID Advisory Board Planning Session and TID Advisory Board Review Session • Continue to add new sales and contact prospects to the CRM • Prospected 15 accounts from the CRM December 2010 • Processed 3 Leads with estimated Economic Impact of $605,844 • Processed 3 Definite Bookings with estimated Economic Impact of $45,010 • Attended CaISAE Seasonal Spectacular Trade Show • Sent E -Blast to 10,000 Leisure Travelers and Meeting Planners promoting upcoming events and trade shows Fiscal Activity Report Year 2010 pip ti o o L NN o o N m 0 0 in *� 0 00 N 0 a0 C .m. N Ina N 0 N 0 if,0 N ID N 1� O L L i1 7 U December M 0 0 a N 0 0 N ti N 0 0 CO 0 N 0 m 0 0 NN N (0 0 m O N ^ m M 0 .-I a N 0 N 0 ti O m m 0 N O .i m V O 0 Q w-9 CO •� N N 0 N 0 O N N (y 0 a L o 0 o 0 .ii 0 0 .fi o 0 o 0 y 0 0 o 0 0 o 0 0 .0 N E al o .y o Ny z torsi N O N o 0 o 0 0 it 0 0 .-I 0 0 .-1 0 0 o 0 n N d .0 d c o a LI N o (0 w N I. 0 m m m O I0 ti N O N .moi N 0 O N M 0 0 m m E m i 0. 0. O1 0 0 N o o 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .+ 0 0 .y 0 0 O 0 m 0 7 in p1 O 7 N 4 ›ii N o 0 N a1 0 0 01 0 0 0 0 0 1n .-1 o ID 0 0 o 0 7 0 7 N .I ,� N m 01 o, 0 C o ry o N 0 0.. 0 o N 0 N 0 O1 m -+ N 0 m In ID m iin n 7 N N N N a 00 D1 N M N m om 1�0 .+ 0 0 .i 0 0 0 N 0 0 0 0 0 m. 0 01 m O o in m 0 ri .i 0 ry M .D M .-- .a 01 - N 0- .`I" N 0 No o O0 O o Oat o 00o M 0 O M 0 0 O In m 0 N 0. 0 10 R1 N N 10 4 .-1 N ny 41, Co' N C=7 N 0 0 N 0 0 0 N 0 O O in 0 .y M 0 a O a 0 7 N L m d ta a i a Z. N 0 0 No 0 0 sa ^ O o Of 7 L a 111LL 0 0 .i 0 0 o 0 0 0 0 A C n ai dr 10 ui a m 10 0 0 0a 0 m ., 0 a m 0 0 .. 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Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE SIXTH OPERATING MEMORANDUM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT BETWEEN ASHBY USA LLC AND THE CITY OF TEMECULA FOR SUNWOOD RORIPAUGH RANCH LLC, BHT-RORIPAUGH WB99 LLC, AND WINGSWEEP CORPORATION, OWNERS OF LOT 7 OF FINAL TRACT MAP 29353-1, TRACT 29661-2, AND LOT 1 OF FINAL TRACT MAP 29353-1, RESPECTIVELY, WITHIN THE RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT BACKGROUND: The Roripaugh Ranch Specific Plan was approved by the City Council on November 26, 2002 and was amended on January 11, 2005 and February 14, 2006 (the "Specific Plan"). On December 17, 2002, the City and Ashby USA entered into that certain agreement entitled "Development Agreement by and between the City of Temecula and Ashby USA, LLC" (the "Development Agreement"). The Specific Plan and Development Agreement required Ashby USA to construct certain improvements necessary to support the homes to be built within the Project. The Specific Plan and Development Agreement further provide that the issuance of building permits is dependent on the completion of specific Public Improvements as set forth in the Specific Plan and Development Agreement. Upon the completion of the reconstruction of the main entry road (Roripaugh Meadows Road) to the Phase 1 Panhandle Area ("Panhandle"), sufficient Public Improvements have been constructed to permit the issuance of 107 building permit for the Panhandle. Pursuant to certain requirements of the Fourth Operating Memorandum approved on March 8, 2007, the City agreed to issue all 515 residential building permits for the Panhandle; however, the letter of credit required for the issuance of the permits was never posted by Ashby USA and no building permits were issued. In July 2009, the Temecula Public Financing Authority and Developer entered into that certain Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement in which the Developer agreed that the City would construct the Phase 1 Public Improvements to be funded by Community Facility District No. 03-02 (Roripaugh Ranch). The construction of the City Improvements by the City is anticipated to be completed before the end of 2011. On November 9, 2010, the City Council entered into the Fifth Operating Memorandum with HRA Roripaugh 1 and 2 LLC's, owners of Tracts 29661-3 and -4 to allow the issuance of 199 building permits (of the 515 permits) for Planning Areas 3 and 4 within the Panhandle prior to the completion of all of the Phase 1 Public Improvements, subject to the fulfillment of certain required improvements. In approving this Fifth Operating Memorandum, the City's intent was to also provide for the release of building permits to other owners of Planning Areas within Phase 1 (panhandle) on similar terms to those provided to HRA. As such, Sunwood, BHT and Wingsweep, (additional owners of Phase 1 property — "Owners"), have requested the City enter into a Sixth Operating Memorandum. Sunwood has requested the City issue 113 building permits for the Sunwood property (Planning Area 4B), BHT has requested the City issue 99 building permits for the BHT property (Planning Area 2), and Wingsweep has requested the City issue 98 building permits for the Wingsweep property (Planning Area 1A). Staff supports issuing these building permits within the Panhandle upon the fulfillment of certain required improvements (as described below). Consistent with the Fifth Operating Memorandum, the major provisions of the proposed Sixth Operating Memorandum include: • Prior to the 51s1 building permit, owners shall begin construction and installation of the traffic signal at the intersection of Pourroy Road and Murrieta Hot Springs. This work shall be complete prior to the 108th building permit. Owners may be reimbursed for this work with CFD funds. • Prior to the 108th building permit, owners will complete the Nature Trail and Slope landscaping immediately adjacent to their respective property, along the rear of the Panhandle. In addition, a one-year landscape maintenance bond would be submitted to the City. • Prior to the 108th building permit, owners will complete the park located at the Roripaugh Ranch Primary Recreation Center. • Prior to the 150th building permit, owners will complete the pool and Recreation Center Building located at the Roripaugh Ranch Primary Recreation Center. The Recreation Center would then be open for use by the residents. FISCAL IMPACT: None. Owners to pay for improvements. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution 6th Operating Memorandum RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING THE SIXTH OPERATING MEMORANDUM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT BETWEEN ASHBY USA LLC AND THE CITY OF TEMECULA FOR SUNWOOD RORIPAUGH RANCH LLC, BHT-RORIPAUGH WB99 LLC, AND WINGSWEEP CORPORATION, OWNERS OF LOT 7 OF FINAL TRACT MAP 29353-1, TRACT 29661-2, AND LOT 1 OF FINAL TRACT MAP 29353-1, RESPECTIVELY, WITHIN THE RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The City Council of the City of Temecula hereby approves that certain agreement entitled "Sixth Operating Memorandum to the Recorded Development Agreement Between City of Temecula and Ashby USA LLC" with such changes in said document as may be mutually agreed upon by the parties, the City manager and City Attorney as are in substantial conformance with the form of such agreement as presented to the City Council. The Mayor is hereby authorized to execute said Sixth Operating Memorandum on behalf of the City. Section 2. The City Manager (or his designee), is hereby authorized, on behalf of the City, to take all actions necessary and appropriate to carry out and implement the Sixth Operating Memorandum and to administer the City's obligations, responsibilities and duties to be performed under the Agreement. Section 3. The City Clerk shall certify the adoption of this Resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 25th day of January, 2011. Ron Roberts, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 11- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 25th day of January, 2011, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk RECORDING REQUESTED BY AND WHEN RECORDED RETURN TO: City of Temecula 43200 Business Park Drive P.O. Box 9033 Temecula, California 92589-9033 Attention: City Clerk Exempt from recording fees pursuant to Government Code Section 27383 (Space above for recorder's use) SIXTH OPERATING MEMORANDUM TO THE RECORDED DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT BETWEEN CITY OF TEMECULA AND ASHBY USA, LLC RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT (Lot 1 of Final Tract Map 29353-1, Final Tract Map 29661-2, and Lot 7 of Final Tract Map 29353-1) THIS SIXTH OPERATING MEMORANDUM to the Recorded Development Agreement Between the City of Temecula and Ashby USA, LLC ("Memorandum") is made and entered into as of January , 2011, by and between City of Temecula, a municipal corporation ("City"), Sunwood Roripaugh Ranch LLC, a Delaware limited liability company ("Sunwood"), BHT - Roripaugh WB99, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company ("BHT"), and Wingsweep Corporation, a California corporation ("Wingsweep"). Sunwood, BHT and Wingsweep are sometimes referred to hereinafter collectively as "Tract Owners". In consideration of the mutual agreements set forth herein and for other valuable consideration, the receipt and sufficiency of which are hereby acknowledged, City and Tract Owners agree as follows: 1. RECITALS. This Memorandum is made with respect to the following facts and for the following purposes, each of which are acknowledged as true and correct by the parties: A. Sunwood is the owner of that certain real property located in the City of Temecula, County of Riverside, State of California generally known as Lot 7 of Final Tract Map 29353-1 (the "Sunwood Property") which property is more specifically described on Exhibit A- 1, Legal Description of the Sunwood Property. Sunwood is responsible for the development of the Sunwood Property. The Sunwood Property may be subdivided into 113 residential building lots subject to the satisfaction of the conditions for recording a final map thereon as set forth in the Conditions of Approval for Planning Application No. 01 -0253 -Tentative Tract Map No. 29661, (Level "B" Map) (Revised Per PA06-0053, Major Modification) approved November 26, 105779-00010 988149.19 1 2002 (revised May 17, 2006), referred to herein as the "Conditions of Approval". BHT is the owner of that certain real property located in the City of Temecula, County of Riverside, State of California generally known as Final Tract Map 29661-2 (the "BHT Property") which property is more specifically described on Exhibit A-2, Legal Description of the BHT Property. BHT is responsible for the development of the BHT Property. The BHT Property has been subdivided into 99 residential building lots pursuant to Final Tract Map 29661-2. Wingsweep is the owner of that certain real property located in the City of Temecula, County of Riverside, State of California generally known as Lot 1 of Final Tract Map 29353-1 (the "Wingsweep Property") which property is more specifically described on Exhibit A-3, Legal Description of the Wingsweep Property. Wingsweep is responsible for the development of the Wingsweep Property. The Wingsweep Property may be subdivided into 98 residential building lots subject to the satisfaction of the conditions for recording a final map thereon as set forth in the Conditions of Approval. The Sunwood Property, the BHT Property and the Wingsweep Property are depicted on Exhibit A-4. B. On December 17, 2002, the City and Ashby USA, LLC, a California limited liability company ("Developer") entered into that certain agreement entitled "Development Agreement by and between the City of Temecula and Ashby USA, LLC" which Development Agreement was recorded on January 9, 2003 in the Official Records of Riverside County ("Official Records") as Document No. 2003-108567, which was amended on February 28, 2006 by the "First Amendment to Development Agreement Between City of Temecula and Ashby USA, LLC" recorded on March 7, 2006 in the Official Records of Riverside County as Document No. 2006-0162268 (collectively, the "Development Agreement"). The Sunwood Property, the BHT Property and the Wingsweep Property are a portion of the real property subject to and encumbered by the Development Agreement. C. Section 3.5.5 of the Development Agreement authorizes Developer or an Owner (such as Sunwood and/or BHT and/or Wingsweep) and the City to approve an "Operating Memorandum which does not constitute an amendment" to the Development Agreement, in order to implement the Development Agreement or provide for "changes, adjustments, or clarifications [that] are appropriate to further the intended purposes" of the Development Agreement. The First Operating Memorandum was entered into on October 21, 2004 and was recorded November 3, 2004 as Document No. 2004-0874441 of Official Records of the Riverside County Recorder, the Second Operating Memorandum was entered into on March 21, 2006 and was recorded on March 30, 2006 as Document No. 2006-0225016 of Official Records, the Third Operating Memorandum was entered into on August 31, 2006 and was recorded October 19, 2006 as Document No. 2006-0770494 of Official Records, the Fourth Operating Memorandum was entered into on March 6, 2007 and was recorded on March 8, 2007 as Document No, 2007-0160512 in the Official Records, and the Fifth Operating Memorandum was entered into on October 26, 2010 and was recorded on November 18, 2010 as Document No. 2010-0557219 in the Official Records (collectively, the "Operating Memoranda"). D. The Roripaugh Ranch Specific Plan was approved by the City on November 26, 2002 and was amended on January 11, 2005 and February 14, 2006 (the "Specific Plan"). The Specific Plan is part of the Development Plan as defined in Section 1 of the 105779-00010 988149.19 2 Development Agreement. "Project" shall mean that development project described in the Development Agreement and the Specific Plan. E. The Specific Plan and Development Agreement require the construction of certain Public Improvements necessary to support the homes to be built within the Project. The Specific Plan and Development Agreement further provide that the issuance of building permits is dependent on the completion of specific Public Improvements as set forth in the Specific Plan and Development Agreement. F. Upon the completion of the reconstruction of the main entry road as described in the Specific Plan, sufficient Public Improvements will have been constructed to permit the issuance of 107 building permits for the Phase I of the Specific Plan (Panhandle Area) ("Phase 1"), of which the Sunwood Property, the BHT Property, and the Wingsweep Property are each a part. G. Pursuant to the Fourth Operating Memorandum, the City agreed to issue all 515 residential building permits for Phase I of the Project with the fulfillment of the following conditions, without application of force majeure: 1) Developer posts the Letter of Credit in the amount of $8,030,000 for the "Phase I Public Improvements" as described in Section 3 of the Fourth Operating Memorandum concurrently with the issuance of the fourth (4th) residential building permit for Phase I of the Project; 2) The Riverside County Flood Control District and the applicable Resource Agencies have issued such permits and approvals as necessary to construct the six foot (6') diameter storm drain necessary for completion of: (1) permanent access on Murrieta Hot Springs Road and Butterfield Stage Road for the fire station, except for sidewalks and landscaping; and (2) the Secondary Access required by Attachment 5 to the Development Agreement and as described in Section "n" of the conditions precedent to the 108th building permit in Appendix K to the Official Statement, except for landscaping and sidewalks; and 3) All other conditions and requirements for the issuance of the requested building permits, including but not limited to Building Codes plan checks, have been fulfilled except for completion of the Phase I Public Improvements. The letter of credit described in Section 3 of the Fourth Operating Memorandum was never posted with the City and no building permits were issued pursuant to the Fourth Operating Memorandum. H. The Phase I Public Improvements for the Project are described on Attachment 5 of the Development Agreement. The current status of the Phase I Public Improvements are as follows: yet completed. 105779-00010 988149.19 1) Fire Station. Construction has started on the Fire Station but is not 3 2) Portion of Murrieta Hot Springs Road. Construct full -width improvements from east of Pourroy Road at the northern project boundary to the MWD pipeline property. Construction has started but is not yet complete. 3) Portion of Murrieta Hot Springs Road. Construct full -width improvements from MWD pipeline property to Butterfield Stage Road. Construction has started but is not yet complete. 4) Culverts for Santa Gertrudis Creek. Construct full width arch culverts for Santa Gertrudis Creek at Butterfield Stage Road and North Loop Road. Construction is complete. 5) Culverts for Long Valley Wash. Construct full width arch culverts for Long Valley Wash at Butterfield Stage Road. Construction is complete. 6) 5.1 Acre Neighborhood Park. The neighborhood park in Planning Area 6 has been partially completed but has not yet been deemed complete or accepted by the City. It is controlled by an entity owned by Developer. 7) Roripaugh Valley Road. Street "A" (Roripaugh Valley Road) has been partially completed but has not yet been accepted by the City. 8) Fiesta Ranch Road. Street "B" (Fiesta Ranch Road) has been partially completed but has not yet been accepted by the City. 9) Nature Walk/Landscape Areas. The nature walk and adjacent landscape areas (Lot 36) and the trail in Planning Area 7A have been partially completed but have not yet been deemed complete by the City. 10) Park at Private Recreation Center. The park portion of the private recreation center in Planning Area 5 has been partially completed but has not yet been deemed complete by the City. 11) Building/Pool Private Recreation Center. The building and pool portion of the private recreation center in Planning Area 5 have been partially completed but have not yet been deemed complete by the City. I. On or about July 21, 2009, Temecula Public Financing Authority (the "Authority") and Developer entered into that certain Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement (the "Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement"). Pursuant to the Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement, the Developer agreed that the City would construct the Phase I Public Improvements defined in the Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement, and described below for convenience, (referred to herein, as "City Improvements") and the Authority agreed to fund the City's construction of the City Improvements through the Authority's Communities Facilities District No. 03-02 (Roripaugh Ranch) (the "CFD"). Funding is currently available through the CFD for these City Improvements. Except for the City Improvements 105779-00010 988149.19 4 described in Sections 2)d. and 2)e. below, construction of the City Improvements by the City is anticipated to be completed before the end of 2011. The City Improvements are as follows: 1) Murrieta Hot Springs Road. a. Murrieta Hot Spring Road from west boundary of Tract 29661 to north boundary of Tract 29661. b. Murrieta Hot Springs Road from north boundary of Tract 29661 to Westside of MWD right-of-way 2,300 feet. c. Murrieta Hot Springs Road from Westside of MWD right- of-way to Butterfield Stage Road 1,500 feet. 2) Butterfield Stage Road. a. Butterfield Stage Road from north right-of-way of Murrieta Hot Springs Road to north right-of-way of Nicolas Road 2,300 feet. b. Butterfield Stage Road from Nicolas Road to 550 feet south of Nicolas Road 550 feet. c. Butterfield Stage Road from 550 feet south of Nicolas Road to southerly boundary line 1,910 feet. d. Butterfield Stage Road from southerly boundary of Tract 29353 to 1,230 feet north of La Serena Way 2,110 feet (50 percent within County). e. Butterfield Stage Road from 1,230 feet north of La Serena Way to La Serena Way 1,930 feet. 3) Calle Chapos from Butterfield Stage Road to Walcott Lane 500 feet. 4) South Loop Road. Full width improvements along frontage of Fire Station to intersection of Butterfield Stage Road. J. The City's construction of the above-described improvements to Murrieta Hot Springs Road and Butterfield Stage Road (even without the construction of the improvements described in Section 1.I.2d and 2e. set forth above) as part of the City Improvements (the "Butterfield Stage Improvements") effectively provides secondary access to Phase I of the Project for all public safety and fire protection purposes in satisfaction of the conditions of approval for the Project. K. In the Fifth Operating Memorandum, the City agreed to issue 199 building permits to HRA Roripaugh 1, LLC and HRA Roripaugh 2, LLC, (which own property within 105779-00010 988149.19 5 Phase 1 of the Project and which property is subject to the Development Agreement) prior to the completion of all of the Phase 1 Public Improvements subject to the terms set forth in such Fifth Operating Memorandum. The Fifth Operating Memorandum also provided that it is the intent of the City to provide for the release of building permits to other owners of Planning Areas within Phase 1 of the Project (which would include Sunwood, BHT and Wingsweep) on similar terms to those set forth in the Fifth Operating Memorandum. L. Sunwood has requested the City to agree to issue 113 building permits for the Sunwood Property, BHT has requested the City to agree to issue 99 building permits for the BHT Property, and Wingsweep has requested the City to agree to issue 98 building permits for the Wingsweep Property of the 515 building permits for Phase 1 of the Project prior to the completion of all of the Phase 1 Public Improvements, and City is willing to do so based on the terms and conditions of this Memorandum. M. The changes, adjustments and clarifications of the Development Agreement set forth in this Memorandum are appropriate to further the intended purposes of the Development Agreement and the Specific Plan. N. There are other owners of Planning Areas within Phase I of the Project. It is the intent of the City to provide for the release of building permits to those owners on terms similar to those set forth in this Sixth Operating Memorandum. O. As used in this Memorandum, the following terms shall be defined as follows: 1) "Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement" is defined in Section 1.I. of this Memorandum. 2) "Authority" is defined in Section 1I of this Memorandum. 3) "BHT Property" is defined in Section 1.A. of this Memorandum. 4) "BHT Property Required Improvements" is defined in Section 3 of this Memorandum and are the public improvements BHT is required to complete prior to the City's issuance to BHT of 99 residential building permits. 5) "Butterfield Stage Improvements" is defined in Section 1.J. of this Memorandum. 6) "CFD" is defined in Section 1 .I. of this Memorandum. 7) "City Improvements" is defined in Section 1.I. of this Memorandum. 8) "Developer" is defined in Section 1.B. of this Memorandum. The current status of Ashby USA and its successors is unknown and, therefore, the City makes no 105779-00010 988149.19 6 representations as to the Developer or its ability to complete its obligations under the Development Agreement. Memorandum. 9) "Development Agreement" is defined in Section 1.B of this 10) "Force Majeure" is defined in Section 6.D. of this Memorandum. 11) "Phase I Public Improvements" are the public improvements described in the Development Agreement and the Specific Plan as required for the homes in Phase I of the Roripaugh Ranch Project and are described in Attachment 5 of the Development Agreement. 12) "Project" shall mean that development project described in the Development Agreement and the Specific Plan. 13) "Recreation Center Property" is defined in Section 2.A. of this Memorandum. 14) "Specific Plan" shall mean the "Roripaugh Ranch Specific Plan (SP11)" approved by the City Council on November 26, 2002, as amended. 15) "Sunwood Property" is defined in Section 1.A. of this Memorandum. 16) "Sunwood Property Required Improvements" is defined in Section 2 of this Memorandum and are the public improvements Sunwood is required to complete prior to the City's issuance to Sunwood of 113 residential building permits. 17) "TUMF Credit Agreement" is defined in Section 6.B. of this Memorandum. 18) "TUMF Improvements" are those certain Public Improvements to be constructed pursuant to the TUMF Credit Agreement. 19) "Wingsweep Property" is defined in Section 1.A. of this Memorandum. 20) "Wingsweep Property Required Improvements" is defined in Section 4 of this Memorandum and are the public improvements Wingsweep is required to complete prior to the City's issuance to Wingsweep of 98 residential building permits 2. ISSUANCE OF 113 BUILDING PERMITS FOR THE SUNWOOD PROPERTY. The City shall issue 113 building permits to Sunwood (for Lot 7 of Final Tract Map 29353-1) of the 515 residential building permits for Phase 1 of the Project upon the 105779-00010 988149.19 7 fulfillment of the following conditions (collectively, the "Sunwood Property Required Improvements"), without application of force maj eure: A. Prior to the issuance of the 108th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, Sunwood shall complete or cause to be completed the Recreation Center Park Work (defined below) in connection with the private recreation center in Planning Area 5 (the "Recreation Center Property"). The "Recreation Center Park Work" shall consist of the work remaining to be completed on the park portion of the Recreation Center Property (to the reasonable satisfaction of the Director of Planning). B. Prior to the issuance of the 150th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, Sunwood shall complete or cause to be completed the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work (defined below). The "Recreation Center Building and Pool Work" shall consist of the work remaining to be completed on the building and pool portion of the Recreation Center Property (to the reasonable satisfaction of the Director of Planning), but shall not include a transfer to the homeowner's association, which is not anticipated to occur until the homeowner's association's ownership and maintenance of the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work is economically viable. Following completion of the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work, Sunwood shall cause to be maintained the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work until the Recreation Center Property is transferred to the homeowner's association. On or before the completion of the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work, Sunwood will enter into an agreement with the owner of the Recreation Center Property to contribute towards the acquisition, construction and maintenance of the Recreation Center Property and the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work ("Recreation Center Agreement"). Given that other Owners of Phase I (or the Panhandle) shall benefit from the Recreation Center Property, and the Recreation Center Building Pool Work, it is anticipated that other Owners in Phase I (or the Panhandle) also shall enter into Recreation Center Agreements with the owner of the Recreation Center Property. If requested by Sunwood, the City shall assist Sunwood and/or the owner of the Recreation Center Property in requiring the other Owners of Phase I (or the Panhandle) to enter into Recreation Center Agreements and, if necessary, the City shall require such Recreation Center Agreements to be in place prior to the release of building permits to such other Owners. C. Prior to the issuance of the 108th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, Sunwood shall complete or cause to be completed the Nature Trail and Slope Work (defined below) on Planning Area 7A. The "Nature Trail and Slope Work" shall consist of: (i) the work remaining to be completed for only those portions of the nature trail and adjacent landscape areas, as well as the slope, located on Planning Area 7A and which are immediately adjacent to, and along the frontage of Lot 7 of Tract 29353-1, including, without limitation, all permanent utilities, and the deeming of the work complete by the City (with a corresponding transfer of Planning Area 7A to the homeowner's association); and (ii) the submittal to the Director of Planning of a one-year maintenance bond pertaining only to those portions of the nature trail and adjacent landscape areas, as well as the slope, located on Planning Area 7A and which are immediately adjacent to, and along the frontage of Lot 7 of Tract 29353- 1. 105779-00010 988149.19 8 D. Prior to the issuance of the 51st residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, Sunwood shall have commenced or caused the commencement of construction and installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Pourroy Road and Murrieta Hot Springs Road. Prior to the issuance of the 108th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, Sunwood shall have completed or caused the completion of construction and installation of such traffic signal. The City already has caused to be designed the plans and specifications for the traffic signal, as well as the related right-hand and left-hand turn pockets required in connection therewith, and, at Sunwood's request, shall assign and/or make available to Sunwood such plans and specifications to enable Sunwood to pull improvement permits related to the traffic signal without further processing or delay. If Sunwood is the party that proceeds with the installation of the traffic signal work, (i) Sunwood shall bid the traffic signal work in accordance with the bidding and construction requirements of the Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement applicable to public improvements paid for with CFD Bond funds, (ii) the Director of Public Works shall approve the bids for the work, (iii) Sunwood acknowledges that pursuant to the Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement, it shall pay prevailing wages in accordance with Labor Code Section 1720, et seq. for the work, and (iv) as soon as reasonably practicable, but not later than forty-five (45) days, following the City's acceptance of the traffic signal, the City shall reimburse Sunwood for its actual costs of the construction and installation of the traffic signal in accordance with Article V of the Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement. E. Prior to the issuance of any residential building permits within Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, the detention basin located in lot 8 of Tract 29353-1 Planning Area 7B and associated drainage facilities (the "Basin A System") shall be constructed and installed. In the event Sunwood constructs and installs the Basin A System, the City shall enter into a Reimbursement Agreement with Sunwood to allow them to recover from benefiting property owners in the vicinity their pro rata costs of constructing the Basin A System and related improvements. Sunwood will use its reasonable best efforts to join with the owners of Lot 1 of Final Tract Map 29353-1, Tract 29661-2 and Tract 29661-3 to assist in achieving the completion of the construction of the Basin A System. Notwithstanding the foregoing, however, upon approval by the City's Planning Commission of a revised condition of approval pertaining to the construction and installation of temporary or permanent drainage facilities so as to connect the drainage facilities on the Sunwood Property to permanent drainage facilities (the "Revised Drainage Condition"), the following provisions shall apply: The City will allow building permits for lots within the Sunwood Property (whose storm drain runoff drains towards the detention basin and associated drainage facilities located to the south of the Recreation Building (the "Basin B System")), upon the completion of the Basin B System. To the extent Sunwood does not have sufficient title or interest in the real property required for the construction or installation of the Basin B System, Sunwood shall make a good faith effort to acquire the required property in a 105779-00010 988149.19 9 timeframe calculated to meet the obligations of this paragraph. If, following this effort, Sunwood is unable to acquire the required property, Sunwood may request that the City acquire the property pursuant to the provisions of Government Code Section 66462.5. The City shall consider in good faith the acquisition of the required property pursuant to an agreement in accordance with the provisions of Government Code Section 66462.5. Both parties acknowledge and agree that the acquisition of real property in accordance with the California Eminent Domain Law requires more time than the suggested timeframes of Government Code Section 66462.5 allow and therefore, the parties waive these time constraints and the Agreement shall so provide. The parties further acknowledge and agree that the City cannot exercise its power of eminent domain unless and until a Resolution of Necessity has been duly adopted by the City Council pursuant to law. The provisions of this paragraph are neither a commitment nor an announcement of intent by the City to acquire any or all of the property required for construction or installation of the Basin B System. The parties shall enter into an agreement provided for the exercise of this section and the payment by Sunwood of necessary City expenses. F. The final map that subdivides the Sunwood Property into 113 building lots shall have been recorded. The City will not impose any additional requirements to the recording of such final map or the issuance of building permits or occupancy permits for the Sunwood Property except (i) as set forth in the Conditions of Approval described in Recital A above as such conditions have been modified, refined or clarified by the Development Agreement, the Operating Memoranda, or as noted in the Recitals set forth above, and (ii) as set forth or clarified in this Memorandum. G. All other conditions and requirements for the issuance of the requested building permits, including but not limited to Building Codes plan checks, have been fulfilled except for completion of the Phase I Public Improvements (which are being addressed pursuant to the terms and conditions of this Memorandum). 3. ISSUANCE OF 99 BUILDING PERMITS FOR THE BHT PROPERTY. The City shall issue 99 building permits to BHT (for Final Tract Map 29661-2) of the 515 residential building permits for Phase 1 of the Project upon the fulfillment of the following conditions (collectively, the "BHT Property Required Improvements"), without application of force majeure: A. Prior to the issuance of the 108th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, BHT shall complete or cause to be completed the Recreation Center Park Work (defined below) in connection with the private recreation center in Planning Area 5 (the "Recreation Center Property"). The "Recreation Center Park Work" shall consist of the work remaining to be completed on the park portion of the Recreation Center Property (to the reasonable satisfaction of the Director of Planning). B. Prior to the issuance of the 150th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, BHT shall complete or cause to be completed the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work (defined below). The "Recreation Center Building and Pool Work" shall consist of the work remaining to be completed on the building and pool portion of 105779-00010 988149.19 10 the Recreation Center Property (to the reasonable satisfaction of the Director of Planning), but shall not include a transfer to the homeowner's association, which is not anticipated to occur until the homeowner's association's ownership and maintenance of the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work is economically viable. Following completion of the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work, BHT shall cause to be maintained the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work until the Recreation Center Property is transferred to the homeowner's association. On or before the completion of the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work, BHT will enter into an agreement with the owner of the Recreation Center Property to contribute towards the acquisition, construction and maintenance of the Recreation Center Property and the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work ("Recreation Center Agreement"). Given that other Owners of Phase I (or the Panhandle) shall benefit from the Recreation Center Property, and the Recreation Center Building Pool Work, it is anticipated that other Owners in Phase I (or the Panhandle) also shall enter into Recreation Center Agreements with the owner of the Recreation Center Property. If requested by BHT, the City shall assist BHT and/or the owner of the Recreation Center Property in requiring the other Owners of Phase I (or the Panhandle) to enter into Recreation Center Agreements and, if necessary, the City shall require such Recreation Center Agreements to be in place prior to the release of building permits to such other Owners. C. Prior to the issuance of the 108th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, BHT shall complete or cause to be completed the Nature Trail and Slope Work (defined below) on Planning Area 7A. The "Nature Trail and Slope Work" shall consist of: (i) the work remaining to be completed for only those portions of the nature trail and adjacent landscape areas, as well as the slope, located on Planning Area 7A and which are immediately adjacent to, and along the frontage of Tract 29661-2, including, without limitation, all permanent utilities, and the deeming of the work complete by the City (with a corresponding transfer of Planning Area 7A to the homeowner's association); and (ii) the submittal to the Director of Planning of a one-year maintenance bond pertaining only to those portions of the nature trail and adjacent landscape areas, as well as the slope, located on Planning Area 7A and which are immediately adjacent to, and along the frontage of Tract 29661-2. D. Prior to the issuance of the 51st residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, BHT shall have commenced or caused the commencement of construction and installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Pourroy Road and Murrieta Hot Springs Road. Prior to the issuance of the 108th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, BHT shall have completed or caused the completion of construction and installation of such traffic signal. The City already has caused to be designed the plans and specifications for the traffic signal, as well as the related right-hand and left-hand turn pockets required in connection therewith, and at BHT's request, shall assign and/or make available to BHT such plans and specifications to enable BHT to pull improvement permits related to the traffic signal without further processing or delay. If BHT is the party that proceeds with the installation of the traffic signal work, (i) BHT shall bid the traffic signal work in accordance with the bidding and construction requirements of the Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement applicable to public improvements paid for with CFD Bond funds, (ii) the Director of Public Works shall approve the bids for the work, (iii) BHT acknowledges that pursuant to the 105779-00010 988149.19 11 Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement, it shall pay prevailing wages in accordance with Labor Code Section 1720, et seq. for the work, and (iv) as soon as reasonably practicable, but not later than forty-five (45) days, following the City's acceptance of the traffic signal, the City shall reimburse BHT for its actual costs of the construction and installation of the traffic signal in accordance with Article V of the Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement. E. Prior to the issuance of any residential building permits within Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, the Basin A System shall be constructed and installed. In the event BHT constructs and installs the Basin A System, the City shall enter into a Reimbursement Agreement with BHT to allow them to recover from benefiting property owners in the vicinity their pro rata costs of constructing the Basin A System and related improvements. BHT will use its reasonable best efforts to join with the owners of Lot 1 of Tract Map 29353-1 and of Tract 29661-3 and complete the construction and share in the costs of the Basin A System. The City will assist BHT with completing the cost sharing agreement for the Basin A System. To the extent BHT does not have sufficient title or interest in the real property required for the construction or installation of the Basin A System, BHT shall make a good faith effort to acquire the required property in a timeframe calculated to meet the obligations of this paragraph. If, following this effort, BHT is unable to acquire the required property, BHT may request that the City acquire the property pursuant to the provisions of Government Code Section 66462.5. The City shall consider in good faith the acquisition of the required property pursuant to an agreement in accordance with the provisions of Government Code Section 66462.5. Both parties acknowledge and agree that the acquisition of real property in accordance with the California Eminent Domain Law requires more time than the suggested timeframes of Government Code Section 66462.5 allow and therefore, the parties waive these time constraints and the Agreement shall so provide. The parties further acknowledge and agree that the City cannot exercise its power of eminent domain unless and until a Resolution of Necessity has been duly adopted by the City Council pursuant to law. The provisions of this paragraph are neither a commitment nor an announcement of intent by the City to acquire any or all of the property required for construction or installation of the Basin A System. The parties shall enter into an agreement provided for the exercise of this section and the payment by BHT of necessary City expenses. F. All other conditions and requirements for the issuance of the requested building permits, including but not limited to Building Codes plan checks, have been fulfilled except for completion of the Phase I Public Improvements (which are being addressed pursuant to the terms and conditions of this Memorandum). 4. ISSUANCE OF 98 BUILDING PERMITS FOR THE WINGSWEEP PROPERTY. The City shall issue 98 building permits to Wingsweep (for Lot 1 of Final Tract Map 29353-1) of the 515 residential building permits for Phase 1 of the Project upon the fulfillment of the following conditions (collectively, the "Wingsweep Property Required Improvements"), without application of force majeure: 105779-00010 988149.19 12 A. Prior to the issuance of the 108th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, Wingsweep shall complete or cause to be completed the Recreation Center Park Work (defined below) in connection with the private recreation center in Planning Area 5 (the "Recreation Center Property"). The "Recreation Center Park Work" shall consist of the work remaining to be completed on the park portion of the Recreation Center Property (to the reasonable satisfaction of the Director of Planning). B. Prior to the issuance of the 150th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, Wingsweep shall complete or cause to be completed the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work (defined below). The "Recreation Center Building and Pool Work" shall consist of the work remaining to be completed on the building and pool portion of the Recreation Center Property (to the reasonable satisfaction of the Director of Planning), but shall not include a transfer to the homeowner's association, which is not anticipated to occur until the homeowner's association's ownership and maintenance of the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work is economically viable. Following completion of the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work, Wingsweep shall cause to be maintained the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work until the Recreation Center Property is transferred to the homeowner's association. On or before the completion of the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work, Wingsweep will enter into an agreement with the owner of the Recreation Center Property to contribute towards the acquisition, construction and maintenance of the Recreation Center Property and the Recreation Center Building and Pool Work ("Recreation Center Agreement"). Given that other Owners of Phase I (or the Panhandle) shall benefit from the Recreation Center Property, and the Recreation Center Building Pool Work, it is anticipated that other Owners in Phase I (or the Panhandle) also shall enter into Recreation Center Agreements with the owner of the Recreation Center Property. If requested by Wingsweep, the City shall assist Wingsweep and/or the owner of the Recreation Center Property in requiring the other Owners of Phase I (or the Panhandle) to enter into Recreation Center Agreements and, if necessary, the City shall require such Recreation Center Agreements to be in place prior to the release of building permits to such other Owners. C. Prior to the issuance of the 108th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, Wingsweep shall complete or cause to be completed the Nature Trail and Slope Work (defined below) on Planning Area 7A. The "Nature Trail and Slope Work" shall consist of: (i) the work remaining to be completed for only those portions of the nature trail and adjacent landscape areas, as well as the slope, located on Planning Area 7A and which are immediately adjacent to, and along the frontage of Lot 1 of Final Tract Map 29353-1, including, without limitation, all permanent utilities, and the deeming of the work complete by the City (with a corresponding transfer of Planning Area 7A to the homeowner's association); and (ii) the submittal to the Director of Planning of a one-year maintenance bond pertaining only to those portions of the nature trail and adjacent landscape areas, as well as the slope, located on Planning Area 7A and which are immediately adjacent to, and along the frontage of Lot 1 of Final Tract Map 29353-1. 105779-00010 988149.19 13 D. Prior to the issuance of the 51st residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, Wingsweep shall have commenced or caused the commencement of construction and installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Pourroy Road and Murrieta Hot Springs Road. Prior to the issuance of the 108th residential building permit in Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, Wingsweep shall have completed or caused the completion of construction and installation of such traffic signal. The City already has caused to be designed the plans and specifications for the traffic signal, as well as the related right-hand and left-hand turn pockets required in connection therewith, and at Wingsweep's request, shall assign and/or make available to Wingsweep such plans and specifications to enable Wingsweep to pull improvement permits related to the traffic signal without further processing or delay. If Wingsweep is the party that proceeds with the installation of the traffic signal work, (i) Wingsweep shall bid the traffic signal work in accordance with the bidding and construction requirements of the Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement applicable to public improvements paid for with CFD Bond funds, (ii) the Director of Public Works shall approve the bids for the work, (iii) Wingsweep acknowledges that pursuant to the Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement, it shall pay prevailing wages in accordance with Labor Code Section 1720, et seq. for the work, and (iv) as soon as reasonably practicable, but not later than forty-five (45) days, following the City's acceptance of the traffic signal, the City shall reimburse Wingsweep for its actual costs of the construction and installation of the traffic signal in accordance with Article V of the Amended and Restated Acquisition Agreement. E. Prior to the issuance of any residential building permits within Phase 1 of the Roripaugh Ranch Project, the Basin A System shall be constructed and installed. In the event Wingsweep constructs and installs the Basin A System, the City shall enter into a Reimbursement Agreement with Wingsweep to allow them to recover from benefiting property owners in the vicinity their pro rata costs of constructing the Basin A System and related improvements. Wingsweep will use its reasonable best efforts to join with the owners of Tracts 29661-2 and 29661-3 and complete the construction and share in the costs of the Basin A System. The City will assist Wingsweep with completing the cost sharing agreement for the Basin A System. To the extent Wingsweep does not have sufficient title or interest in the real property required for the construction or installation of the Basin A System, Wingsweep shall make a good faith effort to acquire the required property in a timeframe calculated to meet the obligations of this paragraph. If, following this effort, Wingsweep is unable to acquire the required property, Wingsweep may request that the City acquire the property pursuant to the provisions of Government Code Section 66462.5. The City shall consider in good faith the acquisition of the required property pursuant to an agreement in accordance with the provisions of Government Code Section 66462.5. Both parties acknowledge and agree that the acquisition of real property in accordance with the California Eminent Domain Law requires more time than the suggested timeframes of Government Code Section 66462.5 allow and therefore, the parties waive these time constraints and the Agreement shall so provide. The parties further acknowledge and agree that the City cannot exercise its power of eminent domain unless and until a Resolution of Necessity has been duly adopted by the City Council pursuant to law. The provisions of this paragraph are neither a commitment nor an announcement of intent by the City to acquire any or all of the property required for construction or installation of the Basin A 105779-00010 988149.19 14 System. The parties shall enter into an agreement provided for the exercise of this section and the payment by Wingsweep of necessary City expenses. F. The final map that subdivides the Wingsweep Property into 98 building lots shall have been recorded. The City will not impose any additional requirements to the recording of such final map or the issuance of building permits or occupancy permits for the Wingsweep Property except (i) as set forth in the Conditions of Approval described in Recital A above as such conditions have been modified, refined or clarified by the Development Agreement, the Operating Memoranda, or as noted in the Recitals set forth above, and (ii) as set forth or clarified in this Memorandum. G. All other conditions and requirements for the issuance of the requested building permits, including but not limited to Building Codes plan checks, have been fulfilled except for completion of the Phase I Public Improvements (which are being addressed pursuant to the terms and conditions of this Memorandum). 5. FEE CREDITS FOR PROPERTY. A. DIF Credits. 1. General. Section 4.1.1 of the Development Agreement governs the means by which the City's Development Impact Fees ("DIF") are collected and accounted for as regards the Project and the conditions under which DIF credits are available. 2. Street Improvement DIF Component. In accordance with Section 4.1.1.1. of the Development Agreement, the City will provide a 100% DIF credit for the street improvement DIF component, and thus not require cash payment to the City from Sunwood or BHT or Wingsweep for this component. 3. Traffic Signal DIF Component. In accordance with Section 4.1.1.2. of the Development Agreement, the City will provide a 100% DIF credit for the traffic signal DIF component, and thus not require cash payment to the City from Sunwood or BHT or Wingsweep for this component. 4. Library and Corporate Facilities DIF Component. No credit for the library and corporate facilities DIF component described in Section 4.1.1.3. of the Development Agreement shall be allowed and Sunwood, BHT and Wingsweep shall each pay the applicable DIF for this component with respect to their respective properties. 5. Fire Service Improvements DIF Component. In accordance with Section 4.1.1.4, the City will provide a 100% DIF credit for the fire service improvements DIF component, and thus not require cash payment to the City from Sunwood or BHT or Wingsweep for this component. 6. Park and Recreation DIF Component. No credit for the park and recreation DIF component described in Section 4.1.1.5. of the Development Agreement shall be 105779-00010 988149.19 15 allowed and Sunwood, BHT and Wingsweep shall each pay the applicable DIF for this component with respect to their respective properties; provided however, that the City shall refund to such party the park and recreation DIF actually paid to the City, without interest, as soon as reasonably practical, but not later than forty-five days following the City's acceptance of the (1) 5.1 acre Neighborhood Park (Planning Area 6) as described in Section 4.1.1.5b. of the Development Agreement, and (2) street and right of way improvements as described in Section 4.1.1.5c. of the Development Agreement. B. TUMF Credits. 1. City, Developer, other Owners and the Western Riverside County Council of Governments, a joint powers agency and council of governments organized under the laws of the State of California entered into that certain "Roripaugh Ranch Project Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Program Improvement and Credit Agreement dated as of February 28, 2006 (the "TUMF Credit Agreement"). 2. Pursuant to the TUMF Credit Agreement it is anticipated that the construction of TUMF Improvements contemplated therein will substantially exceed the TUMF obligations of the Owners and, therefore, Sunwood, BHT and Wingsweep shall not be obligated to pay TUMF fees in connection with their residential building permits for their properties referenced above. C. Quimby Fees. In accordance with Section 412, of the Development Agreement, the City will provide a 100% credit for Sunwood's, BHT's and Wingsweep's proportionate share of the fees required by Section 16.33 of the City's Subdivision Ordinance ("Quimby Fees") for the Property, and thus neither Sunwood nor BHT nor Wingsweep shall be required to pay Quimby Fees for the residential building permits for the their properties referenced above. D. Development Agreement Fee. This fee was paid by Developer at the time of the issuance of the Bonds and, therefore, neither Sunwood nor BHT nor Wingsweep shall be required to pay this fee. E. Public Art, Open Space and Habitat Preservation Fee. Sunwood, BHT and Wingsweep shall each be required to pay the fees described in Section 4.1.4.b. of the Development Agreement. The fee described in Section 4.1.4.a. of the Development Agreement has been fully satisfied and is not required to be paid. F. Transit Contributions. Sunwood, BHT and Wingsweep shall each pay its fair share of the Transit Contribution in accordance with Section 4.1.5 of the Development Agreement. Sunwood's fair share of the Transit Contribution for Lot 7 of Tract 29353-1 shall be in the amount of $19,427 (or $300,000 multiplied by a fraction the numerator of which is the 113 lots within Lot 7 of Tract 29353-1 and the denominator is the 1,745 residential units allowed to be constructed in the Roripaugh Ranch Project), and shall be paid in full prior to the issuance of the first residential building permit in Lot 7 of Tract 29353-1. BHT's fair share of the Transit Contribution for Tract 29661-2 shall be in the amount of $17,020 (based on the same formula 105779-00010 988149.19 16 and the 99 lots contained in Tract 29661-2), and shall be paid in full prior to the issuance of the first residential building permit in Tract 29661-2. Wingsweep's fair share of the Transit Contribution for Lot 1 of Final Tract Map 29353-1 shall be in the amount of $16,848 (based on the same formula and the 98 lots contained in Lot 1 of Final Tract Map 29353-1), and shall be paid in full prior to the issuance of the first residential building permit in Lot 1 of Final Tract Map 29353-1. G. MSHCP. The Development Agreement was approved prior to the adoption of the City's Multispecies Habitat Conservation requirements in Chapter 15.10 of the Temecula Municipal Code and, therefore, neither Sunwood nor BHT is required to pay the MSHCP fee otherwise required by Chapter 15.10. 6. TERM OF DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT. The Development Agreement provides that it shall continue for a ten (10) year term from the Commencement Date unless terminated pursuant to the terms of the Development Agreement. The Commencement Date is defined in the Development Agreement as the date of the issuance of the first building permit within the Project or the one year anniversary date of the Effective Date, whichever occurs first. The Effective Date is defined as the date the Authorizing Ordinance becomes effective, which is the thirty first (31st) day after the second reading of the Authorizing Ordinance. As a matter of clarification, City and the Tract Owners acknowledge and agree that a building permit for the clubhouse was issued November 25, 2003, the second reading of the Authorizing Ordinance occurred December 17, 2002, and as a result of the above, the term of the Development Agreement continues through November 25, 2013. 7. LEGAL REMEDIES; RELEASE OF CLAIMS A. The Tract Owners' sole remedy in the event of a breach of this Memorandum by City shall be specific performance, declaratory relief; writ of mandate, or similar remedies to compel City's compliance with the terms of this Memorandum. Due to the size, nature and scope of the Project, it may not be practical or possible to restore the Property to its natural condition once implementation of this Memorandum has begun. After such implementation, such Tract Owner may be foreclosed from other choices it may have had to utilize the Property and provide for other benefits. City acknowledges that each Tract Owner has already invested significant time and resources and performed extensive planning and processing of the Project in agreeing to the terms of this Memorandum and will be investing even more significant time and resources in implementing the Project in reliance upon the terms of this Memorandum, and it may not be possible to determine the sum of money which would adequately compensate such Tract Owner for such efforts. For the above reason, the City and the Tract Owners agree that damages may not be an adequate remedy if the City fails to carry out its obligations under this Memorandum and that such Tract Owner's sole legal or equitable remedy shall be the right to seek and obtain specific performance, declaratory relief, writ of mandate, or similar remedies to compel City's compliance with the terms of this Memorandum as a remedy for any breach of this Memorandum or the unlawful failure to issue building permits for Phase I of the Project and that specific performance, declaratory relief, writ of mandate, or similar remedies to compel City's compliance with the terms of this Memorandum are available remedies in the event a Tract Owner establishes City's breach of this Memorandum or the 105779-00010 988149.19 17 unlawful failure to issue building permits for Phase I of the Project. Any such action shall be filed in the appropriate court within one (1) year from the date of the action by the City that is being challenged. B. No Tract Owner shall retain the right to seek, and hereby expressly waives, the right to seek damages against City, its elected and appointed officials, agents, contractors and attorneys for any action or failure to act under this Memorandum. C. City shall have all legal and equitable remedies available to it, provided City shall not file any such action until twenty (20) days following notice to the affected Tract Owner of the alleged breach or other problem, except for such filings as may be necessary to preserve any applicable statute of limitations. During such 20 -day period the parties shall meet and confer in good faith in an attempt to resolve the dispute. D. Except as provided in Section 2 of this Memorandum, no Tract Owner shall be deemed to be in default, subject to the provisions of this section, where failure or delay in performance of any of its obligations under this Memorandum is caused by floods, earthquakes, rain, fires, wars, riots or similar hostilities, beyond such Tract Owner's control, but for no other causes ("force majeure"). If a Tract Owner claims force majeure pursuant to this section, the Tract Owner shall notify the City within five (5) business days of the event. The cumulative days allowed for force majeure relief under this Memorandum with respect to any Tract Owner shall be a maximum of forty-five (45) days. E. In consideration of the promise of the parties specified in this Memorandum and the need for the Tract Owners to obtain the early release of the Phase 1 building permits in order to facilitate the sale of the 113 lots of Phase I in the Sunwood Property, the 99 lots in the BHT Property and the 98 lots in the Wingsweep Property to a merchant builder, each such Tract Owner shall fully and forever release, acquit, and discharge the City, Temecula Public Financing Authority, their officers, elected officials, attorneys, agent, servants, representatives, and employees ("Release Party") of and from any and all past, present, or future claims, demand, obligations, actions, causes of action for monetary damages or for relief by way of a writ of mandate for costs, losses of service, expenses, liability, attorney fees, suits, and compensation of any nature whatsoever, except for injunctive or declaratory relief or specific performance, whether based on tort, contract, or other theory of recovery, known or unknown, that they now have, have had, asserted or could have asserted because of any event, act, error or omission occurring up to and including the date of this Memorandum relating to the Specific Plan, Development Agreement, Deferral Agreement, First, Second, Third Operating, and Fourth Operating Memoranda, the land use entitlements for the Roripaugh Ranch Project, the Bonds, or otherwise relate to the alleged actions or inactions of the Indemnified Parties with respect to the Roripaugh Ranch Project or the Bonds. The foregoing release shall not affect any rights, duties, or obligations arising under this Memorandum or arising in the future under any agreement between the parties thereto, subject to the terms of those agreements or an action to compel the Authority to release the proceeds of the Bonds pursuant to the terms of the Acquisition Agreement. Each Tract Owner acknowledges that it is familiar with Section 1542 of the California Civil Code which provides: 105779-00010 988149.19 18 "A general release does not extend to claims which a creditor does not know or suspect to exist in his favor at the time of executing the release, which if known by him must have materially affected his settlement with the debtor." Each Tract Owner being aware of the aforesaid code section, hereby expressly waives any rights it might have hereunder with respect to the release described in this Section. F. Any legal action hereunder shall be heard by way of a reference from the Riverside County Superior Court pursuant to the reference procedures of the California Code of Civil Procedure Sections 638, et seq. The affected Tract Owner and the City shall agree upon a single referee who shall then try all issues, whether of fact or law, and report a finding and judgment thereon and issue all legal and equitable relief appropriate under the circumstances of the controversy before him. If the parties are unable to agree on a referee within ten (10) days of a written request to do so by either party hereto, either party may seek to have one appointed pursuant to the California Code of Civil Procedure Section 640. The cost of such proceeding shall be initially be borne equally by the parties. Any referee selection pursuant to this Section shall be considered a temporary judge appointed pursuant to Article 6, Section 21 of the California Constitution. G. If legal action is brought by any party against another for breach of this Memorandum or to compel performance under this Memorandum, the prevailing party shall be entitled to an award of its costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, and shall also be entitled to recover its contribution for the costs of the referee referred to in this Section as an item of recoverable costs. 8. GENERAL PROVISIONS A. Pursuant to Section 3.5.5 of the Development Agreement, this Memorandum shall be attached to the Development Agreement as an addendum and thereafter become a part of the Development Agreement. B. As part of the Development Agreement, this Memorandum shall bind and inure to the benefit of the parties' successors, transferees and assignees to the same extent as the original Development Agreement. This Memorandum shall be recorded in order to ensure that subsequent owners of the Property are bound hereby. The parties agree that recordation is proper as a conveyance restriction under Government Code §27281.5. C. In entering into this Memorandum, the parties represent that they have relied upon the legal advice of their attorneys, who are the attorneys of their own choice, and that these terms are fully undertaken and voluntary accepted by them. The parties further represent that they have no questions with regard to the legal import of any term, work phrase, or portion of this Memorandum, or the Memorandum in its entirety, and accept the terms of this Memorandum as written. 105779-00010 988149.19 19 D. Each Tract Owner on behalf of itself and its successors and assigns, acknowledges and agrees that this Memorandum is valid, lawful, and binding upon it and its successors and assigns. E. Memorandum constitutes the entire agreement between the parties with respect to the subject matter hereof, and this Memorandum supersedes all previous negotiations, discussion, and agreement between the parties to this Memorandum with respect to its terms, and no prior evidence of any prior or other agreement shall be permitted to contradict or vary the terms hereof, except for the Development Agreement Specific Plan, the land use entitlements for the Roripaugh Ranch Specific Plan, and the First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Operating Memoranda. F. Except for the terms specifically set forth in this Memorandum clarifying and modifying the terms of the Development Agreement and Specific Plan, all other terms and conditions of the Development Agreement and the Specific Plan, shall remain in full force and effect. G. The recitals set forth above are true and correct and are incorporated hereby this reference. H. The City agrees that representatives of the City and representatives of the each Tract Owner will meet as frequently as reasonably necessary to discuss the status of the construction of the infrastructure and improvements and any problems encountered or anticipated with respect thereto. I. Each Tract Owner warrants and represents to the City that it has obtained all required third party approvals of this Memorandum with respect to its execution of this Memorandum. J. This Memorandum shall not be effective and shall not be recorded until such time as all persons with an interest in the Property, or holding a deed of trust in the Property or a portion of the Property, have duly executed a Consent and Subordination in a form reasonably acceptable to the City Attorney. Each Tract Owner warrants and represents to the City that there are no deeds of trust, or other similar financing documentation, encumbering all or any part of its property. K. The following Exhibits are attached to this Memorandum and incorporated herein as though set forth in full: Exhibit A-1 Exhibit A-2 Exhibit A-3 Legal Description of Sunwood Property Legal Description of BHT Property Legal Description of Wingsweep Property L. Except as otherwise expressly provided by law, any and all notice or other communications required or permitted by this Memorandum or by law to be served on or give to a party to this Memorandum by another party shall be in writing and shall be deemed duly served and given when personally delivered to the party to whom it is directed or to any officer of that 105779-00010 988149.19 20 party, or, in lieu of personal service, on the third business day following deposit in the United States mail, Certified, postage prepaid, addressed to: 105779-00010 988149.19 21 To Sunwood: Sunwood Roripaugh Ranch LLC 2600 Laning Road San Diego, CA 92106 Attention: Mr. Donald R. Faye With Copy to: Higgs, Fletcher & Mack, LLP 401 West "A" Street, Suite 2600 San Diego, CA 92101 Attention: Tim Waters, Esq. To BHT: BHT - Roripaugh WB99, LLC 400 Continental Boulevard, Suite 450 El Segundo, CA 90245 Attention: Mr. Stephen Hester To Wingsweep: Wingsweep Corporation c/o UNICOM Systems, Inc. 15535 San Fernando Mission Boulevard Suite 310 Mission Hills, CA 91345 Attention: Mr. Corry Hong To City: 105779-00010 988149.19 City of Temecula 41000 Main Street Post Office Box 9033 Temecula, California 92589-9033 Attention: City Manager (signatures on next pages) 22 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, City and the Tract Owners have signed and entered into this Memorandum as of the day and year first above written. 105779-00010 988149.19 CITY OF TEMECULA Ron Roberts Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: Peter M. Thorson City Attorney Tract Owners: SUNWOOD RORIPAUGH RANCH LLC A Delaware Limited Liability Company By: SUNWOOD AND ASSOCIATES a Delaware limited liability company, Its: Manager 23 By: Name: Title: By: Name: Title: 105779-00010 988149.19 BHT - RORIPAUGH WB99, LLC A Delaware Limited Liability Company By: Name: Title: By: Name: Title: WINGSWEEP Corporation A California Corporation By: Name: Title: By: Name: Title: 24 EXHIBIT "A-1" LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF SUNWOOD PROPERTY All that certain real property situated in the County of Riverside, State of California, described as follows: Lot 7 of Tract No. 29353-1, in the City of Temecula, as shown on map recorded in Book 334, Pages 21 to 24 inclusive of Maps, in the office of the County Recorder of said County. EXHIBIT "A-2" LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF BHT PROPERTY All that certain real property situated in the County of Riverside, State of California, described as follows: Lots 1 through 100, inclusive, and Lots A through I, of TRACT NO. 29661-2, in the City of Temecula, County of Riverside, State of California, as shown my map on file in Book 355 Pages 5 through 8, inclusive, of Maps, Records of Riverside County, California. EXHIBIT "A-3" LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF WINGSWEEP PROPERTY All that certain real property situated in the County of Riverside, State of California, described as follows: Lot 1 of Tract No. 29353-1, in the City of Temecula, as shown on map recorded in Book 334, Pages 21 to 24 inclusive of Maps, in the office of the County Recorder of said County. EXHIBIT A-4 DEPICTION OF SUNWOOD PROPERTY, BHT PROPERTY AND WINGSWEEP PROPERTY (see attached page) Item No. 6 CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Sean Dakin, Fire Marshal DATE: January 25, 2011 SUBJECT: Second Amendment to the Agreement with Proactive Fire Design & Consulting, Inc. RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council approve the Second Amendment with ProActive Fire Design & Consulting, Inc. for an additional amount of $29,000.00 to increase the existing contract amount to $59,000.00. BACKGROUND: On July 1, 2010, the City Manager approved an agreement for $30,000.00 with ProActive Fire Design & Consulting, a fire protection consulting company that performs plan check service for the Fire Department on an as needed basis. Plan check service is utilized when fire prevention staff experiences an increased level of applications that exceed their ability to process plan submittals within acceptable timeframes. The Fire Department went through the formal RFP process in May of 2010 and received several responses/proposals for service. The panel reviewed all proposals and chose two companies, Proactive Fire Design & Consulting, Inc. and Broadspec, Inc. The City entered into agreements with both companies based upon the panel's recommendation. On November 8, 2010, Broadspec stated that their fee for service must be increased from 40% of the fire plan check fee to 80%, or have their agreement terminated. Staff determined that a 40% increase in Broadspecs fee is not fiscally minded and chose to terminate the agreement. Due to the termination of Broadspec's agreement, there has been a significant increase in plan reviews sent to Proactive Fire Design. It is now necessary to increase the agreement for service from $30,000.00 to $59,000.00 through June 30, 2011. The additional funds will allow us to provide quality customer service and effectiveness through the end of the fiscal year. The increase is currently budgeted in the 2010/2011 operating budget and is available through the termination of Broadspec's agreement. FISCAL IMPACT: Adequate funds are available in the current fiscal year 2010/2011 Fire Operating Budget. ATTACHMENTS: Contract Amendment SECOND AMENDMENT TO AGREEMENT BETWEEN CITY OF TEMECULA AND PROACTIVE FIRE DESIGN & CONSULTING, INC. FIRE DEPARTMENT PLAN REVIEW SERVICE THIS SECOND AMENDMENT is made and entered into as of January 25, 2011 by and between the City of Temecula , a municipal corporation (hereinafter referred to as "City"), and Proactive Fire Design & Consulting, Inc., a Corporation (hereinafter referred to as "Consultant"). In consideration of the mutual covenants and conditions set forth herein, the parties agree as follows: 1. This Amendment is made with the respect to the following facts and purposes: a. On July 1, 2010, the City and Consultant entered into that certain Agreement entitled "Agreement for Fire Department Plan Review Service", in the amount of $30,000.00. b. On August 4, 2010, the City and Consultant entered into the First Amendment entitled "Agreement for Fire Department Plan Review Service", to remove paragraph 4, the Prevailing Wages section from the agreement and to clarify paragraph 5, the Payment section to read correctly. c. The parties now desire to increase the payment for services in the amount of Twenty Nine Thousand Dollars and No Cents ($29,000.00), as well as, revise the Written Notice section to notify Consultant of the Temecula City Hall address change effective date, and amend the Agreement as set forth in this Amendment. 2. Section 4. of the Agreement entitled "PAYMENT" at paragraph "a" is hereby amended to read as follows: "The City agrees to pay Consultant monthly, in accordance with the payment rates and schedules and terms set forth in Exhibit B, Payment Rates and Schedule, attached hereto and incorporated herein by this reference as though set forth in full, based upon actual time spent on the above tasks. Any terms in Exhibit B, other than the payment rates and schedule of payment, are null and void. The Second Amendment amount shall not exceed Twenty Nine Thousand Dollars and No Cents ($29,000.00) for additional Fire Department Plan Review Service for a total Agreement amount of Fifty Nine Thousand Dollars and no Cents ($59,000.00)." 3. Section 13 of the Agreement entitled "WRITTEN NOTICE" is hereby amended to read as follows: 1 "Any notices which either party may desire to give to the other party under this Agreement must be in writing and may be given either by (i) personal service, (11) delivery by a reputable document delivery service, such as but not limited to, Federal Express, that provides a receipt showing date and time of delivery, or (iii) mailing in the United States Mail, certified mail, postage prepaid, return receipt requested, addressed to the address of the party as set forth below or at any other address as that party may later designate by Notice. Notice shall be effective upon delivery to the addresses specified below or on the third business day following deposit with the document delivery service or United States Mail as provided above. Mailing Address: City of Temecula Attn: City Manager P.O. Box 9033 Temecula, CA 92589-9033 Use this Address for a Delivery Service: City of Temecula or Hand -Deliveries ONLY Attn: City Manager 41000 Main Street Temecula, CA 92590 4. Except for the changes specifically set forth herein, all other terms and conditions of the Agreement shall remain in full force and effect. 2 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed the day and year first above written. CITY OF TEMECULA PROACTIVE FIRE DESIGN & CONSULTING, INC. (Two Signatures of corporate officers required unless corporate documents authorize only one person to sign the agreement on behalf of the corporation.) By: By: Ron Roberts, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: By: Don Walton, President Jo Marie Walton, Secretary Peter M. Thorson, City Attorney CONSULTANT Proactive Fire Design, Inc Don Walton, President 45686 Hopactong Street 951-695-3539 Proactive.fd@verizon.net FSM Initials: Date: 0/0/70 3 Item No. 7 CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Grant Yates, Deputy City Manager DATE: January 25, 2011 SUBJECT: 5 -Year Agreement for Animal Control and Sheltering Services Between the City of Temecula and Animal Friends of the Valleys (aka L.E.A.F.) PREPARED BY: Tamra Irwin, Senior Management Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council: 1. Approve the five year Agreement for Animal Control and Sheltering Services between the City of Temecula and Animal Friends of the Valleys at a cost of $247,500 annually. 2. Authorize the City Manager to approve additional service not to exceed $30,000 annually. BACKGROUND: The City of Temecula has contracted with Animal Friends of the Valleys, formerly L.E.A.F., since 1995 for animal control services. Animal Friends of the Valleys has performed very well during this period, and City staff, including the Police Department has been very satisfied with the services they provide. On April 24, 2005, the City Council approved Temecula's participation in a Joint Powers Authority referred to as the Southwest Communities Financing Authority (SCFA). The member agencies of the SCFA include the Cities of Temecula, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Canyon Lake and the County of Riverside. The express purpose of the JPA is to fund and construct an animal shelter, located in Wildomar, that will serve the region. The construction of the Southwest Communities Shelter was completed in September 2010, and the grand opening was held in October. The Southwest Communities Financing Authority Joint Powers Authority contracts with Animal Friends of the Valleys for shelter operations at the new animal shelter. Services include vaccination clinics, adoption clinics, impoundment of stray animals, licensing, and food, shelter and care for animals that have been lost, abandoned, or surrendered by their owners. The cost to the SCFA for the Operations Agreement is estimated to be $868,784 per year. The cost per agency has been determined by the percentage of use by each member agency. Temecula's share of the shelter operation equates to $10,625 per month in FY 10-11 with actual costs to be reconciled at the end of each year. The total compensation to Animal Friends of the Valley includes monthly shelter operation costs in the amount of $10,625 and animal control services monthly costs of $10,000, for a total monthly amount of $20,625 for FY 2010-11. These rates are based on the estimated shelter budget. There will be a final adjustment on the last shelter invoice based on actual shelter expenditures to true up the shelter payment. The annual sheltering costs are set based on Temecula animal counts. The updated sheltering rates wil be presented to the City Council in May of each year once they are approved by the SCFA JPA board. This process will ensure the City Council is aware of Temecula's annual contributions, which will also be adopted as part of the annual Operating Budget. FISCAL IMPACT: All costs associated with this contract in Fiscal Year 2010-11 have been included in the Operating Budget and future costs will be budgeted accordingly in future Fiscal Years. ATTACHMENTS: Agreement For Animal Control and Sheltering Services Between the City of Temecula and Animal Friends of the Valleys (aka L.E.A.F.) AGREEMENT FOR ANIMAL CONTROL AND SHELTERING SERVICES BETWEEN THE CITY OF TEMECULA AND ANIMAL FRIENDS OF THE VALLEYS (aka L.E.A.F.) THIS AGREEMENT is made and effective as of January 1, 2011 between the City of Temecula, a municipal corporation ("City") and Animal Friends of the Valleys ("Contractor"). In consideration of the mutual covenants and conditions set forth herein, the parties agree as follows: 1. TERM. This Agreement shall commence on January 1, 2011, and shall remain and continue in effect until tasks described herein are completed, but in no event later than June 30, 2016, unless sooner terminated pursuant to the provisions of this Agreement. 2. SERVICES. Contractor shall perform the services and tasks described and set forth in Exhibit A, attached hereto and incorporated herein as though set forth in full. Contractor shall complete the tasks according to the schedule of performance which is also set forth in Exhibit A. 3. PERFORMANCE. Contractor shall at all time faithfully, competently and to the best of his or her ability, experience, and talent, perform all tasks described herein. Contractor shall employ, at a minimum, generally accepted standards and practices utilized by persons engaged in providing similar services as are required of Contractor hereunder in meeting its obligations under this Agreement. 4. PAYMENT. a. The City agrees to pay Contractor monthly, in accordance with the payment rates and terms and the schedule of payment as set forth in Exhibit B, Payment Schedule for Animal Control Services, and Exhibit C Payment Schedule for Sheltering Services attached hereto and incorporated herein by this reference as though set forth in full, based upon actual time spent on the above tasks. Any terms in Exhibit B and C other than the payment rates and schedule of payment are null and void. The animal control services amount shall not exceed Ten Thousand Dollars and No Cents ($10,000.00) per month and One Hundred Twenty Thousand Dollars and No Cents ($120,000.00) annually unless additional payment is approved as provided in this Agreement. Exhibit C is based on the number of animals housed in the shelter annually. The current amount is for Ten Thousand and Six Hundred Twenty Five Dollars and No Cents ($10,625.00) per month for sheltering services and One Hundred Twenty seven Thousand Five Hundred Dollars and No Cents ($127,500.00) annually. Staff will amend this Exhibit to the City Council annually in May for final spending authorization. These amounts are dependent upon the number of animals housed in the shelter allocated to the City of Temecula and are subject to change. b. Contractor shall not be compensated for any services rendered in connection with its performance of this Agreement which are in addition to those set forth herein, unless such additional services are authorized in advance and in writing by the City Manager. Contractor shall be compensated for any additional services in the amounts and in the manner as agreed to by City Manager and Contractor at the time City's written authorization is given to Contractor for the performance of said services. The City Manager may approve additional work up to Thirty Thousand Dollars and No Cents ($30,000.00) annually. Any additional work in excess of this amount shall be approved by the City Council. c. Contractor will submit invoices monthly for the contract amount as described in Section 4a. Invoices shall be submitted between the first and fifteenth business day of each month, for services provided in the previous month. Payment shall be made within 1 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx thirty (30) days of receipt of each invoice as to all non -disputed fees. If the City disputes any of contractor's fees it shall give written notice to Contractor within 30 days of receipt of an invoice of any disputed fees set forth on the invoice. 5. SUSPENSION OR TERMINATION OF AGREEMENT WITHOUT CAUSE. a. The City may at any time, for any reason, with or without cause, suspend or terminate this Agreement, or any portion hereof, by serving upon the contractor at least ten (10) days prior written notice. Upon receipt of said notice, the Contractor shall immediately cease all work under this Agreement, unless the notice provides otherwise. If the City suspends or terminates a portion of this Agreement such suspension or termination shall not make void or invalidate the remainder of this Agreement. b. In the event this Agreement is terminated pursuant to this Section, the City shall pay to Contractor the actual value of the work performed up to the time of termination, provided that the work performed is of value to the City. Upon termination of the Agreement pursuant to this Section, the Contractor will submit an invoice to the City pursuant to Section 4. 6. DEFAULT OF CONTRACTOR. a. The Contractor's failure to comply with the provisions of this Agreement shall constitute a default. In the event that Contractor is in default for cause under the terms of this Agreement, City shall have no obligation or duty to continue compensating Contractor for any work performed after the date of default and can terminate this Agreement immediately by written notice to the Contractor. If such failure by the Contractor to make progress in the performance of work hereunder arises out of causes beyond the Contractor's control, and without fault or negligence of the Contractor, it shall not be considered a default. b. If the City Manager or his delegate determines that the Contractor is in default in the performance of any of the terms or conditions of this Agreement, it shall serve the Contractor with written notice of the default. The Contractor shall have (10) days after service upon it of said notice in which to cure the default by rendering a satisfactory performance. In the event that the Contractor fails to cure its default within such period of time, the City shall have the right, notwithstanding any other provision of this Agreement, to terminate this Agreement without further notice and without prejudice to any other remedy to which it may be entitled at law, in equity or under this Agreement. 7. OWNERSHIP OF DOCUMENTS. a. Contractor shall maintain complete and accurate records with respect to sales, costs, expenses, receipts and other such information required by City that relate to the performance of services under this Agreement. Contractor shall maintain adequate records of services provided in sufficient detail to permit an evaluation of services. All such records shall be maintained in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and shall be clearly identified and readily accessible. Contractor shall provide free access to the representatives of City or its designees at reasonable times to such books and records, shall give City the right to examine and audit said books and records, shall permit City to make transcripts there from as necessary, and shall allow inspection of all work, data, documents, proceedings and activities related to this Agreement. Such records, together with supporting documents, shall be maintained for a period of three (3) years after receipt of final payment. b. Upon completion of, or in the event of termination or suspension of this Agreement, all original documents, designs, drawings, maps, models, computer files containing data generated for the work, surveys, notes, and other documents prepared in the course of 2 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx providing the services to be performed pursuant to this Agreement shall become the sole property of the City and may be used, reused or otherwise disposed of by the City without the permission of the Contractor. With respect to computer files containing data generated for the work, Contractor shall make available to the City, upon reasonable written request by the City, the necessary computer software and hardware for purposes of accessing, compiling, transferring and printing computer files. 8. INDEMNIFICATION. The Contractor agrees to defend, indemnify, protect and hold harmless the City, the Temecula Community Services District, the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Temecula, its officers, officials, employees and volunteers from and against any and all claims, demands, losses, defense costs or expenses, including attorney fees and expert witness fees, or liability of any kind or nature which the City, the Temecula Community Services District, the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Temecula, its officers, agents, employees or volunteers may sustain or incur or which may be imposed upon them for injury to or death of persons, or damage to property arising out of Contractor's negligent or wrongful acts or omissions arising out of or in any way related to the performance or non- performance of this Agreement, excepting only liability arising out of the negligence of the City, the Temecula Community Services District, the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Temecula. 9. INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS. Contractor shall procure and maintain for the duration of the contract insurance against claims for injuries to persons or damages to property, which may arise from or in connection with the performance of the work hereunder by the Contractor, its agents, representatives, or employees. than: a. Minimum Scope of Insurance. Coverage shall be at least as broad as: (1) Insurance Services Office Commercial General Liability form No. CG 00 01 11 85 or 88. (2) Insurance Services Office Business Auto Coverage form CA 00 01 06 92 covering Automobile Liability, code 1 (any auto). If the Contractor owns no automobiles, a non -owned auto endorsement to the General Liability policy described above is acceptable. (3) Worker's Compensation insurance as required by the State of California and Employer's Liability Insurance. If the Contractor has no employees while performing under this Agreement, worker's compensation insurance is not required, but Contractor shall execute a declaration that it has no employees. b. Minimum Limits of Insurance. Contractor shall maintain limits no less (1) General Liability: $1,000,000 per occurrence for bodily injury, personal injury and property damage. If Commercial General Liability Insurance or other form with a general aggregate limit is used, either the general aggregate limit shall apply separately to this project/location or the general aggregate limit shall be twice the required occurrence limit. (2) Automobile Liability: $1,000,000 per accident for bodily injury and property damage. 3 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx (3) Worker's Compensation as required by the State of California; Employer's Liability: One million dollars ($1,000,000) per accident for bodily injury or disease. c. Deductibles and Self -Insured Retentions. Any deductibles or self-insured retentions shall not exceed Twenty Five Thousand Dollars and No Cents ($25,000). d. Other Insurance Provisions. Other Insurance Provisions. The general liability and automobile liability policies are to contain, or be endorsed to contain, the following provisions: 1) The City, the Temecula Community Services District, the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Temecula, their officers, officials, employees and volunteers are to be covered as insured's, as respects: liability arising out of activities performed by or on behalf of the Contractor; products and completed operations of the Contractor; premises owned, occupied or used by the Contractor; or automobiles owned, leased, hired or borrowed by the Contractor. The coverage shall contain no special limitations on the scope of protection afforded to the City, the Temecula Community Services District, the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Temecula, their officers, officials, employees or volunteers. 2) For any claims related to this project, the Contractor's insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the City, the Temecula Community Services District, the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Temecula, their officers, officials, employees and volunteers. Any insurance or self-insured maintained by the City, its officers, officials, employees or volunteers shall be excess of the Contractor's insurance and shall not contribute with it. 3) Any failure to comply with reporting or other provisions of the policies including breaches of warranties shall not affect coverage provided to the City, the Temecula Community Services District, the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Temecula, their officers, officials, employees or volunteers. 4) The Contractor's insurance shall apply separately to each insured against whom claim is made or suit is brought, except with respect to the limits of the insurer's liability. 5) Each insurance policy required by this agreement shall be endorsed to state: should the policy be canceled before the expiration date the issuing insurer will endeavor to mail thirty (30) days' prior written notice to the City. 6) If insurance coverage is canceled or, reduced in coverage or in limits the Contractor shall within two (2) business days of notice from insurer phone, fax, and/or notify the City via certified mail, return receipt requested of the changes to or cancellation of the policy. e. Acceptability of Insurers. Insurance is to be placed with insurers with a current A.M. Best rating of A -:VII or better, unless otherwise acceptable to the City. Self insurance shall not be considered to comply with these insurance requirements. f. Verification of Coverage. Contractor shall furnish the City with original endorsements effecting coverage required by this clause. The endorsements are to be signed by a person authorized by that insurer to bind coverage on its behalf. The endorsements are to be on forms provided by the City. All endorsements are to be received and approved by the City before work commences. As an alternative to the City's forms, the Contractor's insurer may provide complete, certified copies of all required insurance policies, including endorsements effecting the coverage required by these specifications. 4 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx 10. INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR. a. Contractor is and shall at all times remain as to the City a wholly independent contractor. The personnel performing the services under this Agreement on behalf of Contractor shall at all times be under Contractor's exclusive direction and control. Neither City nor any of its officers, employees, agents, or volunteers shall have control over the conduct of Contractor or any of Contractor's officers, employees, or agents except as set forth in this Agreement. Contractor shall not at any time or in any manner represent that it or any of its officers, employees or agents are in any manner officers, employees or agents of the City. Contractor shall not incur or have the power to incur any debt, obligation or liability whatever against City, or bind City in any manner. b. No employee benefits shall be available to Contractor in connection with the performance of this Agreement. Except for the fees paid to Contractor as provided in the Agreement, City shall not pay salaries, wages, or other compensation to Contractor for performing services hereunder for City. City shall not be liable for compensation or indemnification to Contractor for injury or sickness arising out of performing services hereunder. 11. LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES. The Contractor shall keep itself informed of all local, State and Federal ordinances, laws and regulations which in any manner affect those employed by it or in any way affect the performance of its service pursuant to this Agreement. The Contractor shall at all times observe and comply with all such ordinances, laws and regulations. The City, and its officers and employees, shall not be liable at law or in equity occasioned by failure of the Contractor to comply with this section. 12. RELEASE OF INFORMATION. a. All information gained by Contractor in performance of this Agreement shall be considered confidential and shall not be released by Contractor without City's prior written authorization. Contractor, its officers, employees, agents or subcontractors, shall not without written authorization from the City Manager or unless requested by the City Attorney, voluntarily provide declarations, letters of support, testimony at depositions, response to interrogatories or other information concerning the work performed under this Agreement or relating to any project or property located within the City. Response to a subpoena or court order shall not be considered "voluntary" provided Contractor gives City notice of such court order or subpoena. b. Contractor shall promptly notify City should Contractor, its officers, employees, agents or subcontractors be served with any summons, complaint, subpoena, notice of deposition, request for documents, interrogatories, request for admissions or other discovery request, court order or subpoena from any party regarding this Agreement and the work performed there under or with respect to any project or property located within the City. City retains the right, but has no obligation, to represent Contractor and/or be present at any deposition, hearing or similar proceeding. Contractor agrees to cooperate fully with City and to provide City with the opportunity to review any response to discovery requests provided by Contractor. However, City's right to review any such response does not imply or mean the right by City to control, direct, or rewrite said response. 13. NOTICES. Any notices which either party may desire to give to the other party under this Agreement must be in writing and may be given either by (I) personal service, (ii) delivery by a reputable document delivery service, such as but not limited to, Federal Express, that provides a receipt showing date and time of delivery, or (iii) mailing in the United States Mail, certified mail, postage prepaid, return receipt requested, addressed to the address of the party as set forth below or at any other address as that party may later designate by Notice. Notice shall be effective upon delivery to the addresses specified below or on the third 5 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx business day following deposit with the document delivery service or United States Mail as provided above. To City: City of Temecula Mailing Address: P.O. Box 9033 Temecula, California 92589-9033 Use this Address for a Delivery Service: 41000 Main Street Or Hand -Deliveries ONLY Temecula, California 92589 Attention: City Manager To Contractor: Animal Friends of the Valley 33751 Mission Trail Wildomar, Ca 92595 (951) 674-0618 14. ASSIGNMENT. The Contractor shall not assign the performance of this Agreement, nor any part thereof, nor any monies due hereunder, without prior written consent of the City. Upon termination of this Agreement, Contractor's sole compensation shall be payment for actual services performed up to, and including, the date of termination or as may be otherwise agreed to in writing between the City Council and the Contractor. 15. LICENSES. At all times during the term of this Agreement, Contractor shall have in full force and effect, all licenses required of it by law for the performance of the services described in this Agreement. 16. GOVERNING LAW. The City and Contractor understand and agree that the laws of the State of California shall govern the rights, obligations, duties and liabilities of the parties to this Agreement and also govern the interpretation of this Agreement. Any litigation concerning this Agreement shall take place in the municipal, superior, or federal district court with geographic jurisdiction over the City of Temecula. In the event such litigation is filed by one party against the other to enforce its rights under this Agreement, the prevailing party, as determined by the Court's judgment, shall be entitled to reasonable attorney fees and litigation expenses for the relief granted. 17. PROHIBITED INTEREST. No officer, or employee of the City of Temecula that has participated in the development of this agreement or its approval or who participates in its administration shall have any financial interest, direct or indirect, in this Agreement, the proceeds thereof, the Contractor, or Contractor's sub -contractors for this project, during his/her tenure or for one year thereafter. The Contractor hereby warrants and represents to the City that no officer or employee of the City of Temecula that has participated in the development of this agreement or its approval has any interest, whether contractual, non - contractual, financial or otherwise, in this transaction, the proceeds thereof, or in the business of the Contractor or Contractor's sub -contractors on this project. Contractor further agrees to notify the City in the event any such interests described in this paragraph is discovered whether or not such interest is prohibited by law or this Agreement. 18. ENTIRE AGREEMENT. This Agreement contains the entire understanding between the parties relating to the obligations of the parties described in this Agreement. All prior or contemporaneous agreements, understandings, representations and statements, oral or written, are merged into this Agreement and shall be of no further force or effect. Each party is entering into this Agreement based solely upon the representations set 6 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx forth herein and upon each party's own independent investigation of any and all facts such party deems material. 19. AUTHORITY TO EXECUTE THIS AGREEMENT. The person or persons executing this Agreement on behalf of Contractor warrants and represents that he or she has the authority to execute this Agreement on behalf of the Contractor and has the authority to bind Contractor to the performance of its obligations hereunder. 7 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed the day and year first above written. CITY OF TEMECULA Ron Roberts, Mayor Attest: Susan W. Jones, CMC, City Clerk Approved As to Form: Peter M. Thorson, City Attorney CONTRACTOR Animal Friends of the Valley 33751 Mission Trail Wildomar, CA 92595 (951) 674-0618 By: Name: Title: By: Name: Title: (Two Signatures of Corporate Officers Required For Corporations) 8 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx EXHIBIT A Scope of Services 1. Services To Be Provided. Contractor shall operate a complete animal control program for the City consisting of, but not limited to, field services, and licensing. Animal Friends of the Valleys will provide 1 %2 full time Animal Control Officers, a fully equipped vehicle, and shelter for the City of Temecula's animals. The Animal Control Officers will be serving the City of Temecula 12 hours per day, 5 days per week, as well as, after hours, week -ends and emergency calls. In the conduct of this program, CONTRACTOR shall perform the following specific functions: (a) Enforcement. Enforce all applicable provisions of the Temecula Municipal Code (Animal Control) as it exists on the date of this Agreement pertaining to animals, including the issuing of warning notices or citations as necessary for violations of such Ordinances. In the event the Municipal Code is amended and the amendments would substantially alter the duties and responsibilities of CONTRACTOR under this Agreement, the parties hereto agree to meet and in good faith renegotiate those terms and conditions of this Agreement affected by such amendments. (b) Sheltering. Animals are to be sheltered in accordance with Southwest Community Financing Authority (SCFA) standards as outlined in the Memorandum of Understanding with Animal Friends of the Valley. (c) Impound. Impound all animals caught at large and collect all impound fees assessed on behalf of the City; accept stray animals brought in by private citizens; provided, however that identified, vaccinated, spayed or neutered cats shall be released as required by the Temecula Municipal Code. (d) Quarantine. Quarantine as prescribed by law all animals suspected to be rabid. (e) Complaint Investigation & Resolution. Investigate and pursue action on complaints and/or reports of potential violations of Municipal Code relating to animals, including unnecessary noise, in accordance with such procedures adopted by the City; respond to requests from the County Fire Department and contract law enforcement provider for assistance with animal related situations. (f) Dead Animals. Remove dead animals from the public right-of-way within City limits and from other areas upon request. (g) Potentially Dangerous/Vicious Animals. In accordance with the Temecula Municipal Code, identify potentially dangerous and/or vicious animals and initiate the administrative or legal process for their control. (h) Trapping & Removal. As limited by subsection (b) above, respond to requests for assistance in the trapping and removal of domestic or wild animals, including coyotes and skunks, from public or private property. CONTRACTOR will offer advice in setting a trap in any enclosed space and will remove belongings, or will maintain on - premises surveillance unless in the Officer's or his or her supervisor's opinion there is a 9 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx direct, clear and present danger to human life or injury. Identified cats will be released as required by Temecula Municipal Code. CONTRACTOR will provide traps but will not be required to provide vector control. CONTRACTOR shall charge a fee for traps as set out in the City's Animal Control Fee Schedule as approved by Council action. (i) Dog Licensing. (i) CONTRACTOR shall implement a comprehensive licensing program including conducting dog license inspections. Area -wide canvassing will be conducted as part of the field service activity. CONTRACTOR shall administer the current licensing provision of the Temecula Municipal Code. (ii) Dog licenses shall be issued by mail, at the Animal Shelter, at vaccination clinics and by Animal Control Officers in the field. CONTRACTOR shall send renewal notices by mail to owners of currently licensed dogs, and shall send an application for licensing when requested by owners. (iii) CONTRACTOR shall, at Contractor's expense, provide the forms and tags for such licenses, and shall affix a professionally prepared sign at the Animal Shelter, stating applicable fees for licensing for the City. (iv) CONTRACTOR shall collect all license fees and penalties on behalf of the City, issue receipts for all such fees collected and keep copies thereof. The remaining license revenue collected will be applied to the budget for City services under this contract. Revenue shortfalls, below the estimate, will be the responsibility of Animal Friends of the Valley. (v) All administrative citation revenue will be remitted to Animal Friends of the Valleys on a quarterly basis. (vi) CONTRACTOR shall pursue collection and/or prosecution, if appropriate, to recover any fraudulent, delinquent or worthless payment received as payment for dog licenses issued, including penalties. (vii) CONTRACTOR shall cancel any dog license issued for which invalid payment was received, and give notice of such cancellation to the licensee. (viii) CONTRACTOR shall maintain such records in such form as required by the City's Director of Finance so as to provide for proper cash management and for review and audit of the monies collected. CONTRACTOR shall furnish the City a monthly report detailing the licensing activities. (j) Animal Bites. Investigate reported animal bites. CONTRACTOR may initially receive animal bite reports by telephone, but also shall respond in person to all reported bites by dogs or other suspected rabid or wild animals. CONTRACTOR shall take appropriate steps consistent with the circumstances of each separate incident to locate and quarantine the suspected animal(s) and/or assist the complained and/or injured party or parties to trap the suspected animal(s). (k) Disposition of Unclaimed Animals. After notice and hearing as required, provide 10 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx euthanasia service in a humane manner in accordance with procedures approved by the City Manager for unlicensed animals held for five (5) days and licensed animals held ten (10) days or more, if these animals are not reclaimed by their owner and are deemed unsuitable by the Officer for adoption. (I) Clinics. Make all necessary arrangements and conduct at least two (2) one -day clinics for rabies vaccination and licensing of dogs each year which are open to City residents and which may be located in the City, or may be held in conjunction with the City of Lake Elsinore. (1) Field Services. Assign two and a half field service officers appointed as Animal Control Officer. Routine field services will be provided as necessary within the hours limitation of this Agreement. The number of hours per week include, but are not necessarily limited to routine mobile patrols, investigative and rescue time, court appearances and impoundment of dangerous, wild, injured or loose animals. CONTRACTOR shall assign a sufficient number of field service employees to duty at all times to meet the needs of this Agreement. CONTRACTOR shall provide service of twelve (12) hours per day during such hours as approved by the City Manager. Telephone service for members of the public shall be not less than eight (8) hours per day on a schedule approved by the City Manager. Emergency response shall be available 24 hours per day, seven days per week as described in subparagraph (m). CONTRACTOR shall advise fire and law enforcement authorities serving the City of Temecula of the telephone numbers to access its services and shall cooperate with such authorities in developing the procedures necessary to provide after hours services. (m) After -Hours. Provide a field service person either on duty or on call after regular hours as necessary to respond to emergency calls. The City and CONTRACTOR agree that any incident reported to CONTRACTOR or City staff, through the fire or law enforcement provider involving a dangerous, wild or stray injured animal, constitutes an emergency and requires immediate action by CONTRACTOR. When the City Manager or his or her designee has reason to believe that an animal control emergency exists, the Manager or his or her designee shall notify CONTRACTOR and request a prompt response. If CONTRACTOR fails to respond to such request within a reasonable time or fails to respond at all, the City shall request in writing that CONTRACTOR send to the City a written explanation giving the reason(s) for the delay in responding or the failure to respond. Contractor's written explanation shall be submitted to the City Manager within two (2) working days from the date of the request for emergency service. This Agreement and the provisions herein shall not be construed to limit the interpretation of what constitutes an emergency and/or the need for a priority response. The following examples are illustrative of the need for an immediate response from CONTRACTOR. (1) Requests to remove a wild, dangerous or injured animal or animals from an inhabited place or vehicle; (2) Reported animal bites involving loose animals; and, (3) Livestock, fowl or game birds being attacked or killed by dogs or other 11 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx animals. (n) Public Relations. Provide service to the public on matters covered in this Agreement consistent with established policies and procedures that promote courteous and efficient service and good public relations. Other policies and procedures notwithstanding, CONTRACTOR in processing any type of complaint or request for service will indicate to the caller when a response can be expected from CONTRACTOR and how CONTRACTOR will respond. In the event an in-- person response is appropriate to the specific situation, CONTRACTOR shall make such response by the end of the following business day. This provision shall be subordinate to shorter time limits specified elsewhere in this Agreement. (o) Complaints Regarding Service. Cooperate with the City to resolve any and all complaints filed with CONTRACTOR and/or the City pertaining to services provided under this Agreement. The City shall submit to CONTRACTOR in writing all complaints filed with the City concerning services provided by CONTRACTOR under this Agreement. CONTRACTOR shall report monthly in writing to the City the number of complaints received by CONTRACTOR directly or indirectly through the City pertaining to quality of service(s) provided under this Agreement. (p) Legal. Coordinate with City and City Attorney any inspection warrants impounds or potential dangerous/vicious animal hearings or court actions. (q) Records. Maintain and keep timely, complete and accurate records of the receipt and disposition of all animals delivered into its custody. CONTRACTOR will file a report with the law enforcement provider within twenty-four (24) hours if an impounded animal is missing or suspected to have been stolen. CONTRACTOR shall indicate on the police report the circumstances of the animal's disappearance and make available to the City Manager the designated report or file number. (r) Communications Equipment. CONTRACTOR agrees to provide radio equipment and frequency as necessary for effective performance of its obligations hereunder and in order to provide law enforcement backup for its field personnel. (s) Other Equipment. CONTRACTOR shall provide all vehicles and equipment necessary for the performance of this Agreement and shall be responsible for maintenance of such vehicles and equipment, including the installation and removal of the paging or radio equipment described in Paragraph (q) of this Section. CONTRACTOR shall be responsible for all costs relating to theft, vandalism, or destruction of said equipment by fire, accident or intentional acts. (t) Personnel & Supplies. CONTRACTOR shall provide all personnel, supplies, and equipment necessary for the efficient and effective operation of the Animal Shelter and animal control services and programs provided for herein, including, but not limited to Animal Control Officers, clerical staff, license tags and forms, citation forms, notices and all necessary envelopes and postage. Animal Control Officers will complete the required training in accordance with Penal Code 832 or its equivalent, and such other training as may be required by law, before being issued a badge and given the authority to perform Animal Control duties. Humane Officers will complete the required training in accordance with Corporations Code 14502. 12 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx (u) Attendance at Meetings. Provide input and coordination on amendment of City animal control fees and ordinances and shall attend City Council and other City meetings as required or requested to do so. 2. Coordination. Contractor's Executive Director and the City Manager shall meet not less than quarterly to discuss Agreement performance. 3. Reporting. (a) CONTRACTOR shall furnish the City monthly reports detailing shelter, field, licensing and identification activities, including a summary of the utilization of field service employees' hours required in Section 1 above and the records required by Section 1(P). (b) CONTRACTOR shall maintain and keep records of all expenditures and obligations incurred pursuant to this Agreement and all income and fees received according to generally recognized accounting principles. Such records shall be maintained by CONTRACTOR for a minimum of four (4) years following the termination of this Agreement unless a lesser period is approved in writing by the City Manager. The records and/or animal control operations of CONTRACTOR shall be open to inspection and audit by the City or its authorized representative as is deemed necessary by the City upon reasonable notice to CONTRACTOR. CONTRACTOR shall provide the City a copy of Contractor's full Annual financial statement immediately upon completion thereof, but in no case later than six (6) months after the close of each fiscal year. 4. CONTRACTOR shall also implement the following programs on a continuing basis: (a) Public School presentations (b) Spay/neuter subsidy programs for low income persons (c) Cable television Announcements and educational messages (d) Ordinance review and changes aimed at ending pet overpopulation (e) Animal Rescue Plan for domestic animals during disaster (t) State Humane Officer services 5. In addition, CONTRACTOR will consult with the City and on any policy/procedure that affects Temecula animals, which shall be approved by the City Manager prior to implementation. 6. Contractor shall charge License Fees for dogs within the City as follows: a. Altered dogs $15.00 for 1 year b. Altered dogs $20.00 for 2 years 13 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx c. Altered dogs $25.00 for 3 years d. Unaltered dogs $35.00 for 1 year e. Unaltered dogs $70.00 for 2 years f. Unaltered dogs $105.00 for 3 years g. Senior Citizen's dogs $8.00 for 1 year h. Senior Citizen's dogs $10.00 for 2 years Senior Citizen's dogs $12.00 for 3 years j. Late penalty of $20.00 per license 14 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx EXHIBIT B PAYMENT SCHEDULE FOR ANIMAL CONTROL SERVICES The City shall pay a monthly flat rate to Contractor in the amount of $10,000.00 per month for animal control services for a total of $120,000 annually for the term of the Agreement. 15 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx EXHIBIT C PAYMENT SCHEDULE FOR SHELTERING SERVICES The cost for Sheltering Services in FY 10-11 will be $10,625 monthly. Costs for sheltering services will be based on Temecula's proportionate share of animals being housed in the shelter. Temecula's percentage has been in the 15% - 20% range historically. The animal shelter budget will be approved by the Southwest Community Facility Authority JPA Board and the annual animal count will also be certified by the Board. The City's annual sheltering costs are based on these animal counts. Staff will amend this Schedule in May of each year. These costs will be reflected in the Annual Operating Budget. 16 C:\Program Files \Neevia. Com\Document Converter \temp\988885. docx Item No. 8 ORDINANCE NO. 11-01 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING AN AMENDMENT TO THE RORIPAUGH ESTATES SPECIFIC PLAN TO ALLOW AUTOMOBILE SERVICE STATIONS WITH OR WITHOUT A CAR WASH IN PLANNING AREA 10 UTILIZING THE DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL ZONING DISTRICT THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Procedural Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. On November 3, 2010, the Planning Commission recommended approval of Planning Application Nos. PA09-0246, Specific Plan Amendment; PA09-0287, Conditional Use Permit; and PA09-0288 Development Plan B. The proposed amendment to the Roripaugh Estates Specific Plan will amend the permitted uses and development standards for Planning Area 10 to the standards of the Neighborhood Commercial zoning district with the addition to allow automobile service stations with or without and automated car wash. In addition, the Specific Plan Amendment application is accompanied by a Conditional Use Permit and Development Plan application. C. The Project was processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including the California Environmental Quality Act. D. A Mitigated Negative Declaration was prepared for the Project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act and the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines ("CEQA") and circulated for public review from October 12, 2010 through November 1, 2010 for a 20 -day public review. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Department of Planning, located at City Hall 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California 92590. E. On November 3, 2010, at a duly noticed public hearing as prescribed by law, the Planning Commission considered the Project and any comments received prior to or at the public hearing on November 3, 2010, at which time the City staff presented its report, and interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to the Project and the Mitigated Negative Declaration. F. Following consideration of the entire record before it at the public hearing and due consideration of the proposed Project the Planning Commission recommended R:/Ords 2011/Ords 11-01 1 that the City Council adopt the Mitigated Negative Declaration and adopt a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for the Project. G. At the conclusion of the Planning Commission hearing and after due consideration of the entire record before the Planning Commission hearing, and after due consideration of the testimony regarding the proposed Project, the Planning Commission recommended that the City Council approve the Project including Planning Application No's. PA09-0246, Specific Plan Amendment; PA09-0287, Conditional Use Permit; and PA09-0288, Development Plan. H. On January 11, 2011, the City Council of the City of Temecula considered the Project and the Mitigated Negative Declaration, at a duly noticed public hearing at which time all interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. The Council considered all the testimony and any comments received regarding the Project and the Mitigated Negative Declaration prior to and at the public hearing. Following the public hearing, the Council adopted Resolution No. 11-08 adopting the Mitigated Negative Declaration and adopted a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program. J. All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Ordinance have occurred. Section 2. Legislative Findings. The City Council in approving the Project hereby finds, determines and declares that: A. The proposed Specific Plan Amendment is consistent with the General Plan and Development Code [Subsection 17.16.20 (Procedures) of Chapter 17.16 (Specific Plan Zoning District) of Title 17 of the Temecula Municipal Code]. B. The proposed Specific Plan Amendment is consistent with the General Plan and Development Code; The Specific Plan Amendment identifies a car wash as requiring a Conditional Use Permit and clarifies that the property will be subject to the Development Standards identified for the NC -Neighborhood Commercial zoning district. Car washes are a common ancillary use for a gas station and this proposal meets the development standards for car washes under section 17.08.040.D of the Development Code. The project has been reviewed and conditioned for approval by Building and Safety, Fire, Police, Public Works, and Planning through the Development Review Process (DRC) to ensure compliance with the General Plan, Development Code and all applicable requirements of State law and other Ordinances of the City. C. The proposed Specific Plan Amendment would not be detrimental to the public interest, health, safety, convenience or welfare of the City; R:/Ords 2011/Ords 11-01 2 The Specific Plan Amendment has been reviewed and conditioned by Building and Safety, Fire, Police, Public Works and Planning to ensure that the use will not be detrimental to the health, safety, and general welfare of the community. Furthermore, the project is consistent with the requirements of the General Plan and Development Code, which contain provisions to protect the health, safety, and general welfare of the community. D. The subject property is physically suitable for the requested land use designations and the anticipated land use developments; The Specific Plan Amendment would facilitate development of an automated car wash attached to an existing gas station. The site is adequate in size and shape to accommodate the car wash. Loading, parking, and vehicular circulation will not be adversely affected by the project. The project will adhere to all other development features described in the Development Code. E. The proposed Specific Plan Amendment shall ensure development of a desirable character which will be compatible with existing and proposed development in the surrounding neighborhood; The Specific Plan Amendment would allow a car wash to be located within Planning Area 10 of the Roripaugh Estates Specific Plan, which is within a heavily traveled commercial corridor that is fully developed. Surrounding uses include a high school, commercial and residential development. An Initial Study has been prepared and mitigation measures have been included to address noise impacts from the car wash blowers on surrounding commercial and residential development. With these and other mitigation measures identified, the project will not adversely affect adjacent uses, buildings or structures. Section 3. The City Council hereby amends the Roripaugh Estates Specific Plan to allow automobile service stations with or without a car wash in Planning Area 10 subject to the development standards of the Neighborhood Commercial Zoning District of the Specific Plan and in accordance with the revised Specific Plan on file with in the City of Temecula City Clerk's Office. Section 4. Severability. If any portion, provision, section, paragraph, sentence, or word of this Ordinance is rendered or declared to be invalid by any final court action in a court of competent jurisdiction, or by reason of any preemptive legislation, the remaining portions, provisions, sections, paragraphs, sentences, and words of this Ordinance shall remain in full force and effect and shall be interpreted by the court so as to give effect to such remaining portions of the Ordinance. Section 5. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall take effect thirty (30) days after its adoption. Section 6. Notice of Adoption. The City Clerk shall certify to the adoption of this Ordinance and cause it to be published in the manner required by law. R:/Ords 2011/Ords 11-01 3 PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 25th day of January, 2011. Ron Roberts, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] R:/Ords 2011/Ords 11-01 4 STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Ordinance No. 11-01 was duly introduced and placed upon its first reading at a meeting of the City Council of the City of Temecula on the 11th day of January, 2011, and that thereafter, said Ordinance was duly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 25th day of January, 2011, the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk R:/Ords 2011/Ords 11-01 5 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Item No. 9 ACTION MINUTES of January 11, 2011 City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT MEETING The Temecula Community Services District Meeting convened at 7:54 P.M. CALL TO ORDER: President Jeff Comerchero ROLL CALL: DIRECTORS: Edwards, Naggar, Roberts, Washington, Comerchero CSD PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no public comments. CSD CONSENT CALENDAR 15 Action Minutes - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Director Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Director Roberts and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 15.1 Approve the action minutes of December 14, 2010. CSD Action Minutes\011111 1 CSD DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SERVICES REPORT CSD GENERAL MANAGERS REPORT CSD BOARD OF DIRECTORS REPORTS CSD ADJOURNMENT At 7:55 P.M., the Temecula Community Services District meeting was formally adjourned to Tuesday, January 25, 2011, at 5:30 PM., for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 P.M., in the City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. Chuck Washington, President ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/District Secretary [SEAL] CSD Action Minutes\011111 2 Item No. 10 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT AGENDA REPORT TO: General Manager/Board of Directors FROM: Herman D. Parker, Director of Community Services DATE: January 25, 2011 SUBJECT: Youth Work Experience Program Partnership PREPARED BY: Charles Walker, Human Services Manager RECOMMENDATION: That the Board of Directors approve the Memorandum of Understanding between Oasis Perris Youth Opportunity Center and the Temecula Community Services District to establish a youth employment work experience program. BACKGROUND: The Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) has successfully provided youth employment opportunities to approximately 400 youth through the Mayor's Summer Youth Employment Program for the past two seasons. As clearly identified in the Youth Master Plan, Temecula's youth desire and need employment opportunities and experiences which allow them to acquire important job readiness skills necessary for future employment success. Through the joint funding efforts of the federal government, Riverside County and the City of Temecula, the seasonal program was made available. Recently, staff from the Oasis Perris Youth Opportunity Center proposed entering into a partnership with the Temecula Community Services District to provide a year-round youth employment program for Temecula youth ages 16-21. The partnership will allow for twenty-five eligible youth, to work up to 300 hours each in the program. The TCSD's overall responsibility will be to provide the work sites, supervision, required documentation and in-kind contributions, and program office space. The Center's responsibility will be to confirm eligibility, all aspects associated with wages, pay roll processing, and overall program oversight. This exciting program allows for the Temecula Community Services District to enter a unique partnership with Oasis Perris Youth Opportunity Center, who receives federal funding through the Workforce Investment Act via Riverside County to provide up to 7,500 hours of paid employment experience to Temecula youth at no direct cost to the City. FISCAL IMPACT: The fiscal impact to the TCSD is valued at $15,000 of in-kind contributions. The in-kind contributions will include a temporary work space and minimal staffing support from the Human Services Manager and support staff as appropriate. ATTACHMENTS: Memorandum of Understanding between Oasis Youth Opportunity Center and the City of Temecula. WORK DE MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING between Oasis Perris Youth Opportunity Center and Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) Parties Oasis Perris Youth Opportunity Center, described herein after as "AGENCY" is the lead administrative entity, authorized and existing under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998. Temecula Community Services District (TCSD), described hereinafter as "PARTNER," is a service provider. PARTNER and AGENCY enter into this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) documenting their PARTNERship regarding the comprehensive array of year-round WIA services to youth ages 16-21 years old. IT IS UNDERSTOOD AND AGREED AS FOLLOWS: 1. Term The term of this MOU shall commence when the MOU is signed by AGENCY and PARTNER. The MOU shall remain in effect until June 30, 2011 and shall thereafter renew for successive one-year terms, unless terminated by the repeal of WIA, by action of any applicable law, or otherwise in accordance with this section. Either party may terminate this MOU by giving written notice of intent to withdraw at least thirty (30) calendar days in advance of the effective withdrawal date. Notice shall be given to the party at the address set forth below. The site location for AGENCY services will be at: 351 Wilkerson Avenue, Suite F, Perris, CA 92570 The site location for PARTNER services will be at: 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 2. Description of Services A. PARTNER Responsibilities 1. PARTNER will provide hands-on work experience sites and supervision of youth assigned within the TCSD. 2. PARTNER will provide mentoring and guidance to all youth in work experience. 3. PARTNER will generate and submit timesheets for all youth assigned to work experience bi-weekly for AGENCY to process payroll for all enrolled and assigned youth with the TCSD. 4. PARTNER will conduct evaluations and provide feedback to youth in work experience. Page 1 of 6 5. PARTNER will provide facilities as needed for customized training workshops. 6. PARTNER will provide in -take eligibility to all youth residing in the City of Temecula. 7. PARTNER shall attend scheduled partnership meetings to obtain updated information and provide updates on partner services. B. AGENCY Responsibilities 1. AGENCY will conduct the recruitment, intake -eligibility, enrollment, and work readiness certification. 2. AGENCY will refer eligible and qualified youth for the Work Experience Program to the TCSD. 3. AGENCY will be responsible for all wages up to 300 hours per youth and will process payroll for 25 youth assigned to the TCSD for the Workforce Investment Act program. 4. AGENCY will provide oversight of the Work Experience Program. 5. AGENCY will collect evaluations for all youth in work experience to ensure completion of the Work Experience Certification. 3. Funding Costs of Services As between the parties, this MOU is a non-financial MOU. (WIA funds are not being requested for payments to PARTNER.) 4. Method of Payment (Not Applicable.) PARTNER shall submit itemized monthly invoices and sufficient backup documentation to Arbor Education & Training certifying that required services were performed. No accrual of disallowed costs is permitted. PARTNER's final billing will be due thirty (30) days following the end of the MOU term. 5. Partnership Funding Allocation PARTNER agrees to provide In -Kind Contributions in an amount valued at $15,000.00 during the term of this agreement. The AGENCY will maintain written record of the contributions and report it monthly on the Universal Invoice, Cash or In -Kind Match Detail report. PARTNER will provide a quarterly In -Kind Invoice to AGENCY for records. 6. Disallowed Activities The following activities are disallowed under this Memorandum of Understanding: 1. Political activities (WIA 195 (6). 2. Charging participants a fee for placement or referral into a WIA activity (WIA) 195 (5). Page 2 of 6 3. Displacement of employees by any WIA participants [WIA 181 (b) (2) & (3)]. 4. The promotion or deterrence of union organization [WIA 181 (B) (7)]. 7. Referrals The parties agree to make written referrals to one another for services and activities to individuals, where appropriate. Referrals shall be made with respect to each party's target group, eligibility requirements, and performance standards and expectations. The parties will jointly develop and implement mutually acceptable processes for intake and referral and will train their staff on the services of each participating PARTNER. The parties agree to evaluate this process periodically and to modify it based on changing requirements and/or agreed upon needed improvements. 8. Licenses PARTNER, its employees, and agents, shall maintain professional licenses required by local, State, and Federal laws at all times while performing services under this MOU. 9. Amendments The parties may, upon mutual written agreement, amend this MOU at any time during its term. The amendment(s) must be in writing and a copy of the amended MOU shall be forwarded to the county within ten (10) days of execution. 10. Criminal Background Checks PARTNER shall conduct criminal background checks through the California Department of Justice of all employees providing services to the AGENCY pursuant to Education Code 45125.1. PARTNER shall provide a signed certification stating that criminal background checks have been conducted and that no employee has been convicted of any serious or violent felonies, as specified in Penal Code Sections 1192.7 (c) and 667.5 (c), respectively. PARTNER shall also provide a list of all employees providing services to the AGENCY. 11. Confidentiality The parties will share information regarding clients, applicants, and other customers only to the extent that such sharing does not violate WIA, other applicable statutes or ethical standards or requirements. All such shared information shall remain private and confidential, shall not be published by either party, and shall not be shared with, divulged, or given to individuals or groups not a party to this MOU, unless the disclosure of such information is required by the Page3of6 California Public Records Act. A client must be informed in writing that the parties intend to share information about him or her and consent in writing thereto before that information may be shared. 12. Indemnification AGENCY agrees to indemnify and hold harmless the PARTNER, its officers, employees, agents, and volunteers from any and all liabilities for injury to persons and damage to property arising out of any negligent act or omission of AGENCY in connection with this Memorandum of Understanding. PARTNER agrees to indemnify and hold harmless AGENCY from any and all liabilities for injury to persons and damage to property arising out of any negligent act or omission of the PARTNER, its officers, employees, agents or volunteers in connection with this Memorandum of Understanding. In the event PARTNER and/or AGENCY is found to be comparatively at fault for any claim, action, loss or damage which results from their respective obligations under this Memorandum of Understanding, PARTNER and/or AGENCY shall indemnify the other to the extent of its comparative fault. 13. Insurance PARTNER and AGENCY will maintain professional liability, general liability, and Workers' Compensation Insurance. The degree of coverage should commensurate the types of service, the population to be served, and the level of potential risks. The PARTNER and AGENCY warrant they have adequate professional liability, general liability and Workers' Compensation to provide coverage for liabilities arising out of the PARTNER's and AGENCY's performance of this Memorandum of Understanding. A copy of the insurance policy shall be maintained on site by the AGENCY. 14. Additional Provisions The PARTNER, at their expense, may utilize AGENCY's shared, web -based, electronic case management system, if the PARTNER so desires, if it meets the system's hardware and software requirements. Mutual Responsibilities: Health and Safety Standards Both parties will ensure that all facilities meet health and safety standards established under state and federal law [WIA 181 (B) (4) & CFR 667.274]. Page 4 of 6 Discrimination Clause The parties to this MOU shall not unlawfully discriminate, harass, or allow harassment against any employee, applicant for employment, or participant for services provided under this MOU because of race, color, age, religion, sex, national origin, disability, political affiliation or belief, and for beneficiaries only, citizenship or participation in the WIA Title 1 financially assisted program or activity as specified in Section 188 of WIA. Parties to this MOU will assure compliance with the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability, as well as applicable regulations and guidelines issued pursuant to ADA. 15. Monitoring As part of the required duties in the performance of this MOU, the AGENCY shall monitor WIA program activities of its collaborative PARTNER's including but not limited to fiscal management, invoices, and services rendered to the partnership. The AGENCY shall submit a written report of the monitoring and if applicable, any findings should be noted. Copies of monitoring reports must be available for review by the County, State, and Federal monitors or auditors and shall be maintained in files at the AGENCY's office. Monitoring of all sub -recipients shall be completed by the end of the fiscal year 1 st quarter. 16. Dispute Resolution Process The PARTNER agrees to use the Local Workforce Investment Area's grievance process to resolve disputes. 17. Conformity with Applicable Law In providing all services under this MOU, the PARTNER shall abide by all applicable Federal, State, and local statutes, ordinances, rules, regulations, and standards, as well as the standards and requirements imposed upon the AGENCY by Federal and/or State agencies providing funding to the AGENCY for the purchase of supplemental services. 18. Governing Law This MOU shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of California. 19. Termination This MOU may be terminated, with or without cause, by either party by giving 30 days written notice of intention to terminate by certified mail, such period beginning upon receipt of notice. Page5of6 Notwithstanding any of the provisions of this MOU, PARTNER's rights under this MOU shall terminate (except for fees accrued prior to the date of termination) upon PARTNER's bankruptcy, death or disability or in the event of fraud, dishonesty, or a willful or material breach of this MOU by PARTNER or, at AGENCY's election, in the event of PARTNER's unwillingness or inability for any reason whatsoever to perform the duties hereunder. In such event, PARTNER shall be entitled to no further compensation under this MOU, it being the intent that PARTNER shall be paid as specified in Sections 3 and 4 only during such period that PARTNER shall, in fact, be performing the duties hereunder. 20. Sole Agreement This Agreement is the only MOU between the parties relating to the subject hereof. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the duly authorized representative of each party does hereby sign and date this document as set forth below. Name of AGENCY: Oasis Perris Youth Opportunity Center Dated: By: Authorized Signatory of PARTNER, Title Name, Title: Rosa H. Penaloza, Program Director Name of PARTNER: Temecula Community Services District Dated: By: Authorized Signatory of PARTNER, Title Name, Title: Page 6 of 6 TCSD DEPARTMENTAL REPORT Item No. 11 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT AGENDA REPORT TO: General Manager/Board of Directors FROM: Herman D. Parker, Director of Community Services DATE: January 25, 2011 SUBJECT: Monthly Departmental Report PREPARED BY: Gail Zigler, Administrative Assistant Phase 1 of the Redhawk Park Improvement project is nearing completion. The Redhawk Dog Park is complete, the parking lot renovations are complete, the half -court basketball court is complete. These amenities are now available for use. Staff anticipates the restroom and hydro - seeding portion of the project to be completed within the next 25 days. The park is being used heavily by dog owners from the region. A conceptual design for the Old Town Gymnasium project was completed and approved by the Community Services Commission and City Council. The new gymnasium project will include the construction of a regulation size basketball court, restroom facilities, seating for spectators and an office. The project is currently in design development and we anticipate the plans to be completed by the end of March and ready for bid, The Recreation Division is currently planning for the activities and events which highlight the spring season including our annual Special Games and the Easter Egg Hunts. The Recreation Division is also currently carrying out the classes and activities offered through our Winter/Spring Guide to Leisure Activities. During the next couple of months, staff will be putting together the classes and activities for the summer/fall activities guide. The TCSD Maintenance Division plays an integral role in assisting with the many citywide special events held each month. In addition, the Maintenance Division continues to oversee the maintenance and rehabilitation of all City parks and facilities. At the January 10, 2011 Community Services Commission meeting the Commission honored and thanked Wayne and Mary Bershaw for their donation of a 61" color television they donated to the teen center. The television is now in place in the teen center and the CRC. Sunset Park, which is part of the Redhawk Park Project Phase 1, continues in the construction process. Hardscape has been completed and additional planting and irrigation must be completed. The Escalier House and Barn are now open and being used by the Community Pantry for their community service programs. Due to the heavy rains in December, the contractor was not able to complete the exterior landscaping around the building. The parking lot improvements have been completed and the landscape improvements should be completed within the next three weeks. At tonight's Board of Directors meeting the Board will consider the approval of a MOU between the Oasis Perris Youth Opportunity Center and the TCSD. If approved, the program will provide employment for approximately 25 youth working 300 hours each during the school year. Youth who participate must be eligible and between the ages of 16 and 21 years of age. The program has no fiscal impact to the City. REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY Item No. 12 ACTION MINUTES of JANUARY 11, 2011 City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY MEETING The Temecula Redevelopment Agency Meeting convened at 7:55 P.M. CALL TO ORDER: Chair Person Mike Naggar ROLL CALL: AGENCY MEMBERS: Comerchero, Edwards, Washington, Roberts, Naggar RDA PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no public comments. RDA CONSENT CALENDAR 16 Action Minutes - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) Agency Member Comerchero made the motion; it was seconded by Agency Member Washington and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval RECOMMENDATION: 16.1 Approve the action minutes of December 14, 2010. RDA Action Minutes\011111 1 RDA EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS REPORT RDA AGENCY MEMBERS REPORTS RDA ADJOURNMENT At 7:58 P.M., the Temecula Redevelopment Agency meeting was formally adjourned to Tuesday, January 25, 2011, at 5:30 P.M., for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 P.M., in the City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. Michael S. Naggar, Chair Person ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Agency Secretary [SEAL] RDA Action Minutes\011111 2 RDA DEPARTMENTAL REPORT Item No. 13 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY AGENDA REPORT TO: Executive Director/Agency Members FROM: Patrick Richardson, Director of Planning and Redevelopment DATE: January 25, 2011 SUBJECT: Redevelopment Department November/December Monthly Report RECOMMENDATION: Receive and file. REDEVELOPMENT Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Lease of Commercial Space in the Old Town Parking Garage - The Agency and the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau have executed an Office Lease for commercial space in the Old Town Parking Garage. The Convention and Visitor's Bureau is currently in the process of working with the architect of the Civic Center project to design the tenant improvements. These improvements are estimated to be complete February 1, 2011. Town Square Market Place - As part of the Civic Center Master Plan, the City has created a development opportunity for approximately 52,000 square feet of commercial and office space surrounding the Town Square along the reconfigured Main Street. The Agency issued a Request for Interest to select a preferred development partner. On August 26, 2008, the City Council entered into an Exclusive Negotiating Agreement (ENA) with Pelican Properties to develop the project. Pelican has participated in several meetings with Old Town stakeholders and adjacent property owners. They have worked closely with Staff on site planning issues. On January 22, 2009 the Executive Director granted a three-month extension to the Exclusive Negotiating Agreement which expires on May 26, 2009. Due to the state of the economy Staff recommended the Agency extend the ENA an additional six months. On May 26, 2009 Agency Board approved a six (6) month extension to the ENA. Agency Staff met with the Agency sub- committee in February 2010 and received direction to take an extension of one year with the possibility of an additional one year administrative extension which the Agency approved on March 9, 2010. Agency Staff and Pelican Properties have been in continuous contact as we make progress towards a first draft of the Development Agreement. Auto Mall Sign - The Agency and Auto Dealers Association have entered into a Loan Agreement for a loan from the Agency to the Auto Dealers Association in the amount of $875,000 for a state of the art high definition marquee sign. Part of the agreement stipulates that the City will have 10 percent of the time between sunrise and 11:00 p.m. daily to use the sign to promote City interests. The sign will be located on the parcel south of Rancho Ford. The old sign will be removed before the new sign can receive final approval from the building official. Currently the foundation and structural support beam have been constructed. The construction of the electronic sign itself is anticipated to begin on January 10, 2011. Per the first Amendment to the Loan Agreement, the Auto Mall sign shall be completed on or before January 31, 2011. Facade Improvement Program - The Facade Improvement Program provides funding assistance to Old Town business and property owners to provide exterior improvements to their buildings and property. Funding in the amount of $80,000 is available during FY 2010-2011. As of July 1, 2010 the Agency began accepting applications for the program. The following facade improvements are in process or recently completed: • Emporium Center — Facade Renovation (in process) • Temecula Stampede — Exterior repairs and paint (in process) Abbott Cardiovascular Systems OPA Payment - On February 12, 2002 the Agency Board approved an Owner Participation Agreement ("OPA") between the Agency and Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (formerly Guidant Cardiovascular Systems). The purpose of the OPA was to provide development incentives through property tax reimbursement. In order to receive the reimbursement Abbott was required to meet certain thresholds including minimum square foot expansion to its physical plant (90,000 square feet) and to add and maintain 300 full-time jobs within its Temecula Facility. Per the OPA, the fiscal consultant of the Agency was directed to analyze and determine the amount of the reimbursement due to Abbott. The reimbursement is based on property tax increment generated as a direct result of Abbott's physical plant expansion. The Agency has verified that Abbott has met the thresholds to reimbursement as stated in the OPA. The Agency's fiscal consultant has conducted a review of the amount of reimbursement due to Abbott, and the reimbursement will be delivered to Abbott by February 1, 2011. HOUSING R.C. Hobbs Exclusive Negotiating Agreement - The R.C. Hobbs Company approached the Agency regarding the possible development of mixed income affordable housing on vacant Agency owned property located at 28640 Pujol Street. Considering Hobbs' background and recent Staff experience working with the organization, Staff felt that Hobbs would be a quality partner on an affordable housing development at the aforementioned location. Hobbs requested that the Agency and Hobbs enter into an ENA with a one-year term with a potential six month extension by written approval of the Executive Director. The Agency approved the ENA at its February 9, 2010 meeting. An appraisal for the subject property was commissioned by the Agency and completed on June 24, 2010. The Agency and R.C. Hobbs continue to negotiate potential development on the subject site. First Time Homebuyers Program - On July 22, 2008, the City Council approved an amendment to increase the loan amount for down payment assistance from $24,000 to $65,000. This down payment assistance allows qualifying households to purchase homes in the $200,000-$300,000 price range. As of July 1, 2010, the Agency began accepting applications for FY 2010-2011. Currently, one loan in the amount of $48,000 has been funded for this fiscal year. Summerhouse - The Agency negotiated an Owner Participation Agreement ("OPA") with Summerhouse Housing Partners L.P for the purchase and development of the Summerhouse community. The Agency Board approved the OPA on September 22, 2009. The OPA terms require the development of 70 affordable units at very -low income, 20 units at moderate income, and 20 units at senior affordable income, for a total of 110 affordable units. The terms of this agreement place affordability restrictions on the property for 55 years. Immediately following the close of escrow, Summerhouse Housing Partners L.P. began clean- up and restoration of the site. A Development Plan has been approved by the City and construction of the 20 units is nearing completion. Residential Improvement Program - The Residential Improvement Program provides funding assistance to low and moderate income level homeowners to do exterior improvements to their home and property. The program budget for FY 2010/2011 is $200,000. The Agency began taking applications for the program July 1, 2010. There are currently 32 applications being processed for this program. PUBLIC HEARING Item No. 14 CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Patrick Richardson, Director of Planning and Redevelopment DATE: January 25, 2011 SUBJECT: An Appeal of the Planning Commission's Approval of Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242, Islamic Center of Temecula Valley, a two -Phase Development Plan and Conditional Use Permit for a two-story, 24,943 square foot structure located on 4.32 acres within a VL zone at the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri PREPARED BY: Eric Jones, Assistant Planner RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council: 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF TEMECULA DENYING THE APPEAL OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION'S DECISION AND APPROVING PLANNING APPLICATION NOS. PA08-0241 AND PA08-0242, A TWO- PHASE DEVELOPMENT PLAN AND CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT FOR A TWO-STORY, 24,943 SQUARE FOOT RELIGIOUS FACILITY ON 4.32 ACRES WITHIN A VERY LOW (VL) RESIDENTIAL ZONE LOCATED AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF NICOLAS ROAD AND CALLE COLIBRI (APN: 957-140-012) BACKGROUND: On October 14, 2008, Stephen Sigler of Axis 3 Architecture, Inc., behalf of the Islamic Center of Temecula, submitted Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242, a Development Plan and Conditional Use Permit application designed to allow for the construction of a 24,943 square foot religious facility located within a Very Low (VL) residential zoning district. The Development Plan and Conditional Use Permit applications were unanimously approved by the Planning Commission after hearing public testimony on December 1, 2010. At the Planning Commission hearing, members of the community (including appellant Mr. George Rombach) spoke in opposition to the project. The opposition has focused on several issues related to legal requirements, project design, and operational characteristics. Legal issues consist of requirements related to the Establishment Clause and Free Exercise Clause of the United States Constitution, the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act of 2000 (RLUIPA), the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), and the Brown Act. Project design and operational issues consist of automobile parking, emergency evacuation, minaret height and hours of operation. RECOMMENDED ORDER OF PROCEEDINGS FOR APPEAL PUBLIC HEARING In hearing appeals from actions of the Planning Commission, the Council has utilized the following schedule of comments for the public hearing. Staff has outlined this schedule in this Agenda Report so that all persons interested in the hearing will be apprised of the schedule in advance of the public hearing. The Council is authorized to modify the schedule as appropriate. 1. Staff Report/Council Questions 2. Appellant Presentation — 20 minutes 3. Applicant Presentation — 20 minutes 4. Public Hearing 5. Appellant Rebuttal — 10 minutes 6. Applicant Rebuttal — 10 minutes. APPEAL: On December 15, 2010, Mr. George Rombach (appellant) filed an appeal of the Planning Commission's decision to approve Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242. Attached to this report is the Agenda Report for the Planning Commission hearing on this project. The Planning Commission report provides a detailed explanation of the Project and the analysis of the planning issues. This report to the City Council focuses on the contention's and concerns raised in Mr. Rombach's appeal and the Staff's response to them. Parking Appellant's Contention. Appellant's states that any formula used to caluclate parking for religious facilities must be based on the operational charateristics of the religion being analyzed. The formula used by the Development Code is intended to calculate the parking needs for western style churches. As a result, it is incapable of insuring that adequate parking will exist for Muslim facilities. The insufficient parking requirement generated by the Development Code will cause the surrounding streets to be overburdend and thus endanger the public safety and welfare. Staff Response The City Development Code provides a formula for calculating parking for religious facilities. It does not make distinction between religious denominations. This is consistent with Development Code regulations in cities throughout the State of California. The proposed Project has met all Development Code requirements related to parking. Per Table 17.24.040 of the Development Code, religious facilities shall be parked at a rate of one space for every three fixed seats, and one space for every 35 square feet of assembly area where there are no fixed seats. A Mosque does not use fixed seats. Staff calculated parking based on the assembly area and determined that Phase 1 will require 91 parking spaces (104 provided). The Phase 1 sanctuary will cease to be utlized as a sanctuary after construction of Phase 2. Consequently, the Phase 1 sanctuary square footage is not included in the calculation for Phase 2 parking requirements. Thus, the Phase 2 sanctuary will require 98 parking spaces (181 provided). The Project will have adequate parking for both Phases as required by the Development Code. Additionally, the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) has released the 4th edition of their Parking Generation Report. An analysis of Mosque parking requirements was included in the Report. The ITE Report used the total square footage of each facility analyzed in their calculations instead of only the prayer areas. This means the analysis factored in meeting rooms, classrooms, and all other areas of the facilities studied. The study concluded that 6.3 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area is needed to ensure adequate Mosque parking. Using the ITE Report parking supply ratio, Phase 1 of the Project (4,157 total square feet) will require 27 parking spaces; 104 spaces are provided. Phase 2 (24,943 total square feet including that of Phase 1) will require 158 parking spaces; 181 spaces are provided. The Project provides for a total of 181 spaces for both Phases. Traffic Appellant's Contention. Appellant contends that the traffic study was released five days before the hearing and as a result, did not give the public enough time to review the document. The study has four main issues: (1) the times of day studied avoid the heaviest usage and "rush hour" of the two adjacent churches and the Mosque; (2) analysis of street locations in relation to the ingress and egress of the Project was not conducted; (3) accident history was not evaluated; and, (4) infrastructure improvements should be completed immediately and not in the future by another developer. The Project will result in more area traffic which creates a substantial burden on the religious exercise of the adjacent churches and the free access of the residents in the area thus violating RLUIPA. Staff Response The study was made available for public review on November 24, 2010. The analysis revealed that the applicant will need to provide as mitigation, a two-way left turn lane along the Project frontage on the eastbound approach of the Nicolas Road/Calle Colibri intersection to make impacts for the Project less than significant. The study intersections were selected based on criteria identified in the guidelines established by the County of Riverside's Traffic Impact Analysis Preparation Guide, which is used by the City. The days and peak hours studied were based on the actual operations of the proposed use. Accident history is not typically included in this type of study because a Traffic Impact Analysis (TIA) is a planning tool that is used for forecasting demands on the transportation network that are associated with new development based on accepted practice. Road improvements are designed and modified to minimize accidents. If a road or intersection has a higher incident of accidents then the Public Works Traffic Division analyzes the issue and recommends modification to the Public Safety Traffic Commission for their approval. Roadways analyzed in the traffic study did not have a higher incident of traffic accidents than what is typical found. The roads are designed to carry traffic volumes both currently and if and when the Project is developed. Future traffic infrastructure improvements are expected to be developed as part of the development of residential projects in the surrounding area. The traffic study prepared for the Project indicates there are no significant traffic impacts. It also states that impacts created by the Project can be mitigated to a level of no significance. Since traffic for the Project is considered insignificant with mitigation, there should be no impact to surrounding religious facilities, therefore no violation of RLUIPA will occur. Emergency Evacuation Appellant's Contention. Appellant contends that Calle Colibri will become congested during an emergency as vehicles attempt to leave the area. This will not allow access for rescue vehicles. Staff Response The Project has been designed and conditioned to ensure that all required improvements to Calle Colibri will be completed. These improvements include: Phase 1, the developer shall construct: A. Calle Colibri from the northerly driveway to the southerly terminus of the cul-de-sac to include installation of half -width street improvements plus twelve feet, paving, curb and gutter, sidewalk, drainage facilities, signing, striping and utilities (including but not limited to water and sewer). Phase 2, the developer shall construct: A. Calle Colibri from Nicolas Road to the northerly drive approach to include installation of half -width street improvements plus twelve feet, paving, curb and gutter, sidewalk, drainage facilities, signing, striping and utilities (including but not limited to water and sewer). B. Nicolas Road, from westerly property boundary to Calle Colibiri, to include installation of half -width street improvements, paving, curb and gutter, sidewalk, streetlight, drainage facilities, signing and striping, utilities (including but not limited to water and sewer) including pavement transition per Caltrans' standard. All road improvements required meet emergency vehicle access standards and have been reviewed and accepted by the Fire and Police Departments. Therefore emergency access on Calle Colibri will not be impaired by this Project. Environmental Issues Appellant's Contention. Appellant contends that Grace Presbyterian Church was required to complete an Environmental Impact Report while the proposed Mosque was only required to complete a Mitigated Negative Declaration. In addition, no evidence was presented that all appropriate agencies were notified. Staff Response The Initial Study for the Project was drafted and routed to all appropriate agencies on May 28, 2010. Comments received from outside agencies were incorporated into the Mitigated Negative Declaration. The study revealed that Project impacts could be mitigated to less than significant levels. As a result, an Environmental Impact Report was not required for the project. The City's project file for Grace Presbyterian Church (PA02-0257) shows that the Church was not required to prepare an Environmental Impact Report for approval of its facilities. A Mitigated Negative Declaration was prepared for the Grace Presbyterian Church project in the same manner as the subject application. Flood Plain Issues Appellant's Contention. Appellant contends that other religious facilities have been told they could not build in the area near the proposed Project because of the flood plain. In addition, City officials are trying to remove the property from flood plain designation. Staff Response The Initial Study developed for the Project examined the potential flood risk as required by CEQA. Mitigation measures have been incorporated to ensure impacts are less than significant. The City has prepared a preliminary flood plain analysis irrespective of the proposed Project as the area in general has not been official been mapped by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Based on City flood plain analysis, Grace Presbyterian and Calvary Baptist have been able to develop in areas that are clearly out of the flood plain. In both cases, the facilities have located parking lots in what is believed to be the flood plain. This is consistent with FEMA regulations. The Project has been conditioned that only Phase 1 of the project can move forward immediately if the Project is approved. Construction of Phase 2 cannot begin until the applicant submits a CLOMAR (Conditional Letter of Map Revision) to FEMA to obtain an official detemination as to what is the actual flood plain limit. Once this is obtained and it clearly identifies that Phase 2 structures are out of the flood plain, then the applicant may proceed with Phase 2. If FEMA determines that Phase 2 of the Project is within a flood plain, the applicant will be required to redesign, if possible from an engineering standpoint, the Project to insure that all buildings are located above the flood plain levels before they are able to move forward with Phase 2. This redesign would trigger the need for a Major Modification to the Conditional Use Permit which would require a public hearing before the Planning Commission to consider the redesign. While the applicant is required to prepare the request to FEMA, determining the actual flood plain limit will be of benefit to all property owners in the Nicolas Valley area. Other Churches Have Been Denied Permits Appellant's Contention. Appellant contends that other religious organizations have inquired about constructing facilities in the same area as the proposed Project and that these requests have been denied. Staff Response Staff has reviewed applications for other religious facilities in the area of the Project since incorportation. These applications have included an expansion of Calvary Baptist Church, the construction of Grace Presbyterian Church, and applications related to the construction of a Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witnesses facility. These projects were approved by the City. Height of Minarets Appellant's Contention. Appellant contends that the "Equal Footing" intent of RLUIPA will be violated if the crescents for the proposed project are taller than the steeple for Calvary Baptist Church. Staff Response The height of the minarets (40 feet) are within Development Code requirements. For comparison, the height of the steeple for Calvary Baptist Church is 55 feet at grade and 60.5 feet at the bottom of stairs facing Calle Colibri. The maximum overall height of the proposed facility is 43 feet at grade, including minarets and crescents. This height meets Development Code standards and is less than the height of the steeple for Calvary Baptist Church. Additionally, the Riverside County Airport Land Use Commission (RCALUC) reviewed the project and concluded that its height will not have an impact on French Valley Airport. The following mitigation was recommended by the Commission and these mitigation measures have been incorporated into the condtions of approval: • The following uses shall be prohibited: o Any use which would direct steady light or flashing light of red, white, green, or amber colors associated with airport operations toward an aircraft engaged in an initial straight climb following takeoff or toward an aircraft engaged in a straight final approach toward a landing at an airport, other than an FAA approved navigational signal light or visual approach slope indicator. o Any use which would cause sunlight to be reflected towards an aircraft engaged in an initial straight climb following takeoff or towards an aircraft engaged in a straight final approach towards a landing at an airport. o Any use which would generate smoke or water vapor or which would attract large concentrations of birds, or which may otherwise affect safe air navigation within the area. o Any use which would generate electrical interference that may be detrimental to the operation of aircraft and/or aircraft instrumentation. • Any outdoor lighting that is installed shall be hooded or shielded so as to prevent either the spillage of lumens or reflection into the sky. • The attached notice shall be provided to all potential purchasers and tenants of the property and shall be recorded as a deed notice (notice is attached to the Mitigation Monitoring Program). No Sunday Services Appellant's Contention. Appellant contends that conducting Sunday school will increase traffic congestion. The project should be prohibited from operating on Sundays. Staff Response The traffic study analyzed this issue and concluded that traffic impacts will be reduced to less than significant levels with the recommended mitigation on any day of the week. Since traffic can be mitigated on Sundays as well as other days, there is no valid reason to prohibit services on Sunday. Substantial Burden Issues as to RLUIPA Appellant's Contention: Appellant contends that the "Substantial Burden" verbiage within RLUIPA requires that the project should be moved to a new location. Staff Response The proposed Project will be located within a Very Low (VL) density zoning district. Religious facilities are permitted within VL zones upon the approval of a Conditional Use Permit. The Project was granted a Conditional Use Permit by the Planning Commission on December 1, 2010 consistent with the City's Development Code standards. Impacts on other religious facilities and uses in the area of the Project were studied as part of the Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration. The Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration concluded that there are no substantial impacts on other religious facilities or uses in the area of the Project. No Impartial Review Appellant's Contention. Appellant contends that City officials have violated the Brown Act in the following ways: (1) attempting to conduct a hearing without posting a notice at the site; (2) posting a notice on the wrong property and allowing it to fall; (3) releasing a memorandum changing future Planning Commission dates to the new Civic Center; and, (4) releasing a Resolution indicating Project approval. Response Notices of the public hearings before both the Planning Commission and City Council fully comply with state law and the City's Development Code. The City of Temecula Development Code and state law require that notices for public hearings shall be posted not less than 10 calendar days prior to the public hearing. The City is prohibited from conducting pubic hearings without legal notice. No such attempt occurred. Originally it was intended to schedule the public hearing for late August of 2010. Based on concerns raised by those in opposition to the Project, the Project was delayed while the applicant voluntarily agreed to pay the City to have a traffic study prepared for the Project. The Project was then noticed for a November 17, 2010 hearing. However, the Public Notice sign was inadvertently posted on the wrong property. The meeting was cancelled and a press release was sent to local media explaining the error and the need to postpone the hearing to December 1, 2010. A new sign advertising the revised hearing date of December 1, 2010 was posted on the correct location on November 9, 2010. Staff visited the site every day between this date and the date of the public hearing and verified that it remained in place on each day. In addition new notices were mailed to all property owners within a 1300 -foot radius of the proposed Project , consistent with Development Code Requirments, which stated the hearing had been rescheduled to December 1, 2010. An Agenda Report for the December 1, 2010 Planning Commission agenda provided for the official designation of the new City Hall as the location for future meetings of the Planning Commission as required by the Brown Act. The new City Hall was opened for meetings in the new Council Chambers on December 14, 2010, so the Planning Commission meeting of December 1, 2010 was the last meeting before the move. This Agenda Report was listed as Item 2 in the Consent Calendar section and the Islamic Center of Temecula Valley was listed as Item 3 in the separate Public Hearing Items section. In addition, the December 1, 2010 Planning Commission Agenda clearly identified 43200 Business Park Drive as the location of the hearing location. Further all mailed notices to surrounding property owners clearly noted the date of the meeting and the location at 43200 Business Park Drive. A draft Resolution of Approval for the proposed Project was also included as part of the December 1, 2010 agenda. This was a draft prepared by the Staff consistent with the Staff's recommendation for approval of the Project. The resolution would not be a binding legal document until approved by a vote of the Planning Commission following the public hearing. The Brown Act requires that all documents to be acted on by the Planning Commission be placed in the Agenda packet for public review prior to the meeting. The placement of this document is not only legally required but is standard practice for public hearing items so the public can see the specific findings proposed for the Project. If the Planning Commission had denied the request on December 1, 2010, staff would have been directed to return with a Resolution of Denial at the next Planning Commission meeting. No Consideration of SB 375 Appellant's Contention. Appellant contends that SB 375 is designed to lessen sprawl and that SB 375 was never considered as part of the Project analysis. Staff Response The City of Temecula General Plan, through the Land Use Element, governs development activity within the City. The element does this by identifying the proposed general distribution, location, and extent of land uses including residential commercial and office, light industrial, public/institutional and open spaces areas. This ensures responsible growth for the City on a macro level. Senate Bill 375 is designed to be implemented within this macro context. Implementation for the Bill is conducted by the State's Metropolitan Planning Organizations in an effort to create a sustainable community strategy at the regional level. SB 375 thresholds apply to an individual project only if a developer requests a streamline CEQA review or exemption. No such requests were made by the developer of the proposed Project. Other Documentation Appellant's Contention. The appeal listed a variety of attachments as support of the positions presented. Several of these attachments were not provided to staff as of the printing of this report. These items include video of the parking and traffic at the Corona Mosque and video of the traffic conditions at the intersection of Calle Medusa and Nicolas Road. Response Staff is unable to comment on documentation that was not provided for review. FISCAL IMPACT: None. ATTACHMENTS: Draft Resolution December 1, 2010 Planning Commission Staff Report Appeal Application and Corresponding Attachments Planning Commission Resolution No. 10-26 December 1, 2010 Planning Commission Minutes Public Correspondence STAFF DRAFT OF RESOLUTION NOT EFFECTIVE UNTIL VOTED ON BY CITY COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 11- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DENYING THE APPEAL OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION'S DECISION AND APPROVING PLANNING APPLICATION NOS. PA08-0241 AND PA08- 0242, A TWO-PHASE DEVELOPMENT PLAN AND CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT FOR A TWO-STORY, 24,943 SQUARE FOOT RELIGIOUS FACILITY ON 4.32 ACRES WITHIN A VERY LOW (VL) RESIDENTIAL ZONE LOCATED AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF NICOLAS ROAD AND CALLE COLIBRI (APN 957-140-012) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. Stephen Sigler of Axis 3 Architecture Inc. representing the Islamic Center of Temecula Valley filed Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242, in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. B. Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242 were processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law. C. The Planning Commission, at a regular meeting, considered Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242 on December 1, 2010 at a duly noticed public hearing as prescribed by law, at which time City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. D. On December 15, 2010, George Rombach filed a timely appeal of the Planning Commission's decision approving Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242. E. The City Council, at a regular meeting, considered Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242 on January 25, 2011 at a duly noticed public hearing as prescribed by law, at which time City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. Section 2. Findings. The City Council in approving Planning Applications PA08-0241 and PA08-0242 (Development Plan with a Conditional Use Permit) hereby makes the following findings as required by Section 17.05.010.F of the Temecula Municipal Code. STAFF DRAFT OF RESOLUTION NOT EFFECTIVE UNTIL VOTED ON BY CITY COUNCIL Development Plan (Code Section 17.05.010.F) A. The proposed use is in conformance with the General Plan for Temecula and with all applicable requirements of State law and other Ordinances of the City; As conditioned, the project is consistent with the General Plan. The General Plan has listed the proposed use as a compatible use within residential areas, and the project is in conformance with other Ordinances of the City and State law. B. The overall development of the land is designed for the protection of the public health, safety, and general welfare; As conditioned, the project has been found to be consistent with all applicable policies, guidelines, standards and regulations intended to ensure that the project will be constructed and function in a manner consistent with the protection of the public health, safety, and general welfare. In addition, the project has also been reviewed by a variety of external government agencies as part of the Initial Study process to further ensure that the project has been designed and appropriately conditioned so that it will not be detrimental to the public health, safety, and general welfare. Conditional Use Permit (Section 17.04.010.E) A. The proposed conditional use is consistent with the General Plan and the Development Code; The proposed religious facility is located within a Very Low (VL) residential district. Religious facilities require a Conditional Use Permit in VL zones. As designed and conditioned the project is consistent with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. B. The proposed conditional use is compatible with the nature, condition and development of adjacent uses, buildings and structures and the proposed conditional use will not adversely affect the adjacent uses, buildings or structures; The proposed use is for a religious facility located within a Very Low (VL) residential district. According to the City of Temecula Development Code, these types of uses are allowed in all residential districts upon the approval of a Conditional Use Permit. Custom single-family homes surround the project on all sides with the exception of the east side. An existing religious facility lies to the east of the proposed project. As designed and conditioned, the project will not adversely affect adjacent uses, buildings or structures. C. The site for a proposed conditional use is adequate in size and shape to accommodate the yards, walls, fences, parking and loading facilities, buffer areas, STAFF DRAFT OF RESOLUTION NOT EFFECTIVE UNTIL VOTED ON BY CITY COUNCIL landscaping, and other development features prescribed in this Development Code and required by the Planning Commission or City Council in order to integrate the use with other uses in the neighborhood; As designed and conditioned the yards, walls, fences, parking and loading facilities, buffer areas, landscaping, and other development features required in the City of Temecula Development Code have been satisfied. As a result, the project will integrate into the surrounding area in much the same way as the immediately adjacent existing religious facility. D. The nature of the proposed conditional use is not detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of the community; The project is a religious facility to be located in a Very Low (VL) residential zoning district. Religious facilities are a permitted use in VL zones with the approval of a Conditional Use Permit. As designed and conditioned, the project is consistent with the Temecula General Plan and Development Code, which contains provisions to protect the health, safety and general welfare of the community. E. That the decision to approve, conditionally approve, or deny the application for a Conditional Use Permit be based on substantial evidence in view of the record as a whole before the Planning Commission or City Council on appeal; The decision to approve, conditionally approve, or deny the application for the Conditional Use Permit will be based on substantial evidence in view of the record as a whole before the Planning Commission. Section 3. Environmental Compliance. The City Council hereby makes the following environmental findings and determinations in connection with the approval of the Project: A. Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act ("CEQA") and the City's local CEQA Guidelines, City staff prepared an Initial Study of the potential environmental effects of the approval of the Project as described in the Initial Study (the "Project"). Based upon the findings contained in that Study, City staff determined that there was no substantial evidence that the project could have a significant effect on the environment and a Mitigated Negative Declaration was prepared. STAFF DRAFT OF RESOLUTION NOT EFFECTIVE UNTIL VOTED ON BY CITY COUNCIL B. Thereafter, City staff provided public notice of the public comment period and of the intent to adopt the Mitigated Negative Declaration as required by law. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Planning Department. Prior to December 20, 2010, the Planning Department Offices were located at City Hall, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California and beginning December 20, 2010, at 41000 Main Street, Temecula California C. The City Council has reviewed the Mitigated Negative Declaration and all written and oral comments received regarding the Mitigated Negative Declaration prior to and at the January 25, 2011 public hearing, and based on the whole record before it, finds that: (1) the Mitigated Negative Declaration was prepared in compliance with CEQA; (2) there is no substantial evidence that the Project will have a significant effect on the environment; and, (3) the Mitigated Negative Declaration reflects the independent judgment and analysis of the City Council. D. Based on the findings set forth in this Resolution, the City Council hereby adopts the Mitigated Negative Declaration prepared for the project. The Director of Planning and Redevelopment is authorized and directed to file a Notice of Determination in accordance with CEQA. Section 4. Decision. That the City Council of the City of Temecula hereby denies the Appeal and approves Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242 (Development Plan with a Conditional Use Permit), subject to the Conditions of Approval set forth on Exhibit A, attached hereto, and incorporated herein by this reference. STAFF DRAFT OF RESOLUTION NOT EFFECTIVE UNTIL VOTED ON BY CITY COUNCIL PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 25th day of January, 2011. Ron Roberts, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 11- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 25th day of January, 2011, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk DATE OF MEETING: PREPARED BY: PROJECT SUM MARY: RECOMMENDATION: CEQA: STAFF REPORT — PLANNING CITY OF TEMECULA PLANNING COMMISSION December 1, 2010 Eric Jones, Case Planner Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242, a two-phase Development Plan and Conditional Use Permit for a two-story, 24,943 square foot religious facility on 4.32 acres within a VL zone located at the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri Approve with Conditions Mitigated Negative Declaration w/ Monitoring Plan Section 15070 PROJECT DATA SUMMARY Name of Applicant: General Plan Designation: Stephen Sigler, Axis 3 Architecture, on behalf of owner, Islamic Center of Temecula Valley Very Low (VL) Residential Zoning Designation: Very Low (VL) Residential Existing Conditions/ Land Use: Site: Vacant Lot/Very Low (VL) Residential North: South: East: West: Nicolas Road - Single Family Home/Very Low (VL) Residential Single Family Home/Very Low (VL) Residential Existing Religious Facility/Very Low (VL) Residential Single Family Home/Very Low (VL) Residential Lot Area: Total Floor Area/Ratio: Landscape Area/Coverage: Parking Required/Provided: Existing/Proposed Min/Max Allowable or Required 4.32 Acres 2.5 Acres Minimum .13 Proposed .20 Maximum 55% Proposed N/A Phase 1: 104 Proposed 91 Required Phase 2: 181 Proposed 98 Required BACKGROUND SUMMARY On October 14, 2008, Stephen Sigler of Axis 3 Architecture, Inc. submitted Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242, a Development Plan and Conditional Use Permit application designed to allow for the construction of a 24,943 square foot religious facility located within a Very Low (VL) residential zoning district. No daycare or formal educational institution is proposed as part of the project. The applicant has proposed to construct the project in two phases. Phase one of the project will feature a 4,157 square foot building. This structure will include a prayer hall, restrooms, and a storage area. The site plan for phase one illustrates that parking will be located mostly at the rear of the structure. Landscaping will be placed between the front of the structure and Nicolas Road. Phase two of the project will consist of a 20,786 square foot two-story expansion of phase one. The expansion will include a new prayer hall and several offices and classrooms. These rooms will be used in a manner typical for religious facilities in that they will create space for activities such as religious study and counseling. Parking will be added along the front of the structure in the second phase. The existing prayer hall will be converted to multi-purpose space. Staff has worked with the applicant to ensure that all concerns have been addressed, and the applicant concurs with the recommended Conditions of Approval. ANALYSIS Site Plan The project site will be constructed on a parcel totaling 4.32 acres in a Very Low (VL) residential zoning district. Nicolas Road borders the subject property to the north and Calle Colibri is a cul- de-sac bordering the property to the east. The subject property is surrounded by custom single- family homes to the north, south, and west. An existing religious facility is located immediately to the east across Calle Colibri. Phase one of the project will consist of a one-story 4,157 square foot religious facility. This structure will contain a prayer hall, restrooms and storage space. A playground will also be provided at the east side of the building. Ingress and egress to the site will occur at two points. The primary access to the facility will be placed at the southern end of Calle Colibri. This entrance will take patrons into the parking lot in which the applicant will provide 104 spaces. For phase one, 91 spaces are required per Table 17.24.040 of the City of Temecula Development Code. The site plan also shows that decorative stamped concrete will be used in the areas consisting of the disabled parking spaces. The pedestrian walkway leading from the southernmost portion of the parking to the facility also features the same decorative paving. A seven -foot retaining wall will be installed at the southern end of the parking lot. This retaining wall will be designed to match the fencing around the property. The plans call for the area between the structure and Nicolas Road to be landscaped until the construction of phase two. A secondary entrance has been provided on Calle Colibri and is located approximately 200 feet south of Nicolas Road. For phase one of the project this point of access will lead to the parking lot through a decomposed granite path within the landscaping just described. This vehicular access path will be removed upon the start of construction of phase two. Phase two of the project will consist of a two-story, 20,786 square foot expansion to phase one. This structure will contain a prayer hall with a balcony replacing the prayer hall in phase one, classroom space and offices. According to the Statement of Operation, the classroom space will be devoted to Sunday School programs. The Statement of Operations also indicates that no other classroom activities will occur during Sunday School and that no classroom activities will occur during Friday services. Access to the facility will remain the same as phase one with the exception that the decomposed granite travel lane will be paved. The disabled spaces and pedestrian walkway will feature the same decorative concrete as phase one. The phase one sanctuary will cease to be utilized as a sanctuary after construction of phase two. Per Table 17.24.040 of the City of Temecula Development Code, parking for religious facilities must be parked at a rate of one space per every 35 square feet of assembly area where there are no fixed seats. Phase two will require 98 parking spaces based on this calculation. As part of phase two, the applicant has elected to provide an additional 77 parking spaces to the original 104 for a total of 181 parking spaces at the completion of the project. Architecture The project includes many design elements typically found in traditional Islamic architecture, but also contains many elements of Mediterranean architecture which is widely found in Southern California. For example, the applicant has chosen to use mission style clay tiles for much of the roof with the exception of the dome, and a tile mosaic has been proposed for sections of the exterior wall. Stucco will also be incorporated in the project. The stucco will use three different neutral colors to create accents for both phases of the structure. Two minarets have been included in the design. These traditional Islamic architectural elements have been carefully blended into the project in order to ensure they are in visual harmony with the rest of the structure. They will also be the same height as the main structure. The dome and a portion of the roofing for the minarets will feature a metal roof consisting of the color Cool Copper Penny. This type of roofing has been done in the City before, most notably at the Penny Dome building in Old Town located at 41888 Fourth Street. The project will feature a total building height of 40 feet. The limit for structures in a Very Low (VL) residential district is 35 feet. However, per the City of Temecula Development Code (Section 17.06.050.G), certain architectural elements may exceed the zone height limit by no more than 15 feet. The overall building height of the project does not exceed this 15 -foot threshold. Fencing will surround the property and will incorporate wrought iron elements with interspersed pilasters that will provide a decorative appearance. Landscaping will also be provided along the fencing were it is adjacent to the public right-of-way to help soften its effect. Landscaping Landscaping for the project will feature a variety of trees shrubs and ground cover plant material. These plant materials will surround the property and will thus serve as a way to soften the hardscape features such as pedestrian walkways, drive isles, and parking areas. Phase one of the project will feature wildflower hydroseed mix landscaping in the area that will contain phase two. This effectively means that landscaping during phase one will cover nearly the entire area between the structure and Nicolas Road and help create a finished look for phase one. The hill immediately above the retaining wall located at the southern end of the property will also feature an abundance of landscaping including Magnolia trees and Cape Mallow shrubs. Landscaping for the parking areas for both phases have been designed to include landscape planters at the end of each parking row and a minimum 5 foot landscape planting area along the perimeter of the entire parking area. All planting areas will utilize drought tolerant plants. These design features are consistent with the City of Temecula Development Code (Section 17.24.050. H). Traffic The applicant voluntarily agreed to the development of a traffic study. This study study was prepared by KOA Corporation under the direction of the Public Works Department Traffic Division and submitted to the City on November 11, 2010. Based on the intersections and roadways evaluated, the study reveals that if the recommended mitigation is followed, the proposed project will not result in a significant impact on the city's circulation system. In order to ensure a complete and comprehensive analysis of the proposed project's impacts, KOA Corporation analyzed the following intersections: • Winchester Road and Margarita Road • Winchester Road and Nicolas Road • Nicolas Road and General Kearny Road • Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri • Walcott Lane and La Serena Way The following cumulative projects were also included in the analysis: Project Name Size Land Use Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witness 8,264 Square Feet Religious Facility Saraphina 67 Single -Family Homes Single -Family Residential Roripaugh Ranch 2,015 Single -Family Homes Single -Family Residential AM/PM Car Wash 946 Square Feet Commercial Gas Station Car Wash Walcott Estates 45 Single -Family Homes Single -Family Residential The traffic study analysis of the intersections and cumulative projects listed above revealed that the applicant will need to provide, as mitigation, a two-way left turn lane along the project frontage on the eastbound approach of the Nicolas Road/Calle Colibri intersection. Project impacts at this intersection will be made less than significant with the inclusion of this measure and it is included in the Mitigation Monitoring Program for the project. The study also revealed that intersections of Winchester Road/Nicolas Road and Winchester Road/Margarita Road are operating and will continue to operate at unsatisfactory levels of service. This is a result of existing uses compounded by a heavier traffic load when the pick-up time for Chaparral High School (2 p.m.) and the proposed Roripaugh Ranch project to the east are added to the analysis. Recognizing that the Level of Service and delays at intersections along Winchester Road are currently operating less than satisfactory, the City of Temecula has initiated the implementation of an Adaptive Traffic Signal System to mitigate conditions. The adaptive system monitors traffic flows system wide and adjusts traffic signal cycle lengths to address the changes in traffic flows, minimize delays, and improve system progression. By virtue of this continual monitoring, intersection LOS is improved significantly, typically by 10 to 15 percent. The implementation of the adaptive system will be completed by April 2011. The traffic study utilized the adaptive system to analyze the operation of the intersections of Winchester Road/Nicolas Road and Winchester Road/Margarita Road and found that it will mitigate the intersections to a level of no significant impact. Operational Characteristics The applicant has submitted a Statement of Operations as part of their application materials. Per the Statement of Operations, hours of operation for the religious facility shall be as follows: Monday through Thursday: 5:30 a.m. — 6 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. - 9:15 p.m. Friday: 12:15 p.m. — 2:45 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. — 10:00 p.m. Saturday (last week of the month): 7:00 p.m. — 10:00 p.m. Sunday (Sunday school): 9:00 a.m. — 1:00 p.m. The Statement of Operations indicates that no other types of classroom activities will be conducted during Sunday school sessions and Fridays will consist of religious services with no classroom activities occurring simultaneously. In addition, no daycare facility will be included as part of the project. LEGAL NOTICING REQUIREMENTS Notice of the public hearing was published in the Californian on November 17, 2010 and mailed to the property owners within the required 1300 -foot radius. ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINATION Staff has reviewed the project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and based on an Initial Study, it has been determined the project will not have a significant impact on the environment; therefore, a Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared for the project. An Initial Study was prepared for the project in an effort to further evaluate if the project would generate any potentially significant impacts to the environment. This document was distributed and made available for public review on May 28, 2010. The results of the Initial Study show environmental impacts for the project are all less than significant with the mitigation proposed in the Mitigation Monitoring Program developed for the project. FINDINGS Development Plan (Section 17.050.010.F) The proposed use is in conformance with the General Plan for Temecula and with all applicable requirements of State law and other Ordinances of the City. As conditioned, the project is consistent with the General Plan. The General Plan has listed the proposed use as a compatible use within residential areas, and the project is in conformance with other Ordinances of the City and State law. The overall development of the land is designed for the protection of the public health, safety, and general welfare. As conditioned, the project has been found to be consistent with all applicable policies, guidelines, standards and regulations intended to ensure that the project will be constructed and function in a manner consistent with the protection of the public health, safety, and general welfare. In addition, the project has also been reviewed by a variety of external government agencies as part of the Initial Study process to further ensure that the project has been designed and appropriately conditioned so that it will not be detrimental to the public health, safety, and general welfare. Conditional Use Permit (Section 17.04.010.E) The proposed conditional use is consistent with the General Plan and the Development Code. The proposed religious facility is located within a Very Low (VL) residential district. Religious facilities require a Conditional Use Permit in VL zones. As designed and conditioned the project is consistent with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. The proposed conditional use is compatible with the nature, condition and development of adjacent uses, buildings and structures and the proposed conditional use will not adversely affect the adjacent uses, buildings or structures. The proposed use is for a religious facility located within a Very Low (VL) residential district. According to the City of Temecula Development Code, these types of uses are allowed in all residential districts upon the approval of a Conditional Use Permit. Custom single-family homes surround the project on all sides with the exception of the east side. An existing religious facility lies to the east of the proposed project. As designed and conditioned, the project will not adversely affect adjacent uses, buildings or structures. The site for a proposed conditional use is adequate in size and shape to accommodate the yards, walls, fences, parking and loading facilities, buffer areas, landscaping, and other development features prescribed in this Development Code and required by the Planning Commission or City Council in order to integrate the use with other uses in the neighborhood. As designed and conditioned the yards, walls, fences, parking and loading facilities, buffer areas, landscaping, and other development features required in the City of Temecula Development Code have been satisfied. As a result, the project will integrate into the surrounding area in much the same way as the immediately adjacent existing religious facility. The nature of the proposed conditional use is not detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of the community. The project is a religious facility to be located in a Very Low (VL) residential zoning district. Religious facilities are a permitted use in VL zones with the approval of a Conditional Use Permit. As designed and conditioned, the project is consistent with the Temecula General Plan and Development Code, which contains provisions to protect the health, safety and general welfare of the community. That the decision to approve, conditionally approve, or deny the application for a Conditional Use Permit be based on substantial evidence in view of the record as a whole before the Planning Commission or City Council on appeal. The decision to approve, conditionally approve, or deny the application for the Conditional Use Permit will be based on substantial evidence in view of the record as a whole before the Planning Commission. ATTACHMENTS Vicinity Map Plan Reductions Statement of Operations PC Resolution Exhibit A - Draft Conditions of Approval Initial Study Mitigation Monitoring Plan Responses to Initial Study Traffic Study Public Correspondence Notice of Public Hearing 0ce>' hi°LUI hi HIGHLAND VISTA CIR — .� SO_NIA�,,� a LN ./ �� PARK I S .11 QVISTA CIR v P • & TERRAEE t' 'tom Y Z VIEW CIR 1') CHE ��PKY 1 _ EAST';,�.011� ik • x Au. at' . � 111 -tj al ^ HILLGREST .3 DONS= p\- oak f JR me$ ■ ■ 0 iQ MOO MEW NE= MI MN 111 imomm SKYLINE ar ti PA08.0241 1 1 11111111WAuui/h:11 R ❑ cc w 1 Maw MOM X1111 Ce 0 0 01 w �70N C,Tff OOK-RDi RITA WY Project Site GATLIN RDS e- 110 - Irn it G Ia • l o<V.P S„ --S01 1 PA ; 4k 4111 Pit tramo AR swim. priso di 1* O 01‘11)'cn c• i iog op, tcock 500 1 ov cro�_ ar, tfrAr 441.rs got( • Oar 1,000 2,000 Feet 7 \\X A 1 1-.-1-VIAtNORTE-11---L 000 I . n±5-AI5 ,6 . 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IGROUNIDCC.',VER PLANTING: . —... 1...., ..,..-.;'/...., 7-------:\ i::';:,-"- .,, J • ''''. - .i ' ' ' ' ' ' ' j '• 1-:., 3 .., , 0P -...,. .7?: i . .1- I I JUTE MESH 51'4E311_1=R _I --) 1 v i'y ggvSSZCig6 Hd! 1-!,!!v-,4 OG.r...T.:1.,1 ID "7 -1,71.: -..rel 1 t ---t----1.---, :.wrrs -.c..ci-",: c.... nzt: r- 1,,,n0=.) TT -NO Wr' SV1.0DN :-.,/,` 03A101 )3TIVA V113.3VE. 1 iPi 1 r . 1 (0 z 13NNV -O 28751 Rancho California Rd. SUITE 208 Temecula, CA. 92590 (951)506-2800 (951)506-3988 fox AXIS ARCHITECTURE, INC STEPHEN C. SIGLER A.I.A. LIC. NO. C 19090 stephen®oxls3orchitecture.net Date: November 1, 2010 To: City of Temecula, Planning Department Subject: Regarding: ICTV Community Center Facility Located at Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri Road City of Temecula Plot Plan Approval, PA 08-0242 "Statement of Operations", revised 11.1.10 The following is the proposed facility operations: The facility is approximately 24,943 gross sq. ft., two story structure for religious and community functions that are being planned and constructed in two separate phases. Phase One, one story, 4,157 s.f. community center Parking required for this phase is 91 spaces. Total parking provided is 104 spaces. Phase Two is a two-story Mosque and community center. Main level is 12,481 s.f., and the second floor is 8,305 for a total of 20, 786 gross square feet. Parking required for Phase Two is 98 spaces. The total parking for both phases is 181 spaces. Outdoor Activities: The only outdoor activity related to our normal operation of the facility will be related to the children's playground. Adequate parking, landscaping, open space, play area and driveways have been included to enhance the overall design and function. 28751 Rancho Collfornlo R. SUITE 208 Temaculo. CA. 92590 (951)506-2800 (951)506-3988 fox AXIS ARCHITECTURE, INC STEPHEN C. SIGLER A.I.A. LIC. N. C 19090 staphan®oxls3orchltacture. net a.) Hours of operation: Phase One Facility; Monday thru Thursday, 5:30 thru 6:00 am, and 8:30 thru 9:15 pm. Friday services from 12:15 thru 2:45 pm., and 7:00 thru 10:00 pm. Saturday services, last week of the month, from 7pm —1 Opm. Sunday School services program from 9 am —1 pm. Phase Two Facility, Monday thru Thursday, 5:30 thru 6:00 am, and 8:30 thru 9:15 pm. Friday services from 12:15 thru 2:45 pm., and 7:00 thru 10:00 pm. Saturday services, last week of the month, from 7pm — 1 Opm. Sunday School services program from 9 am —1 pm. b.) Number of employees: Phase One and Phase Two; one employee, Pastor/Imam. One religious leader, Pastor/Imam will be compensated on the basis of a service contract. c.) Required parking for this facility is 91 spaces for phase one. The phase one sanctuary will cease to be utilized as a sanctuary after construction of phase two. 98 spaces are required for phase two of the project. A total of 181 spaces, including 7 motorcycle spaces, will provided at the completion of phase 2. d.) Average daily peak trips anticipated is sixty five (65). e.) Equipment anticipated use: none f.) Hazardous material: none 28751 Rancho Collfornlo Rd. SUITE 208 Tamocula. CA. 92590 (951)506-2800 (951)506-3988 fox AXIS ARCHITECTURE, INC STEPHEN C. SIGLER A.I.A. LIC. NO. C 19090 stephsn®oxls3orchltactura.nat g.) The exterior spires or minarets at the roof area are for design purposes only and at no time during phase one or two will there be any audible prayer calls or outdoor public announcements. h.) The proposed use is a Mosque and community center. PC RESOLUTION NO. 10 - PLANNING APPLICATION NOS. PA08-0241 AND PA08- 0242, A TWO-PHASE DEVELOPMENT PLAN AND CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT FOR A TWO-STORY, 24,943 SQUARE FOOT RELIGIOUS FACILITY ON 4.32 ACRES WITHIN A VERY LOW (VL) RESIDENTIAL ZONE LOCATED AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF NICOLAS ROAD AND CALLE COLIBRI (APN 957-140-012) Section 1. Procedural Findings. The Planning Commission of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. On October 14, 2008, Stephen Sigler, Axis 3 Architecture, on behalf of owner, Islamic Center of Temecula Valley filed Planning Application No. PA08-0241, a Development Plan, and Planning Application No. PA08-0242, a Conditional Use Permit Application. Both applications were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. B. The Applications were processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law. C. The Planning Commission, at a regular meeting, considered the Application and environmental review on December 1, 2010, at a duly noticed public hearing as prescribed by law, at which time the City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. D. At the conclusion of the Commission hearing and after due consideration of the testimony, the Commission approved Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241and PA08-0242 subject to and based upon the findings set forth hereunder. E. All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Resolution have occurred. Section 2. Further Findings. The Planning Commission, in approving the Application hereby finds, determines and declares that: Development Plan (Section 17.05.010.F) A. The proposed use is in conformance with the General Plan for Temecula and with all applicable requirements of State law and other Ordinances of the City; As conditioned, the project is consistent with the General Plan. The General Plan has listed the proposed use as a compatible use within residential areas, and the project is in conformance with other Ordinances of the City and State law. B. The overall development of the land is designed for the protection of the public health, safety, and general welfare; As conditioned, the project has been found to be consistent with all applicable policies, guidelines, standards and regulations intended to ensure that the project will be constructed and function in a manner consistent with the protection of the public health, safety, and general welfare. In addition, the project has also been reviewed by a variety of external government agencies as part of the Initial Study process to further ensure that the project has been designed and appropriately conditioned so that it will not be detrimental to the public health, safety, and general welfare. Conditional Use Permit (Section 17.04.010.E) C. The proposed conditional use is consistent with the General Plan and the Development Code; The proposed religious facility is located within a Very Low (VL) residential district. Religious facilities require a Conditional Use Permit in VL zones. As designed and conditioned the project is consistent with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. D. The proposed conditional use is compatible with the nature, condition and development of adjacent uses, buildings and structures and the proposed conditional use will not adversely affect the adjacent uses, buildings or structures; The proposed use is for a religious facility located within a Very Low (VL) residential district. According to the City of Temecula Development Code, these types of uses are allowed in all residential districts upon the approval of a Conditional Use Permit. Custom single-family homes surround the project on all sides with the exception of the east side. An existing religious facility lies to the east of the proposed project. As designed and conditioned, the project will not adversely affect adjacent uses, buildings or structures. E. The site for a proposed conditional use is adequate in size and shape to accommodate the yards, walls, fences, parking and loading facilities, buffer areas, landscaping, and other development features prescribed in this Development Code and required by the Planning Commission or City Council in order to integrate the use with other uses in the neighborhood; As designed and conditioned the yards, walls, fences, parking and loading facilities, buffer areas, landscaping, and other development features required in the City of Temecula Development Code have been satisfied. As a result, the project will integrate into the surrounding area in much the same way as the immediately adjacent existing religious facility. F. The nature of the proposed conditional use is not detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of the community; The project is a religious facility to be located in a Very Low (VL) residential zoning district. Religious facilities are a permitted use in VL zones with the approval of a Conditional Use Permit. As designed and conditioned the project is consistent with the Temecula General Plan and Development Code, which contains provisions to protect the health, safety and general welfare of the community. G. That the decision to approve, conditionally approve, or deny the application for a Conditional Use Permit be based on substantial evidence in view of the record as a whole before the Planning Commission or City Council on appeal; The decision to approve, conditionally approve, or deny the application for the Conditional Use Permit will be based on substantial evidence in view of the record as a whole before the Planning Commission. Section 3. Environmental Findings. The Planning Commission hereby makes the following environmental findings and determinations in connection with the approval of Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242, a two-phase Development Plan and Conditional Use Permit for a two-story, 24,943 square foot religious facility on 4.32 acres within a VL zone, located at the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri A. Pursuant to California Environmental Quality Act ("CEQA), City staff prepared an Initial Study of the potential environmental effects of the proposed Development Plan and Conditional Use Permit as described in the Initial Study for the project. Based upon the findings contained in that study, it was determined that there was no substantial evidence that the project could have a significant effect on the environment and a Mitigated Negative Declaration was prepared. B. Thereafter, City staff provided public notice of the public comment period and of the intent to adopt the Mitigated Negative Declaration as required by law. The public comment period commenced on May 28, 2010, and expired on June 26, 2010. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Department of Planning, located at City Hall 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California 92590. C. Two written comments on the initial study were received prior to the public hearing and responses to the comments were prepared. The responses have been submitted to the Planning Commission and incorporated into the administrative record of the proceedings. D. The Planning Commission has reviewed the Mitigated Negative Declaration and all comments received regarding the Mitigated Negative Declaration prior to and at the December 1, 2010 public hearing, and based on the whole record before it finds that: (1) the Mitigated Negative Declaration was prepared in compliance with CEQA; (2) there is no substantial evidence that the project will have a significant effect on the environment; and (3) the mitigation measures required by the Mitigated Negative Declaration reflects the independent judgment and analysis of the Planning Comm ission. E. Based on the findings set forth in the Resolution, the Planning Commission hereby adopts the Mitigated Negative Declaration prepared for this project. Section 4. Conditions. The Planning Commission of the City of Temecula approves Planning Application Nos. PA08-0241 and PA08-0242, a two-phase Development Plan and Conditional Use Permit for a two-story, 24,943 square foot religious facility on 4.32 acres within a VL zone located at the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri, subject to the Conditions of Approval set forth on Exhibit A, attached hereto, and incorporated herein by this reference. Section 5. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the City of Temecula Planning Commission this 1st day of December 2010. Carl Carey, Chairman ATTEST: Patrick Richardson, Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE )ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Patrick Richardson, Secretary of the Temecula Planning Commission, do hereby certify that the forgoing PC Resolution No. 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula at a regular meeting thereof held on the 1st day of December 2010, by the following vote: AYES: PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: NOES: PLANNING COMMISSIONERS ABSENT: PLANNING COMMISSIONERS ABSTAIN: PLANNING COMMISSIONERS Patrick Richardson, Secretary EXHIBIT A CITY OF TEMECULA DRAFT CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL Planning Application Nos.: PA08-0241 and PA08-0242 Project Description: A two-phase Development Plan and Conditional Use Permit for a two-story, 24,943 square foot religious facility on 4.32 acres within a VL zone located at the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri Assessor's Parcel No.: 957-140-012 MSHCP Category: Commercial DIF Category: N/A (Non -Profit 501c — Temecula Municipal Code Section 15.06.030.B) TUMF Category: Exempt (House of Worship — Temecula Municipal Code Section 15.08.040. F.9) Approval Date: December 1, 2010 Expiration Date: December 1, 2012 PLANNING DEPARTMENT Within 48 Hours of the Approval of This Project PL -1. The applicant/developer shall deliver to the Planning Department a cashier's check or money order made payable to the County Clerk in the amount of Two Thousand Seventy -Four Dollars and Twenty -Five Cents ($2,074.25) which includes the Two Thousand Ten Dollar and Twenty -Five Cent ($2,010.25) fee, required by Fish and Game Code Section 711.4(d)(3) plus the Sixty -Four Dollar ($64.00) County administrative fee, to enable the City to file the Notice of Determination for the Mitigated or Negative Declaration required under Public Resources Code Section 21152 and California Code of Regulations Section 15075. If within said 48-hour period the applicant/ developer has not delivered to the Planning Department the check as required above, the approval for the project granted shall be void due to failure of condition [Fish and Game Code Section 711.4(c)]. General Requirements PL -2. The applicant and owner of the real property subject to this condition shall hereby agree to indemnify, protect, hold harmless, and defend the City with Legal Counsel of the City's own selection from any and all claims, actions, awards, judgments, or proceedings against the City to attack, set aside, annul, or seek monetary damages resulting, directly or indirectly, from any action in furtherance of and the approval of the City, or any agency or instrumentality thereof, advisory agency, appeal board or legislative body including actions approved by the voters of the City, concerning the Planning Application. The City shall be deemed for purposes of this condition, to include any agency or instrumentality thereof, or any of its elected or appointed officials, officers, employees, consultants, contractors, legal counsel, and agents. City shall promptly notify both the applicant and landowner of any claim, action, or proceeding to which this condition is applicable and shall further cooperate fully in the defense of the action. The City reserves the right to take any and all action the City deems to be in the best interest of the City and its citizens in regards to such defense. PL -3. The permittee shall obtain City approval for any modifications or revisions to the approval of this project. PL -4. This approval shall be used within two years of the approval date; otherwise, it shall become null and void. By use is meant the beginning of substantial construction contemplated by this approval within the two year period, which is thereafter diligently pursued to completion, or the beginning of substantial utilization contemplated by this approval. PL -5. The Planning Director may, upon an application being filed prior to expiration, and for good cause, grant a time extension of up to 3 one-year extensions of time, one year at a time. PL -6. The project and all subsequent projects within this site shall comply with all mitigation measures identified within the Mitigated Negative Declaration. PL -7. A separate building permit shall be required for all signage. PL -8. The development of the premises shall substantially conform to the approved site plan and elevations contained on file with the Planning Department. PL -9. Landscaping installed for the project shall be continuously maintained to the reasonable satisfaction of the Planning Director. If it is determined that the landscaping is not being maintained, the Planning Director shall have the authority to require the property owner to bring the landscaping into conformance with the approved landscape plan. The continued maintenance of all landscaped areas shall be the responsibility of the developer or any successors in interest. PL -10. Other than stormwater, it is illegal to allow liquids, gels, powders, sediment, fertilizers, landscape debris, and waste from entering the storm drain system or from leaving the property. Spills and leaks must be cleaned up immediately. Do not wash, maintain, or repair vehicles onsite. Do not hose down parking areas, sidewalks, alleys, or gutters. Ensure that all materials and products stored outside are protected from rain. Ensure all trash bins are covered at all times. PL -11. The applicant shall paint a three-foot by three-foot section of the building for Planning Department inspection, prior to commencing painting of the building. PL -12. The applicant shall submit to the Planning Department for permanent filing two 8" X 10" glossy photographic color prints of the approved color and materials board and the colored architectural elevations. All labels on the color and materials board and Elevations shall be readable on the photographic prints. PL -13. The Conditions of Approval specified in this resolution, to the extent specific items, materials, equipment, techniques, finishes or similar matters are specified, shall be deemed satisfied by staff's prior approval of the use or utilization of an item, material, equipment, finish or technique that City staff determines to be the substantial equivalent of that required by the Conditions of Approval. Staff may elect to reject the request to substitute, in which case the real party in interest may appeal, after payment of the regular cost of an appeal, the decision to the Planning Commission for its decision. MATERIAL COLOR Exterior Stucco Exterior Stucco Exterior Stucco Roof Tile Metal Roof Wall Mosaic Aspen (La Habra 1/2x23) Silverado (La Habra x820) Mesa Verde (La Habra x)(215) San Ramon Blend (M.C.A. Clay Tile Roofing) Cool Copper Penny (DuraTech 5000 & Zincalume) Chestnut (Jasba-Toscana: 0536/IV) Slate (Jasba-Toscana: 0537/IV), Atlantic (Jasba-Toscana: 0533/IV) PL -14. Trash enclosures shall be provided to house all trash receptacles utilized on the site. These shall be clearly labeled on site plan. PL -15. Parking for the project shall be shared across the site, including parking spaces in all lots that are a part of the project. If the project involves multiple lots, the applicant shall submit to the Planning Department a copy of a recorded Reciprocal Use Agreement, which provides for cross -lot access and parking across all lots. PL -16. If construction is phased, a construction staging area plan or phasing plan for construction equipment and trash shall be approved by the Planning Director. PL -17. The applicant shall comply with all operational characteristics included in their Statement of Operations dated November 1, 2010, on file with the Planning Department, unless superseded by these Conditions of Approval. PL -18. This Conditional Use Permit may be revoked pursuant to Section 17.03.080 of the City's Development Code. PL -19. The City, its Planning Director, Planning Commission, and City Council retain and reserve the right and jurisdiction to review and modify this Conditional Use Permit (including the Conditions of Approval) based on changed circumstances. Changed circumstances include, but are not limited to, the modification of business, a change in scope, emphasis, size of nature of the business, and the expansion, alteration, reconfiguration or change of use. The reservation of right to review any Conditional Use Permit granted or approved or conditionally approved hereunder by the City, its Planning Director, Planning Commission and City Council is in addition to, and not in - lieu of, the right of the City, its Planning Director, Planning Commission, and City Council to review, revoke or modify any Conditional Use Permit approved or conditionally approved hereunder for any violations of the conditions imposed on such Conditional Use Permit or for the maintenance of any nuisance condition or other code violation thereon. PL -20. The trash enclosures shall be large enough to accommodate a recycling bin, as well as, regular solid waste containers. PL -21. The developer shall contact the City's franchised solid waste hauler for disposal of construction and demolition debris. Only the City's franchisee may haul demolition and construction debris. PL -22. The developer shall contact the maintenance superintendent for a pre -design meeting to discuss design perimeters and obtain Temecula Community Services District Landscape Standards. The median landscape plans submitted for consideration for TCSD maintenance shall be in conformance with the TCSD Landscape Standards. PL -23. Construction of the landscaped median shall commence pursuant to a pre -construction meeting with the developer, TCSD maintenance superintendent, Building and Safety inspector and Public Works inspector. Developer shall comply with City and TCSD review and inspection processes. PL -24. The developer, the developer's successor or assignee, shall be responsible for the maintenance of the landscaped median until such time as those responsibilities are accepted by the TCSD or other responsible party. PL -25. The applicant shall comply with the Public Art Ordinance. PL -26. All parkways, including within the right-of-way, landscaping, walls, fencing, and on-site lighting shall be maintained by the property owner. Prior to Issuance of Grading Permit(s) PL -27. Provide the Planning Department with a copy of the underground water plans and electrical plans for verification of proper placement of transformer(s) and double detector check prior to final agreement with the utility companies. PL -28. Double detector check valves shall be installed internal to the project site at locations not visible from the public right-of-way, subject to review and approval by the Planning Director. PL -29. The following shall be included in the Notes Section of the Grading Plan: "If at any time during excavation/construction of the site, archaeological/cultural resources, or any artifacts or other objects which reasonably appears to be evidence of cultural or archaeological resource are discovered, the property owner shall immediately advise the City of such and the City shall cause all further excavation or other disturbance of the affected area to immediately cease. The Planning Director at his/her sole discretion may require the property owner to deposit a sum of money it deems reasonably necessary to allow the City to consult and/or authorize an independent, fully qualified specialist to inspect the site at no cost to the City, in order to assess the significance of the find. Upon determining that the discovery is not an archaeological/ cultural resource, the Planning Director shall notify the property owner of such determination and shall authorize the resumption of work. Upon determining that the discovery is an archaeological/cultural resource, the Planning Director shall notify the property owner that no further excavation or development may take place until a mitigation plan or other corrective measures have been approved by the Planning Director." PL -30. The developer is required to enter into a Cultural Resources Treatment Agreement with the Pechanga Tribe. This Agreement will address the treatment and disposition of cultural resources and human remains that may be impacted as a result of the development of the project, as well as provisions for tribal monitors. PL -31. The following shall be included in the Notes section of the Grading Plan: "If cultural resources are discovered during the project construction (inadvertent discoveries), all work in the area of the find shall cease, and a qualified archaeologist and representatives of the Pechanga Tribe shall be retained by the project sponsor to investigate the find, and make recommendations as to treatment and mitigation." PL -32. The following shall be included in the Notes section of the Grading Plan: "A qualified archaeological monitor will be present and will have the authority to stop and redirect grading activities, in consultation with the Pechanga Tribe and their designated monitors, to evaluate the significance of any archaeological resources discovered on the property." PL -33. The following shall be included in the Notes section of the Grading Plan: "A qualified Paleontologist shall be on-site during grading activities." PL -34. The following shall be included in the Notes section of the Grading Plan: "Tribal monitors from the Pechanga Tribe shall be allowed to monitor all grading, excavation and groundbreaking activities, including all archaeological surveys, testing, and studies, to be compensated by the developer." PL -35. The following shall be included in the Notes section of the Grading Plan: "The landowner agrees to relinquish ownership of all cultural resources, including all archaeological artifacts that are found on the project area, to the Pechanga Tribe for proper treatment and disposition." PL -36. The following shall be included in the Notes section of the Grading Plan: "All sacred sites are to be avoided and preserved." PL -37. The following shall be included in the Notes section of the Grading Plan: "A 30 -day preconstruction survey, in accordance with MSHCP guidelines and survey protocol, shall be conducted prior to ground disturbance. The results of the 30 -day preconstruction survey shall be submitted to the Planning Department prior to scheduling the pre -grading meeting with Public Works." PL -38. The following shall be included in the Notes Section of the Grading Plan: "No grubbing/clearing of the site shall occur prior to scheduling the pre -grading meeting with Public Works. All project sites containing suitable habitat for burrowing owls, whether owls were found or not, require a 30 -day preconstruction survey that shall be conducted within 30 days prior to ground disturbance to avoid direct take of burrowing owls. If the results of the survey indicate that no burrowing owls are present on-site, then the project may move forward with grading, upon Planning Department approval. If burrowing owls are found to be present or nesting on-site during the preconstruction survey, then the following recommendations must be adhered to: Exclusion and relocation activities may not occur during the breeding season, which is defined as March 1 through August 31, with the following exception: From March 1 through March 15 and from August 1 through August 31 exclusion and relocation activities may take place if it is proven to the City and appropriate regulatory agencies (if any) that egg laying or chick rearing is not taking place. This determination must be made by a qualified biologist." PL -39. A copy of the Rough Grading Plans shall be submitted and approved by the Planning Department. Prior to Issuance of Building Permit(s) PL -40. The applicant shall submit a photometric plan, including the parking lotto the Planning Department, which meets the requirements of the Development Code and the Palomar Lighting Ordinance. The parking lot light standards shall be placed in such a way as to not adversely impact the growth potential of the parking lot trees. PL -41. All downspouts shall be internalized. PL -42. Four copies of Construction Landscaping and Irrigation Plans shall be reviewed and approved by the Planning Department. These plans shall conform to the approved conceptual landscape plan, or as amended by these conditions. The location, number, height and spread, water usage or KC value, genus, species, and container size of the plants shall be shown. The plans shall be consistent with the Water Efficient Ordinance and Water Storage Contingency Plan per the Rancho California Water District. The plans shall be accompanied by the appropriate filing fee (per the City of Temecula Fee Schedule at time of submittal) and one copy of the approved Grading Plan. PL -43. The Landscaping and Irrigation Plans shall provide a minimum five-foot wide planter to be installed at the perimeter of all parking areas. Curbs, walkways, etc. are not to infringe on this area. PL -44. The Landscaping and Irrigation Plans shall include a note stating that "Three landscape site inspections are required. The first inspection will verify that the irrigation mainline is capable of being pressurized to 150 psi fora minimum period of two hours without loss of pressure, which will require inspection of irrigation installation of open trenches. The second inspection will verify that all irrigation systems have head-to-head coverage, and to verify that all plantings have been installed consistent with the approved construction landscape plans. The third inspection will verify proper landscape maintenance for release of the one year landscape maintenance bond." The applicant/owner shall contact the Planning Department to schedule inspections. PL -45. The Landscaping and Irrigation Plans shall include a note on the plans stating that "The contractor shall provide two copies of an agronomic soils report at the first irrigation inspection." PL -46. The Landscaping and Irrigation Plans shall include water usage calculations per Chapter 17.32 of the Development Code (Water Efficient Ordinance) and the total cost estimate of plantings and irrigation (in accordance with approved plan). Applicant shall use evapotranspiration (ETo) factor of 0.70 for calculating the maximum allowable water budget. PL -47. A landscape maintenance program shall be submitted for approval, which details the proper maintenance of all proposed plant materials to assure proper growth and landscape development for the long-term esthetics of the property. The approved maintenance program shall be provided to the landscape maintenance contractor who shall be responsible to carry out the detailed program. PL -48. Specifications of the landscape maintenance program shall indicate that "Three landscape site inspections are required. The first inspection will verify that the irrigation mainline is capable of being pressurized to 150 psi for a minimum period of two hours without loss of pressure, which will require inspection of irrigation installation of open trenches. The second inspection will verify that all irrigation systems have head-to-head coverage, and to verify that all plantings have been installed consistent with the approved construction landscape plans. The third inspection will verify proper landscape maintenance for release of the one year landscape maintenance bond." The applicant/owner shall contact the Planning Department to schedule inspections. PL -49. Precise Grading Plans shall be consistent with the approved rough grading plans including all structural setback measurements. PL -50. All WQMP treatment devices, including design details, shall be shown on the construction landscape plans. If revisions are made to the WQMP design that result in any changes to the conceptual landscape plans after entitlement, the revisions will be shown on the construction landscape plans, subject to the approval of the Planning Director. PL -51. All utilities shall be screened from public view. Landscape construction drawings shall show and label all utilities and provide appropriate screening. Provide a three-foot clear zone around fire check detectors as required by the Fire Department before starting the screen. Group utilities together in order to reduce intrusion. Screening of utilities is not to look like an after -thought. Plan planting beds and design around utilities. Locate all light poles on plans and insure that there are no conflicts with trees. PL -52. Building Construction Plans shall include detailed outdoor areas including but not limited to trellises, decorative furniture, fountains, hardscape to match the style of the building subject to the approval of the Planning Director. PL -53. Building plans shall indicate that all roof hatches shall be painted "International Orange." PL -54. The construction plans shall indicate the application of painted rooftop addressing plotted on a nine -inch grid pattern with 45 -inch tall numerals spaced nine inches apart. The numerals shall be painted with a standard nine -inch paint roller using fluorescent yellow paint applied over a contrasting background. The address shall be oriented to the street and placed as closely as possible to the edge of the building closest to the street. PL -55. Prior to the first building permit or installation of additional streetlights, whichever occurs first, the developer shall complete the TCSD application, submit an approved Edison Streetlight Plan and pay the advanced energy fees. PL -56. The developer shall provide TCSD verification of arrangements made with the City's franchise solid waste hauler for disposal of construction and demolition debris. PL -57. The landscape construction drawings for the landscaped median shall be reviewed and approved by the Director of Community Services. PL -58. The developer shall post security and enter into an agreement to install the landscaped median. Prior to Release of Power, Building Occupancy or Any Use Allowed by This Permit PL -59. An applicant shall submit a letter of substantial conformance, subject to field verification by the Planning Director or his/her designee. Said letter of substantial conformance shall be prepared by the project designer and shall indicate that all plant materials and irrigation system components have been installed in accordance with the approved final landscape and irrigation plans. If a certificate of use and occupancy is not required for the project, such letter of substantial conformance shall be submitted prior to scheduling for the final inspection. PL -60. The applicant shall be required to screen all loading areas and roof mounted mechanical equipment from view of the adjacent residences and public right-of-ways. If upon final inspection it is determined that any mechanical equipment, roof equipment or backs of building parapet walls are visible from any portion of the public right-of-way adjacent to the project site, the developer shall provide screening by constructing a sloping tile covered mansard roof element or other screening reviewed and approved by the Planning Director. PL -61. All required landscape planting and irrigation shall have been installed consistent with the approved construction plans and shall be in a condition acceptable to the Planning Director. The plants shall be healthy and free of weeds, disease, or pests. The irrigation system shall be properly constructed and in good working order. PL -62. Performance securities, in amounts to be determined by the Planning Director, to guarantee the maintenance of the plantings in accordance with the approved construction landscape and irrigation plan shall be filed with the Planning Department for a period of one year from final Certificate of Occupancy. After that year, if the landscaping and irrigation system have been maintained in a condition satisfactory to the Planning Director, the bond shall be released upon request by the applicant. PL -63. Each parking space reserved for the handicapped shall be identified by a permanently affixed reflectorized sign constructed of porcelain on steel, beaded text or equal, displaying the International Symbol of Accessibility. The sign shall not be smaller than 70 square inches in area and shall be centered at the interior end of the parking space at a minimum height of 80 inches from the bottom of the sign to the parking space finished grade, or centered at a minimum height of 36 inches from the parking space finished grade, ground, or sidewalk. A sign shall also be posted in a conspicuous place, at each entrance to the off-street parking facility, not less than 17 inches by 22 inches, clearly and conspicuously stating the following: "Unauthorized vehicles parked in designated accessible spaces not displaying distinguishing placards or license plates issued for persons with disabilities may be towed away at owner's expense. Towed vehicles may be reclaimed by telephoning (951) 696-3000." PL -64. In addition to the above requirements, the surface of each parking place shall have a surface identification sign duplicating the Symbol of Accessibility in blue paint of at least three square feet in size. PL -65. All site improvements including but not limited to parking areas and striping shall be installed. PL -66. The developer shall design and construct or provide an in lieu of construction fee for half width raised landscape median on Nicolas Road (Major Arterial Highway Standards -100' R/W) along property frontage. PL -67. All of the foregoing conditions shall be complied with prior to occupancy or any use allowed by this permit. OUTSIDE AGENCIES PL -68. Flood protection shall be provided in accordance with the Riverside County Flood Control District's transmittal dated November 3, 2008, a copy of which is attached. The fee is made payable to the Riverside County Flood Control Water District by either a cashier's check or money order, prior to the issuance of a grading permit (unless deferred to a later date by the District), based upon the prevailing area drainage plan fee. PL -69. The applicant shall comply with the recommendations set forth in the County of Riverside Department of Environmental Health's transmittal dated November 14, 2008, a copy of which is attached. PL -70. The applicant shall comply with the recommendations set forth in the Eastern Municipal Water District's transmittal dated October 28, 2008, a copy of which is attached. PL -71. The applicant shall comply with the recommendations set forth in the Rancho California Water District's transmittal dated November 5, 2008, a copy of which is attached. BUILDING AND SAFETY DEPARTMENT General Conditions/Information B-1. All design components shall comply with applicable provisions of the California Building, Plumbing and Mechanical Codes; California Electrical Code; California Administrative Code, Title 24 Energy Code, California Title 24 Disabled Access Regulations, and the Temecula Municipal Code in place at the time of building permit application submittal. B-2. Provide details of all applicable disabled access provisions and building setbacks on plans. B-3. Provide disabled access from the public way to the main entrance of the building. B-4. Provide van accessible parking located as close as possible to the main entry. B-5. Submit at time of plan review, a complete exterior site lighting plan showing compliance with Ordinance Number 655 for the regulation of light pollution. All streetlights and other outdoor lighting shall be shown on electrical plans submitted to the Department of Building and Safety. Any outside lighting shall be hooded and aimed not to shine directly upon adjoining property or public rights-of-way. B-6. A receipt or clearance letter from the Temecula Valley School District shall be submitted to the Building and Safety Department to ensure the payment or exemption from School Mitigation Fees. B-7. Obtain all building plans and permit approvals prior to commencement of any construction work. B-8. Commercial and industrial project trash enclosures, patio covers, light standards, and any block walls will require separate approvals and permits. B-9. Signage shall be posted conspicuously at the entrance to the project that indicates the hours of construction, as allowed by the City of Temecula Ordinance Number 94-21, specifically Section G(1) of Riverside County Ordinance Number 457.73, for any site within one-quarter mile of an occupied residence. The permitted hours of construction are Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., and Saturday from 7:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. No work is permitted on Sundays or Government Holidays. B-10. The City of Temecula adopted an ordinance on March 31, 2003 to collect fees for a Riverside County area wide Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF). This project is subject to payment of these fees at the time of building permit issuance, subject to the provisions of Ordinance 03-01 and the fee schedule in effect at the time of building permit issuance. Prior to Submitting for Plan Review B-11. Obtain street addressing for all proposed buildings. At Plan Review Submittal B-12. Provide electrical plan including load calculations and panel schedule, plumbing schematic and mechanical plan applicable to scope of work for plan review. B-13. Provide number and type of restroom fixtures, to be in accordance with the provisions of the California Plumbing Code in place at the time of building permit application submittal. B-14. Provide precise grading plan to verify accessibility for persons with disabilities. B-15. Provide truss calculations that have been stamped by the engineer of record of the building and the truss manufacturer engineer. Prior to Issuance of Building Permit(s) B-16. Provide appropriate stamp of a registered professional with original signature on plans. Prior to Beginning of Construction B-17. A pre -construction meeting is required with the building inspector prior to the start of the building construction. FIRE PREVENTION General Requirements F-1. Final fire and life safety conditions will be addressed when building plans are reviewed by the Fire Prevention Bureau. These conditions will be based on occupancy, use, the California Building Code (CBC), California Fire Code (CFC), and related codes which are in force at the time of building plan submittal. F-2. The Fire Prevention Bureau is required to set a minimum fire flow for the remodel or construction of all commercial buildings per CFC Appendix B. The developer shall provide for this project, a looped water system, with two points of connection, capable of delivering 4,000 GPM at 20 -PSI residual operating pressure for a 4 -hour duration (CFC Appendix B and Temecula City Ordinance 15.16.020, Section R). F-3. The Fire Prevention Bureau is required to set minimum fire hydrant distances per CFC Appendix C. A combination of on-site and off site 6" x 4" x 2-2 %2" outlets on a looped system shall be located on fire access roads and adjacent to public streets. Hydrants shall be spaced at 350 feet apart, at each intersection and shall be located no more than 210 feet from any point on the street or Fire Department access road(s) frontage to a hydrant. The required fire flow shall be available from any adjacent hydrants in the system. Additional hydrants may be required to meet spacing requirements to provide hydrant protection for entire site, including parking lots, than what is proposed on development plan (CFC Appendix C and Temecula City Ordinance 15.16.020, Section R) F-4. As required by the California Fire Code, when any portion of the facility or site that is in excess of 150 feet from a water supply on a public street, as measured by an approved route around the exterior of the facility, on-site fire hydrants and mains capable of supplying the required fire flow shall be provided. For this project on-site fire hydrants are required (CFC Chapter 5, Section 508.5). F-5. If construction is phased, each phase shall provide approved access and fire protection prior to any building construction (CFC Chapter 5, Section 503.4) Prior to Issuance of Grading Permit(s) F-6. Fire apparatus access roads shall be designed and maintained to support the imposed loads of fire apparatus and shall be with a surface to provide all-weather driving capabilities. Paved access roads shall be 80,000 lbs. GVW with a minimum of AC thickness of .25 feet. In accordance with Section 1410.1, prior to building construction, all locations where structures are to be built shall have fire apparatus access roads (CFC Chapter 5, Section 503.2, 503.4 and City Ordinance 15.16.020 Section E). F-7. Fire Department vehicle access roads shall have an unobstructed width of not less than 24 feet and an unobstructed vertical clearance of not less than 13 feet 6 inches (CFC Chapter 5, Section 503.2, 503.4 and City Ordinance 15.16.020 Section E). F-8. The gradient for fire apparatus access roads shall not exceed 15 percent (CFC Chapter 5, Section 503.2.7. and City Ordinance 15.16.020 Section E). F-9. This development shall maintain two points of access, via all-weather surface roads, as approved by the Fire Prevention Bureau (CFC Chapter 5, Section 503.1.2). F-10. Dead end roadways and streets in excess of 150 feet which have not been completed shall have a turnaround capable of accommodating fire apparatus (CFC Chapter 5, Section 503.2.5 and City Ordinance 15.16.020 Section E). F-11. Fire Department turn around requirements are 45 feet outside and 37 feet inside. Prior to Issuance of Building Permit(s) F-12. The developer shall furnish one copy of the water system plans to the Fire Prevention Bureau for approval prior to installation for all private water systems pertaining to the fire service loop. Plans shall be signed by a registered civil engineer, contain a Fire Prevention Bureau approval signature block, and conform to hydrant type, location, spacing and minimum fire flow standards. Hydraulic calculations will be required with the underground submittal to ensure fire flow requirements are being metforthe on-site hydrants. The plans must be submitted and approved prior to building permit being issued (CFC Chapter 14, Section 1412 and Chapter 5, Section 501.3). F-13. Fire sprinkler plans shall be submitted to the Fire Prevention Bureau for approval. Three sets of sprinkler plans must be submitted by the installing contractor to the Fire Prevention Bureau. These plans must be submitted prior to the issuance of building permit. F-14. Fire alarm plans shall be submitted to the Fire Prevention Bureau for approval. Three sets of alarm plans must be submitted by the installing contractor to the Fire Prevention Bureau. The fire alarm system is required to have a dedicated circuit from the house panel. These plans must be submitted prior to the issuance of building permit. Prior to Issuance of Certificate of Occupancy F-15. Hydrant locations shall be identified by the installation of reflective markers (blue dots) per City Ordinance 15.16.020 Section E. F-16. New and existing buildings shall have approved address numbers, building numbers or approved building identification placed in a position that is plainly legible and visible from the street or road fronting the property. These numbers shall contrast with their background. Commercial buildings shall have a minimum of 12 -inch numbers with suite numbers being a minimum of six inches in size. All suites shall have a minimum of 6- inch high letters and/or numbers on both the front and rear doors (CFC Chapter 5, Section 505.1 and City Ordinance 15.16.020 Section E). F-17. A "Knox -Box" shall be provided. The Knox -Box shall be installed a minimum of six feet in height and be located to the right side of the fire riser sprinkler room (CFC Chapter 5, Section 506). F-18. All manual and electronic gates on required Fire Department access roads or gates obstructing Fire Department building access shall be provided with the Knox Rapid entry system for emergency access by fire fighting personnel (CFC Chapter 5, Section 506). F-19. The applicant shall prepare and submit to the Fire Department for approval, a site plan designating fire lanes with appropriate lane painting and/or signs (CFC Chapter 5, Section 503.3). POLICE DEPARTMENT General Requirements PD -1. Applicant shall ensure all landscaping surrounding all buildings are kept at a height of no more than three feet or below the ground floor windowsills. Plants, hedges and shrubbery shall be defensible plants to deter would-be intruders from breaking into the buildings utilizing lower level windows. PD -2. Applicant shall ensure all trees surrounding all building rooftops be kept at a distance to deter roof accessibility by "would-be burglars." Since trees also act as a natural ladder, the branches must be pruned to have a six-foot clearance from the buildings. PD -3. Berms shall not exceed three feet in height. PD -4. All parking lot lighting surrounding the complex shall be energy saving and minimized after hours of darkness and in compliance with the State of California Lighting Ordinance, California Government Code 8565. PD -5. All exterior lighting to be in compliance with Mount Palomar Lighting Ordinance 665 requiring low pressure sodium lighting. PD -6. All exterior doors to have their own vandal resistant fixtures installed above each door. The doors shall be illuminated with a minimum one -foot candle illumination at ground level, evenly dispersed. PD -7. All building mounted exterior night lighting shall be wall mount light fixtures to provide sufficient lighting during hours of darkness. PD -8. Applicant shall comply with the Governor's order to address the power crisis. This order became effective March 18, 2001 calling for a substantial reduction from businesses to cut usage during non -business hours. The order, in part, states, "All California retail establishments, including, but not limited to, shopping centers, auto malls and dealerships, shall substantially reduce maximum outdoor lighting capability during non- business hours except as necessary for the health and safety of the public, employees or property." Failure to comply with this order following a warning by law enforcement officials shall be punishable as a misdemeanor with a fine not to exceed $1000 in accordance with Section 8565 of the California Government Code. PD -9. All doors, windows, locking mechanisms, hinges, and other miscellaneous hardware shall be commercial or institution grade. PD -10. Any graffiti painted or marked upon the buildings must be removed or painted over within 24 hours of being discovered. Report all such crimes to the Temecula Police 24- hour dispatch Center at (951) 696 -HELP. PD -11. Upon completion of construction, the buildings shall have a monitored alarm system installed and monitored 24 hours a day by a designated private alarm company to notify the Temecula Police Department of any intrusion. All multi -tenant offices/suites/businesses located within a specific building shall have their own alarm system. This condition is not applicable if the business is opened 24/7. PD -12. All roof hatches shall be painted "International Orange". PD -13. Any public telephones located on the exterior of the buildings shall be placed in a well - lit, highly visible area, and installed with a "call -out only" feature to deter loitering. This feature is not required for public telephones installed within the interior of the buildings. PD -14. All disabled parking stalls on the premises shall be marked in accordance with Section 22511.8 of the California Vehicle Code. PD -15. Businesses desiring a business security survey of their location can contact the Crime Prevention and Plans Unit of the Temecula Police Department. PD -16. Crime prevention through environmental design as developed by the National Crime Prevention Institute (NCPI) supports the concept that "the proper design and effective use of the built environment can lead to a reduction in the fear and incidence of crime and an improvement in the quality of life." The nine primary strategies that support this concept are included as conditions below: a. Provide clear border definition of controlled space. Examples of border definition may include fences, shrubbery or signs in exterior areas. Within a building, the arrangement of furniture and color definition can serve as a means of identifying controlled space. b. Provide clearly marked transitional zones. Persons need to be able to identify when they are moving from public to semi-public to private space. c. Gathering or congregating areas to be located or designated in locations where there is good surveillance and access control. d. Place safe activities in unsafe locations. Safe activities attract normal users to a location and subsequently render the location less attractive to abnormal users due to observation and possible intervention. e. Place unsafe activities in safe locations. Placing unsafe activities in areas of natural surveillance or controlled access will help overcome risk and make the users of the areas feel safer. f. Design the use of space to provide natural barriers. Separate activities that may conflict with each other (outdoor basketball court and children's play area, for example) by distance, natural terrain or other functions to avoid such conflict. g. Improve scheduling of space. The timing in the use of space can reduce the risk for normal users and cause abnormal users to be of greater risk of surveillance and intervention. h. Design space to increase the perception of natural surveillance. Abnormal users need to be award of the risk of detection and possible intervention. Windows and clear lines -of -sight serve to provide such a perception of surveillance. i. Overcome distance and isolation. This strategy may be accomplished through improved communications (portable two-way radios, for example) and design efficiencies, such as the location of restrooms in a public building. PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT General Requirements PW -1. Unless otherwise noted, all conditions shall be completed by the developer at no cost to any Government Agency. It is understood that the developer correctly shows on the site plan all existing and proposed property lines, easements, traveled ways, improvement constraints and drainage courses, and their omission may require the project to be resubmitted for further review and revision. PW -2. The project is proposed to be developed in two phases. a. Phase 1 consists of a 4,157 square feet building and the southerly parking lot. b. Phase 2 consists of a 20,786 square feet building and the northerly parking lot. PW -3. A Grading Permit, for rough and/or precise grading, including all on-site flat work and improvements, shall be obtained from the Department of Public Works prior to commencement of any construction outside of the City -maintained street right-of-way. PW -4. An Encroachment Permit shall be obtained from the Department of Public Works prior to commencement of any construction within an existing or proposed City right-of-way. PW -5. All grading and improvement plans shall be coordinated for consistency with adjacent projects and existing improvements contiguous to the site and shall be submitted on standard 24" x 36" City of Temecula mylars. PW -6. The project shall include construction -phase pollution prevention controls and permanent post -construction water quality protection measures into the design of the project to prevent non -permitted runoff from discharging off site or entering any storm drain system or receiving water. PW -7. Prior to any plan checks submittals, the Water Quality Management Plan (WQMP) shall be conceptually accepted by the City. The WQMP shall be prepared by a registered civil engineer and include infiltration -based best management practices, (BMPs), source control requirements, and treatment mechanisms. Prior to Issuance of Grading Permit(s) PW -8. The developer shall receive written clearance from the following agencies: a. Department of Fish and Game b. Army Corps of Engineers c. San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board d. Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District e. Department of Public Works, and other affected agencies PW -9. A copy of the grading, and improvement plans, along with supporting hydrologic and hydraulic calculations shall be submitted to the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District for approval prior to the issuance of any permit. PW -10. A flood mitigation charge shall be paid. The Area Drainage Plan fee is payable to the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District by either cashier's check or money order, prior to issuance of permits, based on the prevailing area drainage plan fee. If the full Area Drainage Plan fee or mitigation charge has already been credited to this property, no new charge needs to be paid. PW -11. A grading plan shall be prepared by a registered civil engineer in accordance with City of Temecula standards, and shall be reviewed and approved by the Department of Public Works prior to the commencement of grading. The grading plan shall include all necessary erosion control measures needed to adequately protect the site (public and private) and adjoining properties from damage due to erosion. PW -12. For Phase 1, the Developer shall submit for approval: a. A grading plan to include an onsite water quality retention basin, designed in accordance with the CASQA BMP Handbook for New Development, within the proposed parking lot of Phase 2. The basin shall accommodate the 100 -year storm event/runoff from tributary areas. b. A finalized WQMP that includes additional text, exhibits, layouts, details, sections, calculations, and appendices for the retention basin and as necessary to clearly identify the structural treatment controls corresponding to each phase of the project. c. A street and drainage improvement plan for Calle Colibri, from northerly driveway to the southerly terminus of the cul-de-sac, (General Local Street Standard No. 104-60' R/VV) to include installation of half -width street improvements plus twelve feet, paving, curb and gutter, sidewalk, drainage facilities, signing, striping and utilities (including but not limited to water and sewer). PW -13. For Phase 2, the Developer shall submit for approval: a. The site is not mapped and its zoning is not identified in the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). The Developer shall obtain and submit a Conditional Letter of Map Revision (CLOMR) from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The 100 -year water surface elevation of Santa Gertrudis Channel shall be ascertained and the centerline profile of Nicolas Road shall be established. b. A grading plan to include the remainder of the onsite improvements. c. Prior to the approval of any plans, the developer shall comply with Chapter 15.12 of the Temecula Municipal Code. d. A street and drainage improvement plan for Calle Colibri, from the northerly driveway to Nicolas Road, (General Local Street Standard No. 104-60' R/W) to include installation of half -width street improvements plus twelve feet, paving, curb and gutter, sidewalk, drainage facilities, signing, striping and utilities (including but not limited to water and sewer). e. A street and drainage improvement plan for Nicolas Road, from westerly property boundary to Calle Colibiri,(Major Arterial (4 lanes divided) Highway Standard No. 101-100' R/W) to include installation of half -width street improvements, paving, curb and gutter, sidewalk, streetlight, drainage facilities, signing and striping, utilities (including but not limited to water and sewer) including pavement transition per Caltrans' standards. Project shall restripe the eastbound approach on Nicolas Road to include a two-way left turn lane. ii. The developer shall design and construct or provide an in lieu of construction fee for half width raised landscape median on Nicolas Road (Major Arterial Highway Standards -100' R/W) along property frontage. PW -14. The developer shall post security and enter into an agreement guaranteeing the grading and erosion control improvements in conformance with applicable City Standards and subject to approval by the Department of Public Works in accordance with Grading Ordinance Section 18.24.120. PW -15. A Soils Report shall be prepared by a registered soil or civil engineer and submitted to the Department of Public Works with the initial grading plan check. The report shall address all soil conditions of the site, and provide recommendations for the construction of engineered structures and pavement sections. PW -16. A Geological Report shall be prepared by a qualified engineer or geologist and submitted to the Department of Public Works with the initial grading plan check. The report shall address special study zones and the geological conditions of the site, and shall provide recommendations to mitigate the impact of liquefaction. PW -17. A Drainage Study shall be prepared by a registered civil engineer and submitted to the Department of Public Works with the initial grading plan check. The study shall identify storm water runoff quantities expected from the development of this site and upstream of the site. It shall identify all existing or proposed off site or on-site, public or private, drainage facilities intended to discharge this runoff. Runoff shall be conveyed to an adequate outfall capable of receiving the storm water runoff without damage to public or private property. The study shall include a capacity analysis verifying the adequacy of all facilities. Any upgrading or upsizing of drainage facilities necessary to convey the storm water runoff, including acquisition of drainage or access easements necessary to make required improvements, shall be provided by the developer. The basis for analysis and design shall be a storm with a recurrence interval of 100 years. PW -18. Construction -phase pollution prevention controls shall be consistent with the City's Grading, Erosion and Sediment Control Ordinance, associated technical manual, and the City's standard notes for Erosion and Sediment Control. PW -19. The project shall demonstrate coverage under the State NPDES General Permit for Construction Activities by providing a copy of the Waste Discharge Identification Number (WDID) issued by the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). A Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) shall be available at the site throughout the duration of construction activities. PW -20. The developer shall comply with all constraints which may be shown upon an Environmental Constraint Sheet (ECS) recorded with any underlying maps related to the subject property. PW -21. The Developer shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 8.24 of the Temecula Municipal Code (Habitat Conservation) by paying the appropriate fee set forth in that ordinance or by providing documented evidence that the fees have already been paid. PW -22. The developer shall obtain grading and drainage easements for any work performed on adjoining properties. The easements shall be in format as approved by the Department of Public Works. PW -23. Improvement plans shall conform to applicable City of Temecula Standards subject to approval by the Department of Public Works. The following design criteria shall be observed: a. Flowline grades shall be 0.5% minimum over P.C.C. and 1.00% minimum overA.C. paving. b. Driveways shall conform to the applicable City of Temecula Standard Number 207A. c. Streetlight shall be installed along the public streets adjoining the site in accordance with City of Temecula Standard Number 800. d. Concrete sidewalks and ramps shall be constructed along public street frontages in accordance with City of Temecula Standard Number. 400. e. Improvement plans shall extend 300 feet beyond the project boundaries. f. All street and driveway center line intersections shall be at 90 degrees. g. All cul-de-sac shall be constructed in accordance with City Standard Number 600. h. Public street improvement plans shall include plans and profiles showing existing topography, utilities, proposed centerline, top of curb and flowline grades. i. All utilities, except electrical lines rated 34kv or greater, shall be installed underground. j. Landscaping shall be limited in the corner cut-off area of all intersections and adjacent to driveways to provide for minimum sight distance and visibility. PW -24. All street improvement designs shall provide adequate right-of-way and pavement transitions per Caltrans' standards for transition to existing street sections. PW -25. A construction area Traffic Control Plan shall be designed by a registered civil or traffic engineer and reviewed by the Department of Public VVorks for any street closure and detour or other disruption to traffic circulation as required by the Department of Public Works. Prior to Issuance of Building Permit(s) PW -26. The building pad shall be certified to have been substantially constructed in accordance with the approved Precise Grading Plan by a registered civil engineer, and the soil engineer shall issue a Final Soil Report addressing compaction and site conditions. PW -27. The developer shall pay to the City the Public Facilities Development Impact Fee as required by, and in accordance with, Chapter 15.06 of the Temecula Municipal Code and all Resolutions implementing Chapter 15.06. PW -28. The developer shall pay to the City the Western Riverside County Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Program as required by, and in accordance with, Chapter 15.08 of the Temecula Municipal Code and all Resolutions implementing Chapter 15.08. Prior to Issuance of Certificate of Occupancy PW -29. For Phase 1, the developer shall construct: a. Calle Colibri from the northerly driveway to the southerly terminus of the cul-de-sac to include installation of half -width street improvements plus twelve feet, paving, curb and gutter, sidewalk, drainage facilities, signing, striping and utilities (including but not limited to water and sewer). PW -30. For Phase 2, the developer shall construct: a. Calle Colibri from Nicolas Road to the northerly drive approach to include installation of half -width street improvements plus twelve feet, paving, curb and gutter, sidewalk, drainage facilities, signing, striping and utilities (including but not limited to water and sewer). b. Nicolas Road, from westerly property boundary to Calle Colibiri, to include installation of half -width street improvements, paving, curb and gutter, sidewalk, streetlight, drainage facilities, signing and striping, utilities (including but not limited to water and sewer) including pavement transition per Caltrans' standards. PW -31. Corner property line cut off shall be required per City of Temecula Standard No. 603A. PW -32. The project shall demonstrate the pollution prevention BMPs outlined in the WQMP have been constructed and installed in conformance with approved plans and are ready for immediate implementation. PW -33. As deemed necessary by the Department of Public Works the developer shall receive written clearance from Rancho California Water District, Eastern Municipal Water District, or other affected agencies. PW -34. All public improvements shall be constructed and completed per the approved plans and City standards to the satisfaction of the Department of Public Works. PW -35. The existing improvements shall be reviewed. Any appurtenance damaged or broken shall be repaired or removed and replaced to the satisfaction of the Department of Public Works. PW -36. All necessary certifications and clearances from engineers, utility companies and public agencies shall be submitted as required by the Department of Public Works. WARREN D. WILLIAMS General Manager -Chief Engineer City of Temecula Planning Department Post Office Box 9033 Temecula, CaalLir lliifornia 9258 -9033 Attention: t CJ Vin CIV 1995 T STREET E, CA 92501 51.955.1200 1.788.9965 rcflood.org I80_7 RIVERSIDE COUNTY FLOOD C AND WATER CONSERVATION D Ladies and Gentlemen: Re: 12PD— ON 2. /1X14 Y I)o8 - o 2 L ) The District does not normally recommend conditions for land divisions or other land use cases in incorporated cities. The District also does not plan check city land use cases, or provide State Division of Real Estate letters or other flood hazard reports for such cases. District comments/recommendations for such cases are normally limited to items of specific interest to the District including District Master Drainage Plan facilities, other regional flood control and drainage facilities which could be considered a logical component or extension of a master plan system, and District Area Drainage Plan fees (development mitigation fees). In addition, information of a general nature is provided. The District has not reviewed the proposed project in detail and the following checked comments do not in anyway constitute or imply District approval or endorsement of the proposed project with respect to flood hazard, public healh and safety or any other such issue: No comment. This project would not be impacted by District Master Drainage Plan facilities nor are other facilities of regional interest proposed. This project involves District Master Plan facilities: The District will accept ownership of such facilities on written request of the City. Facilities must be constructed to District standards, and District plan check and inspection will be required for District acceptance. Plan check, inspection and administrative fees will be required. This project proposes channels, storm drains 36 inches or larger in diameter or other facilities that could be considered regional in nature and/or a logical extension of the adopted Master Drainage Plan. The District would consider accepting ownership of such facilities on written request of the City. Facilities must be constructed to District standards, and District plan check and inspection will be required for District acceptance. Plan check, inspection and administrative fees will be required. sva Thisproject is located within the limits of the District's MU'�r\2;v1 CX.2Q1 Ytt�,lit}IArea Drainage Plan for which drainage fees have been adopted; applicable fees should be aid y cashier's chheck or money order only to the Flood Control District or City prior to issuance of grading permits. Fees to be paid should be at the rate in effect at the time of issuance of the actual permit. An encroachment permit shall be obtained for any construction related activities occurring within District right of way or facilities. For further information, contact the District's encroachment permit section at 951.955.1266. GENERAL INFORMATION This project may require a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit from the State Water Resources Control Board. Clearance for grading, recordation or other finalapprovalshould not be given until the City has determined that the project has been granted a permit or is shown to be exempt. If this project involves a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) mapped flood plain, then the City should require the applicant to provide all studies, calculations, plans and other information required to meet FEMA requirements, and should further require that the applicant obtain a Conditional Letter of Map Revision (CLOMR) prior to grading, recordation or other final approval of the project, and a Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) prior to occupancy. If a natural watercourse or mapped flood plain is impacted by this project, the City should require the applicant to obtain a Section 1602 Agreement from the California Department of Fish and Game and a Clean Water Act Section 404 Permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, or written correspondence from these agencies indicating the project is exempt from these requirements. A Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification may be required from the local California Regional Water Quality Control Board prior to issuance of the Corps 404 permit. Very truly yours, c: Riverside County Planning Department Attn: David Mares G -4 ALE V. ANDERSON Senior Civil Engineer Date: 1l (3/ 0e,' C��IVTY OF RIVERSIDE •COMA �NITY HEALTH AGENCY L��� DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH City of Temecula Planning Department c/o Eric Jones PO BOX 9033 Temecula, CA 92589-9033 14 November 2008 RE: PA08-0241 and 0242 a Nov 1 NOV8 :' 3 The Department of Environmental Health (DEH) has received and reviewed the PA08- 0241 and 0242 for the Conditional Use Permit to allow a 24,943 square foot Islamic Community Center to operate with a VL zone in the City limits of Temecula under applicant: Stephen C. Singler. The CUP is required per the Conditions of Approval to have presented to the Planning Department of the City of Temecula, will serve letters from the purveyors of piped water (Rancho California Water District) and Sanitary Sewer (Eastern Municipal Water District.) The community center will be located at Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri Roads. (APN 957-140-007) Any future food facility or food sales to the public, the applicant shall contact this Department at 951.461.0284 for food plan check compliance by the County of Riverside DEH. If your have any questions, please do not hesitate to call me at 951.955.8980 Sincerely, Gregor Dellenbach, REHS EHS081535 ($136.00) Land Use and Water Engineering • 39493 Los Alamos Road, Murrieta, CA 92562 • (951) 600-6180 • FAX (951) 600-6181 Board of Directors President David J. Slawson Vice President Ronald W. Sullivan Treasurer Joseph J. Kuebler, CPA Randy A. Record Philip E. Paule Board Secretary Rosemarie V. Howell General Manager Anthony J. Pack Director of the Metropolitan Water District of So. Calif. Randy A. Record Legal Counsel Redwine and Sherrill EASTERN MUNICIPAL WATER DISTRICT October 28, 2008 City of Temecula Planning Department PO Box 9033 Temecula, CA 92589-9033 Attn. Eric Jones SINCE 1950 E©ElVE OCT 3 1 2008 The City of Temecula has requested EMWD to review and comment on APN 967- 140-007 & 957-140-011 EMWD requires beginning dialogue with the applicant at or before the tentative phase of a project, in order to assess the infrastructure needs. Accordingly, we offer to meet with developers/engineers for one initial due -diligence meeting, without requiring a deposit. This meeting is to review your project and determine potential service from EMWD. The objective is to provide a forum to resolve any questions about our development process and help to determine if there are any potential issues that may exist in the area concerning EMWD facilities (water, sewer or recycled water). No improvement plans will be accepted until this pre -project phase is completed and an EMWD Plan of Service has been approved. In an ongoing effort to develop a dependable and reliable water supply for its customers, EMWD's goal is to maximize the use of recycled water, for landscape demands. All projects that include landscaped areas are carefully considered for recycled water use. This process needs to begin early to avoid unnecessary delays. In order to set up a Due Diligence meeting we need: 1- A completed Due Diligence questionnaire. 2- Your proposed agenda for the due -diligence meeting 3- Location Map 4- Proposed development plan layout if available (hard copy and JPEG format) I encourage developers/engineers to become familiar with EMWD New Development processes, while designing your project. They have been developed over many years and serve a great importance as they can prevent complications and save time. More information can be found at http://www.emwd.org/new_biz/new-biz-dev.html If at any point in time there are questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me. If I can not help, I will get you to someone who can. Sincerel Linda H. Petersen Development Coordinator ex. 4310 Petersel@emwd.org MailingAddresscC: Posf 61'fiskttltox 8300 Perris, CA 92572-8300 Telephone: (951) 928-3777 Fax: (951) 928-6177 Location: 2270 Trumble Road Perris, CA 92570 Internet: www.emwd.org Gaucho 9PaYu Board of Directors William E. Plummer President Ralph H. Daily Sr. Vice President Stephen J. Corona Ben R. Drake Lisa D. Herman John E. Hoagland Lawrence M. Libeu Officers: Matthew G. Stone General Manager Phillip L. Forbes, CPA Assistant General Manager/ Chief Financial Officer Perry R. Louck Director of Planning Andrew L. Webster, P.E. Acting District Engineer Jeffrey D. Armstrong Controller Kelli E. Garcia District Secretary C. Michael Cowett Best Best & Krieger LLP General Counsel November 5, 2008 Eric Jones, Project Planner City of Temecula Planning Department Post Office Box 9033 Temecula, CA 92589-9033 SUBJECT: WATER AVAILABILITY ISLAMIC CENTER DEVELOPMENT PLAN LOTS NO. 1 AND NO. 2 OF PARCEL MAP NO. 15421 APN 957-140-007 AND APN 957-140-011 [S. SIGLER] Dear Mr. Jones: Please be advised that the above -referenced project/property is located within the service boundaries of Rancho California Water District (RCWD). The subject project/property fronts an existing 8 -inch diameter water pipeline (1610 Service Pressure Zone) within Calle Colibri. Please note that the existing 8 -inch water pipeline within Calle Colibri is programmed to be converted to the 1485 Service Pressure Zone. Water service to the subject project/property does not currently exist. Additions or modifications to water/sewer service arrangements are subject to the Rules and Regulations (governing) Water System Facilities and Service, as well as the completion of financial arrangements between RCWD and the property owner, including payment of all applicable special assessments. Where private (on-site) facilities are required for water service, fire protection, irrigation, or other purposes, RCWD requires recordation of a Reciprocal Easement and Maintenance Agreement for such on-site private facilities, where private on-site water facilities may cross (or may be shared amongst) multiple lots/project units, and/or where such "common" facilities may be owned and maintained by a common Property Owners Association or agent (proposed now or in the future). Water availability is contingent upon the property owner(s) destroying all on-site wells and signing an Agency Agreement that assigns water management rights, if any, to RCWD. In addition, water availability is contingent upon water supply shortage contingency measures, pursuant to RCWD's Water Shortage Contingency Plan. As soon as feasible, the project proponent should contact RCWD for a determination of existing water system capability, based upon project -specific demands and/or fire flow requirements, as well as a determination of proposed water facilities configuration. If new facilities are required for water service, fire protection, or other purposes, the project proponent should contact RCWD for an assessment of project -specific fees and requirements. Please note that separate water meters will be required for all landscape irrigation. 08\CW:at091\F450\FEG Rancho California Water District 42135 Winchester Road • Post Office Box 9017 • Temecula, California 92589-9017 • (951) 296-6900 • FAX (951) 296-6860 www ranrhnwatrr .nm Eric Jones/City of Temecula November 5, 2008 Page Two Sewer service to the subject project/property, if available, would be Water District. If you should have any questions or need additional information, Services Representative at this office at (951) 296-6900. Sincerely, RANCHO CALIFORNIA WATER DISTRICT Corey F. Wallace Engineering Manager cc: Laurie Williams, Engineering Services Supervisor S. Sigler, Axis 3 Architecture 0 8\C W : at091 \F45 0\FEG provided by Eastern Municipal please contact an Engineering Rancho California Water District 42135 Winchester Road • Post Office Box 9017 • Temecula, California 92589-9017 • (951) 296-6900 • FAX (951) 296-6860 www.ranchowater.com City of Temecula P.O. Box 9033, Temecula, CA 92589-9033 Environmental Checklist Project Title Islamic Center of Temecula Valley (ICTV) Lead Agency Name and Address City of Temecula P.O. Box 9033, Temecula, CA 92589-9033 Contact Person and Phone Number Eric Jones, Case Planner (951)506-5115 Project Location Generally located on the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri Project Sponsor's Name and Address Stephen Sigler, Axis 3 Architecture General Plan Designation Very Low Residential (VL) Zoning Very Low Residential (VL) Description of Project A Development Plan with a Conditional Use Permit and Minor Exception for Height (PA08-0241, PA08-0242 and PA09-0154) for a two-story, 24,943 square foot Islamic Center located on a 4.32 acre parcel (APN 957-140-012). The project will be constructed in two phases consisting of 4,157 square feet in the first phase and 20,786 square feet in the second phase. Surrounding Land Uses and Setting The project is proposed to be located on a vacant 4.32 acre parcel in the Very Low (VL) residential district within the City of Temecula. The immediately surrounding parcels abutting the site to the west and south are also zoned Very Low residential. Nicolas Road and Calle Colibir boarder the property to the north and east respectively. Parcels zoned Very Low (VL) residential exist beyond these roads. The adjacent residentially zoned parcels each contain existing dwellings with the exception of the parcel located to the east. This parcel contains a religious facility. Other public agencies whose approval is required Western Riverside Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) G:IPIANNINGI2008IPA08-0241 Islamic Center DPIPIanning\Initial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc Environmental Factors Potentially Affected The environmental factors checked below would be potentially affected by this project, involving at least one impact that is a "Potentially Significant Impact" as indicated by the checklist on the following pages. Determination (To be completed by the lead agency) On the basis of this initial evaluation: Aesthetics X Mineral Resources Agriculture and Forestry Resources Noise Air Quality Population and Housing Biological Resources Public Services Greenhouse Gas Emissions Recreation Cultural Resources Transportation and Traffic Geology and Soils Utilities and Service Systems Hazards and Hazardous Materials Mandatory Findings of Significance Hydroio_gy and Water Quality None Land Use and Planning Determination (To be completed by the lead agency) On the basis of this initial evaluation: Eric Jones Printed Name 2 S- /0 Date City of Temecula For I find that the proposed project COULD NOT have a significant effect on the environment, and a NEGATIVE DECLARATION will be prepared. X 1 find that although the proposed project could have a significant effect on the environment, there will not be a significant effect in this case because revisions in the project have been made by or agreed to by the project proponent. A MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION will be prepared. 1 find that the proposed project MAY have a significant effect on the environment, and an ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT is required. I find that the proposed project MAY have a "potentially significant impact" or "potentially significant unless mitigated" impact on the environment, but at least one effect 1) has been adequately analyzed in an earlier document pursuant to applicable legal standards, and 2) has been addressed by mitigation measures based on the earlier analysis as described on attached sheets. An ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT is required, but it must analyze only the effects that remain to be addressed. 1 find that although the proposed project could have a significant effect on the environment, because all potentially significant effects (a) have been analyzed adequately in an earlier EIR or NEGATIVE DECLARATION pursuant to applicable standards, and (b) have been avoided or mitigated pursuant to that earlier EIR or NEGATIVE DECLARATION, including revisions or mitigation measures that are imposed upon the proposed project. nothing further is required_ Eric Jones Printed Name 2 S- /0 Date City of Temecula For 1. AESTHETICS. Would the project: Issues and Supporting Information Sources Potentially Significant Impact Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant Impact: No impact a Have a substantial adverse effect on a scenic vista? X b Substantially damage scenic resources, including, but not limited to, trees, rock outcroppings, and historic buildings within a state scenic highway? X c Substantially degrade the existing visual character or quality of the site and its surroundings? X d Create a new source of substantial light or glare which would adversely affect day or nighttime views in the area? X Comments: 1.a. No Impact: The project will have no impact on a scenic vista. The proposed two-story, 24,943 square foot religious facility is located on the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri. The Community Design Element of the City of Temecula's General Plan identifies important scenic viewsheds throughout the City to ensure all new public and private development projects will not obstruct the public views of scenic resources. According to the Community Design Plan Exhibit on page CD -5 of the Temecula General Plan, the subject property has not been identified as a viewshed, nor is the project located in close proximity to an identified viewshed. Therefore, no scenic vistas or identified viewsheds will be affected by the development of the proposed project. 1.b. No Impact: The proposed project will not substantially damage scenic resources including trees, rock outcroppings, and historic buildings within a state scenic highway. The proposed project site does not contain any scenic resources such as trees, rock outcroppings or historical buildings. Furthermore, the proposed project is not located near a State scenic highway. 1.c. Less than Significant Impact: The proposed project will not degrade the existing visual character or quality of the site or quality of its surroundings. The 4.32 acre project site is currently vacant. However, the project .site is surrounded by single-family homes and an existing religious facility on Very Low residential zoned parcels. 1.d. Less than Significant Impact: The project will create a new source of light glare; however, the impact is not anticipated to be significant .enough to adversely impact the daytime or nighttime views in the area. The proposed site is surrounded by parcels with residential development. The City of Temecula requires that all new developments comply with the Mount Palomar Light Ordinance (Ordinance 655). Ordinance 655 requires that all lighting sources be shielded and directed downward to avoid glare on adjacent properties and ensure low levels of glare in the sky. Lighting design will be addressed during the plan check process, prior to the. issuance of any building permits for the new religious facility. Lighting issues will also be addressed during the construction and inspection phase of the project. Because the project will be required to be in compliance with Ordinance 655, it will not adversely affect the day or nighttime views or create substantial light or glare, resulting in a less than significant impact. G_IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DPIPlanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 2. AGRICULTURE AND FOREST RESOURCES. In determining whether impacts to agricultural resources are significant environmental effects, lead agencies may refer to the California Agricultural Land Evaluation and Site Assessment Model (1997) prepared by the California Dept. of Conservation as an optional model to use in assessing impacts on agriculture and farmland. In determining whether impacts to forest resources, including timberland, are significant environmental effects, lead agencies may refer to information compiled by the CaliforniaDepartment of Forestry and Fire Protection regarding the state's inventory of forest land, including the Forest and Range Assessment Project and the Forest Legacy Assessment Project; and forest carbon measurement methodology provided in Forest Protocols adopted by the California Air Resources Board. Would the project: Issues and Supporting Information Sources Potentially Significant Impact Less Than Significant With Mitigation: incorporated Less Than Significant Impact No Impact a Convert Prime Farmland, Unique Farmland, or Farmland of Statewide Importance (Farmland), as shown on the maps prepared pursuant to the Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program of the California Resources Agency, to non-agricultural use? X b Conflict with existing zoning for agricultural use, or a Williamson Act contract? X c Conflict with existing zoning for, or cause rezoning of, forest land (as defined in Public Resources Code section 12220(g)), timberland (as defined by Public Resources Code section 4526), or timberland zoned Timberland Production (as defined by Government Code section 51104(g)? X d Result in the loss of forest land or conversion of forest land to non -forest use X e Involve other changes in the existing environment which, due to their location or nature, could result in conversion of Farmland, to non-agricultural use or conversion of forest land to non -forest use? X Comments: 2.a.e. No Impact: The proposed project will not convert Prime Farmland, Unique Farmland or Farmland of Statewide Importance, to a non-agricultural use. According to the. City of Temecula General Plan, the project site does not contain any Prime Farmland, Unique Farmland or Farmland of Statewide importance. Therefore, the construction and operation of the project will not have any impacts to these types of farmland. Many of the adjacent properties contain existing single-family dwellings and are not used for forest or farmland. Additionally, the project site does not contain existing farmland, or forestland, nor was the site intended to be used for agricultural or foresting purposes. 2.b. No Impact: The project site is zoned Very Low (VL) residential. This zoning designation does allow for agricultural uses provided they are consistent with all. Development Code requirements. However, agricultural uses are not planned for this property. In addition, the site is not regulated by a Williamson Act contract per the General Plan. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\Planninglinitial StudylRevised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.cdoc 2.c.d. No Impact: The project location is not suitable for forest and/or timberland uses as defined by the Public Resources and Government Codes. Forest land is defined as land that can support 10 percent native tree cover of any species, including hardwoods, under natural conditions, and that allows for management of one or more forest resources including timber, aesthetics, fish and wildlife, biodiversity, water quality, recreation and other public benefits. The proposed project site is zoned Very Low (VL) residential and not as a Timberland Production Zone as defined by Section 51104(g) of the Government Code. As such, the parcel and surrounding area are intended to be developed with detached single-family homes and are therefore not available to grow trees commercially as required by the timberland definition contained in Section 4526 of the Public Resources Code. In addition, forest land does not exist on the parcel or in the immediate area. No impact is expected. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1PIanninglInitial StudylRevised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 3. AiR QUALITY. Where available, the significance criteria established by the applicable air quality management or air pollution control district may be relied upon to make the following determinations. Would the project: Issues and Supporting Information Sources Potentially Significant Impact Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant Impact No Impact` a Conflict with or obstruct implementation of the applicable air quality plan? X b Violate any air quality standard or contribute substantially to an existing or projected air quality violation? X c Result in a cumulatively considerable net increase of any criteria pollutant for which the project region is non - attainment under an applicable federal or state ambient air quality standard (including releasing emissions which exceed quantitative thresholds for ozone precursors)? X d Expose sensitive receptors to substantial pollutant concentrations? X e Create objectionable odors affecting a substantial number of people? X Comments: 3.a. No Impact: The proposed religious facility is located within the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB). The South Coast Air Quality Management District and the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) are the responsible agencies for preparing the Air Quality Management Plan for the SCAB. The proposed project would not conflict with or obstruct implementation of the SCAQMD Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP). The proposed project is subject to the requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the California Air Resources Board (CARB), and SCAQMD. A project is deemed inconsistent with air quality plans if it results in population, and/or employment growth that exceed growth estimates in the applicable air quality plan. The proposed project does not include any residential development, housing, or large local or regional employment centers and would not result in significant population or employment growth. Thus, the proposed project would result in no impact with respect to the implementation of the SCAQMD's AQMP. 3.b.d. Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: Air quality impacts may occur during site preparation, grading, and construction activities required for implementation of the proposed land use. Major sources of emissions during construction include exhaust emissions generated during site preparation, grading, and the subsequent construction of the structures, as well as fugitive dust generated as a result of soil and material disturbance during site preparation and grading excavation activities. The emission of reactive organic compounds during site paving and painting of the structures may also occur. Sensitive receptors are land uses such as residences, schools, daycare centers, medical and recreational facilities that are more susceptible to the effects of air pollution than are the general population. The nearest sensitive receptors are the adjacent residential properties. These adjacent uses are located more than 25 meters from the proposed project site. Short term construction related air quality impacts are expected to occur during the development of the site. These short term impacts may be generated by soil disturbances and equipment exhaust. With the prevailing west to east winds, several residential units will be downwind of on-site construction activities. Any potential air quality impact during construction can be minimized by the combination of mandatory control programs. The applicant is required to comply with the mitigation measures outlined below and a less than significant impact is anticipated as a result of the proposed project with mitigation. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1PianninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial.Study.doc Required Mitigation Construction Practices • Use of Best Available Control Measures pursuant to Air Quality Management District guidelines for PM10 and for diesel equipment exhaust and during all grading activities. • Water all active construction areas at least twice daily. • Cover all haul trucks or maintain at least two feet of freeboard. • Pave or apply water four times daily to all unpaved parking or staging areas. • Sweep or wash any site access points within 30 minutes of any visible dirt deposition on any public roadway. • Cover or water twice daily any on-site stockpiles of debris, dirt or other dusty material. • Suspend all operations on any unpaved surface if winds exceed 25 mph. • Hydroseed or otherwise stabilize any cleared area which is to remain inactive for than 96 hours after clearing is completed. • Ensure that all cut and fill slopes are permanently protected from erosion. • Require the construction contractor to ensure that all construction equipment is maintained in peak working order. • Limit allowable idling to 10 minutes for trucks and heavy equipment. • Limit lane closures to off-peak travel periods. • Park construction vehicles off traveled roadways. • Wet down or cover dirt hauled off-site. • Wash or sweep access points daily. • Sandbag construction sites for erosion control. With the required mitigation measures specified above, no SCAQMD emission threshold will be exceeded during construction or operation of the proposed project. Thus, the air quality impacts from the development under this mitigation scenario are anticipated to be less than significant. 3.c. Less than Significant Impact: CEQA Guidelines Section 15064 (h)(3) stipulates that for an impact involving a resource that is addressed by an approved plan or mitigation program, the lead agency may determine that a project's incremental contribution is not cumulatively considerable if the project complies with the adopted plan or program. In addressing cumulative effects for air quality, the SCAQMD Air Quality Management Plan is the most appropriate document to use because it set forth comprehensive programs that will lead the South Coast Air Basin, including the project area, into compliance with all federal and state air quality standards. It also utilizes control measures and related emission reduction estimates based upon emissions projections for a future development scenario derived from land use, population, and employment characteristics defined in consultation with local governments. Because the proposed project is in G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\PlanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial StudyCEQA Initial Study.doc conformance with the AQMP and the project is not significant on an individual basis, it is appropriate to conclude that the project's incremental contribution to criteria pollutant emissions is not cumulatively considerable. Therefore the project's incremental contribution to criteria pollutant emissions is not anticipated to result in a cumulatively considerable increase, and a Tess than significant impact is anticipated. 3.e. No Impact: During construction the proposed project will include operations that will produce odors associated with equipment and materials. The site is located within the vicinity of sensitive receptors, including single-family homes. However, the odors associated with this type project are normally not considered so offensive as to cause sensitive receptors to become adversely affected. Diesel fuel combustion odors from construction equipment, operation equipment, and new asphalt paving fall into this category. Both based on the short-term of the emissions and the characteristics of these emissions, no significant odor impacts are anticipated to result from implementing the proposed project. G:IPLANNING120081PA48-0241 Islamic Center DP 1PIanninglinitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 4. BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES. Would the project? Issues and Supporting information Sources Potentially Significant Impact Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant : .Impact No Impact a Have a substantial adverse effect, either directly or through habitat modifications, on any species identified as a candidate, sensitive, or special status species in local or regional plans, policies, or regulations, or by the California Department of Fish and Game or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? X b Have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian habitat or other sensitive natural community identified in local or regional plans, policies, regulations or by the California Department of Fish and Game or US Fish and Wildlife Service? X c Have a substantial adverse effect of federally protected wetlands as defined by Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (including, but not limited to, marsh, vernal pool, coastal, etc.) through direct removal, filling, hydrological interruption, or other means? X d Interfere substantially with the movement of any native resident or migratory fish or wildlife species or with established native resident or migratory wildlife corridors, or impede the use of native wildlife nursery sites? X e Conflict with any local policies or ordinances protecting biological resources, such as a tree preservation policy or ordinance? X f Conflict with . the provisions of an adopted Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural Community Conservation Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat conservation plan? X Comments: 4.a.d. Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: Based upon existing conditions, the proposed project is not expected to have a significant adverse impact on the wildlife movements in the surrounding area within established native resident or migratory wildlife corridors, or impede the use of native wildlife nursery sites. Further, the project site is not located, within a Criteria Cell of the MSHCP Plan Area. Therefore, no MSHCP HANS review is required. The Western Burrowing Owl was identified as possibly present on or in the vicinity of the proposed project. However, suitable habitat for this species is not present on the proposed project site and Burrowing Owls or signs of Burrowing Owls were not observed on the site during a study performed by PCR Services Corporation (PCR). Thus, a less than significant impact for the project is expected with mitigation. Required Mitigation The following actions shall be taken to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive biological resources: A 30 -day Burrowing Owl Pre -construction Survey shall be conducted prior to any ground disturbing activity. If burrowing owls are found on the site, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shall be consulted regarding relocation of the owls. Relocation may only occur during the non -breeding season. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1Planningllnitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA initial Study.doc Alternatively, pre -construction surveys may be conducted at five-day intervals until three consecutive surveys fail to find owls on the site. 4.b. No Impact: Riparian/Riverine areas are lands which contain habitat dominated by trees, shrubs, persistent emergent vegetation, or emergent mosses and lichens, which occur close to, or which depend upon, soil moisture from a nearby fresh water source; or areas with fresh water flow during all or a portion of the year. According to the City of Temecula General Plan, no portion of the project site is located in a riparian biological area (Sensitive Habitats — Figure 5-3). No impact is anticipated. 4.c. No impact: The project site does not contain federally protected wetlands as defined by Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. To be considered a wetland, a site must meet three criteria: hydric soils, wetland hydrology, and hydrophytic vegetation. Hydric soils are defined by the national Technical Committee as soils that formed under conditions of saturation, flooding, or ponding long enough during the grow season to develop anaerobic conditions in the upper part of the soil. Wetland hydrology is present when, under normal circumstances, the land surface is either inundated or the upper portion of the soil is saturated at a sufficient frequency and duration to create anaerobic conditions. These conditions are also required in order for hydrophytic vegetation to be present. There is no indication that soils on the project site are inundated or saturated long enough during the growing season to promote hydric conditions or hydrophytic vegetation. Based on the absence of hydric soils, wetland hydrology and hydrophytic vegetation, there are no wetlands present on the project site. No impact will occur. 4.e. No Impact: The construction and development of the project will not conflict with any local ordinances or policies as they relate to the protection of biological resources. The City of Temecula has recently adopted a Heritage Tree Ordinance designed to protect certain species of trees within the City. However, no trees designated in the ordinance where located on the subject property. The City of Temecula General Plan outlines a number of policies which emphasize the interrelationship between the built and natural environment. The General Pian recognizes the importance of conserving important biological habitat and protecting plant and animal species of concern. As a result, the General Plan requires that development proposals identify significant biological resources. The Biological Assessment that was completed for the proposed project site did not identify any sensitive plant species, sensitive bird species, sensitive mammal species, sensitive reptile or amphibian species on site. Additionally, a Burrowing Owl survey was completed to identify any potential habitat which would assess the likelihood that Burrowing Owls would utilize the property. No Burrowing Owls were found on-site. No impact will occur. 4.f. No Impact: The proposed development of the project will not conflict with the provisions of the Multi - Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP). The MSHCP is a comprehensive, multi jurisdictional plan which focuses on the conservation of 146 species and their associated habitats in Western Riverside County_ The Plan's overall goal is to maintain a biological and ecological diversity within the rapidly urbanizing area. The Plan Area encompasses approximately 1.26 million acres and includes the City of Temecula within its boundaries. In considering the development of this site in the context of the MSHCP, it has been determined that the project site is not located within MSHCP Criteria Cells (Southwest Area Plan - Subunit 1 Murrieta Creek). Since the project does not lie within a designated Criteria Cell, it is not required to undergo a Habitat Acquisition Negotiation Strategy (HANS) and Joint Project Review application. No impact will occur. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center IDPIPIanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\GEQA Initial Study.doc 5. CULTURAL RESOURCES. Would the project: Issues and Supporting Information Sources Potentially Significant ' Impact Less Thar}, :. Significant With Mitigation Incorporated ':: Less Than Significant Impact No impact`: a Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of a historical resource as defined in Section 15064.5? X b Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of an archaeological resource pursuant to Section 15064.5? X c Directly or indirectly destroy a unique paleontological resource or site or unique geologic feature? X d Disturb any human remains, including those interred outside of formal cemeteries? X Comments: 5.a.b.c.d. Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: "Historic Resources" as defined by CEQA Section 15064.5 are prehistoric and historic resources that are assessed as being "significant", insofar as their evidentiary contents can be demonstrated relevant to the established local, regional or national research domains, issues and questions. According to a Cultural Resource Assessment that was completed for the property on January 20, 2010 by Michael Brandon and Associates, a cultural resources records check conducted at the Eastern Information Center was conducted. A pedestrian field investigation was also completed by using the transect survey technique across the study area. Surface visibility was excellent at 100%. The survey results indicate that one isolated artifact is located within the project area. This artifact (catalogued P#33-17881) consists of a quartzite flake and was likely deposited on the property during the prehistoric era. All topsoil's on the property are disturbed down to the bottom of the disking horizon, which is up to three feet below the modern ground surface. Impacts to potentially significant cultural resources are considered moderate. This because other resources do occur in the area, and it is entirely possible that significant subsurface prehistoric resources will be uncovered during development related earthmoving. If buried prehistoric cultural resources are detected during monitoring, the resources must be evaluated for significance before earthmoving can continue in the area of the find. The following mitigation measures will be required: Required Mitigation • A qualified Paleontologist shall be on-site during grading activities. Prior to the issuance of a grading permit, a qualified Archaeologist shall be retained to initiate and supervise cultural resource mitigation monitoring during project -related earthmoving in all areas of the project. Project -related archaeological monitoring shall include the following constraints: o All construction -related earthmoving shall be monitored by the qualified Archaeologist or his/her designated representative. o Once 50% of the earth to be moved has been examined by the qualified Archaeologist, the qualified Archaeologist may, at his or her discretion, terminate monitoring if and only no buried cultural resources have been detected. If buried cultural resources are detected during monitoring, monitoring must continue until 100% of virgin earth within the study area has been disturbed and inspected by the qualified Archaeologist or his or her designated representative. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1Planningllnitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study_doc o Grading shall cease in the area of a cultural artifact or potential cultural artifact as delineated by the qualified Archaeologist or his/her designated representative. Grading should only continue in other areas of the site while particular finds are investigated. o If cultural artifacts are uncovered during grading, they shall be examined by a professional archaeologist are subject to MM CR -3, and then curated in a museum facility chosen by the County. A mitigation -monitoring report must accompany the artifacts once they are donated to the museum facility. Given the project's Iodation in Pechanga territory, the Pechanga Tribe intends to assert its rights pursuant to California Law with regard to any remains or items discovered in the course of this project. Furthermore, the Pechanga Band of Indians requests the following mitigation measures: • According to the California Public Resources Code, 5097.98, if Native American human remains are discovered, the Native American Heritage Commission must name a "most likely descendant" who shall be consulted as to the appropriate disposition of the remains. Required Mitigation • Prior to the issuance of grading permits, the project applicant/developer is required to enter into a Treatment Agreement with the Pechanga Band of Luiserio Indians. This Agreement will address the treatment and disposition of cultural resources and human remains that may be uncovered during construction as well as provisions for tribal monitors. Tribal monitors from the Pechanga Band of Luiserio Indians shall be allowed to monitor all grading, excavation and ground -breaking activities, including further surveys, to be compensated by the project applicant/developer. The Pechanga Tribal monitors will have the authority to temporarily stop and redirect grading activities to evaluate the significance of any archeological resources discovered on the property, in conjunction with the archeologist and the Lead Agency. • If human remains are encountered, all activity shall stop and the County Corner must be notified immediately. All activity must cease until the County Corner has determined the origin and disposition of said remains. The Corner shall determine if the remains are prehistoric, and shall notify the State Native. American Heritage Commission if applicable. Further actions shall be determined by the desires of the Most Likely Descendant. • The Landowner agrees to relinquish ownership of all resources, including ail Luiserio sacred items, burial goods and all archeological artifacts that are found on the project area to the Pechanga Band of Luiserio Indians for proper treatment and disposition. All sacred sites within the project area are to be avoided and preserved. G_1PLANNING120081PA08-0241.Islamic Center DPIPlanninglInitial StudylRevised Initial. Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 6. GEOLOGY AND SOILS. Would the project: Issues and Supporting. Information Sources Potentially Significant Impact Less Than -. Significant With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant . Impact No impact a Expose people or structures to potential substantial adverse effects, including the risk of loss, injury, or death involving: i. Rupture of a known earthquake fault, as delineated on the most recent Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zoning Map issued by the State Geologist for the area or based on other substantial evidence of a known fault? Refer to Division of Mines and Geology Special Publication 42. X ii Strong seismic ground shaking? X iii Seismic -related ground failure, including liquefaction? X iv Landslides? X b Result in substantial soil erosion or the loss of topsoil? X c Be located on a geologic unit or soil that is unstable, or that would become unstable as a result of the project, and potentially result in on- or off-site landslide, lateral spreading, subsidence, liquefaction or collapse? X d Be located on expansive soil, as defined in Table 18-1-B of the Uniform Building Code (1994), creating substantial risks to life or property? X e Have soils incapable of adequately supporting the use of septic tanks or alternative wastewater disposal systems where sewers are not available for the disposal of wastewater? X Comments: 6.a.i.ii. Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: A Preliminary Geotechnical Interpretive Analysis was completed by Earth -Strata Inc., dated September 17, 2008. According to this analysis, the project is proposed to be located within a seismically active region. As a result, significant ground shaking will likely impact the site within the design life of the project. The geologic structure of the entire southern California area is dominated by northwest -trending faults associated with the San Andreas Fault system, which accommodates for most of the right lateral movement associated with the relative motion between the Pacific and North American tectonic plates. Known active faults within this system include the Newport -Inglewood, Whittier -Elsinore, San Jacinto and San Andreas Faults. No active faults traverse the project site and the site is not located within an Alquest-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zone. However, based on the review of regional geologic maps and the computer program (USGS 2002 Interactive Deaggregation), the Elsinore -Temecula Fault with an approximate source to site distance of 6:7 kilometers (4 miles) is the closest known active fault anticipated to produce the highest ground accelerations, with an anticipated maximum modal magnitude of 6.6. Based on the data compiled during the preparation of the Preliminary Geotechnical report, it has been determined that the potential for surface rupture to adversely impact the proposed project is low to remote; however, since the proposed project is located within a seismically active region, and ground shaking will likely impact the site during the life of the project, the following mitigation measure shall be required: G:\PLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\PIanninglInitial StudylRevised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study_doc Required Mitigation • Structures are required to be designed and constructed to resist the effects of seismic ground motions as provided in the 2007 California Building Code Section 1613. The following seismic design coefficients should be implemented during the design of the proposed structures for the project: it Site Location Latitude: 33.5417 Longitude: -117.1173 Site Class D Mapped Spectral Accelerations for short periods, S5 1.50 Mapped Spectral Accelerations for 1 -Second Period, S1 0.60 Site Coefficient, Fa 1.00 Site Coefficient, Fv 1.50 Maximum Considered Earthquake Spectral Response Acceleration for 1 -Second Short Periods, Sms 1.50 Maximum Considered Earthquake Spectral Response Acceleration for 1 -Second Period, Smi 0.9 Design Spectral Response Acceleration for Short Periods, SDS 1.0 Design Spectral Response Acceleration for 1 -Second Period, SD1 0.60 Seismic Design Category D Importance Factor Based on Occupancy Category 11 All conclusions and recommendations specified in the Geotechnical Study prepared by Earth -Strata, Inc. dated September 17, 2008 shall be incorporated into the plans for the project and implemented during construction. 6.a.iii. Less Than Significant: As indicated above, the project site is located in a seismically active region and within the general vicinity of a number of earthquake faults. The secondary effects of the seismic activity could produce several types of ground failure at the site. These include landslides, ground lurching, shallow ground rupture, and liquefaction/lateral spreading. The probability of occurrence of each type of ground failure depends on the severity of the earthquake, distance from the faults, topography, the state of subsurface earth materials, groundwater conditions, and other factors. Based on the Preliminary Geotechnical Interpretive Report all of the potential secondary effects of seismic activity are considered unlikely. Soil liquefaction was specifically examined in the Preliminary Geotechnical Interpretive Report. Liquefaction occurs as a .result of substantial loss of shear strength or shearing resistance in loose, saturated, cohesionless earth materials subjected to earthquake induced ground shaking. Potential impacts from liquefaction include loss of bearing capacity, liquefaction related settlement, lateral movements, and surface manifestation such as sand boils. Seismically induced settlement occurs when loose sandy soils become denser when subjected to shaking during an earthquake. The three factors determining whether a site is likely to be subject to liquefaction include: seismic ground shaking, type and consistency of earth materials, and groundwater level. The proposed project will be supported by compact fill, competent alluvium and bedrock, with groundwater at a depth of over 51 feet. As such, the potential for earthquake induced liquefaction and lateral spreading beneath the proposed structures is considered very low to remote due to the recommended compacted fill, relatively low groundwater level, and the dense nature of the deeper onsite earth materials. 6.a.iv. No Impact: According to the Preliminary Geotechnical Interpretive Report, landslides are identified as a type of ground failure that is typically studied. However, the report mentions that landslide debris was not observed during the subsurface exploration and no ancient landslides are known to exist on the site_ No impact from landslides is expected to occur. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\PIanningllnitial StudylRevised Initial Study\CEQA InitialStudy_doc 6.b. Less Than Significant Impact: The project will not result in a substantial loss of topsoil or erosion since the project will be graded according to all Public Works specifications and will be paved and improved with asphalt, concrete, landscaping and other materials. Therefore, soil erosion or loss of topsoil is not likely to occur and a less than significant impact is anticipated. 6.c.d. Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: According to the Preliminary Geotechnical Interpretive Report completed for the project by Earth -Strata, dated September 17, 2008, the site visit indicates that landslide debris were not observed on the site and no ancient landslides are known to exist on the site. In addition, the preliminary laboratory test results indicate that the proposed structures will be supported by compacted fill, competent alluvium and bedrock, with groundwater at a depth of over 51 feet. As such, the potential for earthquake induced lateral spreading beneath the proposed structures is considered very low to remote due to the recommended compacted fill, relatively low groundwater level, and the dense nature of the deeper on-site earth materials. The Preliminary Geotechnical report also indicates that preliminary laboratory test results illustrate that onsite earth materials exhibit an expansion potential of low to medium as classified in accordance with the 2007 California Building Code Section 1802.3.2 and ASTM D4829-03. It cannot be determined at this time by the laboratory tests that have already been conducted for the project site whether the soil has an either low or medium expansion potential. As a result, the following mitigation measures shall be required for the earth materials tested upon completion of the rough grading: Required Mitigation • The appropriate preliminary design and construction recommendations contained in the Preliminary Geotechnical Interpretive Report completed by Earth -Strata, dated September 17, 2008, outlined on page 15 under the heading "Low Expansion Potential" and on page 16 under the heading "Medium Expansion Potential", shall be incorporated into the project design, depending upon the determination of the levels of expansion anticipated for the project, as determined at the completion of the rough grading stage of the project. 6.e. No Impact: Per the Preliminary Geotechnical Interpretive Report dated September 17, 2008 by Earth - Strata, Inc. the property is considered suitable for the proposed development from a geotechnical and engineering perspective. The project will utilize a sewer connection. No septic tanks or alternative wastewater disposal systems are proposed. G_IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DPIPlanninglInitial StudylRevised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 7. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS. Would the project: a Issues and Supporting Information Sources Generate greenhouse gas emissions, either directly or indirectly, that may have a significant impact on the environment? Potentially :Significant Impact Less Than !; Significant With Mitigation incorporated - Less Than Significant Impact> X No Impact b Conflict with an applicable plan, policy or regulation adopted for the purpose of reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases? X Comments: 7.a.b. Less Than Significant Impact: At this time there are no adopted statewide guidelines for greenhouse gas emission (GHG) impacts, but this is being addressed through the provisions of Senate Bill 97 (SB 97). For the proposed project, the project would be considered to have a significant impact if the project would be in conflict with the AB 32 State goals for reducing GHG emissions and have. Staff assumes that AB 32 will be successful in reducing GHG emissions and reducing the cumulative GHG emissions statewide by 2020. It is not anticipated that the project could have a major impact (either positively or negatively) on the global concentration of GHG. GHG impacts are considered to be exclusively cumulative impacts; there are no non -cumulative greenhouse gas emission impacts from a climate change perspective (CAPCOA, 2008). The proposed project would contribute to global climate change as a result of emissions of GHGs, primarily CO2, emitted by construction activities. However, the project will not conflict with the CARB's thirty-nine (39) recommended actions in California's AB 32 Climate Change Scoping Plan. The project will also not exceed the SCAQMD GHG screening threshold (3,000 metric tons CO2e/yr). In addition, the City of Temecula does not have any plans, policies, or regulations adopted for the purpose of reducing the emissions of. GHGs. The project is expected to have a less than significant impact with regard to greenhouse gas emissions. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\PIanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 8. HAZARDS AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. Would the project: Issues and Supporting Information Sources Potentially Significant, Impact Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than ';Significant Impact 1. No :Impact a Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through the routine transportation, use, or disposal of hazardous materials? X b Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through reasonably foreseeable upset and accident conditions involving the release of hazardous materials into the environment? X c Emit hazardous emissions or handle hazardous or acutely hazardous materials, substances, or acutely hazardous materials, substances, or waste within one-quarter mile of an existing or proposed school? X d Be located on a site which is included on a list of hazardous materials sites compiled pursuant to Government Code Section 65962.5 and, as a result, would it create a significant hazard to the public or the environment? X e For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport or public use airport, would the project result in a safety hazard for people residing or working in the project area? X. f For a project within the vicinity of a private airstrip, would the project result in a safety hazard for people residing or working in the project area? X g Impair implementation of or physically interfere with an adopted emergency . response plan or emergency evacuation plan? X h Expose people or structures to a significant risk or loss, injury or death involving wildland fires, including where wildlands are adjacent to urbanized areas or where residences are intermixed with wildiands? X Comments: 8.a. No Impact: The proposed project will not create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through the routine transportation, use or disposal of hazardous materials. The proposed land use is a religious facility and will not be routinely transporting, using or disposing hazardous materials_ 8.b.c. No Impact: The proposed project will not create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through reasonably foreseeable upset and accident conditions involving the release of hazardous materials into the environment. The proposed project is a religious facility and will not emit hazardous materials into the environment, or impact the public through day-to-day operations. In addition, the project will not require the handling of hazardous or acutely hazardous materials, substances and waste. Additionally, the proposed project is not located within one-quarter mile of an existing or proposed school. 8.d. No Impact: The proposed project will not be located on a site which is included on a list of hazardous materials sites pursuant to Government Code Section 65962.5 and, as a result, will not create a significant hazard to the public or the environment. The California Environmental Protection Agency lists Hazardous G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DPIPlanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc. Waste and Substances Sites. The project site is not on this list, therefore no impact related to hazardous materials posing a significant hazard to the public or environment will occur. 8.e. Potential Significant Unless Mitigation Incorporated: The French Valley Airport lies approximately two miles to the northwest and is the only air strip in the immediate area. Areas surrounding French Valley Airport have been categorized into six zones. The proposed structure resides in Zone E which is the least restrictive of all zones. Per the City of Temecula General Plan Environmental Impact Report, Zone E only prohibits hazards to aircraft flight. The proposed project was also reviewed by the Riverside County Airport Land Use Commission. The Commission stated that no action was necessary because of the project location, but the Commission did provide standard mitigation measures which address safety hazards. Required Mitigation • The following uses shall be prohibited: o Any use which would direct steady light or flashing light of red, white, green, or amber colors associated with airport operations toward an aircraft engaged in an initial straight climb following takeoff or toward and aircraft engaged in a straight final approach toward a landing at an airport, other than an FAA approved navigational signal light or visual approach slope indicator. o Any use which would cause sunlight to be reflected towards an aircraft engaged in an initial straight climb following takeoff or towards an aircraft engaged in a straight final approach towards a landing at an airport. o Any use which would generate smoke or water vapor or which would attract Targe concentrations of birds, or which may otherwise affect safe air navigation within the area. o Any use which would generate electrical interference that may be detrimental to the operation of aircraft and/or aircraft instrumentation. • Any outdoor lighting that is installed shall be hooded or shielded so as s to prevent either the spillage of lumens or reflection into the sky. • The attached notice shall be provided to all potential purchasers and tenants of the property and shall be recorded as a deed notice (notice is attached to the Mitigation Monitoring Program). 8.f. No. Impact: The project is not located with within the vicinity of a private airstrip. The project will not result in a safety hazard for people residing or working in the :proJect area as a result of a private airfield. No impact is anticipated. 8.g. No Impact: The proposed project will not impair the implementation of, or physically interfere with, an adopted emergency response plan or emergency evacuation plan. The proposed project site is located within an area that is surrounded by residential development and a religious facility located immediately across Calle Colibri. In addition, the subject parcel for which the project is proposed is zoned Very Low (VL) residential and is intended to be developed. The development of this parcel will not physically interfere with an adopted emergency response plan or emergency evacuation plan. 8.h. No Impact: According to the City of Temecula Geographic Information Systems Department, the project site is not located within a High Fire Hazard area. Therefore, the project will not expose people or structures to a significant risk or loss, injury or death involving wildland fires, including where wildlands are. adjacent to urbanized areas or where residents intermixed with wildlands. The closest High Fire Hazard areas are located approximately 4.5 miles to the northeast and southwest of the project area. Since the project is not located within a High Fire Hazard area and is not located in the immediate proximity of a High Fire Hazard area, injury, death and loss of life resulting from a wildfire is not likely to occur. Additionally, the City of G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DPIPIanningllnitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study_doc Temecula Fire Prevention Bureau has reviewed and conditioned the proposed project to ensure that it meets all fire code requirements, and that the project will be provided with fire protection, if needed, in the case that fire does occur on-site. GAPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center ©P1PlanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 9. HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY. Would the project: Issues and Supporting Information Sources - Potentially Significant Impact Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant Impact . No Impact a Violate any water quality standards or waste discharge requirements or otherwise substantially degrade water quality? X b Substantially deplete groundwater supplies or interfere substantially with groundwater recharge such that there would be a net deficit in aquifer volume or a lowering of the local groundwater table level (e.g., the production rate of pre-existing nearby wells would drop to a level which would not support existing land uses or planned uses for which permits have been granted)? X c Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern of the site or area, including through the alteration of the course of a stream or river, in a manner which would result in substantial erosion or siltation on- or off-site? X d Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern of the site or area, including through the alteration of the course of a stream or river, or substantially increase the rate or amount of surface runoff in a manner which would result in flooding on- or off-site? X e Create or contribute runoff water which would exceed the capacity of existing or planned storm water drainage systems or provide substantial additional sources of polluted runoff? X f Require the preparation of a project -specific WQMP? X g Place housing within a 100 -year flood hazard area as mapped on a federal Flood Hazard Boundary or Flood Insurance Rate Map or other flood hazard delineation map? X h Place within a 100 -year flood hazard area structures which would impede or redirect flood flows? X i Expose people or structures to a significant risk of loss, injury or death involving flooding, including flooding as a result of the failure of a levee or dam? X j Inundation by seiche, tsunami, or mudflow? X Comments: 9.a. Less Than Significant Impact: The project proposes a religious facility totaling 24,943 square feet. This type of development typically generates domestic and/or municipal wastewater that does not require pretreatment or waste discharge requirements. No water quality standards are forecast to be violated by implementing the proposed project. In addition, the project submitted a Water Quality Management Plan for review by the Public Works Department_ This document has been conceptually accepted. Upon acceptance of a final WQMP, Best Management Practices outlined in the WQMP will be implemented which will control storm water runoff pollution to a level of no significance. Therefore an overall less than significant impact is anticipated. G_1PLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center. DPIPlanninglInitiai Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study_doc 9.b. Less Than Significant Impact: The proposed project is not anticipated to result in a substantial depletion of groundwater supplies or substantial interference with groundwater recharge such that there would be a net deficit in aquifer volume or a lowering of the local groundwater table. The proposed project is not anticipated to have an effect on the quantity and quality of ground waters, either through direct additions or withdrawals through interception of an aquifer by cuts or excavations or through substantial loss of groundwater recharge capability. Less than significant impacts are anticipated as a result of the proposed project. 9.c. Less Than Significant Impact: The project will not substantially alter the existing drainage pattern of the site or area. Through the implementation of the project SWPPP (Storm Water Protection Program), erosion and siltation issues will be controlled to a less than significant impact level and this project will not result in substantial erosion or siltation on or off-site. 9.d.e.f. Less Than Significant Impact: The project would increase runoff as a result of increasing the impervious surface on the project site. The City imposes standard design criteria to detain surface runoff on the property to ensure that the maximum runoff volume from the site is not significantly increased. The project will not violate any water quality standards or waste discharge requirements established by the State of California. However, the project is required to prepare a Water Quality Management Plan (WQMP) pursuant to the Municipal Separate Storm -Sewer permit (MS4 Permit) issued by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB). A preliminary plan has been submitted and conceptually accepted and the project will comply with RWQCB standards as designed. Based upon the information presented above, no significant adverse impact to either downstream flows or water quality is forecast to affect properties downstream of the site from developing the property as proposed. Less than significant impacts are proposed. 9.g. No Impact: The proposed project is for a religious facility and features no residential component. As a result, the project does not place housing within a 100 -year flood hazard area. 9.h.i. Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: The proposed project may expose people or structures to a significant risk of loss, injury, or death involving flooding, including flooding as a result of a flood plain but not by the failure of a levee or dam. The subject property is not located within a dam inundation area per the City's General Plan. In addition, the City has implemented a multi -hazard functional plan pursuant to the California Emergency Services Act. Staff has also received correspondence from the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District indicating that the project would not be impacted by the District Master Drainage Plan facilities. Flood Control also states that the project is located within the limits of the district's Murrieta Creek/Santa Gertrudis Valley Area Drainage Plan for which drainage fees have been adopted. The proJect will be conditioned to pay these fees prior to issuance of grading permits. The City's Public Works Department indicated that the following mitigation measures must be incorporated: Required Mitigation • Prior to issuance of a Precise Grading Permit for Phase 2, a Conditional Letter of Map Revision (CLOMR) shall be submitted for review and approval by City of Temecula, Riverside County . Flood Control and Water Conservation District (RCFC&WCD), and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to determine the extent of the required improvements to Santa Gertrudis Channel, Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri. Approval from all pertinent local, state and federal environmental agencies shall be obtained. A Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) shall also be processed and approved by FEMA, subsequent to provision of the required infrastructure improvements. • A Drainage Study shall be submitted for review and approval with the precise grading plan in accordance with City Standards identifying storm water runoff expected from this site and upstream of this site. The study shall identify all existing or proposed public or private drainage facilities intended to discharge this runoff. The study shall also analyze and identify impacts to downstream properties and G: 1Pt_ANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\PIanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial StudyICEQA Initial Study.doc provide specific recommendations to protect the properties and mitigate any impacts. Any upgrading or upsizing of downstream facilities, including acquisition of drainage or access easements necessary to make required improvements, shall be provided by the developer. 9.j. No Impact: Due to the project area's distance from the ocean and elevation, there is no potential for a tsunami. The project area is not located near a large surface water body and there is no potential for inundation by seiche or mudflow. No impacts are anticipated. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\PIanning\lnitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 10. LAND USE AND PLANNING. Would the project: Issues and Supporting information Sources Potentially '' Significant- Impact Less Than Significant With Mitigation incorporated Less Than Significant Impact No. .' impact a Physically divide an established community? X b Conflict with any applicable land use plan, policy, or regulation of an agency with jurisdiction over the project (including, but not limited to the general plan, specific plan, local coastal program, or zoning ordinance) adopted for the purpose of avoiding or mitigating an environmental effect? X c Conflict with any applicable habitat conservation plan or natural community conservation plan? X Comments: 1O.a. No Impact: The proposed project will not physically divide an established community. The proposed project is an infill development project located on a 4.32 acre parcel, which is currently vacant. The proposed project is surrounded by residential parcels to the north, west and south, a religious facility to the east. The project does not involve any additional street or highway improvements which could otherwise divide an established community. 10.b. No Impact: The proposed project will not conflict with an applicable land use plan, or regulation of an agency with jurisdiction over the project, (including, but not limited to the General Plan, specific plan, local coastal program, or zoning ordinance) adopted for the purpose of avoiding or mitigating an environmental effect. The General Plan land use designation for the project site is Very Low (VL) residential. The zoning for the property is also Very Low residential. The proposed religious facility is consistent with the General Plan land use and zoning designations for the property. The proposed project meets all Development Code and zoning standards. Since the Development Code is a tool to implement the General Plan, and this project meets all Development Code Requirements, it can be concluded that the project is also consistent with the General Plan. No conflict with any applicable land use plan will occur. 10.c. No Impact: The proposed development of the project will' not conflict with the provisions of the Multi - Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP). The MSHCP is a comprehensive, multi jurisdictional plan which focuses on the conservation of 146 species and their associated habitats in Western Riverside County. The Plan's overall goal is to maintain biological and ecological diversity within the rapidly urbanizing area. The Plan Area encompasses approximately 1.26 million acres and includes the City of Temecula within its boundaries. In considering the development of this site in the context of the MSHCP, it has been determined that the project site is not located within an MSHCP Criteria CeII. However, according to the MSHCP, the site does have a potential for Borrowing Owl habitat. Additional information related to the findings and analysis contained in the biological assessment can be found in the Biological Resources Section (above -Section 4). GIPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1Planninglinitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 11. MINERAL RESOURCES. Would the project: Issues and Supporting Information Sources Potentially Significant Impact .. Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant Impact No Impact a Result in the loss of availability of a known mineral resource that would be of value to the region and the residents of the state? X b Result in the loss of availability of a locally -important mineral resource recovery site delineated on a local general plan, specific plan or other land use plan? X Comments: 11.a. No Impact: The construction of this project on the proposed site is not anticipated to result in the loss of a known mineral resource that would be of value to the region or to the residences of the State. According to the General Plan, the State Division of Mines and Geology has prepared a mineral resources report entitled Mineral Land Classification of the Temescal Valley Area, Riverside County, California, Special Report 165, which evaluated mineral deposits within the Temecula Planning Area. According to the State Geologist, the Temecula Planning Area was classified as a Mineral Resources Zone -3a (MRZ-3a), which determined that the area contains sedimentary deposits which have the potential to supply sand and gravel for concrete and crushed stone for aggregate, however these areas are not considered to contain mineral resources of significant economic value. 11.b. No Impact: The project is not anticipated to result in the Toss of locally important mineral resources, as the project site, which is within the above mentioned Temecula Planning area, has been classified as a Mineral Resources Zone -3a (MRZ-3a). According to the General Plan, the Temecula Planning Area is not considered to contain mineral resources of significant economic value. The property on which the proposed project will be located does not represent an area of locally important mineral resources. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP 1Planningllnitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 12. NOISE. Would the project result in: Issues and Supporting Information Sources Potentially -, Significant Impact . Less Than Significant With Mitigation : Incorporated Less Than Significant Impact No Impact a Exposure of persons to or generation of noise levels in excess of standards established in the local general plan or noise ordinance, or applicable standards of other agencies? X b Exposure of persons to or generation of excessive groundborne vibration or groundborne noise levels? X c A substantial permanent increase in ambient noise levels in the project vicinity above levels existing without the project? X d A substantial temporary or periodic increase in ambient noise levels in the project vicinity above levels existing without the project? X e For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport or public use airport, would the project expose people residing or working in the project area to excessive noise levels? X f For a project within the vicinity of a private airstrip, would the project expose people residing or working in the project area to excessive noise levels? X Comments: 12.a.b.c.d. Less Than Significant Impact: Development of the land will result in increases to noise levels during construction phases as well as increases to noise in the area over the long-term. No activities are anticipated within the proposed project that would expose persons to generation of excessive groundborne vibration or groundborne noise levels. The project will create some noise levels over that currently emanating from the project site as patrons arrive and leave the religious facility. However, those noises are not anticipated to create a substantial permanent increase in ambient noise levels in the project vicinity above levels existing without the project due to the low impact nature of a religious institution. The project may result in temporary or periodic increases in ambient noise levels during construction. Construction machinery is capable of producing noise in the range of 100+ DBA at 50 feet, which is considered bothersome. However, noise from construction of the project will comply with City ordinances regulating the hours of activity to Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and Saturday from 7:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. No significant impacts are anticipated. 12.e.f. Less Than Significant Impact: The project is located within the French Valley Comprehensive Land Use Plan issued by the Riverside County Airport Land Use Commission. The plan divides the area surrounding the airport into six zones. Many of these zones prohibit the development of highly noise -sensitive outdoor nonresidential uses. According to this plan, the project is located in Zone E. This zone does not include the prohibition of highly noise -sensitive nonresidential uses. The French Valley airport is the only airstrip located in the vicinity of the project site. The project is not located within the French Valley Airport Noise Contours exhibit provided on page N-13 of the City of Temecula General Plan. A less than significant impact is anticipated. G:IPLANNING1200131PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\PIanninglinitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 13. POPULATION AND HOUSING. Would the project: Issues and Supporting Information Sources Potentially Significant impact Less Than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant Impact No Impact a Induce substantial population growth in an area, either directly (for example, by proposing new homes and businesses) or indirectly (for example, through extension of roads or other infrastructure)? X b Displace substantial numbers of existing housing, necessitating the construction of replacement housing elsewhere? X c Displace substantial numbers of people, necessitating the construction of replacement housing elsewhere? X Comments: 13.a. Less Than Significant Impact: The proposed project will not induce substantial population growth in the area. The proposed project is for a religious facility located in a Very Low Residential zoning district in the City of Temecula. This religious facility is not anticipated to create new jobs in a manner that will substantially raise the population in the Temecula area. In the event jobs are created, the minimal increase in population that may potentially result is considered to be Tess than significant when compared to the projected population growth that is anticipated for the Temecula Area. 13.b.c. No Impact: The project includes the construction and operation of a 24,943 square foot religious facility on a vacant parcel within a Very Low Residential zoning district in the City of Temecula. Considering the site is currently vacant, it can be concluded that the project will not displace existing housing or necessitate the construction or replacement of housing elsewhere. G:IPEANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\PlanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial StudyICEQA Initial Study.doc 14. PUBLIC SERVICES. issues and Supporting Information Sources Potentially Significant Impact% Less Than Significant; With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant . Impact No Impact a Would the project result in substantial adverse physical impacts associated with the provision of new or physically altered governmental facilities, need for new or physically altered governmental facilities, the construction of which could cause significant environmental impacts, in order to maintain acceptable service ratios, response times or other performance objectives for any of the public services: Fire protection? X Police protection? X Schools? X Parks? X Other public facilities? X Comments: 14.a. Less Than Significant Impact: The project will have a less than significant impact upon the need for new or altered fire, police, recreation or other public facilities. The development of the site will incrementally increase the need for these services; however the development of this parcel was anticipated in the Final Environmental impact Report that was prepared for the City of Temecula General Plan. Therefore, the need for public services was previously analyzed and determined. As a result, the incremental increase in the need for these services, based upon the development of this project, will not result in a significant environmental impact. No additional police or fire facilities will be required to be constructed in order to maintain acceptable service ratios or fire/emergency response times. No additional parks or other facilities are proposed to be constructed as part of this project. Furthermore, the project will contribute its fair share to public services through the City's. Development Impact Fees for the maintenance or provision of services from these entities. The project itself is not proposing a residential use and therefore will have no impact upon, or result in a need for new or altered school facilities. Development of the subject parcel will not cause a significant increase in the number of people within, or coming to, the City of Temecula. The incremental effect from the project will be mitigated through the payment of applicable school fees at the time the project is developed. A Tess than significant impact to existing public services is anticipated as a result of the project. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1PIanningllnitial StudylRevised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study_doc 15. RECREATION. a Issues and Supporting Information ounces Would the project increase the use of existing neighborhood and regional parks or other recreational facilities such that substantial physical deterioration of the facility would occur or be accelerated? Potentially Significant Impact! Less Than, Significant With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than s Significant ,' Impact X b Does the project include recreational facilities or require the construction or expansion of recreational facilities which might have an adverse physical effect on the environment? x Comments: 15.a. Less Than Significant Impact: The proposed project will have a less than significant impact on the existing recreational opportunities and existing parks since the proposed project is a non-residential development. The City owns and maintains 38 parks, and has two recreational centers, and outdoor amphitheater, a gymnasium, two swimming pools, a senior center, the Temecula Museum and Children's Museum. There are 22 neighborhood parks in the Temecula Planning Area which serve the recreational needs of the residents, and based upon the City's population of 72,715 residents at the time that the General Plan was updated, the City should offer 364 acres of parkland. Currently there are 308.73 acres of parkland existing within the City. The proposed project may slightly increase the use of the existing parks or other recreational facilities in the area because it is possible the patrons of the religious facility may wish to visit the existing public park located approximately 1,700 feet to the east near Calle Girasol. It must be noted that nearly all patrons of the religious facility and park will be Temecula residents. As such, since this project is a non-residential development, the demand for parks would not increase significantly as a result of this project. The proposed project would not directly result in the substantial deterioration of the existing recreational and park facilities, nor would this project increase the deterioration of existing park and recreational facilities. 15.b. No Impact: The project does not require or include the construction or expansion or recreational facilities that could otherwise have an adverse impact on the environment. The proposed project is for the development of a 24,943 square foot religious facility. The scope of the project does not include the construction of any additional recreational facilities or parks. Therefore, no impact will occur as a result of the project. G;IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1PIanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 16. TRANSPORTATION/TRAFFIC. Would the project: Issues and Supporting Information Sources Potentially Significant impact. Less Than Significant With Mitigation rincorporated Less Than Significant Impact::- No Impact a Conflict with an applicable plan, ordinance or policy establishing measures of effectiveness for the performance of the circulation system, taking into account all modes of transportation including mass transit and non -motorized travel and relevant components of the circulation system, including but not limited to intersections, streets, highways and freeways, pedestrian and bicycle paths and mass transit? X b Conflict with an applicable congestion management program, including, but not limited to level of service standards and travel demand measures, or other standards established by the county congestion management agency for designated roads or highways? X c Result in a change in air traffic patterns, including either an increase in traffic levels or a change in location that results in substantial safety risks? X d Substantially increase hazards due to a design feature (e.g., sharp curves or dangerous intersections) or incompatible uses (e.g., farm equipment)? X e Result in inadequate emergency access? X f Conflict with adopted policies, plans, or programs regarding public transit, bicycle, or pedestrian facilities, or otherwise decrease the performance or safety of such facilities? X Comments: 16.a.b. Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: The project is consistent with the City of Temecula General Plan. Religious facilities are permitted with the approval of a Conditional Use Permit in Very Low Residential zoning districts and are exempt from performing a traffic impact analysis. However, a traffic study was performed by KOA Corporation and submitted to the city on. October 15, 2010 in order to ensure compliance with all appropriate traffic regulations. Based on the intersections and roadways evaluated, the study reveals that if the recommended mitigation is followed, the proposed project will not result in a conflict with an applicable plan, ordinance or policy establishing measures of effectiveness for the performance of the circulation system in the project area. Further, the project will not conflict with an applicable congestion management program, including but not 'limited to level of service standards and travel demand measures, or other standards established by the County congestion management agency for designated roads or highways. A summary of the traffic study follows: The traffic study analyzed the following intersections: • Winchester Road and Margarita Road • Winchester Road and Nicolas Road • Nicolas Road and General Kearny Road • Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri Walcott Lane and La Serena Way G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DPIPlanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc In addition, the traffic study included the following cumulative projects in the analysis: Project Name Size Land Use Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witness 8,264 Square Feet Religious Facility Saraphina 67 Single Family Homes Single Family Residential Roripaugh Ranch 2,015 Single Family Homes Single Family Residential AM/PM Car Wash 946 Square Feet Commercial Gas Station Car Wash Walcott Estates 45 Single Family Homes Single Family Residential The intersections were evaluated using a variety of scenarios. These scenarios and their corresponding analysis are indicated below: Friday/Sunday Peak Hour intersection Performance Opening Year (2013) Conditions Without and With Project Intersection Opening Year Without Project Opening Year With Project a Delay Significant LOS LOS Friday Peak Hour 1. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd F F 0.1 No 2_ Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd F F 5.3 Yes 3. Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd D D 2.2 No 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* A C 15.8 No 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* B B 0.3 No Sunday Peak Hour 1. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd E E 1.1 No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd E E 3.5 Yes 3. Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd C C -2.3 • No 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* A A 2.7 No 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* A A 0.2 No The first set of scenarios represent the existing conditions with and without the project at opening year (2013). The opening year scenario includes an ambient growth rate of 2% per year. The table currently shows that the intersection of Winchester Road/Nicolas Road will continue to operate at a level of service (LOS) of F for the Friday peak hour and a LOS of E during the Sunday Peak hour. The LOS results are the same with and without the project. The Friday peak hour LOS deterioration is attributed to the significant number of school age pedestrians and vehicular traffic associated with the picking -up of students at Chaparral High School located on the southwest corner of Winchester Road and Nicolas Road. The bulk of this increased traffic occurs within 15-20 minutes surrounding the school dismissal time of 2 p.m. After the school dismissal period is over, LOS improves and the intersection operates normally. The Sunday peak hour LOS is attributed to the ambient growth rate of 2% per year for the area. Impacts to the Winchester Road/Nicolas Road intersection will be mitigated by the City of Temecula's Adaptive Traffic Signal system. Recognizing that the LOS and delays at intersections along Winchester Road are currently operating less than satisfactory, the City of Temecula has initiated the implementation of an Adaptive Traffic Signal System to mitigate conditions. The adaptive system monitors traffic flows system wide and adjusts traffic signal cycle lengths to address the changes in traffic flows, minimize delays, and improve system progression. By virtue of this continual monitoring, intersection. LOS is improved significantly, typically by 10 to 15 percent. The implementation of the adaptive system will be completed by April 2011. The traffic study G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1PIanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study_doc utilized the adaptive system to analyze the operation of the intersection and found that it will mitigate the intersection to a level of no significant impact. The below table summarizes these findings: Level of Service Analysis for Opening Year Conditions with Mitigation Intersection Opening Year Without Project O enin p g Year With Project A Delay Opening Year With Project With Mitigation Impact LOS LOS LOS Friday Peak Hour 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd F F 5.3 ' F No Sunday Peak Hour 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd E E 3.5 E No The second set of scenarios represents cumulative projects, 2% per year ambient growth rate and with and without the project. This analysis also includes Roripaugh Ranch as a variable. The results of the analysis are presented below: Friday/Sunday Peak Hour Intersection Performance Cumulative Year 2013 Without and With Project (Including Roripaugh Ranch) Intersection Cumulative Year 2013 Without Project Cumulative Year 20 13 . With Project © day Significant LOS LOS Friday Peak Hour I. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd F F 4.6 Yes 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd F F 5.0 Yes 3. Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd D D 1.0 No 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* A F 66.2 Yes 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* B B 0.7 No Sunday Peak Hour I. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd E E 0.5 No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd D d 0.5 No 3. Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd C C -L3 No 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* A A 1.8 No 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* B B 0.3 No As shown, three intersections will continue to operate at unsatisfactory levels of service during the Friday peak hour. These intersections are Winchester Road/Margarita Road, Winchester Road/Nicolas Road, and Nicolas Road/Calle Colibri. As previously indicated, the LOS and delays at intersections along Winchester Road are currently operating less than satisfactory, the City of Temecula has initiated the implementation of an Adaptive Traffic Signal System to mitigate conditions. The adaptive system monitors traffic flows system wide and adjusts traffic signal cycle lengths to address the changes in traffic flows, minimize delays, and improve system progression. By virtue of this continual monitoring, intersection LOS is improved significantly, typically by 10 to 15 percent_ The implementation of the adaptive system will be completed by April 2011. The traffic study G:IPLANNINGl20081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\Planninglinitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc indicates that the City proposed adaptive signal system will become appropriate mitigation to relieve traffic impacts to the Winchester intersections with Margarita and Nicolas. An additional mitigation is the extension of the existing left turn lane at the Winchester Road/Margarita Road intersection. This improvement will be constructed through the City's Capital Improvement program and is not the responsibility of the religious facility applicant. The Roripaugh Ranch development has been conditioned to improve the Winchester Road/Nicolas Road intersection through a Development Agreement. These improvements include: • Northbound Approach: Widen to provide two left turn lanes, four through lanes, and two right turn lanes • Southbound Approach: Widen to provide two left turn lanes, four through lanes, and one right turn lane • Eastbound Approach: Widen to provide one left turn lane, one through lane, and one right turn lane • Westbound Approach: Widen to provide three left turn lanes, one through lane, and one right tum lane These improvements are tied directly to the Roripaugh Ranch development and are not the responsibility of the religious facility applicant. The increased delay at the Nicolas Road/Calle Colibri intersection is attributed to increased vehicle volumes along Nicolas Road generated by the Roripaugh Ranch development, causing project generated traffic to wait to access Nicolas Road. The traffic study indicated that mitigation for the Nicolas Road/Calle Colibri intersection must include a two-way left turn lane along the project frontage from the eastbound approach. This mitigation measure is the responsibility of the religious facility applicant and will be included as a condition of approval attached to the project's frontage improvement responsibility. Required Mitigation • Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri -- Eastbound Approach: Widen to provide a two-way left turn lane along the project frontage The adaptive signal system, lane widening, and two-way left turn lane mitigation measure will reduce impacts at these intersections to a level that is less than significant. The below table summarizes these findings: Level of Service Analysis of Mitigation for Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions (Including Roripaugh. Ranch) Intersection Cumulative Year 2013 Without Project Cumulative Year 2013 With Project pay Cumulative Year 2013 With Project With Mitigation Impact LOS LOS LOS Friday Peak Hour 1. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd F F 4.6 F No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd F F 5.0 F No 3. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* A F 66.2 A No G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DPIPlanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc The third set of scenarios represents the cumulative project, the 2% per year growth rate and with and without the project but excludes Roripaugh Ranch as a variable. The results of this analysis are presented below: Friday/Sunday Peak Hour Intersection Performance Cumulative Year 2013 Without and With Project (Excluding Roripaugh Ranch) Intersection Cumulative Year 2013 Without project Cumulative Year 20I 3 With Project A Delay Significant LOS LOS Friday Peak Hour 1. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd F F 0.2 No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd F F 6.4 Yes 3. Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd D D 1.5 No 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* A C 19.0 No 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* B B 0.4 No Sunday Peak Hour I. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd E E 1.6 No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd E E 5.8 Yes 3. Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd C C -2.2 No 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* A A 2.7 No 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* A A 0.2 No The table indicates that the Winchester Road/Nicolas Road intersection during both the Friday and Sunday peak hour will operate at unsatisfactory levels of service under this scenario. The Friday peak hour LOS deterioration is attributed to the significant number of school age pedestrians and vehicular traffic associated with the picking -up of students at Chaparral High School located on the southwest corner of Winchester Road and Nicolas Road. The bulk of this increased traffic occurs within 15-20 minutes surrounding the school dismissal time of 2 p.m. After the school dismissal period is over, the intersection operates normally and LOS improves. The Sunday peak hour LOS is attributed to the ambient growth rate of 2% per year for the area. The traffic study indicates that appropriate mitigation for this intersection is the implantation of an Adaptive Signal System. As previously mentioned, recognizing that the LOS and delays at intersections along Winchester Road are currently operating less than satisfactory, the City of Temecula has initiated the implementation of an Adaptive Traffic Signal System to mitigate conditions. The adaptive system monitors traffic flows system wide and adjusts traffic signal cycle lengths to address the changes in traffic flows, minimize delays, and improve system progression. By virtue of this continual monitoring, intersection LOS is improved significantly, typically by 10 to 15 percent. The implementation of the adaptive system will be completed by April 2011. The traffic study analyzed the affects of this system and found that it will mitigate the intersection to a level of no significant impact. The below table summarizes these findings: Level of Service Analysis of Mitigation for Cumulative 2013 Conditions (Excluding Roripaugh Ranch) Intersection Cumulative Year 20 13 Without Cumulative Year 2013.0e With ay Cumulative Year 2013 With Impact G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1Planningllnitial StudylRevised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc In addition to the required mitigation, the Temecula Capital Improvement Program has three infrastructure improvement projects underway to accommodate the growth and volume of traffic generated by business and recreation areas. The below referenced projects will provide additional traffic relief: French Valley Parkway/I-15 Overcrossing and Interchange Project provides for construction of a new freeway interchange on the 1-15 between the existing Winchester Road Interchange and the 1-15/1-215 freeway split. The project includes the construction of a freeway overcrossing, high occupancy vehicle (HOV) and collector/distributor (CD) lanes, construction of braided ramps between Winchester Road and the proposed new Interchange for both the northbound and southbound directions, and the construction of a by-pass exit ramp southbound north of the 1-15/1-215 freeway junction to French Valley Parkway. The construction of the French Valley Parkway will reduce delays and alleviate current LOS deficiencies along Winchester Road. The construction of this facility will redistribute traffic within the circulation system thereby offsetting the proposed projects impacts at Nicolas Road and Winchester Road. French Valley Parkway (Date Street), Winchester Road to Margarita Road will widen the current arterial from two to four lanes and is being constructed by the cities of Temecula and Murrieta. The widening and extension project will complete the connection between Interstate 15 and Winchester Road (SR79 North) at Murrieta Hot Springs Road. Butterfield Stage Road will extend from Murrieta Hot Springs Road to Calle Chapos. The extension will provide a north -south link between Temecula and Murrieta. Drivers will be able to travel up Butterfield and then turn left on Murrieta Hot Springs to enter Murrieta. When completed, Butterfield will have two lanes in each direction with a raised center median. Improvements listed above will help alleviate roadway congestion and improve intersection LOS along Winchester Road. It is anticipated that approximately 20-30 percent of the existing and projected daily peak hour trips will diverted to the newly constructed roadways listed above. Diverted routes are roadways where trips will divert from an existing congested roadway facility to access newly constructed streets that connect to main roadway arterials or regional freeway facilities. For example, the existing trips that currently access the 1- 1.5 through the Winchester Road interchange will divert from their normal route with the construction of the French Valley Parkway/I-15 Overcrossing and Interchange project. The resulting diverted trips will create a decrease in the traffic volumes along Winchester Road. 17. UTILITIES AND SERVICE SYSTEMS. Would the project: a Issues and Supporting Information Sources Exceed wastewater treatment requirements of the Potentially Significant Impact Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant Impact X No Impact G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\Planningllnitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc Project Project Project With Mitigation LOS LOS LOS Friday Peak Hour 2_ Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd F F 6.4 F No Sunday Peak Hour 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd E E 5.8 E No In addition to the required mitigation, the Temecula Capital Improvement Program has three infrastructure improvement projects underway to accommodate the growth and volume of traffic generated by business and recreation areas. The below referenced projects will provide additional traffic relief: French Valley Parkway/I-15 Overcrossing and Interchange Project provides for construction of a new freeway interchange on the 1-15 between the existing Winchester Road Interchange and the 1-15/1-215 freeway split. The project includes the construction of a freeway overcrossing, high occupancy vehicle (HOV) and collector/distributor (CD) lanes, construction of braided ramps between Winchester Road and the proposed new Interchange for both the northbound and southbound directions, and the construction of a by-pass exit ramp southbound north of the 1-15/1-215 freeway junction to French Valley Parkway. The construction of the French Valley Parkway will reduce delays and alleviate current LOS deficiencies along Winchester Road. The construction of this facility will redistribute traffic within the circulation system thereby offsetting the proposed projects impacts at Nicolas Road and Winchester Road. French Valley Parkway (Date Street), Winchester Road to Margarita Road will widen the current arterial from two to four lanes and is being constructed by the cities of Temecula and Murrieta. The widening and extension project will complete the connection between Interstate 15 and Winchester Road (SR79 North) at Murrieta Hot Springs Road. Butterfield Stage Road will extend from Murrieta Hot Springs Road to Calle Chapos. The extension will provide a north -south link between Temecula and Murrieta. Drivers will be able to travel up Butterfield and then turn left on Murrieta Hot Springs to enter Murrieta. When completed, Butterfield will have two lanes in each direction with a raised center median. Improvements listed above will help alleviate roadway congestion and improve intersection LOS along Winchester Road. It is anticipated that approximately 20-30 percent of the existing and projected daily peak hour trips will diverted to the newly constructed roadways listed above. Diverted routes are roadways where trips will divert from an existing congested roadway facility to access newly constructed streets that connect to main roadway arterials or regional freeway facilities. For example, the existing trips that currently access the 1- 1.5 through the Winchester Road interchange will divert from their normal route with the construction of the French Valley Parkway/I-15 Overcrossing and Interchange project. The resulting diverted trips will create a decrease in the traffic volumes along Winchester Road. 17. UTILITIES AND SERVICE SYSTEMS. Would the project: a Issues and Supporting Information Sources Exceed wastewater treatment requirements of the Potentially Significant Impact Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant Impact X No Impact G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\Planningllnitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc Comments: 17.a.b.e. Less. Than Significant Impact: The project will not exceed wastewater treatment requirements,. require the construction of new treatment facilities, nor affect the capacity of treatment providers. The project will have an incremental effect upon existing systems. However, since the project is consistent with the City's General Plan, less than significant impacts are anticipated as a result of the project. 17.c. Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: The project will create storm water impacts for the surrounding area. The project has been reviewed by the City of Temecula Public Works Department, which has concluded that the project will require the construction of new storm water drainage facilities or the expansion of existing storm water facilities. The below mitigation measures have been provided by the City of Temecula Public Works Department: Required Mitigation • A Drainage Study shall be submitted with the precise grading plan for review and approval in accordance with City Standards identifying storm water runoff expected from this site and upstream of this site. The study shall identify all existing or proposed public or private drainage facilities intended to discharge this runoff. The study shall also analyze and identify impacts to downstream properties and provide specific recommendations to protect the properties and mitigate any impacts. Any upgrading or upsizing of downstream facilities, including acquisition of drainage or access easements necessary to make required improvements, shall be provided by the developer. 17.d. Less Than Significant impact: The project is located within the service boundaries of Rancho California Water District (RCWD). This agency has indicated that water availability is contingent upon water supply shortage contingency measures pursuant to RCWD's Water Shortage Contingency Plan. However, the project will not significantly impact existing water supplies nor require expanded water entitlements. While the project will have an incremental impact upon existing systems, the Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) for the City's General Plan states: "RCWD anticipates supplying water to 167,640 persons within its service area in 2020" (pg. 5.14-3). The FEIR further states: "EMWD anticipates supplying water to 756,699 persons within its service area in 2020" (pg. 5.14-3). This anticipated water supply includes a portion of Temecula. G:IP.LANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1PIanningllnitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA initial Study_doc applicable Regional Water Quality Control Board? b Require or result in the construction of new water or wastewater treatment facilities or expansion of existing facilities, the construction of which could cause significant environmental effects? , X c Require or result in the construction of new storm water drainage facilities or expansion of existing facilities, the construction of which could cause significant environmental effects? X d Have sufficient water supplies available to serve the project from existing entitlements and resources, or are new or expanded entitlements needed? X e Result in a determination by the wastewater treatment provider which serves or may serve the project that it has adequate capacity to serve the project's projected demand in addition to the provider's existing commitments? X f Be served by a landfill with sufficient permitted capacity to accommodate the project's solid waste disposal needs? X g Comply with federal, state, and local statutes and regulations related to solid waste? X Comments: 17.a.b.e. Less. Than Significant Impact: The project will not exceed wastewater treatment requirements,. require the construction of new treatment facilities, nor affect the capacity of treatment providers. The project will have an incremental effect upon existing systems. However, since the project is consistent with the City's General Plan, less than significant impacts are anticipated as a result of the project. 17.c. Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: The project will create storm water impacts for the surrounding area. The project has been reviewed by the City of Temecula Public Works Department, which has concluded that the project will require the construction of new storm water drainage facilities or the expansion of existing storm water facilities. The below mitigation measures have been provided by the City of Temecula Public Works Department: Required Mitigation • A Drainage Study shall be submitted with the precise grading plan for review and approval in accordance with City Standards identifying storm water runoff expected from this site and upstream of this site. The study shall identify all existing or proposed public or private drainage facilities intended to discharge this runoff. The study shall also analyze and identify impacts to downstream properties and provide specific recommendations to protect the properties and mitigate any impacts. Any upgrading or upsizing of downstream facilities, including acquisition of drainage or access easements necessary to make required improvements, shall be provided by the developer. 17.d. Less Than Significant impact: The project is located within the service boundaries of Rancho California Water District (RCWD). This agency has indicated that water availability is contingent upon water supply shortage contingency measures pursuant to RCWD's Water Shortage Contingency Plan. However, the project will not significantly impact existing water supplies nor require expanded water entitlements. While the project will have an incremental impact upon existing systems, the Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) for the City's General Plan states: "RCWD anticipates supplying water to 167,640 persons within its service area in 2020" (pg. 5.14-3). The FEIR further states: "EMWD anticipates supplying water to 756,699 persons within its service area in 2020" (pg. 5.14-3). This anticipated water supply includes a portion of Temecula. G:IP.LANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1PIanningllnitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA initial Study_doc Since the project is consistent with the City's General Pian, less than significant impacts are anticipated as a result of the this project. 17.f.g. Less Than Significant Impact: The project will not result in a need for new landfill capacity. Any potential impacts from solid waste created by this development can be mitigated through participation in Source Reduction and Recycling Programs, which are implemented by the City_ Less than significant impacts are anticipated as a result of this project. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\PlanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 18. MANDATORY FINDINGS OF SIGNIFICANCE. Would the project: Issues: and Supporting Information Sources Potentially Significant Impact Less Than SignificantVUith Mitigation Incorporated Less Than Significant Impact: No impact a Does the project have the potential to degrade the quality of the environment, substantially reduce the habitat of a fish or wildlife species, cause a fish or wildlife population to drop below self-sustaining levels, threaten to eliminate a plant or animal community, reduce the number or restrict the range of a rare or endangered plant or animal or eliminate important examples of the major periods of California history or prehistory? X b Does the project have impacts that are individually limited, but cumulatively considerable ("Cumulatively considerable" means that the incremental effects of a project are considerable when viewed in connection with the effects of past projects, the effects of other current projects, and the effects of probable future projects)? X c Does the project have environmental effects which will cause substantial adverse effects on human beings, either directly or indirectly? X Comments: 18.a. Less than Significant Impact: This site is surrounded by development and does not contain any viable habitat for fish or wildlife species. This is an in -fill development and it does not have the potential to degrade the quality of the environment, substantially reduce the habitat of a fish or wildlife species, cause a fish or wildlife population to drop below self-sustaining levels, threaten to eliminate a plant or animal community, reduce the number or restrict the range of a rare or endangered plant or animal, or eliminate important examples of the major periods of California history or prehistory. Less than significant impacts are anticipated as a result of this project. 18.b. Less than Significant Impact: The effects from this project are Tess than significant from a cumulative impact perspective. None of the impacts associated with the project will be considerable when viewed in connection with the effect of the past projects, current projects and future projects. Less than significant impacts are anticipated as a result of this project. 18.c. Less than Significant Impact: The project will not have environmental effects that would cause substantial adverse effects on human beings, directly or indirectly_ The project will be designed and developed consistent with the Development Code and the General Plan. No significant impacts are anticipated as a result of this project. G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1Planning\Initial Study\Revised Initial Study\CEQA Initial Study.doc 19. EARLIER ANALYSES. Earlier analyses may be used where, pursuant to the tiering program EIR, or other CEQA process, one or more effects have been adequately analyzed in an earlier EIR or negative declaration. Section 15063(c)(3)(D). In this case a discussion should identify the following on attached sheets. a Earlier analyses used. Identify earlier analyses and state where they are available for review. b Impacts adequately addressed. Identify which affects from the above checklist were within the scope of and adequately analyzed in an earlier document pursuant to applicable legal standards, and state whether such effects were addressed by mitigation measures based on the earlier analysis. c Mitigation measures. For effects that are "Less than Significant with Mitigation Incorporated," describe the mitigation measures which were incorporated or refined from the earlier document and the extent to which they address site-specific conditions for the project. 19.a. The City's General Plan and Final Environmental Impact Report were used as a reference source in preparing this Initial Study. These documents are available for review at the City of Temecula Planning Department located at 43200 Business Park Drive 19.b. There were no impacts that were previously addressed by mitigation measures based on an earlier analysis. 19.c. See attached Mitigation Monitoring Program. SOURCES 1. City of Temecula General Plan. 2. City of Temecula General Plan Final Environmental Impact Report 3. South Coast Air Quality Management District CEQA Air Quality Handbook 4. Burrowing Owl Survey prepared by PCR Services Corporation, April 16, 2010 5. Cultural Resource Assessment prepared by Michael Brandman Associates, January 20, 2010 6. Preliminary Geotechnical Interpretive Report prepared by Earth -Strata, Inc. September 17, 2008 G:IPLANNING120081PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP1PlanninglInitial Study\Revised Initial StudyICEQA Initial Study.doc Project Description: Location: Applicant: Mitigation Monitoring Program A Development Plan with a Conditional Use Permit and Minor Exception for Height (PA08-0241, PA08-0242 and PA09-0154), two-story, 24,943 square foot Islamic Center located on a 4.32 acre parcel at APN 957-140-012. The project will be constructed in two phases consisting of 4,157 square feet in the first phase and 20,786 square feet in the second phase. Generally located on the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri Stephen Sigilar 28751 Rancho California Road, Suite 207 Temecula, CA. 92590 Air Quality General Impact: Expose sensitive receptors to substantial pollutant concentrations. Mitigation Measures: 1. Use of Best Available Control Measures pursuant to Air Quality Management District guidelines for PM10 and for diesel equipment exhaust: and during all grading activities. 2. Water all active construction areas at least twice daily. 3. Cover all haul trucks or maintain at least two feet of freeboard. 4. Pave or apply water four times daily to all unpaved parking or staging areas. 5. Sweep or wash any site access points within 30 minutes of any visible dirt deposition on any public roadway. 6. Cover or water twice daily any on-site stockpiles of debris, dirt or other dusty material. 7 Suspend all operations on any unpaved surface if winds exceed 25 mph. 8. Hydroseed or otherwise stabilize any cleared area which is to remain inactive for than 96 hours after clearing is completed. 9. Ensure that all cut and fill slopes are permanently protected from erosion. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Converter\temp\988285.doc Specific Process: Mitigation Milestone: Responsible Monitoring Party: 10. Require the construction contractor to ensure that all construction equipment is maintained in peak working order. 11. Limit allowable idling to 10 minutes for trucks and heavy equipment. 12. Limit lane closures to off-peak travel periods. 13. Park construction vehicles off traveled roadways. 14. Wet down or cover dirt hauled off-site. 15. Wash or sweep away access points daily. 16. Sandbag construction sites for erosion control. Place the above conditions of approval on this project to reduce construction equipment emissions and dust; and to protect sensitive receptors generated by grading/soil disturbance and construction operations. During grading and construction. Planning Department and Public Works Department General Impact: Mitigation Measures: Specific Process: Biological Resources Have a substantial adverse effect, either directly or through habitat modifications, on any species identified as a candidate, sensitive, or special status species in local or regional plans, policies, or regulations, or by the California Department of Fish and Game or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? 17. A 30 -day Burrowing Owl Pre -construction Survey shall be conducted prior to any ground disturbing activity. If burrowing owls are found on the site, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shall be consulted regarding relocation of the owls. Relocation may only occur during the non - breeding season. Alternatively, pre -construction surveys may be conducted at five-day intervals until three consecutive surveys fail to find owls on the site. Place the above Mitigation Measures as Conditions of Approval on the project to reduce potential biological impacts to a less than significant level. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Converter\temp\988285.doc Mitigation Milestone: Precise Grade Plan shall show that the required Mitigation Measures have been incorporated into the project design prior to the issuance of grading permit/building permit. Responsible Monitoring Party: Planning Department Cultural Resources General Impact: Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of a historical resource as defined in Section 15064.5 Mitigation Measures: Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of an archaeological resource pursuant to Section 15064.5 Directly or indirectly destroy a unique paleontological resource or site or unique geologic feature Disturb any human remains, including those interred outside of formal cemeteries Directly or indirectly destroy a unique paleontological resource or site or unique geologic feature? 18. Prior to the issuance of grading permits, the project applicant/developer is required to enter into a Treatment Agreement with the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians. This Agreement will address the treatment and disposition of cultural resources and human remains that may be uncovered during construction as well as provisions for tribal monitors. 19. Tribal monitors from the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians shall be allowed to monitor all grading, excavation and ground -breaking activities, including further surveys, to be compensated by the project applicant/developer. The Pechanga Tribal monitors will have the authority to temporarily stop and redirect grading activities to evaluate the significance of any archeological resources discovered on the property, in conjunction with the conjunction with the archeologist and the Lead Agency. 20. If human remains are encountered, all activity shall stop and the County Corner must be notified immediately. All activity must cease until the County Corner has determined the origin and disposition of said remains. The Corner shall determine if the remains are prehistoric, and shall notify the State Native American Heritage Commission if applicable. Further actions shall be determined by the desires of the Most Likely Descendant. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Converter\temp\988285.doc Specific Process: 21. The Landowner agrees to relinquish ownership of all resources, including all Luiseno sacred items, burial goods and all archeological artifacts that are found on the project area to the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians for proper treatment and disposition. 22. All sacred sites within the project area are to be avoided and preserved. 23. A qualified Paleontologist shall be on-site during grading activities. Place the above Mitigation Measures as Conditions of Approval on the project to reduce potential biological impacts to a less than significant level. Mitigation Milestone: Above referenced mitigation measures shall be placed on all applicable project plans. Responsible Monitoring Party: Planning Department Geology and Soils General Impact: Expose people or structures to potential substantial adverse effects, including the risk of loss, injury, or death involving: Mitigation Measures: Rupture of a known earthquake fault, as delineated on the most recent Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zoning Map issued by the State Geologist for the area or based on other substantial evidence of a known fault? Refer to Division of Mines and Geology Special Publication 42. Strong seismic ground shaking. Be located on a geologic unit or soil that is unstable, or that would become unstable as a result of the project, and potentially result in on- or off-site landslide, lateral spreading, subsidence, liquefaction or collapse? Be located on expansive soil, as defined in Table 18-1-B of the Uniform Building Code (1994), creating substantial risks to life or property? 24. Structures are required to be designed and constructed to resist the effects of seismic ground motions as provided in the 2007 California Building Code Section 1613. The following seismic design coefficients should be implemented during the design of the proposed structures for the project: C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Converter\temp\988285.doc Site Location 1iilimim uuuu iiiii�iiiiuuu ui tl mi uuu 111111111111111111% uu Latitude: 33.5407 Longitude: -117.1098 Site Class D Mapped Spectral Accelerations for short periods, Ss 1.50 Mapped Spectral Accelerations for 1 -Second Period, S 0.60 Site Coefficient, Fa 1.00 Site Coefficient, F, 1.50 Maximum Considered Earthquake Spectral Response Acceleration for 1 -Second Short Periods, Sms 1.50 Maximum Considered Earthquake Spectral Response Acceleration for 1 -Second Period, Smi 0.9 Design Spectral Response Acceleration for Short Periods, SDS 1.0 Design Spectral Response Acceleration for 1 -Second Period, SD1 0.60 Seismic Design Category D Importance Factor Based on Occupancy Category I I Specific Process: 25. All conclusions and recommendations specified in the Geotechnical Study prepared by Earth -Strata, Inc. dated February 9, 2009 shall be incorporated into the plans for the project and implemented during construction. 26. The appropriate preliminary design and construction recommendations contained in the Preliminary Geotechnical Interpretive Report completed by Earth - Strata, dated February 9, 2009, outlined on page 15 under the heading "Low Expansion Potential" and on page 16 under the heading "Medium Expansion Potential," shall be incorporated into the project design, depending upon the determination of the levels of expansion anticipated for the project, as determined at the completion of the rough grading stage of the project. Place the above Mitigation Measures as Conditions of Approval on the project to reduce potential biological impacts to a less than significant level. Mitigation Milestone: Above referenced mitigation measures shall be placed on all applicable project plans. Responsible Monitoring Party: Planning Department and Public Works C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Converter\temp\988285.doc General Impact: Hazards and Hazardous Materials For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport or public use airport, would the project result in a safety hazard for people residing or working in the project area? Mitigation Measures: 27. The following uses shall be prohibited: Specific Process: o Any use which would direct steady light or flashing light of red, white, green, or amber colors associated with airport operations toward an aircraft engaged in an initial straight climb following takeoff or toward and aircraft engaged in a straight final approach toward a landing a an airport, other than an FAA approved navigational signal light or visual approach slope indicator. o Any use which would cause sunlight to be reflected towards an aircraft engaged in an initial straight climb following takeoff or towards an aircraft engaged in a straight final approach towards a landing at an airport. o Any use which would generate smoke or water vapor or which would attract large concentrations of birds, or which may otherwise affect safe air navigation within the area. o Any use which would generate electrical interference that may be detrimental to the operation of aircraft and/or aircraft instrumentation. 28. Any outdoor lighting that is installed shall be hooded or shielded so as to prevent either the spillage of lumens or reflection into the sky. 29. The attached notice shall be provided to all potential purchasers and tenants of the property and shall be recorded as a deed notice (notice is attached to the Mitigation Monitoring Program). Place the above Mitigation Measures as Conditions of Approval on the project to reduce potential biological impacts to a less than significant level. Mitigation Milestone: Above referenced mitigation measures shall be placed on all applicable project plans. Responsible Monitoring Party: Planning Department C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Converter\temp\988285.doc Hydrology and Water Quality General Impact: Place within a 100 -year flood hazard area structures which would impede or redirect flood flows. Mitigation Measures: Specific Process: Expose people or structures to significant risk of loss, injury or death involving flooding, including flooding as a result of the failure of a levee or dam. 30. Prior to issuance of a Precise Grading Permit for Phase 2, a Conditional Letter of Map Revision (CLOMR) shall be submitted for review and approval by City of Temecula, Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (RCFC&WCD), and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to determine the extent of the required improvements to Santa Gertrudis Channel, Nicolas Road and Calle Colibir. Approval from all pertinent local, state and federal environmental agencies shall be obtained. A Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) shall also be processed and approved by FEMA, subsequent to provision of the required infrastructure improvements. 31. A Drainage Study shall be submitted with the precise grading plan for review and approval in accordance with City Standards identifying storm water runoff expected from this site and upstream of this site. The study shall identify all existing or proposed public or private drainage facilities intended to discharge this runoff. The study shall also analyze and identify impacts to downstream properties and provide specific recommendations to protect the properties and mitigate any impacts. Any upgrading or upsizing of downstream facilities, including acquisition of drainage or access easements necessary to make required improvements, shall be provided by the developer. Place the above Mitigation Measures as Conditions of Approval on the project to reduce potential hydrology impacts to a less than significant level. Mitigation Milestone: Above referenced mitigation measures shall completed before any grading permit is issued. Responsible Monitoring Party: Planning Department and Public Works Department General Impact: Transportation/Traffic Conflict with an applicable plan, ordinance or policy establishing measures of effectiveness for the performance of the circulation system, taking into account all modes of transportation including C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Converter\temp\988285.doc Mitigation Measures: Specific Process: Mitigation Milestone: mass transit and non -motorized travel and relevant components of the circulation system, including but not limited to intersections, streets, highways and freeways, pedestrian and bicycle paths and mass transit? Conflict with an applicable congestion management program, including, but not limited to level of service standards and travel demand measures, or other standards established by the county congestion management agency for designated roads or highways? 32. Nicolas Road/Calle Colibri Intersection — Eastbound Approach: Restripe to provide a two-way left turn lane along the project frontage. Place the above Mitigation Measures as Conditions of Approval on the project to reduce potential traffic impacts to a less than significant level. Above referenced mitigation measure shall completed as part of the frontage improvements Responsible Monitoring Party: Planning Department and Public Works Department General Impact: Mitigation Measures: Specific Process: Utilities and Service Systems Require or result in the construction of new water or wastewater treatment facilities or expansion of existing facilities, the construction of which could cause significant environmental effects 33. A Drainage Study shall be submitted with the precise grading plan for review and approval in accordance with City Standards identifying storm water runoff expected from this site and upstream of this site. The study shall identify all existing or proposed public or private drainage facilities intended to discharge this runoff. The study shall also analyze and identify impacts to downstream properties and provide specific recommendations to protect the properties and mitigate any impacts. Any upgrading or upsizing of downstream facilities, including acquisition of drainage or access easements necessary to make required improvements, shall be provided by the developer. Place the above Mitigation Measures as Conditions of Approval on the project to reduce potential hydrology impacts to a less than significant level. Mitigation Milestone: Above referenced mitigation measures shall completed before any grading permit is issued. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Converter\temp\988285.doc Responsible Monitoring Party: Planning Department and Public Works Department C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Converter\temp\988285.doc COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TRANSPORTATION AND LAND MANAGEMENT AGENCY George A. Johnson • Agency Director Planning Department Ron Goldman • Planning Director City of Temecula Planning Department June 2, 2010 Phone: (951) 506-5115, FAX: (951) 694-6477 Attention: Eric Jones, Case Planner RE: DRC REVIEW COMMENTS Islamic Center of Temecula Valley CITY OF TEMECULA CASE NO's. PA08-00241, -0242 and PA09-0154 We are in receipt of the "Notice of Proposed Mitigated Negative Declaration" (NOD) for the referenced cases. The following comments are based on my review of this document and the County's GIS database: 1. The site is located in the County's zone of high potential for paleontological resources at shallow depth. The NOD submitted to the County for review does not mention any assessment of the paleontological resources. Rather, it addresses only the cultural (Archaeological) resources (see Section 5.). In addition, the NOD indicates the level of significance for paleontological resources as "The Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated"; however, there are no paleontological resource mitigation recommendations/conditions provided in the NOD. This resource should be assessed and discussion provided in the NOD independent of the archaeological resource. It appears, based on the County's GIS database and General Plan mapping, mitigation of this resource should include, at a minimum, a condition on the project(s) that require(s) a Paleontological Resources Impact Mitigation Program (PRIMP) prior to issuance of Grading Permits and a condition requiring a report of this monitoring program at some milestone subsequent to completion of site grading. 2. The site is located in the County's subsidence potential zone and moderate liquefaction potential zone. The NOD does address Geologic hazards by reference to a report by prepared by Earth -Strata, Inc. However, the County cannot comment on the content this section of the NOD (Section 6) as the Earth -Strata, Inc. report was not provided to the County for review. 3. The site is located in an area classified by the State of California as MRZ-3 for mineral resources. The site is not designated as being of regional or statewide significance for mineral resources. The NOD indicates "No Impact" to mineral resources. However, given the MRZ-3 classification, it may be more appropriate to indicate the potential impact as "Less Than Significant Impact". Although the County Geologist is not currently contracted with the City of Temecula for geologic hazards review other than for projects within the Alquist-Priolo Zone, or for Riverside Office • 4080 Lemon Street, 9th Floor P.O. Box 1409, Riverside, Califomia 92502-1409 (951) 955-3200 • Fax (951) 955-3157 Desert Office • 38686 El Cerrito Road Palm Desert, Califomia 92211 (760) 863-8277 • Fax (760) 863-7555 review for potential impacts to Paleontological Resources or Mineral Resources, the County would be happy to provide report review services to the City for other geologic hazards and/or paleontological resources and/or mineral resources. Thank you for the opportunity to review this case for the City of Temecula. Please call me at (951) 955-6863 if you have any questions. RIVERSIDE COUNTY PLANNING DEPARTMENT Rondman, Planning Director avid Jones, CEG No. 2283 Chief Engineering Geologist, TLMA-Planning W:\Geology\Temecula Reviews\PA08-0241 DRC.doc June 17, 2010 City of Temecula Community Development Planning Division 43200 Business Park Drive • Temecula, CA 92590 P.0. Box 9033 • Temecula, CA 92589-9033 FAX (951) 694-6477 David Jones Riverside County Planning Department 4080 Lemon Street, 9tr, Floor Riverside, CA. 9250f SUBJECT: External Agency Comments for a Proposed Mitigated Negative Declaration for PA08.0241, a two phase commercial development plan for a two-story 24,943 square foot religious facility located at the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri totaling 4.32 acres; PA08-0242, a Conditional Use Permit to allow the religious facility to operate within a VL zone; PA09-0154, A Minor Exception to allow the religious facility an increase in building height. Dear Mr. Jones: Thank you for reviewing the above -referenced project. This letter shall serve to summarize staff's comment response. County of Riverside Planning Department: 1. Staff will add a mitigation measure/condition of approval indicating that a Paleontologist is present during grading activity. 2. Staff has provided a copy of the Preliminary Geotechnical Report by Earth -Strata for review. 3. The area surrounding the project is developed as primarily residential and the project will be developed as a religious facility. Even though the site as a designation of MRZ-3, the nature of the surrounding area makes it unlikely that a mineral extraction facility will be developed in the area. If you have any questions or comments, please contact me at (951) 506-5115 or by e-mail at eric.jones@cityoftemecula.org Sincerely, Eric Jones Assistant Planner Enclosures G:\PLANNING\2008\PA08-0241 Islamic Center DP\Planning\Hearing\Response to Initial Study Comments.doc South Loast Air Quality Management District 21865 Copley Drive, Diamond Bar, CA 91765-4178 (909) 396-2000 • www.aqmd.gov E-MAILED: JUNE 23, 2010 June 23, 2010 Mr. Eric Jones, Planner eric.jones@cityoftemecula.org Planning Division City of Temecula P.O. Box 9033 Temecula, CA 92589 Draft Mitigated Negative Declaration (Draft MND) for the Islamic Center of Temecula Valley The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the above-mentioned document. The following comments are meant as guidance for the Lead Agency and should be incorporated into the Final Mitigated Negative Declaration. In the project description, the lead agency proposes the construction of a two-story 24,943 square foot religious center located on a 4.32 acre parcel that would be constructed in two phases. The lead agency did not quantify the project's construction or operation air quality impacts unlike a recent CEQA document released by the lead agency for a similarly sized project and land use (Developmental Plan with a Conditional Use Permit PA09-0061). Because this information has not been included in the Draft MND, the lead agency has therefore not demonstrated that the proposed project will not yield significant adverse construction or operational air quality impacts that may trigger further analysis and/or mitigation pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act. To calculate the proposed project's regional air quality impacts, the lead agency can utilize the current URBEMIS 2007 version 9.2.4 land use emissions model', or the lead agency can follow the calculation methodologies in Chapter 9 and the Appendix to Chapter 9 in AQMD's CEQA Air Quality Handbook. In addition, the Draft MND indicates that the proposed project is located within one-quarter mile of sensitive receptors (residential properties) east and south of the proposed project. Therefore, the AQMD staff requests that the lead agency evaluate localized air quality impacts2 to ensure that any nearby sensitive receptors are not adversely affected by the construction activities that are occurring in close proximity. Should the lead agency conclude after its analyses that construction or operational air quality impacts exceed the SCAQMD daily significance thresholds, staff has compiled 1 http://www.agmd.gov/cega/urbemis.html 2 Analysis methodology available here: http://www.aqmd.gov/cega/handbook/LST/LST.html • J 4 w Mr. Eric Jones Planner 2 June 23, 2010 mitigation measures3 in addition to those listed by the lead agency on page 7 that can be implemented if the air quality impacts are determined to be significant. Please provide the AQMD with written responses to all comments contained herein prior to the adoption of the Final MND. The SCAQMD staff would be happy to work with the Lead Agency to address these issues and any other questions that may arise. Please contact Gordon Mize, Air Quality Specialist — CEQA Section, at (909) 396-3302, if you have any questions regarding these comments. Sincerely, 2 V&7/( Ian MacMillan Program Supervisor, Inter -Governmental Review Planning, Rule Development & Area Sources IM: GM RVC100526-03 Control Number 3 http://www.aqmd.gov/cega/handbook/mitigation/MM intro.html Traffic Study for The Islamic Center of Temecula in the City of Temecula November 1 I, 2010 Prepared for: City of Temecula 43200 Business Park Drive Temecula, CA 92589 Prepared by: KOA CORPORATION PLANNING & ENGINEERING 3190 Shelby Street, Bldg. C Ontario, CA 91764 (909) 890-9693 job No: JB04118 Table of Contents I. INTRODUCTION PROJECT LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION 1 2. PROJECT STUDY METHODOLOGY 4 STUDY TIMEFRAMES 4 • PROJECT STUDY AREA 4 ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES 4 INTERSECTION CAPACITY ANALYSIS 5 EXISTING TRAFFIC COUNT DATA 6 FUTURE (YEAR 2013) TRAFFIC VOLUMES 6 3. EXISTING CONDITIONS 7 EXISTING CIRCULATION NETWORK 7 PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE 10 4. THE PROJECT 13 EXISTING LAND USE TRAFFIC 13 PROJECT TRIP GENERATION 13 PROJECT TRIP DISTRIBUTION 14 5. OPENING YEAR WITHOUT AND WITH PROJECT CONDITIONS 18 PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE 18 6. CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITHOUT AND WITH PROJECT CONDITIONS INCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT 23 FUTURE GROWTH 23 PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE 24 7. CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITHOUT AND WITH PROJECT CONDITIONS EXCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH 30 PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION LEVEL OF SERVICE 30 S. IMPACTS AND MITIGATION 36 SIGNIFICANT IMPACTS 36 MITIGATION 36 OPENING YEAR CONDITIONS 36 Winchester Road & Nicolas Road 36 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 CONDITIONS (INCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) 37 Winchester Road & Margarita Road 37 Winchester Road & Nicolas Road 37 Nicolas Road & Calle Colibri 37 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 CONDITIONS (EXCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) 38 Winchester Road & Nicolas Road 38 CITY OF TEMECULA CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (CIP) 39 9. PROJECT ACCESS AND INTERNAL CIRCULATION 41 10. CONCLUSIONS 42 KOA Corporation ii November 2010 List of Figures FIGURE I-1 PROJECT STUDY AREA FIGURE 1-2 PROJECT SITE PLAN FIGURE 3-1 EXISTING CIRCULATION NETWORK FIGURE 3-2 EXISTING FRIDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES FIGURE 3-3 EXISTING SUNDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES FIGURE 4-1 PROJECT TRIP DISTRIBUTION FIGURE 4-2 PROJECT FRIDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES FIGURE 4-3 PROJECT SUNDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES FIGURE 5-1 OPENING YEAR WITHOUT PROJECT FRIDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES FIGURE 5-2 OPENING YEAR WITHOUT PROJECT SUNDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES FIGURE 5-3 OPENING YEAR WITH PROJECT FRIDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES FIGURE 5-4 OPENING YEAR WITH PROJECT SUNDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES FIGURE 6-1 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITHOUT PROJECT CONDITIONS (INCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) FRIDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES 26 FIGURE 6-2 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITHOUT PROJECT CONDITIONS (INCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) SUNDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES 27 FIGURE 6-3 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITH PROJECT CONDITIONS (INCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) FRIDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES 28 FIGURE 6-4 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITH PROJECT CONDITIONS (INCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) SUNDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES 29 FIGURE 7-1 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITHOUT PROJECT CONDITIONS (EXCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) FRIDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES 32 FIGURE 7-2 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITHOUT PROJECT CONDITIONS (EXCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) SUNDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES 33 FIGURE 7-3 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITH PROJECT CONDITIONS (EXCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) FRIDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES FIGURE 7-4 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITH PROJECT CONDITIONS (EXCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) SUNDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES 34 FIGURE 7-4 CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITH PROJECT CONDITIONS (EXCLUDING ROR1PAUGH RANCH PROJECT) SUNDAY PEAK HOUR VOLUMES 35 2 3 9 II 12 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 KOA Corporation iii November 2010 List of Tables TABLE I LEVELS OF SERVICE FOR INTERSECTIONS 5 TABLE 2 FRIDAY/SUNDAY PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION PERFORMANCE EXISTING CONDITIONS (YEAR 2010) TABLE 3 TRIP GENERATION RATES TABLE 4 PROJECT TRAFFIC GENERATION 10 14 14 TABLE 5 FRIDAY/SUNDAY PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION PERFORMANCE OPENING YEAR CONDITIONS WITHOUT AND WITH PROJECT 18 TABLE 6 CUMULATIVE PROJECTS (INCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) 24 TABLE 7 FRIDAY/SUNDAY PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION PERFORMANCE CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITHOUT AND WITH PROJECT (INCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) 25 TABLE 8 CUMULATIVE PROJECTS (EXCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) 30 TABLE 9 FRIDAY/SUNDAY PEAK HOUR INTERSECTION PERFORMANCE CUMULATIVE YEAR 2013 WITHOUT AND WITH PROJECT (EXCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT) 3 I TABLE 10 LEVEL OF SERVICE ANALYSIS FOR OPENING YEAR CONDITIONS WITH MITIGATION 37 TABLE I 1 LEVEL OF SERVICE ANALYSIS OF MITIGATION FOR CUMULATIVE YEAR. 2013 CONDITIONS INCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT 38 TABLE 12 LEVEL OF SERVICE ANALYSIS OF MITIGATION FOR CUMULATIVE 2013 CONDITIONS EXCLUDING RORIPAUGH RANCH PROJECT 39 Appendices APPENDIX A Traffic Count Data (August 2010) APPENDIX B - School and Religious Center Schedules APPENDIX C - Intersection Level of Service Worksheets Existing Conditions APPENDIX D Intersection Level of Service Worksheets Opening Year Conditions APPENDIX E Cumulative Project Information APPENDIX F Intersection Level of Service Worksheets Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions Including Roripaugh Ranch Project APPENDIX G Intersection Level of Service Worksheets Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions Excluding Roripaugh Ranch Project APPENDIX F - Cumulative Year 2013 Mitigation Measures KOA Corporation iv November 2010 I. Introduction This Traffic Impact Analysis (TIA) report is prepared for the proposed Islamic Center of Temecula Valley (ICTV) located at the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri in the City of Temecula. Figure I shows the vicinity of the proposed project as it relates to the regional circulation network. Figure 2 shows the proposed project site plan and local access to the site. The appendices of this report contain background materials for this study. These materials include manual traffic counts, analysis worksheets and other details. Project Location and Description The subject property is currently vacant and located at the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri Road. The proposed project will be constructed in two phases. Phase 1 will include the construction of a 4,157 -square -foot community center and Phase 2 will include the construction of a 20,786 -square -foot, two-story structure that includes a prayer hall, office space and Sunday School classrooms. The main level of the two story structure is anticipated to be 12,481 square feet and the second floor is anticipated to be 8,305 square feet, for a total of 20,786 square feet. The total gross floor area of the proposed project is anticipated to be at 24,943 square feet upon completion of both phases. This report has been prepared consistent with City of Temecula General Plan requirements. KOA Corporation 1 November 2010 0 LJ LI0 L. ICN Religious Facilities J r-1 < 3— .W Cen Study Intersection Locations 4 a) L) L) O Q November 2010 [V introduction ICTV Religious Facilities c,%17 rl z cn LL November 2010 M KOA Corporation 2. Project Study Methodology This chapter documents the methodologies and assumptions used to conduct the circulation impact analysis for the proposed project. This section contains the following background information: • Study timeframes • Study area description • Capacity analysis methodologies Study Timeframes This report presents an analysis of the intersection operating conditions during the peak periods, which were selected in consultation with City of Temecula staff for the following anticipated timeframe scenarios: • Existing Year 2010 • Opening Year 2013 Without and With Project • Cumulative Year 2013 Without and With Project (including Roripaugh Ranch) • Cumulative Year 2013 Without and With Project (excluding Roripaugh Ranch) The City selected the following peak hours for analysis to evaluate the potential impacts of the proposed project during overlapped peak hours between ICN, Chaparral High School, Nicolas Valley Elementary School, Grace Presbyterian Church, and Calvary Baptist Church: • Weekday Friday (peak hours between 1:00 PM and 4:00 PM) • Weekend Sunday (peak hours between 9:00 AM and 12:00 PM) Project Study Area The study area was determined through consultation with City of Temecula staff. As shown in Figure I, the study area consists of the following intersections: • Winchester Road at Margarita Road • Winchester Road at Nicolas Road • Nicolas Road at North General Kearny Road • Nicolas Road at Calle Colibri (Project Driveway) • Walcott Lane at La Serena Way Analysis Methodologies This section presents a brief overview of traffic analysis methodologies and concepts used in this study. Street system operating conditions are typically described in terms of "level of service." Level of service (LOS) is a report -card scale used to indicate the quality of traffic flow on roadway segments and at intersections. LOS ranges from LOS A (free flow, little congestion) to LOS F (forced flow, extreme congestion). KOA Corporation 4 November 2010 ICTV Religious Facilities Project Study Methodology LOS for signalized intersections is based upon the average time (seconds) that vehicles approaching an intersection are delayed. There is a specific delay and LOS associated with each movement and an overall average delay for all movements. The overall LOS for the intersection is based upon the overall average delay. Unsignalized intersection LOS is also based upon the control delay, but delay is only assessed for those traffic movements that are stopped or must yield to through traffic. Some movements, including cross traffic on the minor street or left turns onto the major street, can be subject to long delays; however, unstopped through traffic and right turns from the major street will not experience any delays. When delay for cross traffic is severe (LOS F) the intersection should be evaluated further for possible improvement with traffic signals. In some cases, this analysis determines that the delay is being experienced by a very low number of vehicles and traffic signals are not warranted. In other cases, the number of stopped vehicles is substantial and traffic signals may be justified as a mitigation measure. Table 1 shows the relationship between LOS and the performance measures for signalized and unsignalized intersections, and lists the HCM delay criteria for signalized intersections. Table Levels of Service for Intersections Level of Service Signalized Intersection Control Delay (in seclveh) Unsignalized Intersection Control Delay (in seclveh) A 0-10 0-10 B 10.1-20 10.1-15 C 20.1-35 15.1-25 D 35.1 -- 55 25. I — 35 E 55.1 — 80 35.1 — 50 *.A/L__ J_1___ 1_ _ F 80.1 or more* 50.1 or more* excessively , delay would be shown as > The City of Temecula follows County of Riverside Traffic Study Guidelines. For the purpose of this report, all intersections along Winchester Road and Nicolas Road will comply with the LOS criteria D or better, according to the City of Temecula General Plan requirements. Mitigation measures should be considered when traffic conditions are forecasted to decline to poorer levels of service. Intersection Capacity Analysis The analysis of peak hour intersection conditions was conducted using the Synchro software program. All signalized intersections were analyzed based on the "operational analysis" procedure for signalized intersections, as defined in the. 2000 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM). This technique. uses 1,900 passenger cars per hour of green per lane (pcphgpl) as the maximum saturation flow of a single lane at an intersection for existing and future scenarios. This saturation flow rate is adjusted to account for lane width, on -street parking, conflicting pedestrian flow, traffic composition (i.e., percent of trucks), and shared lane movements (e.g., through and right -turn movements from the same lane). LOS for signalized intersections is based on the average time (seconds) that vehicles entering an intersection are delayed. KOA Corporation 5 November 2010 ICN Religious Facilities Project Study Methodology Table 1 lists the HCM delay criteria for signalized intersections. In addition, the existing peak hour factor was added to all of the volumes to analyze the peak hour. Traffic volumes may fluctuate from minute to minute within the peak periods, so a peak hour factor increases the hourly volume to simulate the higher 15 minute peak period for the entire peak period. Existing traffic signal timing sheets were obtained from the City and were used for this study. Existing Traffic Count Data Existing peak hour traffic data was obtained from True Counts in August 2010. Traffic count data presented in this report was commissioned during the time when Chaparral High School, Nicolas Valley Elementary School, Grace Presbyterian Church, and Calvary Baptist Church were in session. All Data used in this report is compiled in Appendix A. Appendix B include ICTV, churches and schools schedules. Future (Year 2013) Traffic Volumes The Year 2013 was selected for opening year of the project. For the purposes of this traffic study, it was conservatively assumed that both phases (Phase 1 and Phase 2) of the project are constructed and all identified cumulative projects would be constructed and operational by the year 2013. Peak hour intersection volumes under Year 2013 conditions were forecast based on existing peak hour intersection volumes, and were adjusted to reflect anticipated growth in the City of Temecula. A total growth factor of 6% (2% per year) was implemented. The approved cumulative project list provided by the City was added to the background base to determine the relative potential impact of the project. KOA Corporation 6 November 2010 3. Existing Conditions This section documents the existing conditions of the circulation network within the study area. The discussion presented here is limited to specific roadways in the project's vicinity. Existing Circulation Network Streets within the vicinity of the project site that could be affected by the proposed project include Winchester Road, Nicolas Road, North General Kearny Road, Calle Colibri, Walcott Lane, and La Serena Way. Figure 3-1 shows the existing roadway classifications/circulation network and intersection configurations/control in the project vicinity. Winchester Road functions as a six -lane principal arterial running on a north/south alignment located west of the project site. The roadway provides three travel lanes in each direction and is divided by a center median. The posted speed limit in the project vicinity is 45 mph south of Nicolas Road and 55 mph north of Nicolas Road. Land uses along this roadway are mostly commercial with no on -street parking permitted on either side. Winchester Road is controlled by traffic signals at Nicolas Road and Margarita Road. Margarita Road functions as a four -lane major arterial running on an eastlwest alignment located south of the project site. The roadway provides two travel lanes in each direction and is divided by a center median. The speed limit is posted at 45 mph with no on -street parking permitted. Land uses along this roadway are a mix of residential and commercial uses. Nicolas Road is a four -lane major arterial running on an eastlwest alignment. The roadway provides two travel lanes in each direction and transitions to a limited secondary arterial just east of Joseph Road. The roadway is divided by a striped median. The speed limit is posted at 45 mph in the project vicinity and on -street parking is generally not permitted. Land uses along this roadway are mostly residential with commercial uses close to Winchester Road. Nicolas Road is controlled by a traffic signal at North General Kearny Road. North General Kearny Road is a two-lane residential roadway running on a north/south alignment located approximately 1 mile west of the project site. The roadway provides mostly one travel lane in each direction. On street parking is generally permitted along the roadway. Ladd uses along this roadway are mostly residential. North General Kearny Road is controlled by traffic signals at Nicolas Road. Calle Colibri is a two-lane roadway running on a north/south alignment located adjacent to the project site. The roadway provides one travel lane in each direction and is undivided. The speed limit is posted at 45 mph in the project vicinity. Land uses along this roadway are mostly residential and vacant lots. Calle Colibri is controlled by a stop sign at Nicolas Road. Walcott Lane is a two-lane collector running on a north/south alignment located approximately one-half mile east of the project site. The roadway provides one travel lane in each direction. The speed limit is posted at 30 mph in the project vicinity and on -street parking is generally not permitted. Land uses along KOA Corporation 7 November 2010 ICN Religious Facilities Existing Conditions this roadway are mostly residential and vacant lots. Walcott Lane is controlled by a stop sign at La Serena Way. La Serena Way is a two-lane collector roadway that transitions into a secondary arterial roadway running on a north/south alignment located approximately one mile east of the project site. The roadway provides one travel lane in each direction and two lanes along roadway segments west of Calle Medusa that is mostly divided by a painted median. The speed limit is posted at 45 mph in the project vicinity and on -street parking is generally not permitted. Land uses along this roadway are mostly residential and vacant Tots. Interstate 1-15 is the nearest freeway that is located approximately 3 miles to the west of the project site. It provides regional north/south circulation to the San Diego and Riverside Counties and provides a full freeway interchange at Winchester Road. KOA Corporation 8 November 2010 Walcott Ln & La SerenaW ff y� "So 'till D"" _ d L =- r 62 L" al 41L 12 2 H c� LIZ Winchester Rd & Margai1ta Rd 4-' 0 LU LU -J E tJ c 2c crt E 0- November 2010 KOA Corporation ICN Religious Facilities Existing Conditions Peak Hour Intersection Level of Service Figure 3-2 illustrates the existing peak hour traffic volumes during the Friday peak hour. Figure 3-3 illustrates the Sunday peak hour volumes. Table 2 summarizes the results of the LOS analysis for existing conditions. The study area was observed during both morning and evening peak hours. The indicated LOS shown in Table 2 is representative of observed traffic conditions in the study area. Table 2 Friday/Sunday Peak Hour Intersection Performance Existing Conditions (Year 2010) Intersection Without Project Delay LO5 Friday Peak Hour I. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd 137.3 F 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 180.3 F 3. Nicolas Rd & North General Kearny Rd 38.4 D 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* 0.0 A 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* 10.0 A Sunday Peak Hour 1. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd 48.1 D 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 52.9 E 3. Nicolas Rd & North General Kearny Rd 34.1 C 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* 0.1 A 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* 8.4 A ote: Delay based on seconds per vehicle average. * Unsignalized Intersection As shown in Table 2, the majority of intersections currently operate at satisfactory levels of service (LOS D or better) except for the following intersections: • Winchester Road & Margarita Road for the Friday & Sunday peak hour • Winchester Road & Nicolas Road for Friday & Sunday peak hour It should be noted that the significant number of pedestrian/students crossing at the intersection of • Winchester Road and Nicolas Road during Chaparral High School's dismissal time (duration is 15-20 minutes), is considered a major contributing factor to the deterioration in LOS at this intersection. Once the school dismissal period is over, the intersection LOS improves at this location. Appendix C contains the analysis worksheets. KOA Corporation 10 November 2010 Wal cLa e'rtenLan r, Wy to '-157 r9 39-,4 ,.... ,.... as -r_ .L.'4.T (32 icHI 52,7, — u 62 gignsteg"iidcilsr Rd & 2t71‘garny Rd &ltaNicolas .24 0 .-6571 L214 KAN 644 ...°' in — if co <37 (—inc,900 7 ,1 ,,,T Ve., c219 ° 7 cE),, C436 54 0,-. re 1372 70; kr, 588—) t=tr-co 154 k1 839—) to 220Th '" 173—) ,- co v, 49Th 84Th Friday Peak Hour Volumes 0 Lu 11) 8 0 z November 2010 0 4J00- 0 0 'al a Wet i-ican Wy 4-54 T r9 ' 28 • 43-4 i 6Th 82 _cp.z c0 t• -I 1 rE c. nt ,n 81 ril N a, d ci) cg Fi 24 8t. -,1 1 cC 12" 0.1 z a...Y 96--y la OZ ggeit'sVir Rd Le) (R44-10 r391 7-4 tc-D 16-a Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd r`-393 CD <-324 r233 135j 438—) co do =coo 187- \ N Sunday Peak Hour Volumes 0 uJ CD LU November 2010 KOA Corporation 4. The Project Project related traffic consists of trips on any portion of the street system that will begin or end on the project site as a result of the proposed project development. Project related traffic is a function of the extent and type of development proposed for the site. This following information is used to establish traffic generation for the site. The proposed project will be constructed in two phases. Phase I will include the construction of a 4, 157 -square -foot community center and Phase 2 will include the construction of a 20,786 -square -foot, two-story structure that includes a prayer hall, office space, and Sunday School classrooms. The Main level of the two-story structure is anticipated to be 12,481 square feet and the second floor is anticipated to be 8,305 square feet, for a total of 20,786 square feet. The total gross floor area of the proposed project is anticipated to be at 24,943 square feet upon completion of both phases. Existing Land Use Traffic The project site is currently vacant; therefore, the current trip generation for the project site is zero. Project Trip Generation Trip generation is a measure or forecast of the number of trips that will be made to or from the project. It is generally equal to the traffic volume expected at the project entrance. Trip generation characteristics for projects are normally estimated based on rates published in Trip Generation, Eighth Edition, published by the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE). This document is widely used in Southern California and indicates the probable traffic generation rates for various land uses based upon studies of existing developments in comparable settings throughout the nation. Due to the unique nature of the proposed project, there are no trip generation rates provided in the ITE Trip Generation Manual for this specific type of use. Since the characteristics of the Islamic Worship schedule are not reflected in the ITE literature for trip generation, a unique trip generation rate was developed consistent with similar worship land uses such as a church land use. The church ITE trip rates were taken into consideration in the development of the Islamic Center trip generation used in this report. An individual prayer station area was developed and, as a result, a total number of prayer stations were calculated based on the proposed square footage of the prayer hall. The approach taken in developing the total number of prayer stations for the Islamic Center is consistent with the approach taken by the ITE in calculating the trip generation for a church based on number of seats provided. For the purpose of this report and to evaluate worst case scenario, it is assumed that the Islamic Center project will be fully constructed (phase I and phase 2) by the year 2013. The proposed square footage. of the prayer hall shown on the approved site plan for phase 2 is 3,439 square feet. The individual prayer station was calculated to be approximately 13.5 square feet (4x3.5 -square -foot space). Taking into consideration the total square footage of the prayer hall and individual prayer station, the total number of prayer stations that can be accommodated within the proposed prayer hall is a conservative 255 stations, not accounting for any pathways or aisles. The Sunday church trip rate is used to calculate the trip generation for the Islamic Center during the afternoon Friday prayer (worst case) since it correlates KOA Corporation 13 November 2010 1CTV Religious Facilities The Project to the church Sunday mass peak hour. In addition, the weekday church trip rate is used to calculate the trip generation for the Islamic Center during the Sunday peak hour since it correlates to the church weekday peak hour activities. The Islamic Center activities on Sunday include Sunday school activities. Based on the information provided above, the worst case scenario trip generation rates that are applicable to this project are shown in Table 3 below. Table 3 Trip Generation Rates ITE Rates (modified to fit mosque) Prayer Station Intensity Units Rate Friday (ADT) 255 station 1.85 Friday (peak hour) 255 station 0.61 Sunday (ADT) 255 station 0.61 Sunday (peak hour) 255 station 0.61 Table 4 summarizes the traffic generation expected from the project, based on the trip generation rates shown in Table 3. Table 4 Project Traffic Generation ITE rates (modified to fit mosque) Trips In Out Friday (ADT) 472 Friday (Peak Hour) 156 79 76 Sunday (ADT) I56 Sunday (peak hour) 156 78 78 The project will generate a total of 472 daily Friday trips, 156 daily Sunday trips, including 156 trips during the Friday peak hour and 156 trips during the Sunday peak hour. Project Trip Distribution Trip distribution is the process of identifying the probable destinations, directions or traffic routes that will be utilized by project traffic. The potential interaction between the proposed land use and surrounding regional access routes are considered to identify the route where the project traffic will distribute. The distribution of the proposed project was based on information received from the Islamic Center Temecula Valley related to current worshiper's zip codes and routes to the site. The anticipated trip distribution for the proposed development is presented on Figure 4-1. This figure indicates the proportion of project traffic that will use the street segments and turning movements indicated. Figures 4-2 and 4-3 indicate the volume of project related traffic increases. Future traffic levels in the project vicinity are expected to be changed by the amounts shown on these figures. KOA Corporation 14 November 2010 ICTV Religious Facilities ESTIPM 3°3 9.0!103 2110° 76, 41" 01 15 e r- tn 9 104 6 3:0) Z Ck z LU LU Distribution Percentage Lfl November 2010 KOA Corporation Walcott Ln & La Serena Wy 12-'' cn N I, ot 82 _do U��pp _V Z �4 c19 0 to azs K a K To us uz Winchester Rd & Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd Nicolas Rd ce)v -13 I r43 v Lic 'a z 0 0 November 2010 <43 KOA Corporation ICN Religious Facilities Wcatt Ln & 2,°Serena Wy 12-'' o as •A� U 2 -di' 2 ',-0Z r89 00 in Generaasl Rd Keamy Rd & Nicol < --56 58—) Winchester Rd & W€nchester Rd & Margarita Rd N colas Rd er X14 7, r44 T � 0 z ILJJ —J Q v cn 0 0 0 November 2010 KOA Corporation 5. OpeningYearWithout and With Project Conditions This section documents the expected effect of the project upon opening year conditions in the study area with added ambient growth. Traffic growth in the study area has historically increased at a rate of about 2% per year. Future increases in the background traffic volumes due to regional growth are expected to continue at this rate in the vicinity of the project. Assuming an opening year date within 3 years, the existing traffic volumes were adjusted upward by 6% (2% per year) to reflect area wide growth. For the purposes of this traffic study, it was conservatively assumed that both phases (Phase 1 and Phase 2) of the project are completed under "With Project" conditions. Peak Hour intersection Level of Service Figures 5-1 and 5-2 illustrate the opening year without project peak hour traffic volumes. Figures 5-3 and 5-4 illustrate the opening year with project peak hour traffic volumes during the Friday and Sunday peak hours, respectively. Table 5 displays a comparison of existing scenarios for opening year without and with project conditions. The LOS worksheets are provided in Appendix D. Table 5 Friday/Sunday Peak Hour Intersection Performance Opening Year Conditions Without and With Proiect Intersection Opening Year Without Project Opening Year With Project A Delay Significant S Delay LOS Delay LOS Friday Peak Hour I. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd 162.3 F 162.4 F 0.1 No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 203.7 F 209.0 F 5.3 _ Yes 3. Nicolas Rd & North General Kearny Rd 37.5 D 39.7 D 2.2 No 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* 0.0 A 15.8 C 15.8 No 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* 10.5 B 10.8 13 0.3 No Sunday Peak Hour 1. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd 57.1 E 58.2 E 1.1 No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 65.7 E 69.2 E 3.5 Yes 3. Nicolas Rd & North General Kearny Rd 33.9 C 31.6 C -2.3 No 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* 0.1 A 2.8 A 2.7 No 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* 8.6 A 8.8 A 0.2 No vciay oases on seconas per venicte average. *Unsignalized Intersection As shown in. Table 5, study area intersections are forecast to operate at satisfactory levels of service (LOS D or better) except for the following intersections, which continue to operate at an unsatisfactory level of service: • Winchester Road & Nicolas Road for Friday & Sunday peak hour • Winchester Road & Margarita Road for Friday and Sunday peak hour KOA Corporation 18 November 2010 CO 14- ID (0C) CV OO T CO CO 0(0 ch TE, <-1? (-99 (0 • !- 0.1 CO ▪ CO 1 T`-1.98 9Z6L r901. 1,,‘ ED CO CO ‘-96L f--999 L cal? NY 01 • tO Friday Peak Hour Volumes c LU (.9 LU Nov KOA Corporation Opening Year Conditions fCN Religious Facilities cc 1 esnpalN 311e7 vgnoa ow* WaSerelcott na WLn & La y ``-95 X1 rc,0 46- 3 r c� � 17-y, df 70-0 Acotl al' VZ tn N 1 £ 09. a 2 E -1. n caZ 03 NMN ,) .1, 14, Fl j -L£ N i 6iico„),., n4� Winchester Rd & Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd Nicolas Rd • X417 X141 eon F343o rri m F11 7, T.., y-247%--,- tsi Ni.., r414 143 '-) 10-i 'r"...2 If) -3 464co N 198-,y •T2R1 17-,,, z Sunday Peak Hour Volumes November 2010 fd KOA Corporation Walcott Lna Wyn & La Sere CO o X172 M r. co F77 if -10 1152 'i� 63� °D 41Th 0 0 T o Tz8 23 do _ -u ''-61- CO General Kearny Rd & Nlcolas Rd r -32 co co rn F-467 ,()NT, r6 318✓' 7361 'Ps"' 52� Wcolas Rdinchester Rd & Nl u� '-240 ch 4-75 Z, x505 160,' (":".° 183- •-�� 89-y Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd CO KIc+� r`696 c,i a r~ <-683 ,7T`t ir232 1.45-' 'S r" 233T 6 M November 2010 N KOA Corporation Opening Year Conditions ICN Religious Facilities CC U7Uo�feM esnpaW alis) vgtso3 aiieD 0 Walcott Ln & La Serena Wy to o X172 „ 70 115-'' 63-4 c,.,°° 41y u n Q O �u Z 8 Ns 4.62 rs-61. cL9 amu' S'n ,, .1 ag q,3 +.92 Ncry "01, $P -,i 91.-->f`7nv' LEZ� m _WN Winchester Rd & Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd Nicolas Rd -696 u, X240 co v 1.++ E-683 ro N X75 r232 cz, r505 145-'' 6bto 160-'1.1(T 3 623- ro r o> 183-3 o 233 y 't m 89 v a) V Z a) O rclL . O i]I n z 4—I 01 CU L ' 0 SJ co 01 c 0 0 Sunday Peak Hour Volumes November 2010 KOA Corporation 6. CumulativeYear 2013 Without and With Project Conditions Including Roripaugh Ranch Project This section addresses Cumulative conditions in Year 2013 "With and Without Project" traffic in the study area with added ambient growth and cumulative traffic generated by approved or pending projects in the vicinity of the subject property. For the purposes of this traffic study, it was conservatively assumed that both phases (Phase 1 and Phase 2) of the project are completed and all identified cumulative projects including Roripaugh Ranch project would be constructed and operational by the year 2013. Intersection improvements at Nicolas Road and Winchester Road that are provisions of an existing Development Improvement Agreement (DIA) between the City of Temecula and Roripaugh Ranch project are included and assumed to be in place for this scenario. Any traffic issues associated with this location area would mainly be tied to the Roripaugh project. The following are the improvements considered to be in place at the intersection of Nicolas Road and Winchester Road under this scenario: • Northbound Approach: Widen to provide two left turn lanes, four through lanes, and two right turn lanes • Southbound Approach: Widen to provide two left turn lanes, four through lanes, and one right turn lane • Eastbound Approach: Widen to provide one left turn lane, one through lane, and one right turn lane • Westbound Approach: Widen to provide three left turn lanes, one through lane, and one right turn lane Any traffic issues associated with the intersection of Nicolas Road and Winchester Road would mainly be tied to the Roripaugh project. In addition, it should be noted that the significant number of pedestrian/students crossing at this location during Chaparral High School's dismissal time (duration is 15-20 minutes), is considered a major contributing factor to the deterioration in LOS at this intersection. Once the school dismissal period is over, the intersection LOS will improve at this location. Future Growth Based on discussions with City of Temecula staff, it has been established that traffic in the study area has historically increased at a rate of about 2% per year. Future increases in the background traffic volumes due to regional growth are expected to continue at this rate in the vicinity of the project. Assuming a 9 completion date within 3 years, the existing traffic volumes were adjusted upward by 6% (2% per year) to reflect area wide growth. Future traffic increases can also be forecast by considering additional traffic that may be generated by other developments that have been approved in the area. There are several projects near the site that will add cumulative traffic to the intersections analyzed in the study as shown in Table 6. KOA Corporation 23 November 2010. ICN Religious Facilities Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions (Including Roripaugh Ranch Project) Table 6 Cumulative Projects (Including Roripaugh Ranch Project) Project Name Size Land Use Location Number Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witness 8,264 Square Feet Religious Institution I Saraphina 67 Single Family Homes Single -Family 2 Roripaugh Ranch 2,015 Single Family Homes Single Family Residential 3 AM/PM Car Wash 946 Square Feet Commercial Gas Station Car Wash 4 Walcott Estates 45 Single Family Homes Single -Family 5 The trips generated by these cumulative projects are included in the future forecast. Cumulative project information is compiled and shown in Appendix E. Peak Hour Intersection Level of Service To forecast the future growth conditions for the year 2013, the peak hour volumes in Figures 3-2 and 3- 3 were increased by 6% per year and traffic from the list of cumulative projects was added. Table 7 summarizes the results of the LOS analysis for this scenario Figures 6-1 and 6-2 illustrate the Friday and Sunday peak hour volumes for Cumulative Year 2013 without project conditions (including Roripaugh Ranch Project)". Figures 6-3 and 6-4 illustrate the Friday and Sunday peak hour volumes for cumulative Year 2013 with project conditions (including Roripaugh Ranch Project)". The LOS worksheets are provided in Appendix F. KOA Corporation 24 November 2010 ICN Religious Facilities Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions (Including Roripaugh Ranch Project) Table 7 Friday/Sunday Peak Hour Intersection Performance Cumulative Year 2013 Without and With Project (Including Roripaugh Ranch Project Intersection Cumulative Year 2013 Without Project Cumulative Year 2013 With Project 4 Delay Significant $ Delay LOS Delay LOS Friday Peak Hour 1. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd 181.7 F 186.3 F 4.6 Yes 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 118.3 F 123.3 F 5.0 Yes 3. Nicolas Rd & North General Kearny Rd 41.5 D 42.5 D 1.0 No 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* 0.0 A 66.2 F 66.2 Yes 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* 13.4 a 14.1 B 0.7 No Sunday Peak Hour 1. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd 63.6 E 64.1 E 0.5 No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 54.5 D 55.0 D 0.5 No 3. Nicolas Rd & North General Kearny Rd 25.9 C 24.6 C -1.3 No 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* 0.1 A 1.9 A 1.8 No 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* 10.2 B 10.5 B 0.3 No ote:_ uetay based on seconds per vehicle average. * Unsignalized Intersection As shown in Table 7, the following intersections are forecast to continue to operate at unsatisfactory levels of service and experience a significant impact under Cumulative conditions: • Winchester Road & Margarita Road for the Friday peak hour • Winchester Road & Nicolas Road for Friday peak hour • Nicolas Road & Calle Colibri for Friday peak hour k should be noted that the significant number of pedestrian/students crossing at the intersection of Winchester Road and Nicolas Road during Chaparral High School's dismissal time (duration is 15-20 minutes), is considered a major contributing factor to the deterioration in LOS at this intersection. Once the school dismissal period is over, the intersection LOS will improve at this location. The increased delay with project conditions at the intersection of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri is primarily attributed to the increased vehicular volumes generated by Roripaugh Ranch and introduction of side street traffic from the project waiting to access Nicolas Road. KOA Corporation 25 November 2010 0 0 0- a -c tus a 0 re no c v c C 0 0 u 0 sls tis A 3 ICN Religious Facilities -CC a a srt esnpaW allJ uggoa all a M1 M O_ ,7E .4 , (-a 691.-'' •E 144 -01 33 ZS �{`r N vi O N. -Ola T N. V 2 dZ , cn lob tif CZ N-03,— X91 a K -9g E Til. 9 4-a wZlln 6EZ c+, rn CO - C -LLS r'n <-1792 as 4) 1 C x904 geav LOPS' r°C 69E4--> i? T' wmm §z III Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd �0 r716 m 21:.3 F-683 r232 161- 623-1 cesj 0,, 233-y °w - E November 2010 co {6 0 co N lL C 1 0 C U Q1) L . l2 a.-1 O en a-+ a) Friday Peak Hour Volumes O ncluding Roripaugh Ranch Project) ative Year 2013 Conditions ICTV Religious Facilities J J it QsnpaW all�D 11 ugs�ua a{IBJ 11 Walcott Ln & La Serena Wy N ``-98 L (-122 90-4 Tm 17,, as r 84 Yla 1520 Ln 1 L£ • T4:3) O N a'a�c mr,M cg c92 N N -71 <-C ra 8C z04 -y � r Wsnt cochlas erd az. Rd NiesR x`-176 ,;(7.A1<-11 r604 i 10j • 7-3 vrm i17-1 11'2,. ch 31 mM,— N 7 AV; J 1 4, 'Luz <-1--L6es (-961. 9692 9692n�ao �a)rn Sunday Peak Hour Volumes IL! (D uJ J November 2010 KOA Corporation w d 0 0- -C u c Le t 40 d Ce b0 cC c 0 0 u 0 cY m rd CCTV Religious Facilities J 47 A0)1eM esnpayd a41) vggna 21t,r) 0 WalcSereott na Ln W& y La +n —1X181 34 162' 141 v41- _vo flZ mo 1 04 l' CL9 7 K al I+ Ste] - "91H .1 y E-# 3.0 ce w� 9s__/' 9k4 '`i T MOi L9Z Winchester Rd & Ni 1 vr (-75 7T. f657 160 ,1. (" 183- oac 89Th N Winchester Rd & Margari 'coNt- 716 0,[0 F-683 r232 161J T cf: 623—> 233 r' (1) z to 4L CUas L mom' E 3 c a.i O a=+ -0 c O v 11 m N s,. Q1 sll a:+ ts7 7 U Friday Peak Hour Volumes 0 November 2010 CO N KOA Corporation tT N O N O y uric 01 NC. N 8£, za4-� 0 F'£ r4 T rn (-49 T � a co r"-64 cLe , •:1C a -c, 414,5 965-r 449 `s-Z4Z -4Z04 c864 N SCO Sunday Peak Hour Volumes 0 November 2010 N KOA Corporation 7. Cumulative Year 2013 Without and With Project Conditions Excluding Roripaugh Ranch This section addresses Cumulative_ Year 2013 "With and Without Project" traffic conditions, excluding Roripaugh Ranch, in the study area with added ambient growth and cumulative traffic generated by approved or pending projects in the vicinity of the subject property. For the purposes of this traffic study, it was conservatively assumed that both phases (Phase 1 and Phase 2) of the project are constructed and all identified cumulative projects would be constructed and operational by the year 2013. The existing traffic volumes were adjusted upward by 6% (2% per year) to reflect area wide growth. The following cumulative projects shown in Table 8 were added. Table 8 Cumulative Projects (Excluding Roripaugh Ranch Project) Project Nae Nan -le Size Land Use Location Number Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witness 8,264 Square Feet Religious institution l Saraphina 67 Single Family Homes Single -Family 2 AM/PM Car Wash 946 Square Feet Commercial Gas Station Car Wash 4 Walcott Estates 45 Single Family Homes Single -Family 5 The trips generated by these cumulative projects are included in the future forecast. Cumulative project information is compiled and shown in Appendix E. Peak Hour Intersection Level of Service To forecast the future growth conditions for the year 2013, the peak hour volumes in Figures 3-2 and 3- 3 were increased by 6% per year and traffic from the list of cumulative projects was added. Table 9 summarizes the results of the LOS analysis for this scenario Figures 7-1 and 7-2 illustrate the Friday and Sunday peak hour volumes for "Year 2013 Without Project (excluding Roripaugh Ranch)" conditions. Figures 7-3 and 7-4 illustrate the Friday and Sunday peak hour volumes for "Year 2013 With Project (excluding Roripaugh Ranch)" conditions. The LOS worksheets are provided in Appendix G. KOA Corporation 30 November 2010 ICTV Religious Facilities Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions (Excluding Roripaugh Ranch Project) Table 9 Friday/Sunday Peak Hour Intersection Performance Cumulative Year 2013 Without and With Project (Excluding Roripaugh Ranch Project) Intersection Cumulative Year 201 3 Without project Cumulative Year 20 13 With Project A Delay Significant & Delay LOS Delay LOS Friday Peak Hour . Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd 162.6 F 162.8 F 0.2 No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 206.4 • F 212.8 F 6.4 Yes 3. Nicolas Rd & North General Kearny Rd 38.6 D 40.1 D I.5 No 4_ Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* 0.0 A 19.0 C 19.0 No 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* 10.8 8 11.2 B 0.4 No Sunday Peak Hour 1_ Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd 57.8 E 59.4 E 1.6 No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 67.2 E 73.0 E 5.8 Yes 3. Nicolas Rd & North General Kearny Rd 32.1 C 29.9 C -2.2 No . 4. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* 0.1 A 2.8 A 2.7 No 5. Walcott Ln & La Serena Way* 8.8 A 9.0 A 0.2 No i.oiar ua�ea on secanas per venicie average. * Unsignalized Intersection As shown in Table 9, all study intersections are forecast to operate at satisfactory levels of service (LOS D or better) except the following intersections, which will continue to operate at unsatisfactory levels of service under Cumulative conditions, excluding Roripaugh Ranch: • Winchester Road & Nicolas Road for Friday & Sunday peak hour Winchester Road & Margarita Road Friday and Sunday peak hour It should be noted that the significant number of pedestrian/students crossing at the intersection of Winchester Road and Nicolas Road during Chaparral High School's dismissal time (duration is 15-20 minutes), is considered a major contributing factor to the deterioration in LOS at this intersection. Once the school dismissal period is over, the intersection LOS will improve at this location. The increased delay with project traffic at the intersection of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri is attributed to the introduction of side street traffic from the project waiting to access Nicolas Road. KOA Corporation 31 November 2010 0 V OC s 00 0 d L 0 Ce b0 C 7 u 1.15 4� C 0 C O M O N 4 li{ Ol r n J Walcott Ln & N r• 0, %-175 •JJ.� (p 163—) '14:14' 41Th .17 =2 U m siz ;.TA T T W Winchester Rd & General Kearny Rd & Nicolas Rd Nicolas Rd in co '`239 X33 o4 m75 75 ch coo <-435 J ., ('477 ,1 T. r7 w 1602 E 318-'1 71, T r 183-) ,-570" 718 �;7 2 89- s 82-,,, Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd co co co '-697 w co r- <-683 i-232 146-'' T C 23CO 3 v cu O In z Q1 E O O co t) (13 LL rti O A.__ fll 13 0 r4 G1C A a1 w D a1 , 6L X LI/ O U a) 'o a 0 Cr) 0 (NI L cls r v U Friday Peak Hour Volumes 0 w mb 0 z KOA Corporation WalSerecott na WLn & La y to X98 .hZ <10 46—> to t'7 cii a� 43 aO MY To ErE Ic M N d. Emco a ) .L L (-4 els E : 6VA �ul ti- aZO b-,, s '1n� 03Nth Winchester Rd & Nicolas Rd X161 0¼ <-11 j, L X438 102 eco aio d 7-) ttco-4- 1 7Thi 17T MaWinchesterRRd d & Margarita f°C-418 YrFA` <-343 � L'-247 144, T 464—) co r N 198-t,Y' w Sunday Peak Hour Volumes November 2010 en KOA Corporation j • Walcott Ln & i La Serena Wy t€, T\--1231 v to 4--77 c e-10 1232 4c1:3°' 63—) 41-y Calle Colibri & Nicolas Rd 4-533 r20 641-) �� 59Th in F2 °ce =o V OZ N �y� TH,1, c9S 9�°N- sz ") " Md ai ce i i'l CGi ..±. N OS`LEti ��N ,5,4"117 1N . `�, 9z6� �9a� c017 -a 96Zk3 mmm ,--, N Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd T`-697 c0.1 cO 4-683 T. r232 1462 dao M cn' 623-4 a z a.) 0 z uJ C9 uJ Friday Peak Hour Volumes 0 November 2010 KOA Corporation Sunday Peak Hour Volumes uJ U LLJ J November 2010 KOA Corporation 8. Impacts and Mitigation Significant impacts Traffic impacts are identified if the proposed project will result in a significant change in traffic conditions on a roadway or intersection. A significant impact occurs when project related traffic causes LOS at an intersection to deteriorate below the minimum acceptable level by a measurable amount. A cumulative impact may also be significant if the intersection is forecast to fall below the minimum acceptable level of service due to the addition of cumulative traffic and project related. According to the City's General Plan, a project significant impact occurs when the vehicle delay is increased by 2.0 seconds or more at an intersection operating at LOS E or F. For the purpose of this report, all intersections along Winchester Road and Nicolas Road shall comply with the City of Temecula General Plan requirement of LOS D or better.. Unsignalized intersections are considered to be impacted if the LOS is poor and delay is increased significantly. If signals are not warranted, mitigation measures other than signalization may be considered to improve the operation of the stop control. The LOS worksheets are provided in Appendix H. Mitigation Mitigation measures are required if approval and construction of a project results in a significant increase of delay to unsatisfactory LOS. Mitigation measures are also appropriate if cumulative traffic conditions result in an unsatisfactory LOS and the proposed development contributes to these conditions. Recognizing that LOS and delays at intersections along Winchester Road are currently operating less than satisfactory, the City of Temecula has initiated the implementation of an Adaptive Traffic Signal System to mitigate conditions. The adaptive system monitors traffic flows system wide and adjusts traffic signal cycle lengths to address the changes in traffic flows, minimize delays, and improve system progression. By virtue of this continual monitoring, intersection LOS is improved significantly, typically by 10 to 15 percent. The implementation of the adaptive system will be completed by April 20! 1. Given the April 201 1 implementation date, the project traffic was evaluated utilizing the Adaptive Traffic Signal System as a tool for mitigating impacts for each of the scenarios evaluated. Opening Year Conditions The intersection of Winchester Road & Nicolas Road is expected to operate at an unsatisfactory LOS in the Opening Year With Project Conditions. Below is a discussion of the required mitigation measure for this intersection: Winchester Road & Nicolas Road { The LOS at this location is deficient due to the heavy traffic volumes combined with the significant number of students crossing at this location during Chaparral High School's dismissal time. The delay and LOS at this intersection can be mitigated by implementing the City of Temecula's Adaptive Traffic { Signal System.: Table 10 below shows the LOS for the intersection if the above mitigation measure is implemented. KOA Corporation 36 November 2010 ICN Religious Facilities Impacts and Mitigation Table 10 Level of Service Analysis for Opening Year Conditions with Mitigation Intersection Opening Year Without Project Opening Year With Project d Delay Opening Year With Project With Mitigation - Impact Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Friday Peak Hour 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 203.7 F 209.0 F 5.3 184.! F No Sunday Peak Hour 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 65.7 E 69.2 E 3.5 62.! E No Winchester Road, at the intersection of Nicolas Road, will continue to operate at LOS F with the proposed mitigation; however, as shown in Table 10, the implementation of the adaptive traffic signal system reduces the delay and project impact to less than significant and improves the overall intersection LOS to better than with and without project conditions. It should be noted that the significant number of pedestrian/students crossing at the intersection of Winchester Road and Nicolas Road during Chaparral High School's dismissal time (duration is 1520 minutes), is considered a major contributing factor to the deterioration in LOS at this intersection. Once the school dismissal period is over, the intersection LOS will improve at this location. Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions (Including Roripaugh Ranch Project) The intersections of Winchester Road at Nicolas Road and Margarita Road, and Nicolas Road at Calle Colibri are expected to operate at unsatisfactory LOS in the Cumulative Year 2013 With Project Conditions. Below is a discussion of the required mitigation measures for these intersections: Winchester Road Margarita Road The LOS and delay at this location is deficient due to the heavy traffic volumes combined with Chaparral High School's related pedestrian and vehicular traffic during dismissal time. The delay and LOS at this intersection can be mitigated by implementing the City of Temecula's Adaptive Traffic Signal System. Winchester Road & Nicolas Road The LOS at this location is deficient due to the heavy traffic volumes combined with the significant number of students crossing at this location during Chaparral High School's dismissal time. The delay and LOS at this intersection can be mitigated by implementing the City of Temecula's Adaptive Traffic Signal System. Nicolas Road & Calle Colibri This location is expected to operate at unsatisfactory levels of service based on the delay cause by the heavy traffic volumes on Nicolas Road. The LOS can be improved and the delays mitigated by constructing the project's required frontage improvements including a two-way left -turn lane on Nicolas Road adjacent to the project. KOA Corporation 37 November 2010 ICTV Religious Facilities Impacts and Mitigation Table I 1 below shows the LOS for the intersection if the above mitigation measures are implemented. Table 1 I Level of Service Analysis of Mitigation for Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions Including Roripaugh Ranch Project Intersection Cumulative Year 2013 Without Project Cumulative Year 2013 With Project Ma y Cumulative Year 2013 With Project With Mitigation Impact Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Friday Peak Hour I. Winchester Rd & Margarita Rd 181.7 F 186.3 F 4.6 126.E F No 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 118.3 F 123.3 F 5.0 81.8 F No 3. Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri* 0.0 A 66.2 F 66/ 5.3 A No ntersecLon The intersection of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri will operate at an acceptable LOS if the recommended improvements are provided. Winchester Road, at the intersections of Margarita Road and Nicolas Road, will continue to operate at LOS F with the proposed mitigation; however, as shown in Table 11, the implementation of the adaptive traffic signal system reduces the delay and project impact to less than significant and improves the overall intersection LOS to better than with and without project conditions. Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions (Excluding Roripaugh Ranch Project) The intersection of Winchester Road and Nicolas Road is expected to operate at an unsatisfactory LOS under this scenario. Below is a discussion of the required mitigation measure for this intersection: Winchester Road & Nicolas Road The LOS at this location is deficient due to the heavy traffic volumes combined with the significant number of students crossing at this location during Chaparral High School's dismissal time. The delay and LOS at this intersection can be mitigated by implementing the City of Temecula's Adaptive Traffic Signal System. Table 12 below shows the LOS for the intersection if the above mitigation measure is implemented. KOA Corporation 38 November 2010 ICTV Religious Facilities Impacts and Mitigation Table 12 Level of Service Analysis of Mitigation for Cumulative 2013 Conditions Excluding Roripaugh Ranch Project Intersection Cumulative Year 2013 Without Project Cumulative Year 2013 With Project d Delay Cumulative Year 2013 With Project With Mitigation Impact Delay LOS Delay LOS Delay LOS Friday Peak Hour 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 206.4 F 212.8 F 6.4 190.7 F No Sunday Peak Hour 2. Winchester Road & Nicolas Rd 67.2 E 73.0 E 5.8 , 65.0 E No Winchester Road, at the intersection of Nicolas Road, "will continue to operate at LOS F. However, as shown in Table 12, the implementation of the adaptive traffic signal system reduces the delay and project impact to less than significant and improves the overall intersection LOS to better than with and without project conditions. City of Temecula Capital Improvement Program (CIP) The City's Capital Improvement Program has several infrastructure improvement projects underway to accommodate the growth and volume of traffic generated by business and recreation areas. The following are three major infrastructure improvement projects planned in the City of Temecula: French Valley Parkway/l-15 Overcrossing and Interchange Project provides for construction of a new freeway interchange on the 1-15 between the existing Winchester Road Interchange and the 1-15/1-215 freeway split. The project includes the construction of a freeway overcrossing, collector/distributor (CD) lanes, construction of braided ramps between Winchester Road and the proposed new interchange for both the northbound and southbound directions, and the construction of a by-pass exit ramp southbound north of the 1-1511-215 freeway junction to French Valley Parkway. The construction of the French Valley Parkway will reduce delays and alleviate current LOS deficiencies along Winchester Road. The construction of this facility will redistribute traffic within the circulation system thereby offsetting the proposed projects impacts at Nicolas Road and Winchester Road. French Valley Parkway (Date Street), Winchester Road (SR79 North) to Margarita Road will widen the current arterial from two to four lanes and is being constructed by the cities of Temecula and Murrieta. The widening and extension project will complete the connection between Interstate 15 and Winchester Road (SR79 North) at Murrieta Hot Springs Road. Butterfield Stage Road will extend from Murrieta Hot Springs Road to Rancho California Road. The extension will provide a north -south link between Temecula and Murrieta. Drivers will be able to travel up Butterfield, and then turn left on Murrieta Hot Springs to enter Murrieta. When completed, Butterfield will have two lanes in each direction with a raised center median. KOA Corporation 39 November 2010 ICTV Religious Facilities Impacts and Mitigation The improvements listed above will help alleviate roadway congestion and improve intersection LOS along Winchester Road. It is anticipated that approximately 20-30 percent of the existing and projected daily and peak hour trips will be diverted to the newly constructed roadways listed above. Diverted routes are roadways where trips will divert from an existing congested roadway facility to access newly constructed streets that connect to main roadway arterials or regional freeway facilities. For example, the existing trips that currently access the 1-15 through the Winchester Road interchange will divert from their normal route with the construction of the French Valley Parkway/1-15 Overcrossing and Interchange project. The resulting diverted trips will create a decrease in the traffic volumes along Winchester Road. KOA Corporation . 40 November 2010 9. Project Access and Internal Circulation The project proposes to take access to the roadway system at one location along Nicolas Road. Daily traffic volumes were evaluated at the project access points to determine if there is need for signalization. Accepted traffic signal warrants are not met for the intersection of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri. Traffic controls should be adequate with the current stop sign control and the recommended improvements identified in the previous chapter including the following: • Eastbound Approach: As part of the project frontage improvements, project shall restripe Nicolas Road to provide a two-way left turn lane. The proposed project shall be conditioned to construct the recommended improvement at the intersection of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri, satisfactory to the City Engineer. KOA Corporation 41 November 2010 10. Conclusions The City of Temecula is evaluating the development of a proposed Islamic Center religious facility located on the southwest corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Colibri. The project site is currently vacant. The project will generate a total of 472 average daily trips (ADT) on Friday and 156 ADT on Sunday, including 156 trips during the Friday peak hour and 156 trips during the Sunday peak hour. KOA Corporation's analysis finds that the traffic impact of the project has no adverse effect on the surrounding street system with implementation of the identified mitigation measures, which include the following: • Project shall restripe eastbound Nicolas Road at Calle Colibri to provide a two-way left turn lane. KOA Corporation 42 November 2010 • APPENDIX A Traffic Count Data (August 2010) KOA Corporation November 2010 tia a arch rc0 M 'o S Y z= ma as 0 rc me r a' W t 0 0 ZO Y s 2 i r 2 2 gra ' N N N ae 0 Era 0 00 &a r= s 0 1 0 3 F n Peak Hour Data MARGARITA RO 0) In Tolal 406 iT0)I 1 29261 MTO�Eliil I 41 f,l phi TV 1 by 100 Peds Peak Hour Elogirtoel 55:0 1Vc .Pad [s 111 10 1 Imz ILi .a AIM ul 02Vlt)90Wl 20 6 a 12 � a gw 2 9 m n C b w a V N E41,7,e' N mvi 1:32g;_ <^cV 0000 2a F a M0 G s o00 A 0 a a. w. 1-0 .0 w0 01 2 0 mT mm 77 3 al w. am wm =0 22 }11 (k C.) # 3 g q§3!i !e„ 01. .419 476 .724 !r!E 0 �$ 1k +111 1 11 1LIC CRI &® B2 0 W. wc 2. ■- st ri o 3 ! ! f VI N 00100 n ,o O`w Ulu 0 } z° W 0 z K C U 2 7 n 3 m VI n � n uTu .n a a ca .0 AI WI A NI - ab. O.mG r 6 Q a Peak Hour Data ry A ry ,71... '",-.7,1M M O n Rh rozi N = NICOLAS RD Eastbound y00r.N jg gtg OON .14N +o rgrv. mwn ..N Nv w N GENERAL KEARNY RD Northbound Un Thar [ mast I Peds 8 1 0 0 12 3 0 0 1• 2 2 0. . 5 1 [ 0� odr cm c.1 N^oNH 20M .e ..,. . w -+n rdr rrrV'C Nmn m N c m a G h '''' NICOLAS RD Westbound • ten MISI J�9m1=1:01 0 66 2 0 I 46 4 0 0 74 7 0 0 60 6 .0 ONr m,.. -,N 1.1m�O.N ..... H H M V- r a sIzn N m o N n v . A .o ry b N 00 N GENERAL KEARNY RD Southbound telt 1 Thn j Right 1 Ped. D 0 15 0 4 0 27 0 2 0 30 0 3 l 3.7 0 000 Nv.e QMOO mcu,0 0-.0 00-N nnOm .. AAA,M r r G O n e+. . m A. Al 'fr.," MA.A V M1Nm �0..---rM� O. 2On.T Gngv Cotal Grand Total Apprch Total % S 22 00 S 3 09 4-6 2 lam CoMg Iu fi _I J° 0Z 0 "g 00 00 00 00 vg 00 0 O 10 X{ 2 22 22 09 22 22 N 5 0 U 0 s m 0 W 000 $$n gEig- Emma. ZUOZ m e m w memo_ a` d 0 Z Iz a my c U 1U.0 Jo 0 00 0 m 2 i a L 0 N 2 a • 2 a e 3 2 3 00000000 0000 ntiw 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 .041,0 0000 0000 0000 000 O 0000 O O O — b wpicz Wm 7W F. O. Um WM r 2� teE 1-0 wr xr 00 0 B 2 0 W. wo )CO 3 | 2 ! o §7E§ 0 _ \�"LIED _ MhPW ZZ 2 | h oh 1 r. co 3 03 gg }) 2 ) 0 =0 } 741 E 000 !■ ! 0000 06 e; em # f 0 ceg ik Ow 0. 10000 3 � � ZZWS MZ OD Mr 011 k0 0 kw §z )k ■i k 2 }w grin`; 23,-@ §§qk2 M )k 07 ND 0 CV— o 2-.000 � —000 O. NDO sp a. wWN K2 M 7 52 u� y7 3 mm 0 O V J al N �n v m a1 3 z 1 d 2 3 0000 m q 4 0000 o N m N.00 0000 0000 Ng 0000 0000 404 O O o 0 00 ra 00 2.000 .:m r q0 0 0 0 sx r O o g 0 $9 LL300o0 00 0 a 00 W 0 52 0'J a UIY Z 0 C 4D 00 u z 3 2 L d tt 0000 a0 0 0000 00-,0 0000 00040 .0 . 0 00000 .0000 000 3 1 0000. 0000 0000 0000 .444 4000 O 00000 00000 400 0 40000 00000 000. A a 3-01 j— z mr Vaca" 0.22 oEg LA SERENA WAY 04t In Total L 1591 it -fl 31 11 mmairinewl qhL j Let Pnd /111: area 1ELC 1 L92L I f AtlMN3lf3 tl5'K1 iO ry O m N m �o em000 se— o No En i d a O m co 0 m J W LL1 000 ZZa°i t 43 c c c O c _c 2 ▪ Q¢� W aa) m N oVICC ttttt'' 11:1 m LEI 1— • mru a 0) Change Record m O T 0 • • 0 r 0 T 0 O. 0 0 Ti7 7ti E d (Red Lock I O } EV -A Clear (Ped Recall 1 m citN CO Red Rest 1 'Dual Entry Max Recall [Soft Recall 1 2 'Cond. Service CO c as t O y First Phases o C7 Ie) C 0 0 0 T p0 O 0 4 m iv' Opppp)-'N F � L 00030 O o 0 • r- 001000,-,-,-NNpaooCio a com O us 14.: U.:10aD c 0 O O LO l"' oi CO a a C 0 0 o h 0 0 0 0 N { j �y O 0 • o 0 Ii [i IL ✓ V V O) N 0 0 I1i Ts 0 5 0 } m cC ID co N A A < 0 v v d ID 7 m 5 0) 0 0 ID 2 0 0 G) Ts ID 2 Z 0 A A A ACJ ON -C11[13---0 ++++—m o a a o N vvv Vg o-0 O 73 In M 10 113 Z 0 0 ID E Z m 0 m E Z ID m tn m ID m a) 0 ar 0 m Z U a a 0 at 0 U 0 0 tartigt MragiN 12345678 O O T 0 • • 0 r 0 T 0 O. 0 0 Ti7 TI E d (Red Lock I O } EV -A Clear (Ped Recall 1 m citN [Rest In Walk Red Rest 1 'Dual Entry Max Recall [Soft Recall 1 2 'Cond. Service [ManCntrl Calls 1, O y First Phases O O O T 0 T 0 r 0 T 0 O. 0 0 e 0 tl' Tr w [L m T w7 Et ¢ w EV -A Clear FEV -B Delay EV -B Clear EV -C Deiay- m 0 0 w W IEV-D Delay EV -D Clear RR -2 Delay I [RR -2 Clear . Ij) m 1V7ewEV Clear Qa 0 m 0 m A U) O) m 0 - LL LL V N O u_ ID 0) O. fl cc Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:32 PM It) co0 N0 1� 0 0 iN 0 CV O CV p Ih p vs 4 0 0 0 0 o 0 tl' 0 - 0 0 0 4 V .3-• O 0 In O 4 co uY T an T ill Y o0 N N p CI 000 o o C7 Ie) C 0 0 T p0 O 0 4 0 a Opppp)-'N F � L 00030 O o If • r- 001000,-,-,-NNpaooCio O us 14.: U.:10aD 0 O O LO l"' oi CO a a C 0 o h 0 0 0 0 N 0 N 0 N 0 p 0 0 0 o 0 0 poo 0 T 0 0 q7 p O o In T LC) r Let a= p N p0 N o O o 0 o 0 to i0 6 1-- N Too 000,00000q0 00000) .,. 0 0 In O I10C0In00 o T T r N N p o00IQ o 0 M o Column Numbers ----> Phase Names --1 Ped Walk• IPed FDW c W c 5 (Type 3 Limit 1 ID a ¢ IVeh Extension ro g 2 A c'2 5 5 'Max Limit 2 I Call To Phase 'Reduce By Reduce Every (Yellow Change 1Red Clear fl cc Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:32 PM r0) ew1— z * = Coordination Recall muumuu Plan 1 - Sync Plan 2 - Sync Plan 3 - Sync Plan 4 - Sync Plan 5 - Sync Plan 6 - Sync Plan 7 - Sync Plan 8 - Syne Plan 9 - Sync nnrwri Pr i * NEMA Hold MEMO '''S.'•.- , MEI C1 " 1-• to co 0 os to co cs 10 co 0 0 cm 05 to 0 is 0 0 to r- in Ca 0 ;Exclusive Phases IRR Overlap A - Phases 8 r-.4° c 2 Tecsi tsce c v -c" tr" c ..-cr' c c tr2 2 0 120 84 c, o Lig 24 77 c, o o o co c, ..- o ,..„ - w - in o - ... 4. 20 51 0 a CI 0 0 S6 9l. C °3 Y. .4= 0000000000000000 01 :,... XL 000000t000000000ci ,, ci " 01 r CO 0 10 01 01 a r CI CO 10 Ch r CR a o cr 0 0 ICI • 4') li, 0 r 01 r 18 57 79 0 15 57 erz. CI a r a o 15 255 0 I I —•—= 0 ca 1% tl; c 15 o c'3 cs es 10 tn in o Column Numbers dr% =13 2 = Cycle Length Phase 1 - ForceOff Phase 2 - ForceOff = 4.z• .....-.: 0000 0000 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 =01 LL LL LL LL C) en (0 (0 0000 CO0G1C0 tataaaal _0 .0 = QOO_ Phase 7- ForceOff Phase 8 - ForceOff Ring Offset Offset 1 Offset 2 Offset 3 Permissive Hold Release Zone Offset rf-,t ...11,41vALaa .9F A as a v 0 .c 0. 0 A 0.1 04 CL. V 0 0 19. "rn.F.<-,.=.4.:-. ors 1J - 0 0- 7r. F••• 0 fai A 0 + 0 ÷ 0 v E. c s , 0 1 g 01 i- 0 o Z co zor a) rd 2 (7) 7 1 t4 E o E - - N n u u 11 4 11 11 u crn =cr 40 40 n co MEI 0 11 Free Lag Plan 1 - Lag Plan 2- Lag Plan 3 - Lag Plan 4 - Lag Plan 5 - Lag Plan 6 - Lag Plan 7 - Lag Plan 8 - Lag Plan 9 - Lag Crinrri Max * Crawl 1 ari * ors 1J - 0 0- 7r. F••• 0 fai A 0 + 0 ÷ 0 v E. c s , 0 1 g 01 i- 0 o Z co zor a) rd 2 (7) 7 1 t4 E o E - - N n u u 11 4 11 11 u crn =cr 40 40 n co ,r... =r, (•1 (13111'1'j CO C•1 Ca r I '°I 11 CO r C•11 " 11\ ..2 E g a ;Exclusive Phases IRR Overlap A - Phases FRR Overlap B - Phases _ RR Overlap C - Phases RR Overlap D - Phases Ped 2P IPed 6P Ped 4P Ped BP Yellow Flash Phases Overlap A -.Phases Overlap 8 - Phases Overlap C - Phases Overlap D - Phases 'Restricted Phases Assign 5 Outputs ,r... =r, CN1 CO I 0.1 i k- .4. ir '°I 11 1 ell Ir C•11 " 11\ ..2 E g a ;Exclusive Phases RR -1 Clear Phases !RR -2 Clear Phases IRR -2 Limited Service 'Prot / Perm Phases 'Overlap A - Green Omit 'Overlap 8 - Green Omit !Overlap 0 - Green Omit 'Overlap D - Green Omit Overlap Yellow Flash IEV-A Phases I EV -B Phases IEV-C Phases I EV -D Phases 'Extra 1 Config. Bits EC Select (Interconnect) 2 EfiZAW:,,e A a) a) 0_ 0 v A 0 LL1 V 0 og 0 A a) OP LU V Revision: 10430 Printed on 09/21/2010 2:32 PM Cr tkl found 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 1 0 i 0 0 0 m E M 0 0 0 0 O 0 O O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 O O 0 O 0 0 0 O O 0 O O 0 0 O 0 0 O 0 0 O 0 0 0 O O 0 O O 0 Day of Week a) a) d 0 a 0 ( sr 1 _23456 i j r• n J 1 1 i M N1 4-95)10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cr 0 0 0 0 0 0 ulJd O 000 O 00 OO 0 00 000 0 O a) h, O 0 O 0 O O O 0 0 0 O O 0 0 0 0 O O 0 0 O O O 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 0 O O 0 O 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 found 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 1 0 i 0 0 0 m E M 0 0 0 0 O 0 O O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 O O 0 O 0 0 0 O O 0 O O 0 0 O 0 0 O 0 0 O 0 0 0 O O 0 O O 0 Day of Week Day of Week] ( sr 1 _23456 i j r• n J 1 1 i M N1 4-95)10 0 0 0 0 O O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 laid 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O O O O O O 0 ay F. 0 0 0 0 0 0 O O O 0 0 O O O O O oa000Oa0000Ca000o 0 0 0 c 0 0 0 c 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O O O 0 0 0 0 0 C7 0 0 0 0 0 found 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 1 0 i 0 0 0 m E M 0 0 0 0 O 0 O O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 O O 0 O 0 0 0 O O 0 O O 0 0 O 0 0 O 0 0 O 0 0 0 O O 0 O O 0 Day of Week Day of Week ( sr 1 _23456 i j r• n J 1 1 i M N1 iMMJJQ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O us14 O O O O O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 000000 O O O O O 0 0. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 E O Cr O O O O O O O O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 j- 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Co 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 found 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 1 0 i 0 0 0 m E M 0 0 0 0 O 0 O O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 O O 0 O 0 0 0 O O 0 O O 0 0 O 0 0 O 0 0 O 0 0 0 O O 0 O O 0 Day of Week m � ( sr 1 _23456 i j r• n J 1 1 found 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 1 0 i 0 0 0 m E M 0 0 0 0 O 0 O O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 O O 0 O 0 0 0 O O 0 O O 0 0 O 0 0 O 0 0 O 0 0 0 O O 0 O O 0 Day of Week 0[ v ( sr 1 _23456 i 0i sr r• n J M N1 C7 NJ N N' 'J4O4as Sr C7 Q 0000000OOO meld (0..I- W W CAW 0 0 0 000000 O q3O O -O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 E00'00000000000000 f- (0 0 10 O CO O O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O s- •- CY O CH 0 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 m sts A M O a' 0� a -0U it 0 IC o C3 3 cam O 0, v A 0} M a v 0 CP 0 0 ynuoVV 0 0 O JP8), O 0 O ICE© O ar N O 4* n 0 O m 0 N 4* 0 S O 0) id 0 co 4* -o o 2 ts a a � `� n 1-41111 A R - t T° LyQ1 }O 3) 11 17 17 11 71 11 11 11 17 11 11 11 N P7 cpwr, co m<m0 11-A o o m :!%121.." 2 _ m,1acVg2 0118" d Y >Dm _ Swcc 7 N R 0 m 8 xlcm 0ErasgaOm D-4-1,:c�L C�-0m`rm0�LL Q0ammwO bo '$=t -a cnmm»Uu.mmanman Qu unu nnouaunn m -1n8 O .- N l7 '�P f0 n c0 m< m 0 0 W n ii 1<m0 m m 000 81515 11 11 L <00 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:32 PM m u J CO a 0 0 0 SS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0' QA a) 0 0 0 N 0 m • ,111 A m 0- V V A IC 0- !L. v a E 1- TB 0 1 0) a) n E z 0 0 4) 0 N co 0 0 a TN" 10E[ o 0 V' m N • 0 o 21 22 23 24 Detector Number � N to NN N M .- N ^°N 27 r,-. . . 332 Input File r N N M M d d W M 1�!+ J . M G) . . Detector Name N N M M d' If) co r, n a0 a, . ; 8, '45E 4 0 c 0 0 0 0 0 0 c 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 c 0 0 c 0 0 0 0 0 m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 c 0 c 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 c 0 0 0 0 A A A A + M T } k N U + c ❑ + a) V V U) V V (i) 1 1 C C 0 O m CO 0) a c c C O •E ea v CO 0 = o U m L N > > 'a t E la a aF-a 0 0 0 E Z a) ea r 0- 733 m y. m 0 m m a) co i - as !L !L v v 0 0 0 0 m 0 tL 0) a3 rt 0 0 m m 0 O U L c 0 d U 0 0 0 d m a m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m 0 E a) 0 N N 0 E 0, m C) 0 E a) U) 0 E m 0 G) 0 E m w a) ❑ E m a 0 0 E a) 1 ao U) 0 E m a 0, A a1 g 0 v N O 0 0 N N U) W €c. Q Q ❑ ❑ V V Ili 0 m m E 0 c E LL u 0 2 Detector Number CO N N N 1.0 N co r r,-. a . 332 Input File ....I D J J -6L 7 J 0 J -9L 1 a . , N N M M d' If) co r, n a0 a, . ; 8, '45E '' 2o [0 Z 0 c 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 17 . Tu 0 0 c 0 c 0 0 c 0 c 0 0 0 0 0 c 0 c 0 0 a 0 0 0 c . 0 cc A N g 0- V . v V i 4) 0 i 0 tu 0 10 v G) 0 Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:32 PM CO U O con "eot m al CL o�tp�t . 0000 0 0 0 0 C C •0000 0 0 O O q 0.0 0.0 0.0 cF Paae> 10 0 0 0 ,0 0000 C O C d 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 d III S) O O O O C O O 0 O 0 G 0 O O O a O 0 C? 0 0 O a 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Q 0 0 0.0 1 0.0 - Bank s I 0 • 0000 0 0 0. 0 a,000 0 0 0000 0 Q 0 • 0 0 O .;.r Iii 0000 • 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 Q 0 Q 0 0.0 0.0 1 0.0 Phase Timi O o 0 a o 0 0 0 o 0 a 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 s a 0 0 0 0 0 •0 •Co •Co •0 0000 0 0 a 0CI d 00000 d Column Numbers ---> I E yC IPed Walk IPed FDW Min Green Type 3 Limit f IVeh Extension II 2-s in C 'Max Limit 2 Call To Phase [Reduce By Reduce Every 11 Yellow Change 1Red Clear 11 Phase 1 o�tp�t . o 0 0 0 a 0doo o 0 0 0 0 0 o a Dodo 0 0 0 R. sem, 0 0 0 Co 0 o 0 0 0 o 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 d 0 o 0 d 0 E o S) f O 4 0 0 0 d 0 o 0 o 00 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 a 0 ,... C 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 O O a 0 0 0 0 I 0 • a,000 c ddd Iii N Q • 0 0 0 0 o O o Co , 0000 Co O 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 ; T d• 00.00 N 0000 :i! O 0 0 0 Co 0000 , 0 N 0 M ln o N 0 O O d r Ch 0 0 0 0 ''4. 0 0 0 O O 0 O 4 O O O 0 0 0 0 O O O O O O Co O 0 5' O O O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 C2•• 0 0 O O 0 O d d .mn Numbers ----> Phase Names ---> Ped Walk IPed FLAN Min Green Type 3 Limit Added Initial IVeh Extension Max Gap ) 'Reduce By Reduce Everll (Yellow Change Red Clear CV CO a 8 :a I X22 0 cc 70' O cc x: f 1 o�tp�t 12345678 I 12345678 I 12345678 Al k 3 Ped Omit___ 4 ,-.0 Permit Phases f o 1. Vehicle Call [ Iii N Q 4r rte. MI S , 111 m ; T d• O O N O e' No :i! O n 0 0 @0 O , m Ec0v00 H 0 N 0 M ln o N o P1 , r- .12 r r Ch Fr cQ7. ON's A N Q1 LL .0 Co0 V 09 co 0 t v Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:32 PM 0 CO 43) O '0 0 as O 0 Z O 0 0 z z 0 N z 00 UJ IJJ p2Z phi Z E E E o m• a)Z baa m 'w'T a m U) o • N 2 W 1– a E Z it _N j - c4 0 O z Change Record m 0) 0 A in coo p M [n ID 0 o p COO o WI lid .crIrl Change h Red Lock Yellow Lock a CC I Ped Recall View Set Peds m' 0) 0 'Red Rest 0 Max Recall I [Soft Recall 1 a) u N a 20 u. IMan _Cntrl Calls 1 m m ce d OO.c+f4 r 0 0 0 m C al t 0 M 0 0 0 o ov W • LL o 0 • o 0 + ++ ✓ V V cn 0 In O to co CC 11) CC a CC A A + v v 0 0) c lO 0 ID 15 CO2 AAAA G 0 0 0 C) v v v 0 .fl E z 0 0 0 0 E D Z 0 a`) .o 2 0) 0 r tos 11) 11) a 10 0 E 1- N CG .6. In .11 N 0 N 0 c 10 2 0 as 0 m z 0 12_456_8 1 A in coo p M o I ID 0 o p COO o WI lid .crIrl 0 Permit 1 Red Lock Yellow Lock a CC I Ped Recall View Set Peds CC 'Red Rest 0 Max Recall I [Soft Recall 1 a) u N a 20 u. IMan _Cntrl Calls 1 Yellow Start m ce d 000 1 A in coo p M 0 ID 0 o p COO o 0pN 0 0 RR -1 Delay RR -1 Clear of N 0 Q 1.1.1W EV -A Clear EV -B Delay EV -B Clear FEV -C Delay EV -C Clear EV -D Delay �al a1 m 0 0 L] N CC RR -2 Clear View EV belay `U 1u 3 S View AR Delay 1 .111 R 3 S A 0 CO 0 U_ V c E 1= E tl01 Phase 1 A co) N p r p 00G 4 N or O N o M p COO o 0pN 0 0 M ui O Z Q V QO M COOO O io 10 10 0*'rlp 1. p OO.c+f4 r 0 0 0 M 0 0 0 o ov o o vv T O p d 0 a C O 0 0 0 C 0 11ir. 0 O O 11f o 0 Q 10 r 1n. r N r o N 10 N O o O 0 0 0 HS !J In O r ,e Cti Ca G CS C 111 1, P? N p O -ON o 0 0 04 o NMM p p C COO 00 10 riO 1n a 110>In poc'o000 u1 iq o ...... r�"lpporri6P. 0 x000.5 N 0.0 °o..a.4.4a'doeo6 00p Opp 0°00.0 Lei 4-c . Up O IO O 0 O 1n r 1n Ci In r 10 C4 10 CV O 04 0 10 rib 10 c E z E IPhase Names ---a Ped Walk Ped FDW Min Green Type 3 Limit tO 0x IVeh Extension 1 Max Gap 0 _E R 'Max Limit 2 j Call To Phase Reduce By 'Reduce Every (Yellow Change I Red Clear A Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:04 PM N t- = Coordination Recall 0 cc 9 7s ktt 111111111111 III Plan 1 - Sync Plan 2 - Sync 'Plan 3 - Sync Plan 4 - Sync Plan 5 - Sync Plan 6 - Sync Plan 7 - Sync Plan 8 - Sync Plan 9 - Sync C:nnrrl PPrt NEMA Hold js,. o o (0O O N c. c1AO O N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 'Exclusive Phases RR Overlap A - Phases O(6 RR Overlap C - Phases C? N 40 Ped 4P O 25 40 0 0 0 0 r N 0 o SI Q N c>na C N Q 0 0 0 a r N o b O NO (GNaOO a O O ._` Out `tel C LO . a CS O r O N too.) O 25 j 40 0 0 0 0 12 255 0 I 100 1 � O co 40 C0 ccsL x 0 0 0 0 �N. US N 0 0 w 0 cl 40 —� 12 O 25 40 0 0 O C? N • O 1 1 o p o 25 1 65 O N R. o 0 0 0 N 255 I 0 .44 . .. C4 Orcp. O N".( O N Q 0 0 0 0 12 I 40 N O Column Numbers ----a Plan Name :.-a Cycle Length Phase 1 - ForceOff Phase 2 - ForceOff Phase 3 - ForceOff Phase 4 - ForceOff Phase 5 - ForceOff Phase 6 - ForceOff Phase 7 - ForceOff Phase 8 - ForceOff Ring Offset - r m 000n N m co m o > H rn E : 'Hold Release m m = O m c N a A CO L7) 0. 0 V N G) co s 0 eF tai Imo: OE rtI NI of 0i Nt COL 01 of of vi Ni co of 01 of of or NI 0f mL aI NI of �aE VI NI oI co `*1 Ni CO of al NI O 0) U LL m LL [�tl N CT - CO ro N (O 0. CO J CrJ CO C J CO o. J cc a J fD Q m J CO CL co (0 m 10 -J Q) A a kcc t C C e R t C C c; 0 N Q 0 0 1- A 0 + 0 = L C. Q C . N n F TJ > m W ` 0 8 W m m O] LL X � C C o o E m— m m.. 1.c 4_ FGO o o}s m Er -0 8 o r-- LT_ mr-4 O Z 11 0 11 11 II 1 11 0 U 1- N CO '7 In CO 1. 03- co 0 m 1-- s D. N L j a o ...gy m m,. ca Cr- aeu v m o.a }O ' 2 N. A a j 11 4• a y 1 r�i § �3 m CI. HQOOa m i 31'-o m m R y Ca QMo6 mi':. arammmm> m W >> a2 f0 Q'O» 8.2 -8 El }-Z dlkl U)f(.m mJ cr1- W W CO0-4 [� 0 8 0 11 8 0 X 0 -0 0 0 C 11111011 V rN CO v 10) (OA90 d N CO) 0 In 031.03 ID = b O o s s E o m 4020E C L57.- 31. AA) LT 0 v N ' N Nas 0 10 A O) ad CL LU V Configuration Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA N O �1 11 0. N� I 1 F w 0 I O r,E N1 Q. 2 L^ E 'Exclusive Phases RR Overlap A - Phases 1RR Overlap B - Phases RR Overlap C - Phases RR Overlap D - Phases I Ped 2P (Ped 6P Ped 4P Ped 8P Yellow Flash Phases II 'Overlap A - Phases II Overlap B - Phases I Overlap C - Phases II 'Overlap D - Phases II 'Restricted Phases f Assign 5 Outputs C L57.- 31. AA) LT 0 v N ' N Nas 0 10 A O) ad CL LU V Configuration Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA N� I 1 F w 0 I O r,E N1 Q. 2 L^ E 'Exclusive Phases IRR -1 Clear Phases I RR -2 Clear Phases RR -2 Limited Service Prot 1 Perm Phases 1 Overlap A - Green Omit Overlap B - Green Omit 1 Overlap C - Green Omit Overlap D - Green Omit 1 Overlap Yellow Flash J EV -A Phases _I IEV-B Phases EV -C Phases EV -D Phases 'Extra 1 Config. Bits___ IC Select (Interconnect) C L57.- 31. AA) LT 0 v N ' N Nas 0 10 A O) ad CL LU V Configuration Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA 0 a 0. 1144 fi u m CD 0 N 0 1asIIO UDId 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m E j- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 0 O a a 0 0 a 0 a 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 Day of Week ]3u° O O o 0 a 0 0 000000000 /Feld 0 0 0 0 0 0 0000000000 0 m E p.-0000000000000000 0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m CD 0 N 0 1asIIO UDId 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m E j- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 0 O a a 0 0 a 0 a 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 II -1011 ID N 0 ro 0 nj 1 1 1 0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a O 0 d E h a 0 0 0 a 0 0 O a 0 a a O 0 O O O 0 a O 0 0 O O O 0 O O 0 a a 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 O 0 0 O a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 a) m 0 0 12s110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 USId 0 a O O O O 0 a a O O 0 Q 0 Q 0 0) E 1- 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 a a 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10. r e t, A m ID r 0 v c 0 U Y 17 V 0 1- LDUOyy 0 0 0 JEa� a 0 Aeq 0 0 a m is 0 ld 0-o 2 m 0 N lG 0 2 m iC 0 co ted -a 0 m i mg E E .r .a8= 7, C >, �rn 0 2 a 0 ��Q�'ice 60C) Co n 8 u _n 1 11 A 1 fl 11 11 11 N V2 V' (0DO. f -m 07 10 '68 0 .= O 0 a- m rst 73 n � @- -- 2 ro 0 m m m a U m ° i3 Ra nWm m mr • d Z'timNwL 0m�LL..-▪ F— u- 2 a_� xomm � mc=CCt22`A'sO22 3•-1 % wo¢m cC 2caE:Ty E a L 3 ro 0 0 m m m o m ni m_ . .a �} j a. CL LC07?>�ULLm m frim n u n u n n v u n n I u p u a OS co and co A co m Q CO 0 CO W 0 4 m 0 T5 15 15 000 • 1 u n <00 n w - m m O Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA LDay of Week 1 125110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mid 00000043000000000 00000000000000000 F 00000000000000040 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o a a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 II -1011 ID N 0 ro 0 nj 1 1 1 0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a O 0 d E h a 0 0 0 a 0 0 O a 0 a a O 0 O O O 0 a O 0 0 O O O 0 O O 0 a a 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 O 0 0 O a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 a) m 0 0 12s110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 USId 0 a O O O O 0 a a O O 0 Q 0 Q 0 0) E 1- 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 a a 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10. r e t, A m ID r 0 v c 0 U Y 17 V 0 1- LDUOyy 0 0 0 JEa� a 0 Aeq 0 0 a m is 0 ld 0-o 2 m 0 N lG 0 2 m iC 0 co ted -a 0 m i mg E E .r .a8= 7, C >, �rn 0 2 a 0 ��Q�'ice 60C) Co n 8 u _n 1 11 A 1 fl 11 11 11 N V2 V' (0DO. f -m 07 10 '68 0 .= O 0 a- m rst 73 n � @- -- 2 ro 0 m m m a U m ° i3 Ra nWm m mr • d Z'timNwL 0m�LL..-▪ F— u- 2 a_� xomm � mc=CCt22`A'sO22 3•-1 % wo¢m cC 2caE:Ty E a L 3 ro 0 0 m m m o m ni m_ . .a �} j a. CL LC07?>�ULLm m frim n u n u n n v u n n I u p u a OS co and co A co m Q CO 0 CO W 0 4 m 0 T5 15 15 000 • 1 u n <00 n w - m m O Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA -1011 ID N 0 ro 0 nj 1 1 1 0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a O 0 d E h a 0 0 0 a 0 0 O a 0 a a O 0 O O O 0 a O 0 0 O O O 0 O O 0 a a 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 O 0 0 O a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 a) m 0 0 12s110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 USId 0 a O O O O 0 a a O O 0 Q 0 Q 0 0) E 1- 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 a a 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10. r e t, A m ID r 0 v c 0 U Y 17 V 0 1- LDUOyy 0 0 0 JEa� a 0 Aeq 0 0 a m is 0 ld 0-o 2 m 0 N lG 0 2 m iC 0 co ted -a 0 m i mg E E .r .a8= 7, C >, �rn 0 2 a 0 ��Q�'ice 60C) Co n 8 u _n 1 11 A 1 fl 11 11 11 N V2 V' (0DO. f -m 07 10 '68 0 .= O 0 a- m rst 73 n � @- -- 2 ro 0 m m m a U m ° i3 Ra nWm m mr • d Z'timNwL 0m�LL..-▪ F— u- 2 a_� xomm � mc=CCt22`A'sO22 3•-1 % wo¢m cC 2caE:Ty E a L 3 ro 0 0 m m m o m ni m_ . .a �} j a. CL LC07?>�ULLm m frim n u n u n n v u n n I u p u a OS co and co A co m Q CO 0 CO W 0 4 m 0 T5 15 15 000 • 1 u n <00 n w - m m O Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA 43 0 3 0 0 0 0 0�9 0 0 a 43 4) 0 a 0 CO o 4) 0 a 0 0 o 4) 0 0 0 0 4) O A 4) _a 0 V A LC 2 EL V H 0 i Detector Number 1234 12345678 L° 01 N 1 Detector Numbers r1 2 3 4 5 6 7 81 9 10 11 12 -- -- -- -_ 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 2011 -- 21 22 23 24 i ' 40 1 (NI 0 N 332 Input File CO • N i Detector Number w 00o0a 332 Input File L° 01 N CAM,^ o o 0 N N r m Nr-'- 0 332 Input File r 7_.d7J�„7-17J n1 P1 co C7 — — 40 ID a I - W i 7J G) 0) . Id . 1 1 Detector Name ' d 0 . I i N 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 • 071-0.1 Fr riligmn A 0A] 0 0 U_+ !L V V 0 a 0 .0 E Z m co ca 4) >- a> m m E 1- } + N 0 0 c V VCO c CCi0 U tlf 1I R d U c 7 a 0) 0 0 Phase Number IT) >- 4) O m m E A A 0 • 0 ✓ V 0 Q 0 4) F I1. 0) 0 4) (C 0 0) A a O 0 0v V. 0 C� G 4, o 0�. cut C�- O D 0 C f D N To . S a 4) n 0 O N OE 0 0 0 0 0 a ❑ E N N Cn 04 0 E 4) 0) M 3fi ❑ E 4) 7 Cn 43 ❑ E 4) (4 0 E 0) CO Cil 4) O N V7 N. 4) 0 4) >. CO co 4k 4) 0 E 4) ) A 4) a 0 0) O 2 4Y E N co a a) t E z 0 4) D C E 1I 11 0 2 0 4- 0 m .00 4L 0 U 2 0 0 _U w 00o0a 332 Input File 1163 1” Detector Name il on iii _U w 00o0a o 0 0 a o 00000codao o o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 . a" p ,_, 0U ?he '0000000000q000 dao ❑ 0 0 0 o a a 0 0 a o o..a ' d 0 0 41ti, CC Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:04 PM j a_ • z ca cES a_ Ik ... CI r.eaci"c=c"5007c=c 1-• V) 10 Cal 0.5 1 0.0 1.0 <F Paae› -g- : • ea ca co 0 • 0000'” • • • el Ca C3 0 1- VI I -IIA" " 1._ 1 Permit Phases /••• e II•-• 0 Cal ...7, 10 c„.; 0 ui. CI cyi 0 ,,p ca p„. 0 0 I- 6 0 ..z. CI .cil 1 .I. 0000 0 C•1 0 a • 10 • in • In • ps azj 00 III•6 • 0 • 0 • to 1 0.0 na - Bank 1,.• 0 „_ 1.• 0 cv • •I in • tyl 0 • 10 0 • 01 0 azi. 40 ps. 0 0 1- • 0 0 • re• 0 • cr 1 1 ca ea C9 0 CI o UI o WI o 9 o P". 1- Cp Vi 0 0 7; aa ct a•- c! CO 0.0 0.5 0.0 Phase Timi 0 E 43) t-. ... f•-• e l'•••• 0 CI ••• ID • t".7 CI. WI Ct 01 0 ,i. 1;:a p„, 0 0 Ir. • CI 0 • ".- 0 • ch g Q) la 03 CL o 0 ra o • C3 • 0 • C1 • C1 3- 3.0 0 ca • 0 • ,i • 03 Column Numbers ta' E R sz a. 1Ped Walk 1 Ped FDW 2 :•-•,.= o a) T, a IVah Extension 11 1Veh Extension Max Gap • 0_ 40 .E Max Limit 2 II Call To Phase 'Reduce By -11 Reduce Every 11 [Yellow Change 11 'Red Clear 11 Out out 1-• V) 10 Cal 0.0 1 0.5 1 0.0 I 1.0 lank 2 cF Parie E 0 Its e, : • ea ca co 0 • 0000'” • • • el Ca C3 6 ... ci - -., I.: ..„._ -t- ,.:•-, 1 Permit Phases . . 0 C.I ILO 0 S CI CI 1.•. S. Ci 1 .I. 0 0 C•1 0 0 • II) • III - • II) • p, 0 ?OO .0 CI. /.." :2 1"- 4) CM • ••••• criooaso • C•1 • ID • 0.11 cr r. e5 e5 r- Ci 0 Ili 0 a C 1 ERMEMR77 Advance a C3 30 1f) 10 p, ca a••• 0 q 0 E 43) t-. ... 0 el r- ul C1 0 cri 0, csi Q co 1.- el g Q) la 03 CL ,, •. 0 1Ped Walk -1 0 Ped FDW Min Green 0 • 0000l • . ' - tneOcj., 0 0 0 c.i. 6 • G I 4 a. G I 2 LIZI 4- _.i Ea. C -a 1Veh Extension Max Gap • 0_ 40 .E E g IMax Limit 2 Call To Phase 'Reduce By 'Reduce Every 'Yellow Change es a.) -a Wra (Set Dwelt = 255) 0 1:H41 vele. sttitSC cr Out out ,tk 1,---; - E 0 Its e, : • - -., I.: ..„._ -t- ,.:•-, 1 Permit Phases . . 1 .I. -ti 0 rt. . 1‘ I • I ERMEMR77 Advance a t-. ... ,, •. 0 • • 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1. E 0000000.000 • 0 0 0 0 0 • 0 cc •'; 4o` ORM Revision: 10430 Printed on 09/21/2010 2:04 PM LO 0 Id a 31/2010 8:11 0 m rn ca 0 CD 0 C C an al 8 To CD 0 as 0 zz E E ca z 2 N 65 N N 0 LU EU ,.O ZZ Z Z v C C N z C C c o0,0,Z CI fl! F < � U LIU a N or- CI) ?N O W 0 2 0 1— a E N N 1L j,. Change Record 1 0 ID Cam 0 ,- 0 1- 0 e-• 0 1- eo N 1 1 "' i o 07 O O ml "1,+ v Permit 'Red Lock (Yellow Lock I Min Recall PedRecall 1 N Q. . h 0 Red Rest I IDual Entry 1 - N CC Soft Recall N a) . 0 9 c -0• N O First Phases 0 Q 0 0 0 0• L13 0 0 0 00 1- 0 r 0 O m 0 0 0 0 0 y 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 C . 0 0 m O 0 O 0 N 0 N 0 N „y M I Change 0 0 G O O O O cl uq C? `.g 0 CCI a LS A A A w u o 0 • o 0 ui u u ✓ V V y O O 10 N w cc Up a A A m V V a ID N a asc A A A A O * N M O O O O ✓ v v v A m Q E 0 0 N m Q 7 Z m 1V co b 2 m m m ID ams E 1- cc i R N C 0co d is ar azu wpm 1 12345678 1 0 0 ,- 0 1- 0 e-• 0 1- eo N 1 1 "' i o 07 O O ml "1,+ 0 O Permit 'Red Lock (Yellow Lock I Min Recall PedRecall 1 N Q. . h Rest In Walk Red Rest I IDual Entry 1 - N CC Soft Recall N a) . 0 9 c -0• 1Man Ontrl Calls 1 O First Phases o 0 0 ,- 0 1- 0 e-• 0 1- 0 0 o 07 O O 0 O 0 O RR -t Delay FRR-1 Clear EV -A Delay EV -A Clear EV -B Delay EV -B Clear EV -C Delay EV -C Clear EV -D Delay EV -D Clear a m 0 N [X RR -2 Clear 4 W View EV Clear 0 ¢ R S 0 cc a 0 Co V y 0 U- 4) y y t 0 Phase [*- No 1-y +n o 0N 0 0 N o N a M o 07 O O 0 O 0 O 0 e' 0 1— A cd d L.L. ¢ O 0 p o 0 a r cri r a r 0 CS 0 PI O G 0 Q 0 0 0 0• L13 0 0 00 1- 0 r 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 y 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 C . 0 0 [1-f O 0 O 0 N 0 N 0 N „y M Lej M 0 0 G O O O O cl uq C? `.g 0 CCI a LS 'K F,r 1.••7 cm 0 O 0 o 0 01 0 .04N a y y 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 cll. QGOgQ..r 0 IA 1if"2ir1 rC4 a000a,E CV 0Oao of O 0 co co a O N*- 0 0 4 4 a a 0 0 0 0 Irl r• 0o000NNoain01 0 o O O Le) 0 0 00caO 0 0 10 n Lq E U n k , 2 x Ped Walk (Ped FDW (Min Green I IType 3 Limit Added initial —11 IVeh Extension 11 (} 2 UI `ti IMax Limit 2 Call To Phase fn N = aC 'Reduce Every (Yellow Chang Red Clear MOP Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA N N 10 a 0 1w fq O 1- 0 = Coordination Recall) 0 tQ 0�0( • 4 Q • 1 Ii'iiiiiiiIIIOI 'Plan 1 - Sync Plan 2 - Sync Plan 3 - Sync Plan 4 - Sync Plan 5 - Sync Plan 6 - Sync Plan 7 - Sync Plan B - Sync Plan 9 - Sync (:nnrd Par! * NEMA Hold c C a a wi- 1• Napolra�mo nC�I O EE 20 1 mo 03 11to z U 1 -Of en 0 RR Overlap A - Phases RR Overlap B Phases N4 RR Overlap D - Phases 0c 69 0 CO O 20 59 O la o 0 15 O O .a< N o6f) 09 N O N 2 0 0 V 0 0 15 10 • M M 120 74 0 1013 M n Q 20 59 00.0Q 4 00000000000 0 0 0 0 0 0000000000000000 120 76 0 r-. O r co co h O 0 r CO O CO h 0 O h w 0 01I A s. :: 4iy .3?R- 0 N 00 O r CO 0 0 r. CO O C O Cr r 1.0 o 0 .YIll N., CO O r N 03 O r 10 a OP 411 0 0 111111611111 ! 255 1 O !t Lu z C a (Cycle Length Phase 1 - ForceOff Phase 2 - ForceOff Phase 3 - ForceOff Phase 4 - ForceOff Phase 5 - ForceOff ! Phase 6 - ForceOff Phase 7 - ForceOff Phase 8 - ForceOff I'D in 0 m -C - hcc To !Offset 2 Offset 3 Permissive m m m 'a 2 IZone Offset A OI 0) Q 0 v COCO Z a 0 0 1) 0 1a (0 U v 0 0 0 • • • r-- 8 8 ti O 0- C 47) 0 0 1— A 0 0 + V v 0 1 F 0 m F 0 1 N ro `m 0 .1; N CO 11 x c m m = r 0.= m o m E `L n 1L 11 a 11 U u e 9 11 CO 4.13 OD ME II III Free Lag Plan 1 - Lag Plan 2 - Lag Plan 3 - Lag Plan 4 - Lag Plan 5 - Lag Plan 6 - Lag Plan 7 - Lag Plan 8 - Lag Plan 9 - Lag (:nnrrl Max * C:nr rrl tarn r-- 8 8 ti O 0- C 47) 0 0 1— A 0 0 + V v 0 1 F 0 m F 0 1 N ro `m 0 .1; N CO 11 x c m m = r 0.= m o m E `L n 1L 11 a 11 U u e 9 11 CO 4.13 OD CE A 0) 0 a. U v A m 1a 0 w v 0 4— 01 0 U A Ae 0 w V 0 a7 C 0 Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:02 PM. nC�I O EE 11to z U Exclusive Phases 11 [RR -1 Clear Phases IRR -2 Clear Phases RR Overlap A - Phases RR Overlap B Phases j RR Overlap C - Phases RR Overlap D - Phases Ped 2P co N a IPed 4P Ped 8P [Yellow Flash Phases Overlap A - Phases Overlap B - Phases !Overlap C - Phases j Overlap 0 - Phases ea a) 40 a Ts m a Assign 5 Outputs CE A 0) 0 a. U v A m 1a 0 w v 0 4— 01 0 U A Ae 0 w V 0 a7 C 0 Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:02 PM. 11to z U Exclusive Phases 11 [RR -1 Clear Phases IRR -2 Clear Phases RR -2 Limited Service Prot / Perm Phases 'Overlap A - Green Omit 11 Overlap B - Green Omit] Overlap C - Green Omit Overlap D - Green Omit Overlap Yellow Flash 11 EV -A Phases EV -B Phases EV -C Phases EV -D Phases Extra 1 Config. Bits IC Select (Interconnect) CE A 0) 0 a. U v A m 1a 0 w v 0 4— 01 0 U A Ae 0 w V 0 a7 C 0 Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:02 PM. CO m 0. 0 ais O c c 0 it. 1.1. Day of Week I 3 T- 4# 4k la NO M It `-al s8s4p0 0 0 0 00 0 0 0000000000^3 0 0 0 0 card o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Co 0 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a a o a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.1. Day of Week 3 T- 4# 4k la NO CO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CO 0 0 0 0 0 as 0 0 '3 •0 "aid 0 0 0 0 N MILO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 mid 0 o 0 0 00 0 0 0 0 0000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 0 0 0 E a o 0 0 0 0 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 CO 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0000000000000000 1.1. Day of Week T- 4# 4k la NO CO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CO 0 0 0 0 0 as 0 0 '3 •0 "aid 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 e E F 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CO 0 0 0 0 0 Co 0 0 Co 0 0 CO 0 0 CO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00600 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 'ca Day of Weekl C O M m 0 "0 '0 0 '0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Q rai 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 E o a o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0'O 0 1 1 0 0 0 card 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m % 1- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ware x m ar 0 0 ynuoW 0 0 0 !PGA 0 0 0 Apo 0 0 0 ar 0 ctia Q S ar id 0 N 0 1 m 0 co 0 A O pj C + 'aU o.. 0 U 0 n.o 7.. � m .. E `m E E 3 . p O Y C A _ C? O m co lri4.34:7Qmozo V I. 11 11 1 1 0 11 0 n 1 6 11 N cyV u° m r` m m <al0 5 0 c '0 0 0 o m m 2NMOnpj 0. V m .b -- c N y m q C 0 m L , m NL0 m. mm m LLUo4 v`Y c m "= 7,0-822w0-2712 oc m m m g o Ei3ddOo qlz 3 3 ° ET a XE v m y a d E -o QL'p "a �r. 16 0 NC7. Em % V m m m m m m m o m m m J &fl )-76. ��07 7"20[1- 0 (0m CO G] O !I n tt u n 7 II 0 u II II II II ) n II o r"r C] .0 0, m Q°3 U 0 1-L Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:02 PM Day of Weekl C O M 'j7tlllj 0 "0 '0 0 '0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Q 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 E o a o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o a o o E... 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0'O 0 1 1 0 0 0 card 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m % 1- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ware x m ar 0 0 ynuoW 0 0 0 !PGA 0 0 0 Apo 0 0 0 ar 0 ctia Q S ar id 0 N 0 1 m 0 co 0 A O pj C + 'aU o.. 0 U 0 n.o 7.. � m .. E `m E E 3 . p O Y C A _ C? O m co lri4.34:7Qmozo V I. 11 11 1 1 0 11 0 n 1 6 11 N cyV u° m r` m m <al0 5 0 c '0 0 0 o m m 2NMOnpj 0. V m .b -- c N y m q C 0 m L , m NL0 m. mm m LLUo4 v`Y c m "= 7,0-822w0-2712 oc m m m g o Ei3ddOo qlz 3 3 ° ET a XE v m y a d E -o QL'p "a �r. 16 0 NC7. Em % V m m m m m m m o m m m J &fl )-76. ��07 7"20[1- 0 (0m CO G] O !I n tt u n 7 II 0 u II II II II ) n II o r"r C] .0 0, m Q°3 U 0 1-L Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:02 PM or or 0 J O 0 0 0 0 al O (j 0 O 0 Ib 0 O 0 m 0 at, 0 O_ ID 0 0 0_ 46 ID 0 aA) O osW 0 v A ID al a IL v 0 0 m w tioM cm Detector Numbers a m cr !'7 V^ 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 4.0 to 21 22 23 24 m N CO N I() N A ID 0- 0- V v v i 04) 4) Detector Number Q3 m oc500 0 0 0.0 0 0 Yellow Chane 0 0 0 0 0000 N V- 1— 0 al O (j 0 O 0 Ib 0 O 0 m 0 at, 0 O_ ID 0 0 0_ 46 ID 0 aA) O osW 0 v A ID al a IL v 0 0 m w tioM cm Detector Numbers a m cr !'7 V^ 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 4.0 to 21 22 23 24 m N CO N I() N A ID 0- 0- V v v i 04) 4) Detector Number . .- r 100tW N N o r L0 V OD` cod' N,_mN N N V- 1— a r a 332 Input File N J N M [7 J1) M V'10 -S -S D (O J w D r J 1i m D O) J C) a a Detector .,Name I i I O 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 O 0) 0 O 0 0 0 O O O 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 O 0 O c 0 O Cc O 0 O c O 0 O 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 A cJ r 0 0 V V!%) •c 0 0 d m c •i O c Q 0 0 0 Phase Number 0 0 m >ID O m m ID E } • N 00 c ✓ v 0%) O 0)R C 0d C a 0 0 0 .0 E z ID ld m m O m E to h + • + 0 o + + ✓ V 0 0 0 0 ID Ii O) 0 -J m <6 LL O r 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 d 1 O U m 0 0 a A CO Ca tr; + CO 0 '3 m 70 E O • 3 CD W C 0 Q , a d o � o Q c a $ R N av 0 to a ID (0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ID N a 0) a M 0 E ID 7 it 11) m co a U) 4* to E ID a 0) 0 ID >. (1) 0) m a m 14. ID 0 N T Eiga A ID � L ■Q,I O 8 ✓ 0 IT 2 L O L i N m 7 41 . �.. Q) 0 ._ U O E LL 0 O 0o° Ciril C▪ I W • [f_ 0 ✓ v V 10 0 m O Q) 'O 03 n z ., N N (O N o r L0 V cod' N c0 N N V- 1— O) a 332 Input File J -2U N % J -3U 0) V'10 -S -S LJO t '22 I in -a a Detector Name I a 0 0 0 0 C 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 c 0 0 0 0 0 0 ab m O 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0. O 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 alleirMe Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:02 PM LI) rr W M 1 -------, P- C5 "D CD O CD O 04 ca oi CD 44 cp vs cp 0/ 0 0 0 C2 0 CD 0 NT 0 22- 11! 0 0 4, 0 0 41 9 41 cp c) 0 0 0 C1 0 41 I I .,_ up 0 ,- 0 ,- 0q9c:Ro009Rgc: c, ,t .4 ,t us us 4, 0-.0 C! 0 CD CO v• ' 17 CD 10 CD CI • C2 LO • 1- 41 • 1- Ill • 1- c2 ...m N. 0 ..... -• 0 CD CD • CI 0 • C2 CD • CI I.0 . • C7 • ,_ e2 ,,.. ..„ CI 0 CI ri 0 ri 0 ri up 4-, up VD ..... " . " 0 ci 0 ci 0 1 0 L0 0 m) up 0 C: Ift III it: LID 40 0 el g c,C7! cIR ci i• 41 �o CM 1- CD CD 0 CD nf CD nf C2 ni 0 us 0 us CD CD CD CS CI CS C2 It; CI g -CI E c E -. a C2 CD Ul CD 0 CD 41 1- 41 1- If! 1- up VI up 04 CD CD CD CS C2 CS C2 CS 41 CS Phase Names [Ped Walk [Ped FDW IMin Green Type 3 Limit Added initial Veh Extension Max Gap Min Gap Max Limit Max Limit 2 Call To Phase Reduce By Reduce Every [Yellow Change 1 [Red Clear Ch. CO A= 11 P- cp 0/ "D CD 0 CS C1 01 C1 01 C2 c4 c) vs cp 0 c' c' 0 6 0 6 CD ni CD ' i • Ili ez es us ca R 't! ral 41 c) C2 CD CD C1! CD C:,! LID I 20 CC 0 4, C! 0 CI ..i• CI la cl cr. CI ul CI in 4, 4, C! 0 C? 0 CI 41 Ci 1- J 46 1- y- N- VI CO 'D CD 0 6 CS 4 CS Wint4V-K5M Advance 1 0 CD 111 0 CD . NO • 41 • ICJ • up up CD CI 2 2 2 Ict4 i' up CO C4 C2 T- ry -- C2 0,t CI! CI ..4. C:: ..4. CD us CD O .-. -- P, -- Q 6 a 6 C: up C:! t 00000 CD 111 111 1.11 20 up _ a) E F -7- 0 6 CI 6 0 ci 41 6 0 0 g •Z Cb N Z [Ped Walk [Ped FDW Min Green Type 3 Limit Added Initial Veh Extension 2 ca CD [Call To Phase I [Reduce By Reduce Every 1 [Yellow Change 'Red Clear ITNENUMF1 - _ AL1311,-NAN A V as a A w cs) 1. n;$ V (Set Dwell 25g, 4-F PA7. ,•;..53'4.:. :-.42.`•• .1; V t -,..-.2i IP F PAO E 0 a) EL .71 Permit Phases ,.. =._ '5e13 a) > :... 41 Force Off Wint4V-K5M Advance piovi Wit 0 • 000000000000000 _ a) E F -7- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ea = 0 0 0 ca CD A >. 0 0 grilketArIMPVIA A LL _4= 1g 0 V Revision: 10430 Timing Sheet Version: 200 SA & CA Printed on 09/21/2010 2:02 PM APPENDIX B School and Religious Center Schedules KOA Corporation November 2010 Temecula Valley Unified School District Student/Teacher Calendar 2010/2011 School Year = Student Days S M T W TH F S W TH F S 1 ' 2 3 4 (FI) 5 H 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Holidays and Breaks: Independence Day Labor Day Veteran's Day July 5, 2010 September 6, 2010 November 11, 2010 H - Holidays & School Breaks T - Teacher Preparation Day (K-12 Non -student day: iS - Staff Development Day (K-12 Non -student day) MHhN - Modified Day (6-12 only) HM - Modified Day (9-12 only) w- Work Year Reduction Days M - Modified Day (K-12) EM - Elem. Modified Day (K-5 only) MM - Modified Day (6-8 only) fon-ILS (6-12 anly)Late Start -MSB -IS Sit- Staff Dev & Teacher Prep Day (K-12 Non -student day) Work Year Reduction Days Board Adopted 2/23/2070 (Board Adopted on 210212010) bevaea3-111.2010} 2010 3M OCTOBER APRIL 1'H S M T W TH F S 8 7 8 9 sur 10 T.... 1 : 2 3 .-4 1 .5:'..-6''.'=7` ` 4.-.- _ • .5:. -8- 9 10 'ft:;.T2 - mica . '•33 em '14" • MY ''"15 . MN 16 17 1.8, ' .19r' 20 21 - 22. 23 24 25." MHOS. 26 - 127 -: 'EM ".28 - .'•.-29 . 30 31 Holidays and Breaks: Independence Day Labor Day Veteran's Day July 5, 2010 September 6, 2010 November 11, 2010 H - Holidays & School Breaks T - Teacher Preparation Day (K-12 Non -student day: iS - Staff Development Day (K-12 Non -student day) MHhN - Modified Day (6-12 only) HM - Modified Day (9-12 only) w- Work Year Reduction Days M - Modified Day (K-12) EM - Elem. Modified Day (K-5 only) MM - Modified Day (6-8 only) fon-ILS (6-12 anly)Late Start -MSB -IS Sit- Staff Dev & Teacher Prep Day (K-12 Non -student day) Work Year Reduction Days Board Adopted 2/23/2070 (Board Adopted on 210212010) bevaea3-111.2010} 2010 3M JANUARY APRIL 1'H F SM 1 T W TH F 8 7 8 9 sur 10 T.... ' 1'1": • 1 H 1 2 3 ` 4.-.- _ • .5:. 6 - -_7 8 9 f0' MHLS •11 '..: .. . 12.::-1-3. -:,.ar _ , _ 14 W 15 16 17:.:'18, ' . _ _ 19::''20::'' =21. - 21 22.. 3fl `•-"° .4: -25:-• ` .28': EN.- .47..";; --f '.:28 -•. 29 Holidays and Breaks: Independence Day Labor Day Veteran's Day July 5, 2010 September 6, 2010 November 11, 2010 H - Holidays & School Breaks T - Teacher Preparation Day (K-12 Non -student day: iS - Staff Development Day (K-12 Non -student day) MHhN - Modified Day (6-12 only) HM - Modified Day (9-12 only) w- Work Year Reduction Days M - Modified Day (K-12) EM - Elem. Modified Day (K-5 only) MM - Modified Day (6-8 only) fon-ILS (6-12 anly)Late Start -MSB -IS Sit- Staff Dev & Teacher Prep Day (K-12 Non -student day) Work Year Reduction Days Board Adopted 2/23/2070 (Board Adopted on 210212010) bevaea3-111.2010} 2010 3M M APRIL 1'H F 6 1 2 W TH F S 7 8 9 sur 10 T.... ' 1'1": • 1 H 2 3 4 11 5 H 6 H 7 H 8 - H 9 10 . 11 : . 12 ' 13; .-"i4:•, 15 16 17 18:.,'19. ilt•• ' . _ _ .,-20 :EM =21. - _ 22 _ 23 24 • :25, -`20; 27:.. 28 :29 30 Holidays and Breaks: Independence Day Labor Day Veteran's Day July 5, 2010 September 6, 2010 November 11, 2010 H - Holidays & School Breaks T - Teacher Preparation Day (K-12 Non -student day: iS - Staff Development Day (K-12 Non -student day) MHhN - Modified Day (6-12 only) HM - Modified Day (9-12 only) w- Work Year Reduction Days M - Modified Day (K-12) EM - Elem. Modified Day (K-5 only) MM - Modified Day (6-8 only) fon-ILS (6-12 anly)Late Start -MSB -IS Sit- Staff Dev & Teacher Prep Day (K-12 Non -student day) Work Year Reduction Days Board Adopted 2/23/2070 (Board Adopted on 210212010) bevaea3-111.2010} 2010 3M M AUGUST T W 1'H F 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 sur 10 T.... ' 1'1": • .;71 • -._- 13' . .. .... 14 15 `'.:i."0-.-: .17: ..0'...1V. ' -'f:0 - '2U' 21 22 23..: 'MOBS: "24 .... -.. t25.: -- - :26, ...'=27 • '- •- . .- - 28 29 =..30• .: 31 -- : Temecula Valley Unified School District Student/Teacher Calendar 2010-2011 School Year "'Board Adopted on 2/02a0101 (Board Adoption of "W" Days - 2/23/2040) (Revised 3.19-2010) alendar nates H" w Holidays & School Breaks (K-12) Dates Independence Day Labor Day Veteran's Day Thanksgiving Break Winter Break Martin Luther King Jr. Day Lincoln's Birthday Washington's Birthday Spring Break Memorial Day July 5, 2010 September 6, 2010 November 11, 2010 November 22- 26, 2010 Dec. 20, 2010 -January 3, 2011 January 17, 2011 February 18, 2011 February 21, 2011 March 28 -April 8, 2011 May 30, 2011 _ - eac er ' reparation ' ay ' - (Non -student clay) ''S" August 10, 2010 June 6, 2011 - Staff Development Day (K-12) (Non -student day) August 9, 201-0 January 3, 2011 "W" Vflork Year Reduction Day (K-12 & All 1111212010; 1/14/2011; 5/31/11; Employees) (Non -student & employee day) 6/1/11; 6/2/11; 6/3/11; & 616/11 'al" - Modified Day (K-12) May 26, 2011 May 27, 2011 "1=N1" - Elementary Modified Day (K-5 only) Every Wed. starting 8/18/10, ending 5/11/11; (Also: 11/16/10, 11/18/10 & 11/19/10) MM" -- Middle School Modified Day (6-8 only) October 14, 2010 October 15, 2010 MHM" - Middle & High School (includes RVHS) December 17, 2010 Modified Day (6-12 only) March 11, 2011 "HM" - High School Modified Days(9-12 only) September 23, 2010 (includes RVHS) December 16, 2010 III a ala MP at Mt a mama El a MI a ML a IN "MHLS" -- Middle & High School Late Start (6th -8th grades & 9th -12th grades) School Hours: High Schools(8:45am 2:30pm) & Middle Schools(9:15am-2:45pm) School Sites ("MHLS"): CHS GOHS & TVHS (High Schools 8:45am - 2:30pm) and BVMS. DMS, GMS MMS. TMS, VRMS (Middle Schools 9:15am - 2:45pm) Dates ("MHLS"): Middle & High School Late Start Monday DATES: (Dates below are also the same for RVHS "Modified Day" Schedule seen below) 8/23/10, 8/30/10, 9/13/10, 9/20/2010, 9/27/10, 10/4/10, 10/11/10,10/18/10, 10/25/10, 11/1110,11/8/10,11/15//10,11/29/10, 12/6/10,12/13/10,1/10/11, 1/24/11,1/31/11, 2/7/11, 2/14/11, 2/28/11, 317/11, 3/14/11, 3/21/11, 4/11/11, /18/11, 4/25/11, 5/2/11, 5/9(11, 5/16/11, & 5/23/11. School Chaparral, Great alk &moi emecula Valley High Schools Crisis information Line 506-7900 • Page 2 of 2 School Listing Site Elementary Schools_ Alamos Elementary School (AES) Abby Reinke Elementary School (ARES) Ysabel Barnett Elementary School (BES) Crowne Hill Elementary School (CHES) French Valley Elementary School (IVES) Helen Hunt Jackson Elem. School (JES) Susan La Vorgna Elem. School (LES) Nicolas Valley Elementary School (NVES) Paloma Elementary School (PES) Pauba Valley Elementary School (PVES) Rancho Elementary School (RES) Red Hawk Elementary School (RHES) Temecula Elementary School (TES) Temecula Lulseno Elementary (TIES) Tony Tobin Elementary School (TIES) Vail Elementary School (VES) Vintage Hills Elementary School (VHES) Middle Schools Bella Vista Middle School (BVMS) James L Day Middle School (DMS) Erie Stanley Gardner Middle School (GMS) Margarita Middle School (MMS) Temecula Middle School (TMS) Vail Ranch Middle School (VRMS) Phone 284-6780 302-6610 296-5579 294-6370 926-3643 302-5199 294-6385 695-7180 302-5165 302-5140 695-7150 302-5125 595-7130 294-6340 294-6355 695-7140 695-4260 294-6600 699-8138 699-0080 695-7370 302-5151 302-5188 High Schools Chaparral High School (CHS) 695-4200 Great Oak High School (GOHS) 294-6450 Temecula Valley High School (TVHS) 695-7300 Rancho Vista High School (RVHS) 695-7320 (RVHS fp the Joan F. Sparkman Alternative Ed. Center- SAEC Alternative Education Programs Susan H. Nelson High School (NHS) SAEC 695-7360 Temecula Valley Adult School ('NAS) ( D.O. 506-7996 Rolling Hills Academy Horne School (RHAHS) 506-7908 (RHAHS W Joan F. Sparkman Alternative Ee Center- SAEC7 Temecula Valley Charter School 294-6775" Temecula Preparatory School (Charter School) 926-6776` *Cell for Information District Admintstratlon District Administration Center (DO) 676-2661 Transportation (MOT) 695-7110 Maintenance and Operations (MOT) 695-7115 2010-2011 Daily School Schedules Regular Day 7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. TEMECULA VALLEY unrrld sauna restrict Modified Day 7:30 a.m.-12:22 p.m. Rancho Vista High School Middle Schools 725 a.m. - 3:13 p.m. (flex schedule) .m. - .. pm (ContaGRVAg for a todrbedlaay-Ftex Schedules) (same dates as MI -LS dates) 8:15 a.m. - 2:45 p.m. 8:15 a.m. - 12:25 p.m. Elementary Schools AM Kindergarten PM Kindergarten 8:55 a.m. - 3:20 p.m. 8:55 a.m. 12:22 p.m. Extended DavJ<inder garterr: AES, RES, LES, NVES. RES. ES, TES. VES & VHES Charter Schools 11:53 a.m. 3:20 p.m. 8:55 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 8:55 a.m. - 11:35 a.m. 8:55 a.m. - 2:10 p.m. (e#mzded day 10ntlergutes schools) 2:40 p.m. - 3:2u p.m. s "MHLS' ! Late Start Mondays 1 (see dates above) ▪ High School: ▪ 8:45am - I 2:30pm J 1 Middle School: 8:55 am. - 1:00 p.m. (extended) i 9:15am - 2:45pm Call School Call School Nicolas Valley Elementary School Schedule ATTENDANCE HOURS Kindergarten - 8:55 a.m. - 2:10 p.m. Grades 1-5 - 8:55 a.m. - 3:20 p.m. Modified Days - Grades K-5 Dismissal 1:00 p.m. DAILY SCHEDULE 8:50 Warning BeII 8:55 School Begins - MI Students 9:05 - 9:35 School -wide Interventions/Enrichment Block 10:45 - 10:55 Snack/Recess - Grades 1, 2, 3 11:15 - 12:00 Lunch - Kindergarten 11:45 - 12:30 Lunch - Grade 5 12:05 - 12:50 Lunch - Grade 4 12:25 - 1:10 12:45 - 1:30 1:10 - 1:55 2:00 - 2:10 2:10 3:20 Lunch - Grade 1 Lunch - Grade 2 Lunch - Grade 3 Snack/Recess - Grades 4,5 Dismissal - Kindergarten Students Dismissal - 1st -5th Grade Students MODIFIED DAY Recess 10:45 - 10:55 12:50 -- 1:00 Lunch 11:00 - 11:30 11:30 - 12:00 11:45 - 12:15 12:00-12:30 12:15 - 12:45 12:30 -1:00 Snack/Recess -- Grades 1, 2, 3 Snack/Recess - Grades 4, 5 Kindergarten Gracie 5 Grade 4 Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 RAINY DAY/HOT DAY Lunch 11:15 - 11:45 11:30 -12:00 12:05 - 12:35 12:20 - 12:50 12:40 -1:10 12:55 - 1:25 Kindergarten Grade 5 Grade 4 Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Home About Us Connect Coming Up... Missions Youth Group Contact Us Service Times You Are Here » Home \ About Us \ Service Times Join us for either one of our Worship Services: 9:00am - Contemporary - children join adults for the first part of service and then dismissed to theft classe! 10:30am - Traditional - children go directly to their classes in the Youth Center. Junior High Students and 1 except for the first Sunday of the month when they join everyone for Communion. Copyright 2010, Grace Presbyterian Church (PCUSA) Temecula, CA 1 (951) 695-1913 Powerec httpi/www,gracepreschurch.netJcontent.cfm?id=293 8/26/2010 search • Home • About Us» • Ministries» • Media» • About Us » • Our Service Times Parents welcome! "Children are given to parents?' I've said it before and I'll say it again and again. In fact, I try to -preach' • to them the basic idea that if they are not right with their parents, they are certainly not right with their God! That said, I want it to Read More » Latest Slog Posts • Parents welcome! • Further Discussion: the Temecula Mosque and Islam • Another view of some camphQ otos • Pictures and Videos from Camp • New Youth Series Post Archives Select Month Our Service Times Sunday http://www.cbctemecula.org/about usiservice-times 8/30/2010 rta:• �. - Adult Bible Classes 10:00 AM Children's Sunday School 10:00 AM Morning Service 11:00 AM Children's Church 11:00 AM Evening Service 6:00 PM Wednesdays Master's Club Children's Ministry 7:00 PM Evening Service 7:00 PM Loving nursery care provided by trained workers for all services About Us • Home • About Us o Pastor's Notes o Are You Sure About Heaven? o Our Service Times o How to Find Us o Our Staff o What We Believe o Upcoming Events o Contact • Ministries o Bus Ministry o Children's Ministries ■ Sunday School ■ Master's Club o Youth Ministry a Announcements • Bro. Ryan's Notes o Adult Bible Classes N Youth Ministry ■ Merry Hearts • Lively Stones • Fellowship Class • Ambassadors o Music Ministry a Missions o Men's Ministry o Ladies' Ministry http://www.cbctemecula.org/about us/service-tunes 8/30/2010 ',raw r rqy, y bW# Vaa.ia vwi. ... Vlii./v µlLi till t If V.Aa_ 1,/.!i 7 {Vv 1 itzst.., A 446V J VA T o Outreach o Reformers Unanimous o Jail Ministry o Construction Ministry o Upcoming Events • Media o Videos o Pictures WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM Y4 • Home • About Us • Ministries • Media Copyright 0 2010 Calvary Baptist Church: Temecula, CA - All Rights Reserved CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH 31087 Nicolas Rd. Temecula, CA 92591 Pastor Wm. Rench (951) 676-8700 Quick Contact Form Name Email Message http://www.cbctemecula.org/about us/service-times 8/30/2010 ICTV Opening Day Phase 1 opening date 3 years from issuance of grading plan permit Phase 11 opening date 4 years from opening of Phase 1 ICTV Schedule Monday Thru Thursday:5:30 am -6:00 am and 8.30 pm -9:15 pm Friday: 12:15 pm -2:45 pm Friday: 7:00 pm -10:00 pm Saturday (Last week of the month): 7:00 pm -10:00 pm Sunday School: 9:00 am -1:00 pm APPENDIX C Intersection Level of Service Worksheets Existing Conditions KOA Corporation November 2010 -EAQij:.:(,ig.6.6AVMM:*SIRAF-#qiaIMKK.MNVifeakdatO22tar:.7i.itrVPWeP-NPETRRPttr HCM Volume to Capacity ratio ...#00-mmegaga.'4.r Ex Friday 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility k. 4\ /0. \ Lane Configurations - -19-00 1900 19 VI 44 1900 VI 0 - 1900 r '124-4101at'L In ideal z-- -1900 1900 1 uuu 1900 1900 1900 1900 Lane Util. Factor 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 0.91 Rialkterralz.- gYq Fl Pt: 1.11 Ari 0 r 721111Palk; ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 6 "Slie,"g ,4-S.AWVi,f: 116V-t.,:riftrr' Flt Protected 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1'4. ire Fit Permitted *1161k1.0.4cf ,,,a,#:41:14.414.4.1691,10WRIOW4540;41yEettaintlargRANgtillgi ,s7.6 - • 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 g IM104100-5, At4-6" ° - Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.94 0.94 0.94 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 litafi&-42,44ingti.q41,,F 0 0 116 0 7 RTOR Reduction (vph) WeajViP'Allige Conti. Peds. (Mr) Protected Phases OtiiAt'ARNAIW Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated gIC Ratio RAT(11.0K103,10.,:. 711. - Vehicle Extension (s) 164 41,76 319 Fv- e e MRSiSTM , r - 4 9.5 28.5 0.05 0.19 20.7 13.9 32.9 20.1 ttx.• 20.7 51.2 13.9 20.1 0.13 0.08 0.23 0.13 0.13 0.37 0.08 0.13 i,t,,,---- tap, • ...,0 50.6 0.36 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 1.5 1.5 :62 4.0 vls Ratio Prot 0.04 0.17 - - vlc Ratio ROP-14.711.,v.cv Progression Factor ‘k Aft:4- Delay (s) Approach Delay (s) 0.84 1.00 90.6 0.04 c0.07 c0.21 0.90 0.32 0.89 0.92 Aftte,*.lciTrattivi-401e: '"r'?.?":"-*TVIIIP-ANE..k 2.16 0.95 0.86 9.67 1.55 0.85 kvi; ige4r7 "ay- ,,A; c0.28 0.13 c0.32 0.06 0.20 0.31 1.00 65.5 1.00 51.9 1.00 1.00 85.6 65.5 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 t,"1,14,r 594.9 86.1 43.2 68.0 316.2 42.9 66.0 297.2 53.8 127.4 VAPP•WitAt-letelVIWW-VgaIri,t4 nor ta*F"g Intersection Capacity Utilization 1.04 0W/4T-re 94.1% ICU Level of Service At-litoRt.geNr0:7412,14,,,Fet- Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 Ex Friday 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations YAMS/Cab ;,Y Ideal Flow (vphpl) Teo g �-�.�:���� Lane Util. Factor Flpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected Flt Permitted 6_4 :irifol* --► %V 1900 1.00 1.00 0.95 1900 1900 1.00 • f "i ++t 1900 1900y 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 0.97 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 • ANA' WAttarklati,r,V.". 1121PiggagNONC •,• 0.95 k1 1.00 0.95 1.00 .�1.00 .5. 0.951 1.00ply +T., ��,:....«e.001S! ` 1p4 �"fs:sv..b•, 'c. br'31.'-'�5n.,2d�'xk 0.95 1:00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0,x°3 Peak -hour factor, PHF 44-1k1034,41400-1*. 4 RTOR Reduction (vph) Conf. Peds. (#!hr) 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.72 0.72 0.72 IMPAIM 10 0 0 0 t� .- 287 fi 0.82 0.82 t 44 m `� 0.82 0.88 226 295 0 173 169 0.88 0.88 630 Protected Phases Actuated Green, G ( Actuated glC Ratio 4i. } bf 4f.16X ;tea Vehicle Extension is) 25.0 39.0 0.13 0.21 • 1.5 • gf 2.0 30.0 44.0 W.412L, 0.16 0.24 1.5 �.w 2.0 44.0 16.1 50.0 0.24 0.08 2.0 2.0 50.0 35.0 68.9 0.27 0.27 0.19 4.0 4.0 2.0 0.38 4.0 vis Ratio Prot v/c Ratio Progression Factor Delay (s) 0.14 c0.27 c0.17 0.05 1.13 1.28 1.10 0.22 0.27 1.00 1.00 172.1 215.0 1-i O ; r a"� Approach Delay (s) 199.1 106.8 1.00 1.00 Y6 0.07 c0.43 0.89 1.00 1.00 Witt c0.22 1.56 0.75 1.18 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.31 0.80 1.00 141.8 52.7 53.6 123.6 319.7 67.5 179.2 50.0 272.9 77.2 • NCM Volume to Capacity ratio Se. Intersection Capacity Utilization Critical Lane Group 1.39 124.4% t_ �� c "^k'w ? max." sx>" '�. ICU Level of Service KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 Ex Friday 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd ICTV Religious Facility f -1* se" Lane Configurations +13 ti) MtMfltfdatiigai,, - ' ''''''.:i' • 30 7_,:.,,..A•LIORIN .,,.... Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 VtVLWittitgala%ILiltctagttOiMM*Nakaaadkagfa.tglnrgMoaa Lane Util. Factor 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 r0- :'''''-iik-7-rVer 4-1310,1Lielignil. jgVAM"tOaj,n:"":ViSktaigr' 4 VIINS-Vati , Flpb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 ROISSB.3M,SOEOIWgAttked,OPPMPKSMOBNITM,tangi ..,„3101grala Flt Protected 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 taglagalebRIONEMMIntat I8q5MADVAPA52401C,AgialViCatingigik4ii Flt Permitted 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.22 1.00 0.75 1.00 Peak -hour factor, PI -IF 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.53 0.53 0.53 •M`-` ir&s iirrARAIS 0 4 0 0 6 0 0 9 0 0 301 toe- . Tat RTOR Reduction (vph) 4 -At, colej Confl. Peds. (#/hr) -4114: t'Ok. 11 1 14 81. Protected Phases n •-• VI'In.SMNie Actuated Green, G (s) WrgliaratMAPRI4 1 6 .5 ;:11**-Oriti,VASMIntatift!..' Ve44 8 25.2 41.0 3.6 19.4 25.5 25.5 25.5 25.5 ,N.41-- wwww„2,.A...4-Agtt•6_,f, Actuated g/C Ratio 01.1 '; • 0.26 0.45 0.01 0.20 Cr-ONRiateplitz4,44a -4V44.,"`Ar-aw,.„W-wei:Aptv-' WCg'ffit--WO'Wftfetfl-”NVzi 4 £r6i147. Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 4.0 1.5 4.0 2.0 2M 2.0 2.0 0.27 0.27 0.27_ 0.27 -- 41 ff '7q.W? 4;6- v'WMstTec.., 1,411:-Y5 Via-0,0AVZOWV-4:1,W41-3 vis Ratio Prot c0.20 0.24 0.02 c0.13 0.00 0. vlc Ratio 0.78 0.52 2.54 0.66 0.63 0.02 0.23 0.34 VSM010-""7'--"'I'nik:4*Iatigattfle'SINfiata:13.:74.7Wiskitrl'2i3i4LI-- Progression Factor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 rji Delay (s) 35.8 17.0 915.1 33.7 34.9 22.7 V44'&4'4:1-11, fAVZ 1.00 1.00 24.1 25.0 krgitAkatzit-iVi*Okit.:46iAigitibiks.45Z4efiNittavirAN:Kv'414-V-ZNPIthAPAZIO;$;- W1.5' Approach Delay (s) 22.7 7dit'Dt.WU ;2.gPtitt44:153 92.4 32.5 24.9 6-IMMIWillit-kOLLR-PL-SiYAVIW4iiPiTati-A4M-64Zal0014; HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.69 Intersection Capacity Utilization �im: Critical Lane Group rkigife4,-; 40#4 86.5% ICU Level of Service •5•••,--•,,,.. • . . - •r, "NA., KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 3 Ex Friday 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations Sign Control Free Free Stop `+'P -s. r,g4 M Yip . , .,.v��'�C��:;s�n..r.._.._ ..x -sem. Peak Hour Factor Pedestrians Lam tti N f, Walking Speed (ft/s) � � -�.,a;� wr 4 C i it •� Right turn flare (veh) 0.78 0.78 0.90 0.90 0.42 0.42 Median storage veh .°.10=r a�. pX, platoon unblocked vC1, stage 1 conf vol vCu, unblocked vol tC, 2 stage (s) p0 queue free% Volume Left OROI cSH E 744 100 Mc"' y ee; 1274. 744 100 100 mss' S .,`ri'., a w: kvt.'ftrr T^�� Queue Length 95th (ft) 1700 873 0 1700 Lane LOS z � Yom•_; • 411. ;01 - Approach LOS Average Delay Analysis Period (m n 0.0 Vair KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 4 Ex Friday 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln Lane Configurations Volume (vph) Hourly flow rate (vph) Volume Total (vph) Olt kom-,7 Volume Right (vph) Departure Headway Capacity (veh/h) Approach Delay (s) 4 ICTV Religious Facility k. 4\ 97 59 39 TiM 120 73 48 120 121 3 v7:: .�. r e .e.:ua3t s�._ _ .A,,.'.x>- w- 'e 48 0 178 7 0 138 s) 6.5 5.7 6.4 5.5 6.4 6.4 5.3 9 73 157 t �l® 10 83 1-78 33 8 6 145 39 10 7 171 16 117 19 138 10 261 56 171 156 526 598 527 628 513 527 634 9.4 HCM Level of Service 8 Analysis Period 4' r14S5"h y mi 15 flISAMIESi 10.1 9.9 • „max" KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 5 Ex Sun 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations VI ft 'Pi/i +ft ++4 rAttertiiMPAMALAW519Wif-,ANSW:4.--4P4 Arg -'0$01"410M1...„, Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1904 1900 -1900 1900- 1900 - -1900- -1'904 1900 1900 1900 1900 iMVSMIVII.graggZi41eatf„kdatbaCKVMFVA104.tlg§ela•Ark0.AA Lane Util. Factor 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 0.91 VIMOLS.It"-"SONNIONINKANgralt 'atggtftqPgkq:-glatlgCaVf2 Flpb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4: 1--z1-WDRVIAW604,41.096,111,g9MA:1PMA, 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 'Fit :Z*146?idril!l0r Jr 91:991I'l 6 1.00 0.95 'tor' tanski;- iitiMieWtilliaalliMitgAgtOOMMitit4.1414-MISA4fn Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.84 0.84 0.84 0.87 0.87 0.87 0.98 0.98 0.98 0.89 0.89 0.89 'r.?.,:eakitAthz-14.4407:Mki,i,"41#1,-A, AtagAta IA* ' RTOR Reduction (vph) 0 0 208 0 0 324 FltProtected 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 0 186 .7t=t1 4 • 0 7 0 11 'Protected Phases ' 7 4 5 3 8 1 5 2 3 StetiatriW7 IlAyUlaiINIBMASNOISS.LvatII - 9.2 20.7 10.2 12.7 24.2 20.5 10.2 35.2 12.7 20.5 45.5 0.06 0.17 0.07 0.09 0.20 0.16 0.07 0.30 0.09 0.16 0.40 Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated gIC Ratio k-47arafnie-123 Vehicle Extension (s) 0.05 c0.14 0.01 c0.08 c0.10 0.08 0.05 0.16 0.01 c0.18 c0.29 - - ‘';A%Ve.t.d'A:',, ge-R:AVE.4.*Wf.,,'2§n,A.WAtii5rf .;Tr.k0-..05,NA'att.°,0,t;211,4MVZ.,07,:ft,1-;-CW'kl 0.79 0.87 0.14 0.85 0.52 0.49 0.81 0.52 0.13 1.07 0.74 '-10:24-,--Afit: ''. ' ''''''''‘gOithlittinakkititMailt: litar--.061...rja0#1024i44,MAKAIIV2-141,A14-'' Progression Factor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 arcar434.040.0Wr*, • 1.5 4.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 2.0 1.5 Ids Ratio Prot vlc Ratio Delay (s) Approach Delay (s) Unkagliltlag 67.5 56.5 47.2 65.6 38.7 41.2 67.3 31.4 44.9 103.1 29.2 - 56.2 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.88 - A 137'404%. os LISIda,7,45V-1-517. ,giaiSVaTa-aa4 75.7% ICU Level of Service 7 - VIEU 4;74 g RA VA U-A,74V17C1 igaViagatWM t4g4 Z‘A--1-1 46.4 stalocz - 39.4 50.5 "r.,IrPc-t.k4 ;N4 Intersection Capacity Utilization_ aftga."- Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio Intersection Capacity Utilization Ex Sun 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICN Religious Facility Lane Configurations Ideal Flow (vphpl) Lane Utii. Factor Flpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected ftif in 44 $9, 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 . ?, .,sr. Via:+.5E ,YJ 4g� 6 ta.7c..sI -Ii�1„ iC.r , 1.00 1.00 0.97 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 0.91_1 . > } y. 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 6`. %r,,. F„..r rn'v. ; ,3.--...$d•a.. �. - ,",,,-..-4 "`...U�ABit?�, �azl�_ 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 Flt Permitted 0.95 arJflitlititVIV 1.00 1V 5 #' 1 ©5 5th" .�. ..;�., ...,. sr �._ :��. .., •.r,+y4.,r�,�,. � . r3 ic�'�. 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 feWititkVIOMINKAISEAMP Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.67 0.67 0.67 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.88 0.88 0.88 �f'� V1fP tlhd $ RTOR Reduction (vph) 0 18 Ailtelritinealtr aS3s. Confl. Peds. (#Ihr) yy 109 0 0 Protected Phases 3 Actuated Green, G (s) 25.2 40.7 . sr 26.3 41.8 41.8 7.6 47.4 47.4 28.8 Actuated gIC Ratio 0.14 0.23 0.14 0.24 0.24 0.03 0.28 0.28 FI.�' i%': ..Y.-�x�.-a'...Ic.3.v,.:Lv'ims i3�i�:�P� ' �Eb 4t::"•� Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 2.0 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 0.03 c0.23 vis Ratio Prot vfc Ratio q-se Progression Factor Delay (s) Liu{..... _. 0.01 0.01 c015 0.01 0.05 0.04 ... .. 1.00 0.03 0. 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Wir 11 0 92 0 83 0 29 S£k` 3 yam: 3 G4e. J .+t` r" q ]_ tf.F•-.;.;.- 'i�"`� '.'l.'�ix H . ~�"ZG'i�y6 ',ry1:��° $ ,� . ':c' ,.ve5>r �t r"� �« .e`_ 'Y-y.� ��.S'�"eew�;�� X�b ����'.;3F���� 60.8 47.9 109.9 46.8 47.7 173.1 59.5 46.4 Approach Delay (s) 51.5 ft6Ti. ):4,: f .-r- : mo i 93.3 61.1 101 68.6 0.16 0.41 2.0 4.0 c016 0.28 0.98 1.00 affS 0.69 1.00 115.3 40.4 52.6 • Critical Lane Group 0.65 86.7% ICU Level of Service V KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 Ex Sun 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd ICTV Religious Facility 1 4- Lane Configurations 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 \* 4, Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 TAWAMENNittSOMMEPJUSIOINDM:ar, * 0174WW1141,40.§.4": -4,: Lane Util. Factor 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 . . !, ,-"rd- :-.,+:... . ' .*-=,L ,.4,,,,,-,1.. •,..,.---.:,,,A;,,...r' 'lay, ..'., -, ..,:---, -0 t 0 . : t 0 ,;• ..„.z...,- , 4.: - ..,..,,),R4 :, 04 it . ,:4;:g Le, 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 w WOMINNitakwoh'inteivairiotervamiwatoolgwoor -„,,*,_ ,7470:por • &we:0 ,a.e,ftaitz4.,:i4,,, ,hogg„,..:, ,:o,a,',v,,-&,.,..,,,,m,, 4,:p.: iw,g-,.., ',.. V•az,., r.,10;.! '.gr'.,MilkIlf Flt Protected Flpb, ped/bikes 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 RE. • %..itgAtiktiteMMOAP5a,ViintataategliVAZ4-i.T.: kg.F4.= Fit Permitted 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.68 1.00 0.76 1.00 Jima 4:i; :*:+4,z441,-.1.444-4,;:;:zoskosimmatitit.ototkm, Peak -hour factor, PH F ,AAtititOttil,71474.-3.4 RTOR Reduction (vph) „.. Amigozo Confl. Peds. (hr) DIA-AMAYg Protected Phases kaltak3...* OhONlitaci: Actuated Green, G (s) r.11 -4,..110-.7P114104",V. ,••'' -,:g01.4 4530,41.4'N',V* ... .4 ..,•-4 ;,,.•x -&-w.; , -- -• -... Actuated g/C Ratio 0.05 0.28 0.06 0.28 0.15 0.15 -4.i.,•0,----- .•0,:,,,-.4,..-y 1Iip 4.0 2.0 0.88 0.88 0.88 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.71 0.71 0.71 2 igengtZ 0 0.88 0.88 0.88 0 93 cir 2 5.3 15.4 5 5.6 15.7 1; -1-itigt,-avr 9.7 9.7 EU? Ii-ircifits- Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 4.0 1.5 9.7 9.7 11' %.4-2.4.14K 0 5vv,14illw 2.0 ..41aEff•Ar.6•1:aiz4 Ws Ratio Prot 9/4;RN vlc Ratio Impelge. • e..L ro 0.05 0.09 c0.06 c0.12 liate '0414../Ar 1.07 0.42 iri4.9Me ' ';4 Progression Factor Delay (s) 1.02 0.31 1.00 1.00 120.5 1 3.0 1.00 1.00 128.0 13.4 0.00 0.25 0.00 1.00 1.00 17.0 1 6.2 0.01 • .u.TWk&A.i.{244•Vh$ 0.09 0.09 1"4:1,,W4P.A.4f8L44-4,V,, 1.00 1.00 16.4 Approach Delay (s) 38.0 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 37.2 17.0 16.4 7'4_'AP"12. i'ATttli&O 0.32 #0,61-114440,11091-ent ; • - F4,g- Intersection Capacity Utilization_ 10-aftWIMIN5144-0? -3/4...tvtrgsk, 42.7% Critical Lane Group ICU Level of Service A wt-t- KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 3 Ex Sun 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri ICTV Religious Facility — - \ Lane Configurations T+4 f Sign Control Free Free Stop • .V.Aft4tv4-.. Peak Hour Factor Pedestrians ka . - . 0.97 0.97 0.98 0.98 0.62 0.62 • 1:45rfelf.igV,PV'''w;''''A2P'":'ojra''i•',''A'-o-7:-4vWWW).4v4RiaV4. pi-lpirztki-aiNg..4.0E,.w:4i.z.*_,,,,,,,Kv-0.,..,.7,*,,„=, „., Walking Speed (Ws) _,,,,W;;,„!:,,,,,r:VZ.:,(q/.4iN.,,,,,,-7q;M,W:-1-.4;4,,1---;.,V.NR.",;.',...417F-7-74V-.:,,,V,M0±1,.V.,:W.:,,,N -,V;,.,A,,,,t,..0,-;:-.7*!,,,.07&L.,;;,,,,,,,,,,,,,-,5,,,,,a.M,,a.,1,-,ft Right tum flare (veh) ,0.141.14.44:46;i- 4,0'1 --'''' ‘,7411.* ',.,1,t,k,,V ' ".'-• - ' kolMar..., . .,-.10;:: ..0,„!,=':, ,. 24:42A4EVOMN,W_Slegt-M-,M1. 4.V. -Z'!.'4,t Median storage veh ' ininSIVA ' ., .:.., -:,..,R.rgL,-7.,..,ztw...tv.,-mz pX, platoon unblocked .4110016 :46 t~. Exrci , . rkV:;,° _Are.}.,,,zSiarxrif,.:exv vC1, stage 1 cont vol r4-1;"3/41AleV,M vCu, unblocked vol •Ve .•:?4,?.‘• tC, 2 stage (s) p0 queue free % 343 • -2- ., • 7 ° id rr: rararirr„raef r'N,r14,,,ty.,1•4 474 613 329 airgr„...Ea 99 100 7-zso 7; • VpjagfAdi_Q:XAiq.iek;,P-a-M,Vbtt*taiPj-W-gTAttfRliXPI'trrg,-ZtiVret4tq.irtWrXPttgVi5 0 0 5 Volume Left oSH .,;4101,.[Ti.14ii.GaWOra, N-4'114 —•4 Queue Length 95th (ft) Lane LOS 411%.7.5V"' 4,0-014K k e .wzr. 1700 1227 459 g - A-4 •,g 500, -4-4, ',4'444%-1Z0*-- Itt!A161;70Avegpyitc*L.T,;,44.fttaskthg-Macgilentk-4-44a.VA,r14,4 Approach LOS : 1 - Average Delay -P'''._14,:'-'41°0-A-71041911.4011074- Analysis Period (min ' 0. 7 VrY 15 ;i'AZ-SaV .-lxvilti4-0-'Itate-W71;; AVIPM--,471f-Z..P3:44,%****;E*VEVt: 4 = • r KOA Corporation Synchro 7- Report Page 4 Ex Sun 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations` Pb :Ai' 6lj Ali '-� xy. J.., PI � . fi z _ _Nxr ? . �.. w L, favim ., Volume (vph) 28 43 16 A k t P Hourly flow rate (vph) Volume Total (vph) Volume Right (vph) Mittcps i^ Departure Headway (s) Capacity (vehlh) Approach Delay (s) 34 52 20 34 72 rrF 12 12 195 401402, 20 0 ?tSit 6.0 5.3 5.9 bac 569 646 582 7.8 8.4 90 18 73 122 28 42 149 80 122 9 0 73 44 ? iP 4.9 5.6 5.8 4.7 698 604 588 9.0 8.6 725 54 149 7 73 • ^.x -�,.To� ,��, Vis= �v _ g._,t .�.. y.sfi .,5��`-s �''ir .��s'�.`+.`�.% �" �w;*s r.,,•-.a;4� HCM Level of Service Analysis Period Txa. 15 twg a KOA Corporation Synchro 7 e Report Page 5 APPENDIX D Intersection Level of Service Worksheets Opening Year Conditions KOA Corporation November 2010 j Ex +Amb Fri 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd 1CTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations VI 4+ r • 11) 44 if 1i) +14 r 'ffil to natt,t ,..• 7IN.MT;SiMi-4'Me6:AVMISIEM,fait41_VitgiMMMM€1RRINSVEdfg Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 0.91 Flpb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 t -,„ --:.,:,.:-§,„:4:w.,ord-mqgligF4tpf-Axr,argiipp.S1pgqtlt--Mgkt-VakPrjtrg”la,,,-.,''Lr c't4i c.%.-4,--;%;,:'!,a0af.,: ,11.&e4A.W0-4Alt.k.,..,,.....:,..e--21DAL :gfil, - , • ' n.E.---ft.if .'3Zt-.11.5A-.- ,4Z4g.' ...,1&,;.m.". k&t.M7-. - 4;.'.3:.2:= ' faft.13t'-1,-:! Flt Protected 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 ':',,Lqtf.ZVSaaaVatMIXMMttdntnitaaaglz:an 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 Lane UtiI. Factor 11.4V - Fit Permitted 4r4,:a'S Peak -hour factor, PH F 4(;-;j1113- . RTOR Reduction (vph) .cii.li.647S24.0610° "5*Wit, .W. . ;AIX"."` .azif:To...- °Vr/a- • ,:sei • 333 201.r.r,? 3 ;'-44.1 §.! 0.94 0.94 0.94 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 .taTifir.A.M.P.W. ;0' :iiikisks„,$1,AftEtegt-,IIIRtg 0 4 ailieWitfean? 163 316 Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 04:240tatit Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) 9.9 29.3 Actuated g!C Ratio 1 kr: 22.0 14.5 33.9 20.0 22.0 52.8 14.5 20.0 50.8 ta • " -•frk r3C,"",-Vp.33; , EIRMS.* - 0.09 0.23 0.13 0.14 0.37 0.09 0.13 0.36 -13. 446ZIOS6 17%33...3: F,3,3‘33 116 0.90 ""'• • VAT Vehicle Extension (s) 0.05 0.20 0.14 *AP 1.5 2.0 4 r vtat . Ids Ratio Prot 0.04 0.18 0.86 0.94 vlc Ratio Progression Factor Delay (s) Approach Delay (s) 1.5 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 Yq . 7,,fr, latiAr'PAir'Mal= . ,,,i, rt wt. 0.y.ve.ppf.,, At1-4,nirg , r,4•,-4--34 -..7.--Aq ..t-' 0.05 00.08 00.22 00.31 ' 0.14 -00 34 .„ ___,_, ,,,,,,,,,x,,,,..,..„., --,-..?,,y,-,./..,•::::: -,ida • WIN- ..-3W-fe.i'- A...e.., ,', ..3-, • ^ ''.' %, ''''"3, 0.97 2.46 0.96 0.91 1.00 1.00 0.06 0.21 0.33 0.37 0.91 0.74 1.69 0.92 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 A4F- - s• a - 93.0 73.8 52.8 91.0 75.0 732.3 88.4 46.9 76.2 380.0 49.4 71.7 361.2 57.7 151.6 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 11,04,,72Wki".4-WE g±1,414r 98.3%, ICU Level of Service 1.12 '.&-11•4;. : Intersection Capacity Utilization c Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 - • . . ... • • • Ex +Amb Fri 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations VI " +ft r1 +4$ ., ' „ .....4tr4 , , .. . ISal'ik-- 12561 371 .., , ..„.. Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1999 1900 1900_-,,, 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 7994900-Top19._.9,mkzMVg%at*fAk_APMAtttCtM„ Lane Util. Factor 1.00 1.00 0.97 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 0.91 44. 7.30,retatt! _607: Flpb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 rar'4k Flt Protected 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 it_rikAggeeli., ` 42ISi4.-.._10 .,.4b#,Aktil N1* -§1 - 4itialle : :VIORIVO- Flt Permitted 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 .. W4r1y4 ,..411Eriymi1805 g161 -42L.,:' ..':''',vilatelanktefi-;:giif ti''41§titgl*VOM!-1 Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.72 0.72 0.72 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.88 0.88 0.88 '1,10A(N-OPZisz:::-4tieltriMgargUtt: Itele-Strhi:Fri"-ie4.414-:_',40144Witti.P,'' At, RTOR Reduction (vph) 0 10 0 0 0 240 0 0 173 g,...., ,.:,.a,--4„1tow!:. :,„...o.i.v.k.,-4-4, , -D,i4yi - Conti. Peds. (#/hr) 287 295 169 630 Protected Phases tatiO11016$A Actuated Green, G (s) 25.0 39.0 ianOrattin. :784, 3 8 "pm Actuated 9IC Ratio 0.13 0.21 eJ_(.4argitif P.1,234, 1.5 2.0 Vehicle Extension (s) • • 2 . . 30.0 44.0 44.0 16.8 50.0 50.0 e 0.16 0.24 0.24 0.08 0.27 0.27 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 35.0 68.2 0.19 0.38 2.0 4.0 vis Ratio Prot .5313 vtv,ank, , vlc Ratio Progression Factor n:-10 % 0.15 c0.28 c0.18 0.05 0.07 c0.45 go 0).-, -,..04- ' i, .-•;-1 ,..A.---A---7,,',,jii.,!..e.-,:v_.7,,.:-5.i.141.LIT,ffcs,_".,.-4,..,-1,,,AVI.a.1:-.7 .... :.---„,,-.-,,,- ,..... el .4.3`C: hig-37.,g:--,6: .:•'' .... V%-4-'' - '...2.t.. 1.19 1.36 1.17 0.23 0.29 0.89 1.66 046rAletAikkArdfle Delay (s) Approach Delay (s) 228.4 121.7 PUgligaMfa6V-rftWAiSsal.-gfitAtittgeti,.W4%:A:4:550#3r-iajiiicen-lE-Vti-a. 1.06-"1.00 1.00 1.00 -1.00 1.00 1.00 -44.1k-Asle5j 197.0 246.9 166.1 52.9 53.8 120.7 361.6 c0.23 0.33 0.83 1.26 0.86 • 1.00 1.00 1.00 75.4 207.2 53.6 P..in-ttitk-Z443,1Air4Z;latiItAWS 307.8 86.0 ;*'79&b.49Tg3iiltki0fi.tgAV-Vifliibti.gfaTo*PAKOAII:bilr HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 1.48 Xr.T4711t..-14:014.gi°' - '•W tkAWM Intersection Capacity Utilization 128.4% liffilaPtag,010.2 c Critical Lane Group ICU Level of Service U .L VW. KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 }.-.7A41..)tei534:7Z6rniri•.'1:;Wr!ars*.P=4,4:.5:7Agrin, Approach Delay (s) 28.2 77.1 1 1 J . . .." ....• Ex +Amb Fri 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd ICTV Religious Facility C 4- 41\ Lane Configurations jft, "i Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 `°,.W.C.,••• 2:15Vdts-.11.1-AllIALAM-AW Lane Uti . Factor 1.00 0.95 • "§; Ac 44A44-aggilg011er 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 • - '••41'. . 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Flpb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4A434.4tatitattriattrVakSiStAttAVANSA Flt Protected 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 CirajZV''. {1V41411tWMIAMIAgatAt. Fit Permitted We: 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 364,161Miteat-IMMAir 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 laggatsle- 0.24 1.00 0.75 1.00 Tgi r40.:141 -f• re P•ktk76,2" Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.90 RTOR Reduction (vph) 0 1:WV,i,00,490,taRtliiikiat°-4104; Cod. Peds. (#/hr) 11 0.90 0.90 0.77 0.77 0:77 0.53 0.53 "eV 14 298 0.53 81 DtiR'0:i:;-,,3..r.s:51Ntinttejs!,,t4te 0°- :°,4,t6.-1;f,V$A4,91$.7.4:467.41,t4A4- tY*Ii,r4i14 Protected Phases 01' 51 014;46-"A4111I-Zt 110-0'" 7.4'4-kv4t414i114.,kAr---tv4, Actuated Green, G (s) 26.8 41.7 Actuated g/C Ratio 0.26 0.42 GEodirUAdthAct'44-1.13,4h,.voi Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 4.0 3.9 18.8 32.1 32.1 32.1 7•7 0.01 0.17 • `,Est..-t";'24/0'',4t; • ".±-s'- 1.5 4.0 0.32 0.32 2.0 2.0 32.1 0.32 0.32 2.0 2.0 -21('V'f-Fi'W,r4.-°:6116i):37:043.14*-0S \VI rAiket:1 40:$.1 C.314:ad . .444.k. ".ir• '44-",V4.0,5".W vis Ratio Prot v/c Ratio c0.22 c0.25 '71"..•hf:Vs' 0.84 0.60 1.83 0.79 0.02 c0.14 k.17, 0.01 0.11 j, 0.50 0.02 Progression Factor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.20 0.35 1.00 1.00 '7101 "k.K.. Vt'Pgra-VAVIR4.47,4Z114*4 40444-- WV-1ga Delay (s) 44.1 21.2 575.9 43.6 26.4 21.5 22.9 24.2 25.4 24.0 • HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.79 Intersection Capacity Utilization c Critical Lane Group 88.2% ICU Level of Service 4.7 47•44'7.-73. 441' ":047.1 47,7 rfo 74> KOA Corporation Synch ro 7 - Report Page 3 • • - • - _ - _ • . ..• .•- • - - - • -•-• • Ex +Arrib Fri 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Coiibri ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations ta, FreSt.op Sign Control Free Peak Hour Factor Pedestrians "e• 4v4.1-titlk amt -.11,..%. -Ph- • 0.78 0.78 0.90 0.90 0.42 0.42 :04f#AVA4Vgag:':' Walking Speed (ft/s) J -W -Aka' Right turn flare (veh ellititiSAbiTIOAT4--,!: Median storage veh) u1511'.001-11.RIKceit, pX, platoon unblocked r 4;167 4-Otti.:42itlz,ez,,y, vC1, stage 1 conf vol • - " 41.11-- 4- - vCu, unblocked vol tc,-2stage (s) • p0 queue free % aW121W61.0- MOS WV1-100:' 011 Z*1- t344911 441SWAVA2.:',Atvg" 1351 788 100 7V6it?I.V- • VtigX•4,:cr, :Se fp/ - , 4191"4 VAT' "Zt 788 • 'Ag"PelAtit 100 100 :viihWotgisk • Yrn • .44*-XieVarAMM. *'APSOIR: Volume Left cSH •••410,,, .qh•gr; 1700 840 1700 1-L-4 - Queue Length 95th (ft) €W6flifWAalf-MIA,o ikAgi,444044.04-' Lane LOS Approach LOS WA' ittr*OM,499k-gt!':-.A • "-'..6*-tv=f--- , • ,0 • •-•-• 14440 Vea ..15.444•00 4 4..• -k -1-,L Average Delay 5511:04-141,Alt*P.AbratakViald ° Analysis Period (min Nr-it*Ile-S*445:4, 4>g, 0.0 15 -A•44,fn KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 4 Ex +Amb Fri 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln 1CTV Religious Facility .#44 {4__ t d Lane Configurations WM!: A*:atkaiataiAr't,S'BtaaRtAIPUdVkEaAtktVMIOiaNakgittli Volume (vph) 103 63 41 10 77 166 35 8 6 154 17 124 Ohiati:AISEliiiii '-'41ZASOI litlitASEAMMaUe 4" ',z. - 084''''1'/' IG:SANZ:Vi Hourly flow rate (vph) 127 78 51 11 88 189 42 10 7 181 20 146 Volume Total (vph) 127 128 11 276 58 181 166 ,ve: Volume Right (vph) :1569; jahoof NAtr- - V- 4 -.1; '37x.gent 0 51 0 189 7 0 146 Departure Headway (s) 6.6 5.8 5.6 --------------- Capacity (veh/h) -0414171WX,W74'4‘.- Approach Delay (s) NNA-igraialbrig--4b 6.6 1 47 6.6 6.6 5.4 491, 517 586 518 616 499 519 9.7 \se 11.3 10.3 10.3 0, - • ' ;AZ' • 622 • FICM Level of Service Analysis Period (min) ••-••,,• -17 15 4,1 -", KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 5 �y�e i is .k.o � yvs:�Sr ,r. . igel ^' 4 ': FR.��.. �-m w�t�-�',:`.'r'�t._'F'i.���� �i �� HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.93 Ex + Amb Sun 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICN Religious Facility J Lane Configurations /111 ff ' r /111 ft 4:y :190�3a;5iy.rF; 8 '0{tk�2' 4 ► "`c4 0 1900w1900;1900190�a0 ,1900 rrait'ar�"-`J 1900 1900 1900 1900 Ideal Flow (vphpl) 190 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 0.91 Lane UK Factor Flpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected Fit Permitted akafi��7-- tem Vo ` up. 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 is 6 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1,00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 0 1.00 Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 0.84 0.84 0.84 0.87 0.87 0.87 0.98 0.98 0.98 0.89 0.89 0.89 by'''`A4131' ,,. v ' 131'. 220 0 320 196 4 0 11 �-d Protected Phases • p R.1-4,4401101%44, uM v i.. Va' Actuated Green, G (s) 9.7 22.3 Actuated gIC Ratio a Vehicle Extension (s) 0.06 0.17 1.5 2.0 10.7 13.4 26.0 20.3 0.07 1.5 0.09 0.20 1.5 2.0 0.1 10.7 38.5 13.4 20.3 48.1 5 0.07 0.32 0.09 1.5 1.5 • 4.0 1.5 0.15 0.40 1.5 4.0 vis Ratio Prot vic Ratio Progression Factor Delay (s) 0.05 c0.15 0.81 0.89 0.01 c0.08 c0.11 0.10 0.06 0.16 0.01 c0.19 c0.31 0.15 0.88 0.53 0.64 0.84 0.52 0.13 1.21 0.78 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1 .00 72.2 60.3 49.5 72.1 40.3 48.9 73.5 31.9 47.1 157.6 31.4 Approach Delay (s) 59.8 ry 51.7 41.1 67.9 • Intersection Capacity Utilization OMKAIRr°dnn .r,;.1 a te Critical Lane Group 78.5% ICU Level of Service KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 Ex + Amb Sun 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations •Aa��f Ideal Flow (vphpl) Lane Util. Factor Ffpb, ped/bikes ax Flt Protected Flt Permitted + +++Qy �fy1r '} ftp .. vf-P :.a.`_ �,' 6�' r.2+,17 i�•FLS" 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 5r -{,ate �' t! - 4gV 5ko• -5F @ 1.00 1.00 0.97 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 vAeriF 3 r a 0.91 1.00 1.00 , 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 q,oo 09 r -v��ti 0---60,,,--- i s� ' &� z€ 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 rillxtit]77 IA9lai4t48Ms c L1 - T . , Y 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 xv 0.95 Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.67 0.67 0.67 '�.:4rt�,iF"�r7..lY�B9'�`F��`�' �, �ia�. ,.x � 3 - • _ RTOR Reduction (vph) Conff. Peds. (#/hr) Protected Phases 19 k• 9 ).77 0.77 0.77 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.88 0.88 0.88 0 0 139 0 0 ��i't ok. Yom �n_ r"i-aSa' Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated gJC Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) 25.1 39.8_ 0.13 0.22 1.5 2.0 27.9 42.6 42.6 7.9 49.0 49.0 30.6 71.7 IMO " 514740% 0.15 0.24 0.24 0.03 0.28 0.28 0.17 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 0.42 4.0 *Pt ititaigPir.' vls Ratio Prot vlc Ratio Progression Factor Delay (s) 0.01 0.01 0.06 0.04 1.00 1.00 c0.15 0.01 41}- 0.03 c0.24 c0.17 0.30 1.02 0.03 0.11 0.94 0.88 0.32 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 yy 1.00 1.00 1.00 63.0 50.6 0.71 1.00 1.00 114.2 48.2 49.2 180.7 63.4 47.8 120.7 41.3 Approach Delay (s) 54.4 96.8 64.7 54.3 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio intersection Capacity Ufilizafion c Critical Lane Group 111 4 44"a 4 a pal; r WW 0.72 88.8% ICU Level of Service Anif Xz_ KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 Ex + Amb Sun 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd ICTV Religious Facility • Lane Configurations 44, 44, 'I I, iiIdeal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 .1900 1900 1900 1900 rr ' 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Lane Util. Factor r"." -g4 • - -'Vkk '.W;k4v.34,W!,44P' j*.eig90.tal.R.**,.4.47411040iftit. Rob, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 c-ive, tf-A-Sfit,=5-1-Av?"-ttlikt*W-liVegs-VP-'014ile'4 Flt Protected 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 _ 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.68 1.00 0.76 1.00 j. 4.1.1 Fit Permitted .`:,,0_,*.•e4-well-701,, Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.88 0.88 0.88 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.71 0.71 0.71 0.88 0.88 0.88 /14411501Pis,atifkA ARNi-gi4 -44,14LAm. RTOR Reduction (vph) ':L•i4':?'i'll'%f1115,,,gfMMqggg-Vgg-r-r"i-'Agetqfst9k4,-1= Confi. Peds. (#/hr) 0 0 (te-V-i-X6P 4 4--P64` 99 quanig4-ieiliVwiWk-ONV-Vapat,c.. ,-;44:616,13 Protected Phases '!ieiftr4settdigrfiz:P:tq*dia:iki.z.,::'i.rvkrstf_tm,; 74-iiitatiOgiigAVNe--ArgtaNg-0.441eAAAti,r*c404.11A Actuated Green, G (s) 5.5 15.9 5.8 16.2 4.01#419.10:ft44.-*-49:0U0174,14.kr, Actuated gIC Ratio 0.06 0.28 421,4 Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 4.0 --pagiste4, 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.7 'X',W"'',r '4AP' IiriEW:Ms'..eiZ''4U.:40r4'44V'tPa:WA... 0.06 0.29 DE -4.• 4:4kn 1.5 4.0 0.15 0.15 2.0 2.0 • • ••',3e1,,Pri:',d-1,..•.• 0.15 0.15 2.0 ..- 5.4 2.0 '40.(2-4-ffil4NOWA5MaktiV4:141M.en,'.4' V.:41 -100:2;?.- tejt; vis Ratio Prot 1,744-1,,t-:461.41-tt v/cRatio 0.06 0.09 c0.07 cO.13 1.02 0.32 tYtifti;A r41.1a° Progression Factor Delay (s) 1.00 1.00 117.5 13.1 1.07 0.43 1.00 1.00 127.4 13.5 0.27 0.00 11° 114 ,.4.4-A454s9WA.7 TV 4: 0.00 . 0.10 cot `42*;•=e•tr-...? m•4 1.00 1.00 17.5 16.5 0.01 0.09 • 1.00 1.00 16.8 16.8 Approach Delay (s) 37.4 37.2 17.4 16.8 t,.;-1•4`..Rtgi*ak.'1Hje,i'egalgete!..L.i?-ttWhVItarr.t=tat-lt-Sg4,.V1. HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.33 rs4AtitaVi44aNZARVAWMAti -:L;aftft11;r. Intersection Capacity Utilization 43.7% ICU Level of Service c Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 3 Ex+AmbSun 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations 4 Sign Control Free Free Stop Peak Hour Factor 0.97 0.97 0.98 0.98 0..62 0.62 Pedestrians Walking Speed (ftls) Right turn flare (veh) Median storage veh) pX, platoon unblocked vC1, stage 1 conf voi 4-43 1 e. , 498 4.:.rs t s7 vCu, unblocked vol IC, 2 stage (s) p0 queue free % 100 M a wfW • as s Y-4 gg&we-.. , 364 Volume Left cSH 1700 1206 437 650 • 99 MOW� p,, a , t va. Queue Length 95th (ft) Lane LOS Approach LOS AverageDelay 016171,:4-1,71VOcat 0.1 349 100 te_ Analysis Period (min) 15 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 4 j Ex + Amb Sun 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln ICN Religious Facility Lane Configurations Volume (vph) ci Hourly flow rate (vph) Volume Total (vph) Volume Right (vph) 30 46 37 • y 17 10 57 95 19 3 6 117 5 57 56 21 14 77 128 30 5 9 158 7 77 37 77 14 205 158 21 0 128 9 0 6.0 5.3 5.9 5.0 5.7 Departure Headway (s) Capacity (vehlh) ey)F Approach Delay (s) 562 7.9 veltkowfmr,Pt.ove 14-41 637 576 690 592 8.7 9.1 77 5.9 4.7 581 715 8.8 HCM Level of Service Analysis Period (min) 15 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 5 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Ex +Amb +Project Fri 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility t \.* Lane Configurations tri tt ++ r +++ 411, -1906 1900 1900 1900 1900 Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 'h41.4., jf&r Lane UV!. Factor ARe 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.9791 -r,a-qD:;k:VIIROS:t'i'--qii`;, '0=V -+-4TIA9etrci'da.V(.4 0.95 1.00 0. . . . . 97 091 100 097 0 qo:.AvsAgOrgft;:-ttfi.aikiditaelteoxfkba Flpb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 •1.00 1.00 Flt Protected 6r4 otfk. Flt Permitted -141,4UfrigkitatjaV4-10.410101.40 :1,12LitY '14 0.95 1.00 1.000.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 ttwerkitios.,44, tOISAVietriAl 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 .1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 41t MircViVratillt?9", ak. ,334' K.JCW- P rgi At Peak -hour factor, PHF 01E174; Ailf/T';t'''• RTOR Reduction (vph) Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 0.94 0.94 0.94 0.85 0.85 0.85 163 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 -0kg02,!Nvkiflok6::611.”042TiARAKIAIrti 0 316 113 ,*:atIM:1Vg•-ai#SXat-ta#Msti*?ieM,SMVR'ttg:-, Protected Phases rAf ti4 - --44. --;VANCIttegagtining-S,W-,r4;41,Qt•Sk,f• -.VV-e441"14.41,!- ... Actuated Green, G (s) 9.9 29.3 22.0 14.5 33.9 20.0 22.0 52.8 14.5 20.0 50.8 q-INAKAgain,-A4Siitia-faitt600 ' 404 0- tiAig.740:14.tt-24taletaigagtOik CarrOW "4:11,-;'‘-- 0.05 0.20 0.14 0.09 0.23 0.13 0.14 0.37 0.09 0.13 0.36 kAlgq.E1PrIrigOtal,*,...--***40:AR,I, Vehicle Extension Actuated glC Ratio (s) 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 :.16JT;M9;:tgt•gtlr-F.ktfiit4"rirt4*-•tkeqr;AMt't-a%**-a:XSAagV4AXP'et:VAZTMN:tttVg•S213WRVVta* 0.04 0.18 0.05 c0.08 c0.22 c0.31 0.14 c0.34 0.06 0.21 0.34 ' fo vls Ratio Prot vlc Ratio -4 ' - Wlif.-4,4.'- 1-1•Wit-UVAVP!,D21D7Cht,,X..s ''''';?::,:.:',WAVN-Vet 0.86 0.94 - 0.37 0.91 0.97 2.46 0.96 0.93 0.76 1.69 0.94 -00.C.ZO•fak-itzt'i-44aPreN,i7-"g-,*104V4440,1 t -1P•06?-*MAtaagagjigtitilkalvOi-i° 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Progression Factor re> rg,,5-1.pm7,141ift-;43s-htvm Delay (s) 93.0 73.8 52.8 91.0 75.0 732.3 88.4 49.8 79.0 380.0 52.8 ee4'7-4!•71t0ii4 Approach Delay (s) 71.7 361.2 59.7 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio Intersection Capacity Utilization 151.9 t7, i•ig! 1.13 " 0,41-1:ciAtqr*Ft4ir.g4t$4*--V4V-441-1(ke ••• 99.1% ICU Level of Service _ - • • , _ so, 1.11,-,4•5 • c Cdtical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 .. _ Ex +Amb +Project Fri 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility t 4/ Lane Configurations I + II' +++ rfte4 Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 11:-Ie..;;i4g§iti-if.t413-'611410PRIMPOr 1900 1.00 1.00 ' 097 1.00 1.00 toa 0.91 1.00 1:00 0.91 440-1442**414 Lane Util. Factor tr4,101g- Flpb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1101001.9.e.4 1.00 1.at. 991:99).90tiv,,,ni SWA-94fagiltirgiar,,ARIA- t; '''' -7ArMattn..*' ':aW.,::,k,-- ,, - •,,,a ._-4„,,.. •,,,L,.., , Flt Protected 0.95 1.00 ' er3--ArftotageMirittK, ,,t„,, 0.95 1.00 at e Fit Permitted 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 ; • . _ . , 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1z1,44-. Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.72 0.72 0.72 Ye.4*.jk RTOR Reduction (vph) Off-4-lectitbedeR* Conti. Peds. (#/hr) • - 10 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.88 0.88 0.88 AtAit.44A4T-AVSAV-W38. 254 195 ‘„4-, 4P4., p#Tark :4407. 287 295 169 630 Protected Phases i-1:401140akalAa.-*= d*.!- tl'AzOtk-, 50.0 50.0 35.0 68.2 Ac?'PT 4.4,1 otArretiFAMS Actuated Green, G (s) ..7"1 -111-1,4X2'4Afr Actuated 25.0 39.0 30.0 44.0 44.0 16.8 IC Ratio geiffinitiCt? .96 Vehicle Extension (s) 0.13 0.21 1.5 -n47,0 4'1^ 2.0 0.16 0.24 0.24 0.08 . „ . 1.5 -(44. 0.27 0.27 0.19 0.38 - .•41,17*,rt. '''k,-.Alkt; -WA ititteit''*"7:7).0W4 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 8:= “.4A-4.7" WA44141 :;-10%;-WhItg-,1V-4'); 6v;01045-44.jVc---LAWX-4A-Lt 7i2A0-4-1-ite c0.20 0.05 v/s Ratio Prot ;11.--: .1=16 ,4*-• vlc Ratio rAltikalt Progression Factor 0.15 c0.28 1.19 1.36 1.00 1.00 .:-,'!1-76*-0•04,0'11AltAt:1*At RtkatRIAN1164:ttia.:24Y; kr44:4K. =W4- : Delay (s) 0.07 c0.45 :4 0.89 0.89 1.66 0.93 1.30 0.86 1.27 0.23 0.31 • " Pg. fa, 44A. e0.24 0.33 /IA: -0, 47.4its, 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Approach Delay (s) 197.0 246.9 209.7 52.9 54.0 120.7 14j /41‘. 361.6 94.2 226.7 53.6 228.4 149.8 306.7 91.2 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 1.51 i''''-';it',7)4S-I-NOr'ILKti-',4W):9::'1;74-;5,40.--tikg-.,41-.:Ult,?!@kz,r--, 4'4 - ttd-t*V-0-0k5-Atilkiip, 2.-‘„,..-',,.-,.S..t... ; sAt' - • . Intersection Capacity Utilization 130.4% ECU Level of Service .„...„H c Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 Ex +Amb +Project Fri 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations Ideal Flow (vphpl) Lane Util. Factor Ff pb, ped/bikes r. Flt Protected p Flt Permitted J +t "1 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 rix _ti ' `i" MA-. 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 e2 1 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.23 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.75 1.00 gikS at Peak -hour factor, PHF ‘.111c RTOR Reduction (vph) Dai Confl. Peds. (#Ihr) 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.90 0.90 0.90 ;liaf Bet 11 4 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.53 0.53 0.53 14 301 81 Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated g1C Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) 25.1 0.24 1.5 43.8 0.43 4.0 • 3.9 22.6 0.01 1.5 0.21 4.0 47. 32.1 32.1 0.31 0.31 2.0 2.0 329 32.9 0.31 0.31 2.0 2.0 vls Ratio Prot vlc Ratio Progression Factor Delay (s) c0.22 0.27 0.92 0.62 1.00 1.00 0.02 c0.15 .94 0.74 1.00 1 -�...};'•s'�� �� ;�--ria=,.:.�,°. ti�� ��_"�� K ti �i lr� .ki �ir"r`-s`f �: = ca1� z {s ��.+,"k.,..: "•�,*;cKx" .am..'.�. .u.:t,.i:v--��.-i�..'�r..s:.� _4 t�-. -„�. +a.:i�'-�-. e,8. �..w_.:a- :.a'� kx Approach Delay (s) 71.9 60.5 21.5 .00 628.8 38.7 v_s at 0.01 0.54 0.02 1.00 1 .00 28.8 22.4 0.11 0.21 0.35 1.00 1.00 23.9 25.2 32.7 27.5 25.0 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio Intersection Capacity Utilization Critical Lane Group 0.71 89.8% ICU Level of Service wzo KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 3 Ex +Amb +Project Fri 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurelions t4. 4 V veritqwk - Free Sign Control Peak Hour Factor Pedestrians 3-400 Walking Speed (ftls) Right turn flare (veh) h.141reginiKACOM,N Free Stop 0.78 0.78 0.90 0.90 0.42 0.42 Median storage veh) OpirOnaiiiiiS it -2$ ' pX, platoon unblocked vC1, stage 1 confvol vCu, unblocked vol k4ieftilgR-24,040,14*0 tC, 2 stage (s) oi:ag.,020:141.-5attek- p0 queue free % Volume Left cSH " .00 _WA V-Pe'e'T,741M-: abagiigiggggePKW • vfktlw ----ASTAWMV,2U-44 S'T&L.Wb.ZfAy„-wt.74R1,,,65e,a- ,;;;0.-4p6iggt4k1AUVig4AWWWL -atftWMAXUAWA • ,...&-i-4,A5kr 884 1433 826 alOrU4.ola-4WV115,-;‘Az _ 97 88 .eS14agia4,04111iihe.,, .'Aigri4V-VON*44nriVinifi' letupri30,V*A.ca,,kg-'41-ga?-4,1,4,-qMir 0 245v4146 ifOlt 17, e- V114,-;' 1700 787 171 t'LA.z.iNg;r7.4ift--15-74i4i**;14:10 22 136 Queue Length 95th (ft) 0 2 222 :011.agRallaitatifei4S74:061W4JAH4a.ag44.;:i4L-. s14144.17V'4116iStit-N-iftiAgfilkiritftittagetiliiigazoi. Lane LOS A F Approach LOS Average Delay Analysis Period (min OV,V4154.1.13.5**k. 14: 15.8 15 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 4 '1-472,1 HCM Level of Service Ex +Amb +Project Fri 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations Volume (vph) c 4 - 115 63 41 - 10 77 AvAit:Ovava*-tri4, 161.M - etigtfe, Li Hourly flow rate (vph) • Volume Total (vph) "4 -Alp PA -4 Volume Right (vph) .x• 142 4, Witmax,,:_k-041" 172 35 8 6 160 17 136 VIA* i,:vadm -1,1, 78 51 11 88 195 42 10 142 128 --41441„: zokatatrate, 51 0 195 r:IVMtkii-Vtr=.1 11 283 58 188 180 Departure Headway (s) 6.7 5.9 6.7 5.7 6.7 6.6 5.5 188 • 0 , 0A.67-,NAV-atlIgesfAX*M50-04,S-OrtirVIYA4 41trittiMAAMOLIV---Ate-4-ti '4601-itt„ Capacity (vehlh) 51 1 577 510 606 479 514 615 rIcata,r;R:Vta;a0Pon'14,Attqf,AAV Approach Delay (s) A•5P.:45))11-4K-::sti' 10.1 11.8 10.5 10.7 20 160 1,-YR4iffct-W9wq, Analysis Period (min) 15 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 5 1 Ex + Amb Project Sun 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations VI ftjVVI ft In .44 vili 4414 % - ---,,,,:,,xv,,,,,,w..-,-,-,,•••-: 7'4g4Sg',IriPgRWkVEE'-"OWAA1E,,-,."':EE-4 ,-1 7 --r,AE-1.6Er6A4.VER4AA66,'_,. -122 Ideal Flovv (vpholli: .1„1900 .2:4900w1,900. 190 ,5 1900 91,,,,,:,_, .,,,,1900 alltaz:11; I 0... - -'4VU.*- Lane IJtiI. Factor 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 0.91 _,.. *ROO, 11:1:::; 494,--e, •-..,.,.. ‘•,. , , §0., ,, .t f 11-1, ,,... ,:: A .0.-0..• A•m:.,„ '=„0„,, ••",,,,-.,•WiA,"fr'' ') ;If' A_ V.4 0 '!: ''-- Y'E i1 c, ,,,,-,„ „n .,,,,u: 4 . 1 ,,..4,..,:k.,_ Flpb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Flt Protected 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 42K2:::-:7-14811,143-MIMA-0141.41IMUNI ,er Fit Permitted 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 '4°4; greq.•'';- iNVI0,10:405:1 ,„ Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.84 0.84 0.84 0.87 0.87 0.87 0.98 0.98 0.98 0.89 0.89 0.89 - - 0 7 0 r 4.1014*)_iNtr04-4,1141-40..ttrake.,01k RTOR Reduction (vph) fii-AATtiii0grirg00,' 3-F•154Attze,1.0Q,•: Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 220 318 196 dlia,11,4,21*AZWiiMONSOAL,T,:;. 11 figfogiL•Vii:001P-4•VictifitAt.,1Ariffisdri4:::1' Protected Phases '-..:4IigOgikkgigArt.44:4442tA4:4,1"r4itte.• Actuated Green, G (s) "AWAR Actuated gIC Ratio iit'-ktv• 9.7 22.3 Vehicle Extension (s) 0.06 0.17 - cf4r14;00.4.a* V.It*.4744 %)4664P766/6/&:? -E "'IlEkif66.,.. 4 10.7 13.4 26.0 20.3 10.7 39.6 13.4 20.3 49.2 t- 10.11,-;4..;•Vgint 0.07 0.09 0.20 0.15 0.07 0.32 0.09 ..• 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 . 4.0 0.15 0.41 1.5 1.5 4.0 "fArQvgiRAWOnsk4; v/s Ratio Prot ' E.E" 66'4' E6.• 0.05 !AL 0.05 c0.15 0.01 c0.08 c0.11 0.10 0.06 0.17 0.01 c0.19 c0.32 " "ipW•wolgo VE:E-EYar,i-lkif).4:17N • 1.22 0.79 -. - - • ^AZ vlc Ratio 0.82 0.90 0.15 0.88 0.54 0.65 0.85 Progression Factor 1.00 1.00 1.00 Delay (s) - .00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.54 0.13 1.00 1.00 1.00 74.2 62.3 50.1 74.3 40.9 50.1 76.0 32.0 47.6 163.8 31.8 14-e Approach Delay (s) 61.4 52.9 41.3 69.1 Verrnit:441*A7140404,11aP HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.94 n?-1Y-W1:14-04iArk-ataVtlfr--40-5•r:-:4;%.4.1A;;;;7, 'VX,M#V1 79.4% ICU Level of Service Intersection Capacity Utilization l''.Vrt • s," 1.414f Critical Lane Group D KOA Corporation Synch ro 7 - Report Page 1 Protected Phases Ex + Amb + Project Sun 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICN Religious Facility Lane Configurations Ideal Ffow (vphpl) Lane Util. Factor Flpb, ped/bikes Fit Protected Flt Permitted k. t 7 1 +,++R +ft4.f� .. 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1.00 1.00 0.97 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 1.00 too 1.00 X1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95_y 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 , > � (Y�J(�}j S ` rr77�' F �"� 4 3 ,, f his e �1"..mak-,Z,}41.- „ 4.H�3F . Sd..'�SiJ'�a� _ �i'i�ti.�, �r,.,_�'.. _+- _s5'.r.�L 0.95 1.ry00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.67 0.67 0.67 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.88 0.88 4 RTOR Reduction (vph) 0 20 t WP4'"9. r ,axe pg 152 Confl. Peds. (#/h) 131 0.88 'AO tfitigT4 Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated gIC Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) 25.0 39.1 o 0.13 0.21 30.0 44.1 44.1 8.1 49.4 49.4 0.16 0.24 0.24 0.03 0.28 0.28 ''6 7.14.--" • <X :'tee 1.5 2.0 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 32.2 73.5 0.17 0.42 2.0 4.0 vis Ratio Prot vlc Ratio Progression Factor Delay (s) 0.01 0.01 0.06 0.04 5�. 1.00 1.00 F rc c0.17 0.01 0.03 c0.24 1.06 0.03 �Ca -ATP. c0.18 0.30 0.12 0.93 0.89 0.38 1.02 0.71 • 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00. 64.8 52.8 $ �?�� Fit 4 a`r�fyq,� 4� �; ��4�i�-� -w�•gA.i.,��� . r 126.6 48.6 49.8 1746 65.8 ...s'c4 50.3 124.8 41.8 �s'At W1�_�Vaf¢:. dS.,K-kfraiVP YT O Approach Delay (s) 56.4 106.2 66.3 56.0 '! HCM Volume to Capacity ratio Intersection Capacity utilization Critical Lane Group 0.75 89.5% !CU Level of Service KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 1 Ex + Amb Project Sun 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd 1CTV Religious Facility k- 4 at fa. ,I, 4/ Lane Configurations ftY 'Pi tra. 1 T.) li ta S9-' -''''32t'''-'"*30 i89 o86:144424:t37vA1:Vo. .A.,;:t,. . kw- , Ideal Flow (vphpf) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 rjAamiP,!:P-,::tir-- talattliWAW'ItILM4v -411-7Z+21- 74200i" ' 1 15--"e•W' 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 . 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Lane LAI. Factor 444takftc12;00149i*-Sk-.'1,A.-‘114a-44.01.t.,',61/20Att‘ Rob, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 -''''2! 6 ''),, .;,, 1.0 ,.•-k ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,>,, , 1.00 1.00 1-.4i.,,,,,mwAorNi. iw.L.`,i.•,; A ,,, ,..ii,,z :,....,,q 6 '',W..... 40.39. 04 , 4i- .6, ... J. 0 .... . 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 ,A,.w....,pmt...;.t.twevw4..„„%v, w„si0•9O0 Fit Permitted 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.68 1.00 0.76 1.00 -.A; a ‘,.. • Fit Protected Peak -hour factor, PHF i'.'611111Mafront‘t*:44:- RTOR Reduction (vph) C,onfi. Peds. (#/hr) 0.88 0.88 0.88 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.71 ag-fiev z 0 0.71 011 tT74K-g: • Wf.%tte0164'VP''Flk 01,0*,V4P6:4:2;41P 6 `;‘if.'-'*,k170,--.t",‘"...t-3N-445.1-0,? 0 0.88 0.88 0.88 99 iiltD5COU414,1%.104-0, Protected Phases keth.§:03000W*441/4.1414.6,74--M4k,*SaItitlYli2WAloblie Aivsc4--aq;...a-ko4*AvqkiOs-talti:V-T' Actuated Green, G (s) 5.5 16.7 Actuated gIC Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) 5.9 17.1 le3.034. 0.05 0.30 0.06 0.31 1.5 4.0 1.5 4.0 9.6 9.6 0.14 0.14 2.0 2.0 9.6 9.6 0.14 0.14 2.0 2.0 4'OPYWin:if(01.1A.i? Ykt-M5Via,:ft.g.rLkttVgPff;YM.;*OAIVNOA"'):CAii0.iftZ;gqYaij%rah:nNig- vis Ratio Prot 0.06 0.11 if.ig4tOiel*P 1.03 0.37 vlc Ratio c0.07 c0.15 1.05 0.48 d •fiThltIP5ArAII, ,-§,FMAPte,)t,i5NrYadt:44V-V,&;1 4,‘" Progression Factor 1166-00141t. Delay (s) 1.00 r,1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.28 0.00 "IT • . 0.01 0.11 0.09 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Approach Delay (s) 1 11 121.3 13.2 35.0 121.3 13.5 33.3 18.0 17.0 17.3 17.3 18.0 17.3 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio VD:P=0;74' Intersection Capacity Utilization Onggt5VjaraN4;a-ti*f**g*)t*Mr#aktYMrft*ae'SVZGAA.''\i4L 1i Critical Lane Group 0.36 45.2% ICU Level of Service 4.4 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 3 =„1 Ex + Amb + Project Sun 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations et) 4 •••.; Sign Control Peak Hour Factor Pedestrians Free 0.97 0.97 0.98 Free Stop • 0.98 0.62 0.62 WI -6 A: -_,-i-1,11)44-1V•!'-'11-elf.4 f•-•*?' 37-;.*.V.g4Z04-4-54;,k-Dbadgifit-40$5:--0-7-',!'" Walking Speed (ftls) 2:14F.,(41WW-t na,WAitagMbtAA-TEVIRA''' ..,:::,tirftfVtAtrVM&L6ZWtakta)., Right turn flare (veh), l'AW" '4441AJ-: 114i±g`V Median storage veh) pX, platoon unblocked . . . -4T:34WT-240$Pras vC1, stage 1 conf vol vCu, unblocked vol yfrOlt 1.1'-}V157£6A 1-'!* -,`4=.6164-1R4 ;444 ^ - tC, 2 stage (s) p0 queue free % 424 98 4>1 721 379 _Loa, ,EVtP421,204, 75 95 „A • Volume Left cSH ,221Te 1700 1146 435 20 ‹.2!... A 98 n1.14WWW-glatai-7401R4-14V,-- Queue Length 95th (ft) 0 1 31 • ';'Z'AV-NIRM2i-Virt45444,tkii,;144:414:WitMg!K;-404.430-41e4.0310+-:? Lane LOS kta. , A Approach LOS Average Delay Analysis Period (m n Vn4.% 2.8 15 • -..,..4,0,gek,Ly..,.avf '131SW10,„ 5"4"i_ , .g= KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 4 9 1 1 Ex + Amb + Project Sun 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln ICTV Religious Facility , . Lane Configurations Volume (vph) —111. k- 4\ t Ti! •;„ 1 0 6 123 5. 69 42 46 17 10 57 •V}.0:4WkIre4;91tEA. - - 1 -Et kl.ISSM.FA-5.-E4Ifeartt•:14-11V " Hourly flow rate (vph) Volume Total (vph) Volume Right (vph) Departure Headway (s) 51 56 51 77 6.1 5.4 21 14 AVAM, " V-1 WOrt. 77 136 30 14 214 44 166 100 -481111.7\424. 111- 136 9 0 93 6.0 5.1 5.8 5.9 4.8 ..w4,11•;4110-1,11Glifw.T.V'-,,AiimsA4ki-,-AWA,3sWe:w5%,erit-4.4 Capacity (vehlh) 554 626 566 678 580 574 706 Approach Delay (s) 8.1 8.9 • %RV 166 7 93 are 70:Agt:itiAgl$544-5:31-RiVf.,41;4'443:,;.4-iutlges=e- 9,2 9.0 HCM Level of Service tattirVvf-4,15 Analysis Period (min) 15 --"Z" 141-74.7'0 eicit"-74-4W0-4 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 5 • -- ,,,,, 7.1 APPENDIX E Cumulative Project Information KOA Corporation November 2010 aapment Activities )5 - 06/03110) • 4,9 APPENDIX F Intersection Level of Service Worksheets - Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions Including Roripaugh Ranch Project KOA Corporation November 2010 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility -rfr44- Lane*Wile ConfigurationsgIII ft til f +++ �r 'II ,++ *Wil ova ' s x' it.,1,,,%LA S z c, j h fi Y2 3 y, „�8 t k L &11}.�,r {,�' 1 S �*""i '�53 -�S'+�4>u«. ��,�y`L.:. i.t` `5 a'..L4! t- T - +` f <d'.i."'A �t�� � 6111 Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900{ 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 "-"` "�`ka v:',_Tt . h i- "E�i en - ova9, Y , -�[` 4.`F'z 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 0.91 Iftiik..0a4.4.,:kaigiO 0441-11.4M67404,_ • Lane Util. Factor FIpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Jtt h .. nh.,;b AM} .YG PENIA Mtra ggiNSIC 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 gtr 1.00 1.00 1.00 • i 110.401 Fit Permitted 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) Confl. Peds. (#Ihr) twaZiaitmeite- Protected Phases r-RIMR101.%-h- vet Actuated Green, G ( 0.94 0.94 0.94 163 sr� 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.90 0.90 0:90 310 0 0 97 0.90 0.90 0.90 0 fire's afeA 10.5 29.3 22.0 14.9 Actuated gIC Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) 0.06 0.19 vls Ratio Prot vlc Ratio Progression Factor g 0.88 1.5 �x 0.05 0.14 0.09 2.0 1.5 1.5 33.7 20.1- 22.0 52.7 44.6 Eigfi.74R-t-c4 14.9. 20.1 50.8 oESL .�k�^ fA- 0.23 0.13 0.14 0.37 0.09 0.13 0.35 40, 2.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 i';t"[y [. i `a 3h9 qJ_ 0.18 0.05 c0.08 c0:22 c0.33 0.14 c0.40 0.08 0.22 0.37 0.94 0.37 0.88 0.98 2.59 0.97 1.09 0.85 1.72 1.05 "�� � 'se tA, � ��^.P'��"'�, ��SX�-Fd"�y..�..�1._ :1 s�'3 yy � d ��f-a'�l '�{. �.�. � �-i a�� 'd t3^���• 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Y. _ 1.00 1.00 - b>�.��-�+3t�EA�,3.y�'Z:.3€_+-c.^'t�'. i.N���0,�.+n��`'"Y�'.2;�.0����*`,47,44,1M-,: 95.2 74.5 53.0 84.7. 77.8 790.7 89.1 92.3 96.0 391.7 79.1 72.8 Delay (s) Approach Delay (s) 391.6 92.0 168.4 - r3'?`'"tel sfr. HCMVolume to Capacity ratio 1.22 g)tlf_ 4441 giOkk':3 • Intersection Capacity Utilization c Critical Lane Group 104.6% ICU Level of Service ;y3 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 ,Y42' *-4.±e,a{c:PtonAKZIV-A.tl&-IANX -441A, Progression Factor :1 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility -"A "\T I 4- k- t \ I4' tilt Lane Configurations -liaait.„.:AaSmM,V1.1M_§Sf614Mkeatoqa-*il.gMIMS)ISiktttgigifiMM4 Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 • 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 [io •••,?wooftwirtoramtiorgivag,*-k..4, ' arlfavr- -,-.21WXMaMETX-.M...,W,MZEge•-41:- • , 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.94 1.00 1.00 0.97 0.86 0.88 0.97 0.86 1.00 Lane UtiI. Factor ti Flpb, ped/bikes 4U_:: o__o tz,2,41-30 • too 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 f•,••= „,„,,,,,temitgammesaavyantagut r -P TAAMIMAI Flt Protected 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 , 424- I. T*400,4:8 r qt..4410.21,441P-0-0101-4,, it:teraf, 0.95 1.00 Flt Permitted 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 Itta4A, J A -41-,e0 Avo n Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.72 0.72 0.72 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.88 aA,V1901))k,r:t*e ge4 .S10 V-7-tQz;34614;g4--ffek, :4114K.-4 RTOR Reduction (vph) 70 qrrotAKia,MA AEI Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 287 257 295 277 169 0.88 0.88 31 41; 630 Protected Phases (Lq4=-0-1614VVWSWIM.041:41"tia Actuated Green, G ( 4:17_ 7E,"4 1,,oe ;El 65.3 65.3 • 4g1,10-404VAiliXre.itAMA.,::- ;1.24.46...I,PAWAGAI 25.0 39.0 39.0 30.0 44.0 44.0 10.4 50.0 50.0 25.7 rov-wgz0a.-14-4,AtviiI-4..v3w4,,tpr&Azyt-v2,44up Actuated gIC Ratio 0.14 0.22 0.22 0.17 0.25 0.25 0.05 0.29 0.29 0.14 0.38 0.38 Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 2.0 2.0 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 7-aii.§-/VAlertmeiWt&c.RAWaaqqatAari4.4;4i4iF744PAlivaNsfvotOnsag4'74-4-' vis Ratio Prot 4.0 v/c Ratio 0.15 c0.17 c0.17 0.05 e - . 1.13 0.75 0.34 1.01 0.22 0.31 0.04 c0.38 c0.13 0.24 ,5491-14t',.S..rAtar•Vt4ni., 'IMATIT'VEy.` 4% 0.81 1.33 0.91 0.94 0.62 0.24 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Delay (s) 167.9 71.0 57.1 101.2 48.2 49.6 101.7 208.7 77.5 96.3 41.2 34.7 Approach Delay (s) 104.0 83.3 176.9 52.9 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 1.11 Intersection Capacity Utilization 'AT4,-,KOTAPSMIRAT::,;:;,t12., Critical Lane Group 110.6% ICU Level of Service -40* KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations • '211E [Apt.;,,itgi, -• c 4-- 4,- 4\ t \ 1, _ Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 -4aust.,4~,m,Rmt-m-A-0:tamow&ww-v- V,''"Atif,A114471.VtKot;144:1-31p.--Zr--"" '',iw:r*Wrhyti&w.f* • mft. 1.00 1.00 1.00 0 Lane Util. Factor 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 ?TATO OlvF Flpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected 4 u c Fit Permitted 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 • • • 1.00 1.00 1.00 ;71", A.P=1'7:4°Nr:41701V5aq`.'tYMT 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.19 1.00 Artpt .-C,WCepat 0.95 1.00 KWATL.::; • 0.71 1.00 Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.53 0.53 0.53 , About 41K Maxt,--4,6 4x,? -Ir twn-V-4-*V.-ftia0 RTOR Reduction (vph) Conti. Peds. (#/hr) ",144Z1::::-Avittkv 11 43 309 0 g,nt-Satt70.,PAilnqesliT*iMA.4,1w 14 81 gjf:"WICT-OZP:atirA*te4 t,I.T7AV4-444.VITA' %.4:iiii-44%103W-UtittR/VArgirtifiaiDVAViV-, Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated g/C Ratio 25.1 49.7 0.22 0.47 k. • 4.0 28.6 32.1 32.1 32.1 32.1 0.01 0.26 0.29 0.29 ir-4:165.4.M1fAti-tfait4004:-#.44'4,kef4101-`3%.4.4:-.:ig • 0110.g..C.O.RiEF0S7*4'4..f.-.5-Paik-1, 0.29 0.29 Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 4.0 1.5 4.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 v/s Ratio Prot v/c Ratio c0.22 c0.34 0.02 0.20 0.98 0.72 1.89 0.77 Milti:V3.4-440A*,4-P10.*4 p_q* 0.01 -a-54070Pk,Urigrlfk-olKiali. 0.68 0.05 0.11 0.40 0.36 Progression Factor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Delay (s) 78.7 22.9 603.0 38.7 43.6 25.4 28.6 28.2 Approach Delay (s) TP 36.6 64.5 35.0 28.3 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.72 piffogsmowitim.oftux.„., *141,--aar Intersection Capacity Utilization 93.6% ICU Level of Service .1.7M-tqVj.fif,-44-4-..lft0t.ni:l;Wf:.40t'*S•q-4.V.ZVf#ZSijeni.5ttf*Vf7tPtakt4:'-A-V-ak;--' -P Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 3 . • - Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri ICTV Religious Facility -"` c 44— 4\ /6* • Lane Configurations 't+ 4 icir Sign Control Free Free Stop Zintrilatag.011940024akit-M Peak Hour Factor 0.78 0.78 0.90 0.90 0.42 0.42 "q3'1'..„44-tplepiW14-29P4r- L- • , . Pedestrians ViltiNaitokr "44 41.t. 'aMtfr"1111Pat e7t4s." 44, tY-Alf.W Walking Speed (Ns) Right tum flare (veh) rt;,Vlb • 4-f., ,111`Z' • r} • - aittiiVIVAMORMIlhttkaUttc Median storage veh) pX, platoon unblocked vC1, stage 1 conf vol vCu, unblocked vol o ,:4,ii61160wW4titwr.4;4,4, tC, 2 stage (s) .T'llON4-*Z1 p0 queue free % 1176 100 1986 • 4,1., - •-*4-"Falyg .P.V4 , • . „ 1176 100 100 00, ye Volume Left 0 0 0 ,z*,71A4Vilir cSH Queue Length 95th (ft) Lane LOS. 1700 A.. 601 1700 A 5-,71PA- •PV: Approach LOS A Average Delay ‘R',!4-1fiN7k'':igeOcatt,ca0-,!-Ii,*&7;f3,st Analysis Period (min) 15 ,4,-.44,ydrwa 0.0 VtXfv,->it; WAY035-..- x ;„ „t"1.-71eXip 440'4'9 ."441&-'11-,'tr..411.1*-1 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 4 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln ICN Religious Facility Lane Configurations 1 T.} 'I t+ 4) 1 t ic0.614it fi 4.aS.d.traa*adriagratM;,-k-ikaVg.MP.:.:..04-A'W.---WANH.6.3V4iaOt:g.t.M--Vk.',-,A▪ 9Hfitfts;AP-4-`,tiw:-41v.WA:StYP,2,d:-V;-Mf, 150 141 41 10 134 175 35 8 6 159 17 152 t,,,, .s.,..„iz. -.. . ,1- ° qat.glittligratfifeMOVA: 174 51 11 152 199 42 10 7 187 20 - 179 Volume (vph) Hourly flow rate (vph) Volume Total (vph) ° Volume Right (vph) Departure Headway (s) 185 ;.. : , ' . • • •••., ; ; • 185 225 11 351 58 187 199 0 51 0 199 0 179 = akagYa4P-.?...W• &IV* 7.0 6.3 7.1 6.1 7.4 7.2 6.1 • ik',4**-4.:-OrrieW.06-0-Alm,--1.-10,P.,A14;131-24„i3i7Arigt-Aft9,44-41M.Atii -'.14-2,41-Cfrwi.-.OLVAtrias ' - =`,.%`• Capacity (vehih) 493 Approach Delay (s) 1 2.3 547 482 16.5 556 426 470 11.4 12.1 556 --. HCM Level of Service i.,iXANgTiA141.-011414-14.,:z5,2d;&0*,t4,7...4 Analysis Period (min) 15 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 5 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Sun 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility f 4, Lane Configurations ++ r 11 ft ' Ft+ r fft) ,r,. 411. Wt-egraV.4.1 4.P434h4.Y,WarifigeriW4Laqi.-Ir4"6 ,.g•0 -.V 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 WafaiSto • Ideal Flow (vphpl) Lane Util. Factor Flpb, ped/bikes 711:44,445069-4-, Fit Protected 6 - Fit Permitted 1=-W. 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 taire'" 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 •P.= 42% - '*1 _ ,VivZ 0.91 cAgi-VO:.&4 "Xwti':,t5Pitt.t7,1 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 14,t; Varirti- 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 '101VIN, !%t-f:r -111P7MOVAIMINSIIMMATIMANI, -;r%t' 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 MeffreffV.AvOnfrows-40 Apv .Stiktk .;.!4,4014-Z4.g_tVitA40,i74. 0.95 • 1.00 1.00 Peak -hour factor, PHF vrulptio6m5ov-4',* RTOR Reduction (vph) 0.84 0.84 0.84 0.87 0.87 0.87 0.98 0.98 098 0.88 202 309 ,2,74,743rAgtititelY,7 196 0.88 0.88 0 OTAN'gAgijitASVUPPIA6145,'4,,:kaingAVA `;14'0DiAlt, '66*".4)''',Ii4-170V3Y1014,-0. Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 10 11 004 ilkFigEfiNfitk}Nial" el: z-eatTarxie4V, atzn-,1,steijsAP,') Proteded Phases Actuated Green, Green, G (s) 10.0 22.2 10.7 13.4 25.6 20.2 10.7 41.0 13.4 20.2 50.5 44-42APACTS-...1- 2 ''qita3M--44',W-'.;141kAtia,Zna*ZitiAt3.44,6-it,W •NAQ T,VZ474,';:4-laairtitalziOW-1,4 Actuated g/C Ratio 0.06 0.17 0.07 0.09 0.20 0.15 0.07 0.33 0.09 0.15 24RQfrAit-ARViA444,10-Mget-MAP•faii0ft:4:A.;,, •,d 41',44-1-4001WW014a4 • 0.41 Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 A46-iirzsitAtigact#14104106:41,464AWK, USWAIM,V":Varf4r,tn-_114411:43.1gPV4filat.55AMNORM. 0.05 c0.15 0.02 c0.08 c0.11 0.11 0.06 0.19 0.01 c0.19 c0.38 vis Ratio Prot vIc Ratio Progression Factor 0.85 0.91 0.31 1 Delay (s) ; I4.401t*J.17:0R-0.,31VOteMS1net. ,e44,{1,14,11TC 4:;k*, 0.90 0.55 0.75 0.86 0.58 0.13 1 .00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1 77.7 65.1 51.6 77.1 42.1 58.0 77.6 32.4 48.2 .29 0.91 .00 1.00 192.9 38.3 rr-4 7.,'1:11,Vi:tr:_ffg.74-•;'!1,-,L-"*11-•?-f,2',•:-.-:1=-114V47J-T-:';'-‘e;:-1.4;:t4t27-44-':**-'.k:-U.A4ta,niVeziAlittfIMr.:itiOgY Approach Delay (s) 64.1 57.3 FICIVI Volume to Capacity ratio 1.01 are, 41:1‘49,,:fsk`tt-g- drpi(Alri intersection Capacity Utilization at-IriteMfAU:4,4•*0-&10.--7.= - c Critical Lane Group 83.9% ICU Level of Service 41.3 ..gfV . 78.3 qel KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Sun 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations r eirctd.410..41„: r 11) Mt re in tttt r '110' • Wiff4 Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 • 4,44-V -Mt7.-4M0.RMYiei0W6Wat • Lane Util. Factor 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.94 1.00 1.00 0.97 0.86 0.88 0.97 0.86 ' - ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 .71. 1.00 , Ak.,! 49-"Vjeag WA- 4 Y Flt Pt roected 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 Flt Permitted 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 git(.41-0A ,t7.1 . , 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 St, -,..:dortor 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.67 0.67 0.67 0.77 • 0.77 .44 . . Airil.:770W40.9jgg'Zift.M.Gt,i-P-1.44-41.4.1q,' RTOR Reduction (vph) Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 19 0.77 0.90 169 0.90 0.90 0.88 276 IL 0.88 0.88 r'% 11461 "V.r 3:10 faimitelarigidNaW 3 8 -• Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) jrtr..6=a zitav---2vorrAge44---.44„,;,- 5.5 46.8, :46.8 18.2 59.5 59.5 Actuated gIC Ratio 25.1 40.2 40.2 26.9 42.0 42.0 0.15 0.25 0.25 0.16 0.26 0.26 0.02 0.29 0.29 0.10 0.38 0.38 ,A44-441-7:2*.W.V.?A Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 2.0 2.0 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 :itiRRiariAM, 444, v/s Ratio Prot fro-41,r-rNt- ),,:x4.4zi,-.10,-DVa-Y.:c v/c Ratio AROV.10.*04!,ig: .1aIg14 2 „cc* v 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - - • 0.01 0.01 'Ft! 0.06 0.02 0.02 ' . -Naraf: 4 v-tiYilswit:Ail*ctookyfqx---f-44,0. -atv9,-ge c0.15 0.01 0.01 0.20 0.97 0.03 0.14 0.88 0.68 0.14 Progression Factor Delay (s Approach Delay (s) c0.09 c0.25 : 0.91 0.67 0.01 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 55.4. 42.8 42.7 86.3 41.4 42.7 147.2 46.5 76.0 48.2 39.3 92.5 49.1 39.8 29.3 n2W45.07 48.3 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.54 -. --- ,-----,ci -5--,04.- - -0,---c-4-ay.Pi'lWil-gR41-00r-e4---" . '4' • e„ -,T.**-, - * '.. $1,-4 ,.:,,iffkak:4,%01 !f-.. ',- Intersection Capacity Utilization C-.016MWArgiA2-441,4fr c Critical Lane Group 84.5% ICU Level of Service A 4-gfalgfi _4P4,421-: . E KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 ."::1 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Sun 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations Ideal Flow (vphpl) Lane Util. Factor C `` t P t t i f bt-#0...,.�- WSJ 1900 1900 1900 1900 , 1900 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 € tY�g'_�'x.' , 1.00 1.00 1.0 0 1.00 ro `Eb�h4�ad��AL 4� 444i$o aA-A 6 E; m3 40 Fipb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 Flt Protected 0 6 Flt Permitted 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 �,i^n-. «�.: 5��._..'.x,-ssk"�-.�i..r z_,✓tea 0.95 1.00 0.95 Peak -hour factor, PHF 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 n. 1.00 0.68 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.74 1.00 MFR 0.88 0.88 0.88 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.71 0.71 0.71 0.88 0.88 0.88 CIA RTOR Reduction (vph) Conti. Peds. (#/hr) 0 We 'Ix 24 101 2 Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated g/C Ratio 6 5 4 6.0 22.4 Vehicle Extension (s) 0.06 0.37 1.5 4.0 2 6.5 22.9 0.07 0.38 9.6 0.13 9.6 0.13 1.5 4.0 2.0 2.0 9.6 8 9.6 0.13 0.13 2.0 2.0 vis Ratio Prot vlc Ratio Progression Factor 0.06 0.13 0.98 0.36 1.00 1.00 c0.07 c0.22 0.99 0.58 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.32 0.02 1.00 1.00 miookome- 0.01 0.24 0.10 1.00 1.00 t. e,.: G4-e,yi ', t-aN1, aaE' ' r t ? ' - huWvA P ''w . 5-011, , iter a Delay (s) 103.7 106.7 12.3 13.7 21.3 20.1 v z tt ?jY' ?.;A[� iw fir fff,. a`a ,�.::!- - .... .=-1r ,t'ZW: -1w - __.n 'R mow- lie i-zA-- '�` � - -4?- s -�; �, .�: �". �, � �t3� �',� � tet:= Approach Delay (s) 28.6 25.5 21.0 20.4 20.9 20.5 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.44 50410-1054 Intersection Capacity Utilization 50.4% ICU Level of Service • Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 3 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Sun 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations APS -41-. Sign Control r'rtf-'4" Peak Hour Factor Free • 8' 0.97 4 Free Stop 0.97 0.98 0.98 0.98 0.62 r1.10v-triM1P1 ';41°W;ZP4'.4.:AtZkURGI, '7,z111 Pedestrians AtWAD:14VOINItitigow-* Walking Speed (ftls) ,a91.1A-MAIL Right turn flare (veh) Median storage veh) ,.:10F.4(1141.5.11144z, pX, platoon unblocked Acret*t. ItigeSIX:f431 %AUL* 1.4 ;.:iy,:f;40.11,Altitt004:WAVV4Staliteihig-VAlentirlarViat4-00.-WAsti; ',t'Ult?:4154.*144t4;*., vC1, stage 1 conf vol vCu, unblocked vol tC, 2 stage (s) 'A> 4:"IMCi''47:ATALf*/", f-cli-VrPt4 350 900 335 hre=1:17:Alf-r-air:54'4441'4.43r'it;11--'44$9; AitditT''F4RNI.44'4Er ,IP.;n4QMORRI-40F4POW*N.0014M5Ng-MWL:TARAP---,405!%,=ieigs*A_ p0 queue free % 100 Volume Left 99 100 Ac,711;t4.*,418v-44?-40,10,1A441,5,0-742. 71,;_;51? °Ili. eirl' 7:03. cSH 1700 1220 311 42Pi:O.M&A-1344.745,04,0teatiVMP;[kAtAvti- Queue Length 95th (ft) Lane LOS Ag4,14-A.A. ;AP: VatriaL4*, . _ Approach LOS Average Delay 0.1 f'ilW=41V41.iaatlUiqiftg-ki-*jtnrjgcAAfVVdl-Wqgf'/iPd0'e44aiWAWft, Analysis Period (min) 15 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 4 1 • Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Sun 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations eja-Alce i-ko4 44 90 17 Volume (vph) k*K-WiiVh roe - ; Hourly flow rate (vph) 10 44 *I T4 122 98 19 3 6 125 5 6 !. ,v,..7. 169 110 21 14 165 132 30 5 96 Volume Total (vph). .TkIt.i*P9RD Volume Right (vph) Departure Headway (s) 54 130 21 14 297 !,411'1K315.,- 169 136 132 9 0 130 ..:0•04A1 VairrittliyargWfi'MW4Wiv. • t 6.4 5.8 6.3 5.4 6.3 6.4 5.2 46z ciAlriA1-404.MINA- Atie.pqr oxt:,41m1,31,Aohtlialn.x.ft Atir4,4010444_ Capacity (veh/h) 528 588 546 637 !S.ANR*-Oji:4t''Nl_A."ZAOY3fireg,=:jraf,RM-l*;VXZ;j:4.,e:,Nf-akk-Vk,VYAV-A;;.‘.jerg:Y,Xa-c'P:ai 522 534 646 Approach Delay (s) 9.0 11.4 9.8 9.7 , 4 HCM Level of Service Analysis Period (min fasaltiftft=77-N-!,.. A 15 KO- KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 5 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility With Project f s' 4- Lane Configurations VI ++ r in 44 11) tt4 r ill 440 .40,11iNelNO,tx- . - ,temw,. ,,_•,,,.,.*,,,.,,,. Aw wu 7ANSAVI:41r-i•enta deal Flow (vphpl) 1900 -1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 ailf.441.1i.Mil.40.- vaCtlillii4- , blar ; ',3.4--; Lane Util. Factor 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 0.91 INU:EjtatNiMMINO.Ada-Vit0..ig4t,t;gril,4144.ARMVSAirittAk4-04tP Flpb, ped/bikes +441P'4 It`IS,Wq;* -Wax, Fit Protected 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4be 1=4 kattf: "40-SittiO 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 liadUrgaira--,r r::)9141tage#A4Maktafia-: 7`f=efitA: 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0,95 1.00 IV-4PFtY ni(1,,44:4,-Mig.-gatkr44,41 F4' Flt Permitted Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) Cant Peds. (#/hr) 0.94 0.94 0.94 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 4;g1.11 -44,4.W 10:41X44-MWt4V4C-4461''AiiZtitt ff.".C1: 163 310 95 6,0 Te0,-;Ire;'S.-'':•;=.40-7,411,5MONWatei,Y..tAi4-4471i.WW67-MaajtagttNaliar-WP -?24-;44,44540t: 1 Actuated Green, G (s) 10.5 29.3 22.0 15.1 33.9 20.1 22.0 52.7 15.1 20.1 50.8 Protected Phases 7 4 5 3 8 1 5 2 3 6 Actuated /C Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) 0.06 0.19 0.14 0.09 0.23 0.13 0.14 0.37 0.09 0.13 0.35 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 1.5 se',114k,„ 1.5 4.0 :i16-'.3M4WiliA0-MN'At.V,PAUTOWragg-WittNAggidAtMat.Paial-4:,,,;JW4NNVIRAZ vis Ratio Prot 0.05 0.18 0.05 c0.08 c0.22 00.33 0.14 c0.41 0.08 0.22 0.38 -4ft'Wlkt5t,t*,MRNiAai'eAN:--IB::?AtgT,eaAMgrLiIra,gYgWgilrr:!A W 0.88 0.94 0.37 0.87 0.97 vlc Ratio 2.61 0.97 1.12 0.85 1.72 1.08 Progression Factor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1 .00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Defay (s) 96.7 74.8 53.1 82.6 76.7 796.4 89.6 103.4 94.8 393.5 71: Approach Delay (s) 73.3 393.3 100.4 89.0 174.5 = HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 1.23 intersection Capacity Utilization 105.5% ICU Level of Service Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 Wit^ 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Delay (s) Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility With Project Lane Configurations .'410;1` Ideal Flow (vphpl) Lane Uti! Factor 11- t/0. \* 1 r + r !pi tilt re tilt 1900 19.00 1900 1900 1900K 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 100 10001.00 0.94 1.00 1.00 0.97 0.86 0.88 0.97 0.86 1.00 *# e st v� zG e4iti `§; rfa :1 °av : Ren i. Flpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected Flt Permitted rk�wys. � 1.00 1:000, 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3`'�i -s 7 s' a ter 4 w `- EF,a ttAcG 6t 9 s 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.04 =-i Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.72 70 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.72 0.72 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.88 0.88 0.88 271 300 31 287 295 169 630 Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) 25.0 39.0 39.0 30.0 44.0 44.0 10.4 50.1 50.1 26.5 66.2 66.2 10ring",�s.��` -��'..�,.%..C4tak.3'Vigt@3'_.. �' .Mg;m�'r�� PWOz�„�i.DY00:04MieAs�Z.:KA 0.13 0.22 0.22 0.17 0.25 0.25 0.05 0.29 0.29 0.14 0.39 0.39 Actuated glC Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 2.0 2.0 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 vis Ratio Prot vlc Ratio Progression Factor 0.15 c0..17 114 0.76 0.34 00.18 0.05 0.04 c0.38 c0.14 0.24 ,446.61,0 1.09 0.22 0.33 0.82 1.33 0.99 0.95 0.62 0.24 170.1 71.7 57.6 125.3 48.7 50.3 102.9 211.0 956 97.2 41.0 34.5 7'r cfi �Ff �.��r��� ���'�!"'" ,- �'�y�'� �`" � �.� �`� ice• �7� -��' �r+x�r� � �s '�' e `" � �'� r''"+ �_ Approach Delay (s) 105.3 99.8 181.0 53.2 �;aViF HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 1.12 ?Y }�o��J� ���i�G1�49 '� � � �'• i4�= ��� A'.' 'gyp ��'3� Intersection Capacity Utilization 1 11.8% ICU Level of Service (K� I.*i'n1.+2c-AM. sem'-- "�..• -,..rfp;f45b,sia -rc_ �a�•,F ..y. � � ;. Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd ICTV Religious Facility With Project C t 4, Lane Configurations fit. ) 114) 1 Ts. 1 T+ rkelbati,,..i. . ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 ,_ •.. 4.014P-RagistWO , ,„:::-Vii,,-„,,,.....•;.. all.y.,,,, .,,,,_..-,..,-,41..,...g...-• ,z,....„,_ ','• V.,413..;A•1-1•1=0:.,,-.1.:-F,*,,4 -•-•,Azz,L.,,,x4.1 .,- , -;---- --.-', -.:*-7..tr.og,i,-,;.,,r.A--,,,..4,-,14i6%...,,,:,s,,,, 1.00 0.95 ---,,w.,--- • .1--0•0.k 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Lane Util. Factor ,f1,04,0.-04*-41A40*--- Fipb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 eNdic -: SAIMMAIROS31:IfatellalkgritaNMAL: $11 SP Fit Protected 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 t-.:V101-AJMNI ti-liVAMIAS2111: gtelglificalLWAP&WW'al, ' ' - , -A.,".-)-2. --• Flt Permitted 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.18 1.00 0.71 1.00 Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.81 RTOR Reduction (vph) 1 Confl. Peds. (#Ihr) 0.81 A4,44.4azeci, 0.81 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.53 0.53 0.53 11 ViAaratiVi --CY`74aftli4k1A4.144;-VA,16aPjk 43 0 312 MRW-Q*4.& 14 81 a4s',r0---E!,:alaggiiovzo Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) q.q4V4-47sKaRo: Actuated gfC Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) it;PzitliP Al* 25.1 52.1 4.1 31.1 .y•-••.. e 'F. • '0,440VINK-M.4.4,144&,' ft.;•Sf , 0.22 0.48 1.5 4.0 0.01 0.27 .104.440.10-: - 1.5 4.0 32.1 32.1 32.1 32.1 442-it,,A0,49-av:44*-;%7-44o4,Jon,151M1,14, 0.28 0.28 2.0 2.0 0.28 0.28 2.0 2.0 Nik,'W.Mita.414V440414.0 -q`C' "71-"fitr,Wh• •`V15'.'r ,r:&.!‹"M. v/s Ratio Prot :=5 5 vk Ratio kellara-Mikaib4 Progression Factor c0.22 c0.36 •Vika:,, 1.01 0.74 1.00 1.00 0.02 0.22 '745T- "4.'5 5104.4143%5"ai5.'” 1.79 0.78 1.00 1.00 0.01 0.75 0.05 0.41 0.10 0.36 •"555‘ • 4•4-"Vi'',g'1,!.:,3s-filVP4t---*-k-SaffetrIgl-7Ntx,44--,2-„,_/441..m,' 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1"L'•-.'47-PIROWW-tiik**-44,4-18,W.Wiy;e1M5,kiiggitiltiZ):VdMi;i4Cit,_8-Mr:41aWe.44! Delay (s) 87.6 23.4 556.6 38.7 58.2 26.6 30.0 29.4 Approach Delay (s) 38.5 60.5 43.3 29.5 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.76 Intersection Capacity Utilization 95.1% 'ids-Itj-Kligfi-NRQTA•44,4,..it,;;;Aiiatiftelk.etikf*Ar;r414iiRtgaitarNribti4411,1_0i;430g..;:itOSikt c Critical Lane Group ICU Level of Service KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 3 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri ICTV Religious Facility With Project Lane Configurations fttalS'-'''r41 14 - Free Sign Control Peak Hour Factor 440 'AV`WMFIWA:4,,,likirakid*-31W;2",*740Alitn -:04,117n.--:,t4V-EViOA:WW:beptMV.,4k.ragt42z)71::i Pedestrians .47 4 Free Stop P 0.78 0.78 0.90 0.90 0.42 0.42 --"Afvf •-•#.4 regtvawit Walking Speed (ft/s) anaLlattiik Right tum flare (veh) Median storage veh) t.I.ORrei6"_Cifjlet.0.31.710?".A.:iik-Vk.-i;:33,-A-4VAI:f.L-WAW::;;X:.-V-46.-.0e-h#14-4%•-f-4(5' ARM 01;-4ra-ttea- pX, platoon unblocked !el yr 2ci'.."-zIttAkkilaVli'dlitek-f.'4:'*4- vC1, stage 1 conf vol vCu, unblocked vol 1251 2068 1213 Mf.qf.M.VaZif4:-.i-$ZN',-a_.I.ZtW.AIRS.tet*:ZW--AAMA*N#'gai4'tic4kTkAkSN*:MMS.Ma tC, 2 stage (s) n4fittiiPsff-iFt401-1-4,-::7 p0 queue free % 96 80 Volume Left 0 22 136 Vigttg.iAig.„C4=7:i:V:j*:iatAiy2-itAgjXtgMi.iAfikka:iW"Ai4ZV-VfPAie'':4;1iaiii;tlt4V''.'W-IA;ftittaa;.:!":rV't cSH 1700 563 71 Queue Length 95th (ft) ft Lane LOS 0 3 439 A F '7- ; • Approach LOS F Average Delay 66.2 rig'f----f'tjaVik3rAr.iijgek4-t8VF-4Dtlgn't;M.Vtral,z'*fsa.V-iaigPZ-V:4UtifiVSridt4-ASiigfW,4 Analysis Period (min) 15 ';si,'UtlYittaigiitVIOz;zAiriftfSV'fegtV;-fA41iivf-:iz;'IC;_W--ig-A?;:ge)-ftfg=tva KOA Corporation Synchro 7- Report Page 4 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln ICTV Religious Facility With Project " • Lane Configurations ,fr • - )0gagROKI*M-45-&4, Volume (vph) s 162 141 41 10 134 181 =,---60.:..-Ve:144441,41A,„! Houdy flow rate (vph) 200 174 35 t \•• 1, Volume Total (vph) 451-Wq,10*-Trz::63,7- Volume Right (vph) 200 ;',1•11 . 51 11 152 206 42 10 225 11 358 51 0 206 0 4A 58 194 213 Departure Headway (s) 7.1 6.4 7.2 6.3 W=-zi'4;VW;tt?bVc.M;tfigJff'.*t-tAe.,,4l4SaXI;*_:gki.rAq0e4-YgM:jlftfW=girWaitiigtt-.46 475 548 7.5 193 7.3 6.2 165 17 164 194 20 193 0670-41iWail Capacity (veh/h) Approach Delay (s) 487 539 418 466 12.9 17.6 11.6 12.6 551 • HCM Level of Service Analysis Period (min 15 KOA Corporation Synchro 7- Report Page 5 te :0 i k'.°F� m ie 2 3 ' $ ; it a : Y #r - .i`. `€ Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 i." 4 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Sun 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICN Religious Facility With Project Lane Configurations Ideal Flow (vphpl) 4- t )111 ft r 'i" ++ i' +•+ 'i +ft* 'uxay ,� � S �xr�.r` CCA �Jvi si's r, a ' . E" ^:� } . � 1- 1tz i .G a t a 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 as °tea Lane Util. Factor 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 0.91 qxSS� p �� ,� y P p ry q h°4`'�rLfY �a `1G -1f � �'G.V�I�-:``p,}�' S .N iq V "'0: C -`$. ° L `7;G` p.�V F Z¢ ro: fi' V �.1 0 tl W 4 V fi' �' kik'-?��-s 5�.. ��r v,C :s ��..��:', � "i�".c�.� �� .��r�` 5... ��,�.�'�alri �� ��� � ,� �� E' @, 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 _ isAs'ti vim= ,- , tMU: ®--- 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 Fipb, ped/bikes Fit Protected f�- Flt Permitted 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 litMINISTEP 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) Conti. Peds. (#/hr) 0.84 0.84 0 0.84 0.87 0.87 0.87 0.98 0.98 0.98 0.88 0.88 0.88 202 308 191 „ G-. Aye[ s����5:,: 0 ��� -•�� � Wig, � � ;��.. ��- � ,� ° �. x , ,11 10 11 4 Protected Phases 7 4 5 ..€%- ta ariiiiiids14_}'max, i�'�a�`-%e� -�A ��T-.. •sem}�.. yz 3 t riaj° ri paq1. 0 4sa ,} Actuated Green, G (s) 8 5 3 1 6 10.0 22.2 10.7 13.4 25.6 20.2 10.7 41.0 13.4 20.2 50.5 !-4):' j P!TiSi'i igA:M:: {,1 X,0 `° ` 4 -3' i;ANsect "? EW g 0.06 0.17 Actuated glC Ratio 0.07 0.09 0.20 0.15 0.07 0.33 0.09 0.15 0.41 2.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 v/s Ratio Prot v/c Ratio 0.05 c0.15 0.02 c0.08 c0.11 0.11 0.06 0.20 0.02 c0.19 c0.39 0.85 0.91 0.31 0.90 0.55 0.76 0.86 0.61 Progression Factor 3 0.17 1.29 0.94 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Delay (s) 77.7 65.1 51.6 77.1 42.1 58.8 77.6 32.9 48.4 192.9 40.8 rLi . �. �� -�° �y � '``` � ��,�"� �'��'ia ���'3j%� r�j� '�� ���+� ,*�+� '�. �1 "��-�� �� " l .,mat � �s-�, wv:� �- 5. �, � �m'� � `�� � ,r'•� �<�,E,r:Pa Approach Delay (s) 64.1 57.6 41.4 79.4 i 7 �G v..+�� .,r ...�,n� ,_.� k2,• �.�� , �� � r���ct�� `ki.�� '-;f:Ci�.i4t�.>..k>.. �' �r� .� .? Xv�"_�:��ax- g �.eA��.:Lrit HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 1.02 Intersection Capacity Utilization 84.8% ••,- fit* tiVii4eNnitAc.4124-ii4.4ft,Se,PAate.e ICU Level of Service E c Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 Report Page 1 14' 1 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Sun 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility With Project -DP P Lane Confguratiops irt 11' )1111111 'i ttft -P4V. 4 Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 zr,>-;.**--'44t.•za ip.044,7434 Lane Util. Factor 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.94 1.00 1.00 0.97 0.86 0.88 0.97 0.86 1.00 6.41m, 4,o,-;,;4%.11,7473, iett-af,i1D 4tV rq:5* Flpb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4, aegitiltVIWAUSIMPWILIIAli Flt Protected 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 Wertnig-ft,Z20-Wit'" Talt 'MO '0.411 tIA;Z, 4,1„;,,WilstavOU 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 :17;je;A-Itfi'd- .'"',7!-).--.4:414,Ai,1ek5Zro P•i9-i:liila#10-5.,;-0:%106i1M61Akcf-,frA vAs_. pse :11M110 ' fr;- .111" 1.00 1.00 Flt Permitted Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.67 0.67. 0.67 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.88 0.88 0.88 4FA-Vjg;k:AqFWATtiAlligta- Vik,Y=E40112M:ft-ififixag!**,;.1100M3WtNitn-,7103AMVirOA UDR Reduction (vph) 0 0 19 eLiar:4VXi'Yif.3"W?gn-X?0611NV4kri;-10!W404rTAEW Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 0 0 182 0 0 311 3 0 0 3 Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) 3 8 7 4 5 2 1 6 25.1 39.2 39.2 29.5 43.6 43.6 5.6 47.6 47.6 19.2 61.2 61.2 git.*-igh-ViN,q;'gtgzV:gt;a:VMCAeN"-l"1"4'*AAVj*"5-lii*:MaeiGkir4;±AkW.FitiaiiZE''Sg:W 0.14 0.24 0.24 0.17 0.26 0.26 0.02 0.29 0.29 0.11 0.38 0.38 Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 1.5 Actuated gIC Ratio 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 vis Ratio Prot 0.01 0.01 vlc Ratio Progression Factor Delay (s) c0.17 0.01 0.01 0.20 c0.10 c0.25 ;arianigt:PlIatitt OtatMtif:OZNR840--AdA7414M-::-.40, g 0.06 0.02 0.02 0.96 0.03 0.15 0.86 0.69 0.15 0.92 0.66 0.01 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 57.1 45.1 45.1 83.4 41.8 43.3 143.8 49.4 40.6 94.3 40.3 29.7 Approach Delay (s) 48.7 73.9 49.9 49.4 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.58 viik.M.*:-00:7470.X.ittiOM%1:--1#.0014R,100' ,,,ZtTegcROMI-TaligOge7q541 intersection Capacity Utilization 85.4% ICU Level of Service c Critical Lane Group E KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Sun 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd Lane Configurations Ideal Flow (vphpi) Lane Util. Factor 'it+ 1900 1900 b`tl 1.00 0.95 Flpb, ped/bikes Fit Protected Flt Permitted Peak -hour factor, PHF x.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 ICN Religious Facility With Project ft+► t 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 `�1900 1�K59` 0-40- ,190Q 19 .. 0SiS0 19 9. 00 1.00 0.95t 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 CLiik 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 MORIKUM - 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.68 1.00 0.74 1.00 1.00 1.00 m spa e.l 0.88 0.88 0.88 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.71 0.71 0.71 RTOR Reduction (vph) 0 24 w�, _ �-i.� � � ���. ��,�5'� � '�� k ;. `�� �::�6e�-�.f�;s s am. ��`:"5��a✓>. a '� s @ % :'max Conft. Peds. (#/hr) 0.88 0.88 0.88 0 102 Protected Phases F 111`b5 a iiy 4. 4- k VV 5 0 sg�pc ., «tea c ua s 6.2 24.7 A f tedGreen, G( ) Actuated gIC Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) 0.06 0.39 1.5 4.0 6.7 25.2 0.07 0.40 1.5 4.0 9.7 9.7 0.12 0.12 2.0 2.0 X, a5. v. te �. 9.7 9.7 0.12 0.12 2.0 2.0 v/s Ratio Prot �. vlc Ratio Progression Factor 0.06 0.15 0.96 0.39 1.00 1.00 c0.07 c0.24 0.98 0.60 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.33 0.02 1.00 1.00 0.25 1.00 0.01 0.10 1.00 �i;3�� 1`��{}t���,F*�.�'��z�t€���4.-�`€� ��`.��a•',�n�.hr€f5�1 63��r','~�,�. L���.���'� j���'^�$�>�°.�5 Delay (s) Approach Delay (s) 100.7 12.2 25.9 101.7 13.7 22.6 21.3 22.2 21.6 24.4 22.2 21.8 INN HCM Volume to Capacity ratio ,•Wr tiAsw Via¢.,?? s5tr fl til 3 -. Intersection Capacity Utilization 0.46 52.0% ICU Level of Service c Crifical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 3 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Sun 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Coiibri ICTV Religious Facility With Project Lane Configurations .01P-4-700AN--4- Sign Control Peak Hour Factor IMP-aMili-A. '4 -PA Pedestrians Mtil 'F 44P - Walking Speed (ft/s) Right turn flare (veh) Median storage veh) flL pX, platoon unblocked --••• te- Free 0.97 0.97 41. 4 V '1V1.4:6WRAWAV = Free Stop :loot - • 241/41.WVA, * ;:f 0.98 0.98 0.98 17' • 0.62 V•X :%54470.1"'ia -.2WV`,A.'" • 42Z -M , AttrIni, kr-1.15:441142 •01.44ew-Terftr''''89-1,,,,t"' •,;e ,1-4114.41kafke--5.14,-".fi-_ vC1, stage 1 conf vol vCu, unblocked vol 410 971 365 giiitWafik,M41410-75WP: IC, 2 stage (s) LE-43,-AtWhik.1 4f5ttfr p0 queue free % Volume Left cSH y4:40firalw?toz Queue Length 95th (ft) igiA* Lane LOS 98 20 62 1700 1160 348 27 78 95 WMTA-4.-2Prerr‘T'-;:',7nAir.::#t 47,Z,VtLVt';.:10 Approach LOS Average Delay 41:6.&10ii,•Nwpigk. ,futigmextstafammt%4ftRv Analysis Period (min ,4,4140. d,ZN;:ztb-4VVafiW-f5-:V-TK. =;°'' avs,i44t. Rtetialfir KQA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 4 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Sun 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln Lane Configurations Volume (vph) —11b 56 Hourly flow rate (vph) 4Fiktr131. 90 17 10 122 104 19 Volume Total (vph) Volume Right (vph) Departure Headway (s) 68 110 21 14 165 ICTV Religious Facility With Project -o 5 108 Ve.A '-'10111a 141 30 5 9 177 7 146 68 130 44 177 153 14 305 0 0 141 21 6.5 5.9 6.4 NIFIS tz$4.-kfliAi.1 4 5.5 146 6.4 6.5 5.3 3%,4-rijageiP:.‘',..i1A-04-ARIre*:;;Yetgqtr.A-%!Ialtn.4WgariEWAV4:1V.:4gti?NleiVe-IW 521 577 536 627 511 527 639 9.2 Capacity (veh/h) )Q, Approach Delay (s) 12.0 9.9 10.0 HCM Level of Service B Analysis Period (min) %.;:17A;2:'-'-cret:MiierkAKZiatatialfgalil-454404-AiSnitag'Vtgtitlit6Art4,145TIN44-i: 15 KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 5 IIIII.1IiiiiI1HIii1!h•;; lilut ir', big I3 ttfaI1111 'wlI 1 -1111111TH IIII1 1. =•_- hi!IIIII;IIIi • .: I �1 II1n1'II11LJ1111'.in1111 I: III L !!!klIIIIIIIIII1 IIIiirtEIM �II1iihI11OC111111 mo■■Eiiue.ai4.1111prwoll u1■■r■ pmq��ike moen111110111111■■■■1e■ � memi1io■ip■■ie■■■o■ .mmirm ipil !iIIIIrim..!V•IIIP!I•!III Ii"InIHhILiIit1IJHuIH ilinFielligillinlinililli mummatimmimpAmommumminimmin mnsiaorrnmvcimmosuiWimmlmmoomm JociIocar3midi■eoo■ptmilit+t:�aassi■■ r gill' i 1 °1.r s o iz a .W414i s"; i (! 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L 00 ft 209 99' +£6 111,94 019199136 110610 11 .0099 99£94£6 STO1W-ti@ 01 0 901 V-Za 143:4-1 I ;;11;1•101.1 1 i 1 ■■■■.■!!!!! . 1111161 1111111MENMEM L_. a ; i g$;! g 3 185- gqiIi2 ,4gf m� mai gil �a6� ..3 a 0e®0€®®000®®®®®® w �1C�Io7 ������®�1+� ,t—dfgR.; 5gz.io 4 2 9 .! a w 3 3 t .4EIER ggg.gxgE 2 § §§ zigEZ igg§ ecxxxxx)(Deogoo® 1 A 41 CD z ZO cq g 1 z 71 431 0 1 os crisici• a COI 63.00+41. S2131410 AS , AVM.11.91.113arana kedY1.1PX.1493 11 ,00!99 Zalt+ZI L ON £1.1V+13 31 EL7.601: 100 r 31 96603i 18 Arra ;.f °.7 P. rk- .0 ��T���� �1L�3�� tiOa•£V10+15 W REMOVE AND SALVAGE SIGN 5 �C 1111111111111111 CXXXXX ocoNc Hcoo®® it 4 I S Et6"illi ! oe®®o® o@® ?Zr+cc wis 1,i4 (,r ;4741'11111 1 `,� er' � 5s t7 °e - 0 g o J 777-0 Rye SIGNING AND SIR NF Yp = ! SO 15 aoan I w2 MK xb g m 4!41 4 Nm p0 A VSW '�` t/1 :5 s< cJ PI om i; g. g g. wl ate. E z d 4" d 0. 6, 31 �aiAsn t4 �'� 4$ 4.6 r m a r 0 1d3� dOi 33s 3N111-101VIN 09+1-6 'VIS f; ca 12' Y1HI1E STRIPE ECg 5 s a pi 2 g. a O M OL 133HS 33S 0÷6 'V1S Igitfiliii-gui 0 114 Naos. 1103111110=1111 g ,G1117: it El w O. ING GENERAL SIGNING AND DER .BAR CROSS 1 S a S 0 0.2 Z q a i o c_.1 s61 000000®00®@®@@0®® ®®o®o®o 41 .,U 00411 1 a 6 C4 A LA (51 0.0 • n 8,4 p Z m M 8 tr d ip n m r8i 8 8 0 8 8 8.i b 0 8 735 Est gt of 11 Qt SVIODJN a WC) 0 oz Ix CC a3- 1 < U -J 2 52 Lao . te Id Le W C I� ltl 1— W _ , 3 a4 rw IS f N N d �rS M n MJ`N N H q N 11 f 1 H n Wred YE 01 A i1 LA Cf) F- 6 41 g 6 APPENDIX G Intersection Level of Service Worksheets Cumulative Year 2013 Conditions Exncluding Roripaugh Ranch Project KOA Corporation November 2010 Approach Delay (s) 71.9 362.4 .4 Ex+Amb+CP-Roripaugh Fri 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICN Religious Facility Lane Configurations IdealFlow (vphpl) - -Ism Lane UfiI. Factor el. ITA 6 f Flpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected Fit Permitted *PONY -41 t ' ++r lin ft nI) +++ r vivi 411) 4..,::,,,„Ems, l23 233 2 , j,� e>z e ms_ t f :......5'"i „� 40.1 1 ` �'~ a 2 r`� 8 1900 1900 19£00 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 .,_2...rMI���(.a�.S�..�.A�,iT��NISi 'fir, f ,L, a,-": 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 0.91 Fra • VAL•�'`t.: 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 c�r yfi< 1 0lAAI. "w2ragIP ov6 6 #w 91 J 1•v :01-Sa- =,- 0"95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 -i SSS_ 51 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 � 0.95::rr1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 :'toaitva ra .n6 Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) Confl. Peds. (#/hr) 0.94 0.94 0.94 0.85 0.85 0:85 0.90 0.90 1 316 163 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 • Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated o/C Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) 9.9 29 4.4 $,. %Ar . e TM. .3 22.0 14.5 P33.9 20.0 22.0 0.05 0.2 1.5 0 2.0 0.14 0.09 0.23 0.13 0.14 C 52.8 14.5 � 1.5 z:q 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 20.0 50.8 0.37 0.09 0.13 4.0 1.5 1.5 0.36 4.0 VIS Ratio Prot v]c Ratio .-44 Progression Factor Delay (s) iR 0.04 0.18 0.05 0.86 0.94 0.37 1.00 1.00 1.00 sooigiA 70, c0.08 c0.22 c0.31 0.14 c0.34 0.91 0.97 2.47 0.96 0.92 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.06 0.21 0.33 0.75 1.69 0.93 • y, p 1.00 1.00 1.00 .00 94.4 73.8 52.8 91.0 75.0 734.5 88.4 48.2 78.4 380.0 50.4 58.7 151.6 ;r474i� �'3 r fi erre - tee: r ^z HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 1.12 AgitaiAnaliliV 4:VAL; Intersection Capacity Utilization Critical Lane Group 98.7% ICU Level of Service KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 4)31n. -16P.' _- Ex+Amb+CP-Roripaugh Fri 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations Ideal Flow (vphpl) .,1111„•c,111114.'.,-; rffi��a 1900 1900 Lane Util. Factor Flpb, ped/bikes • Fit Protected Flt Permitted 1.00' 1.00 1.00 1.00 _7tr ^v1111�N y 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 al.+.WS .c 0.97 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.91 i .00 6 A) Li-s's tir 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 „..t.:6 -1t SaSSigaitifattargat 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 a.95 1.00 WI 46 1.00 MI a 0.0 Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) Confl. Peds. (##!hr) 0.58 vow 0.58 0.58 0.72 0.72 0.72 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.88 10 287 253 295 185 169 0.88 0.88 630 Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated g/C Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) 25.0 39.0 -•nom 0.13 0.21 1.5 2.0 30.0 44.0 44.0 16.8 50.0 50.0 35.0 68.2 Rio 3 ai..= '. `�a 4 �„ 4in�. - . 0.16 0.24 0.24 0.08 0.27 0.27 0.19 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 0.38 4.0 iPnNif v/s Ratio Prot vlc Ratio Progression Factor Delay (s) 4' 0.15 c0.28 1.19 1.36 1.00 1.00 c0.19 0.05 0.07 c0.45 1.20 0.23 0.30 0.89 1.66 r -r, 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1 .00 c0.25 0.33 0.89 1.32 0.86 arf 1.00 1.00 1.00 gEi Approach Delay (s) 197.0 246.9 228.4 180.5 52.9 54.0 120.7 361.6 84.6 234.1 53.6 130.2 306.9 93.2 HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 1.50 intersection Capacity Utilization 130.0%. ICU Level of Service Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 1 Ex+Amb+CP-Roripaugh Fri 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations Ideal Flow (vphpl) 10.00.,f Lane Util. Factor Flpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected Auneg,i9 Fit Permitted C 4- 4\ t \o• -4/ - ' ze • -‘:Ow'''r • 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 ARA* Mpt 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 At' rtV• -paIiVide =':' A•Ni*A 19.1,c40014,4t.i..1'41-AN,,ek.,:li 4 U -V-,..4- ".4.0.1. . ..,,m... .0 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 m-_,-1m.,.11440n•t=•,-:...1,,,,4V3-..-.1,MVGMvkitti351&v. :je:. a. _. t::'*g1-Vim.71,,:-.;,1'4.-.5,-.-.1.,5,.,,,Ft4-, 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 tftttg%AAMV.fr&XOXdtfitXrXX,Vf?;tt.f---,'-'EiMe,NlttfSfV,Afikit *44-WAgraVA:.-7,,SK .;.,-••,-13k,A§,;,-,-, vAva...-e.).3..44.,,I,Z.4.-1;0:'," -......,..2"-.Z.,:a....,,,,T,-•-•-::-:-'k',:."-- 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.24 1.00 0.75 1.00 -.11N Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) Confl. Peds.p/hr) 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.53 0.53 0.53 4-45-Pria, 44-161tiV46W4,..el iv' ff. •a. 0 11 10 14 299 81 ligitcm5A4K51400, g,441tIO,OVItliOneIR*6 Protected Phases Actuated Green, G ( Actuated gIC Ratio 25.0 42.6 0.24 0.43 Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 4.0 3.9 21.5 32.1 32.1 0.01 1.5 0.20 4.0 0.31 0.31 Asigat yr 2.0 2.0 32.1 32.1 0.31 d•t;4' - 47- ,ft_ROI 2.0 0.31 2.0 44,4.105,3.(c.4a3p,,,praf,„qpINITAM.'i,107,-.1014:013M-.61.AME,4-4.411.0-Tik vis Ratio Prot c0.22 0.27 iq,MaVgiff0.14q-'41-1:46„.40:x:- vt-V.; N.,s2 vlc Ratio Progression Factor ril.f504 Delay (s) Approach Delay (s) HCM Volume to Capacity rafio 0.92 0.62 1.00 1.00 0.02 c0.14 1.83 0.72 .00 1.00 58.0 21.5 576.4 38.5 Intersection Capacity Utilization Critical Lane Group 32.2 0.70 str, 70.6 0.01 0.52 0.02 1.00 1.00 40"f".I.V.OP 0.11 0.21 0.35 1.00 1.00 27.3 21.9 23.4 24.7 14,•its CA% 88.9% ICU Level of Service •••171..eol.; :Y1345144 -61.194:4T 26.2 24.5 ff,f2aiistoViAweit-04-miu* 6, e KOA Corporation Synch ro - Report Page 3 c.1 Ex+Amb-'-CP-Roripaugh Fri 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations T.) Sou A.Taog_o*.v., v Sign Control Free Free Stop 0106144-;1::'1,;:-'14357:441:'001o. 1J%''•":1:4.V.StAtiftVilig,oAtagt, 0.78 0.78 0.90 0.90 0.42 0.42 4:-.6A.A.A%1,-54*-V4':'44144 Peak Hour Factor tratoAva--, " -6;4, 4-'1 • Pedestrians lat,',A12101111SIMIONMINO-i- :201SVIStr Walking Speed (Ws) Right turn flare (veh) Median storage veh) waasb:htla,WIA pX, platoon unblocked vC1, stage 1 conf vol vCu, unblocked vol tC, 2 stage (s) p0 queue free % krt:V •;"*P"- • +A .4.1.457 'Ag.e• Si-P'ASEAFIOr "4-•v$A2-44.4. 822 100 • s...,P•;.0,44.!Y `'361 A?1:$":Ag.§"iiWg.V44-jgfrA'Alt Volume Left cSH iat#T-OZIrk22*C414*.i., Queue Length 95th (ft) Lane LOS Approach LOS Average Delay 1700 816 1700 0.0 Analysis Period (min) 15 tlii4ML.40/Viikiikt 1414 100 822 822 100 , • .,,,i•kr",ro- • kV • ,-.&-i-15zs lg§W.4:WW: -y. ''''14Veri•tVArx 4Fel-t-t,WRIVE<M41442-47-6iN0' ";.rn zzazo-- •, ' ,• KOA Corporation Synchro 7- Report Page 4 :1 Ex+Amb+CP-Roripaugh Fri 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln ICTV Religious Facility f —1111. d Lane Configurations 1"4 7„,.,_ 4, ,,,,I,N-P4--mt.,_ Mg-A4Skg-lw., - tAtkfir"'":17-it-oV-,17 N4?;4g::-..-'q-, ' ,•'%''t-', - Volume (vph) 111 63 41 10 77 175 35 8 P, athu KheditHftrikailt. 'ga:4.4.vd,,,,,d,m,,,, eA;:-.mx-i,,,,,,..c Hourly flow rate (vph) 137 78 51 11 88 199 42 = 10 T.) 6 159 17 129 'Vrgr'w-AitM 187 20 152 Volume Total (vph) 137 128 11 286 58 187 172 J, Iiiitke;]" :.-fltVititillt,- --11Ali:1017 ,aiiVg.OMMINASilk-zi Volume Right (vph) 0 51 0 199 7 0 152 iya4irmilwifgo-N4r -,w .- _,T‘..,-,7dR.A..e ala ..i WO 007 W50 Departure Headway (s) 6.6 5.9 6.6 5.6 6.7 6.6 5.5 -v. -*4 .6 '2ileatriAila ',..;k 579 L!--.6,14-413ai Capacity (veh/h) 513 513 610 481 514 615 ,:44M,14 4.344s4grag_S-4, v741,-.e4itzliatsilo 4-ratke?tI'4.--lit--Z*NrtVi3`iegiAreiv=44 Approach Delay (s) 10.0 11.8 10.5 10.6 ANQR'J-Ft-MtS(W4$,'C'=t'kg4".:aktl.t):iVit4:-4;;t.-Wtgh!AV;.e.4fq`Nk„-;tkt'r2.krgqM"NVV.:-kVit:.44-Xt-;f.:N'V.1:A-*Z=-VV--: HCM Level of Service laff.#4feeklIV*Vt: Analysis Period min 44.41-4±44.:4Cg4-111.• 15 :341::-Arat; KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 5 Ex+Amb+CP-Roripaugh Sun 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configuration_ s Lane Ufil. Factor Flpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected Fit Permitted J t 'yFL��glr' c +1 r ' ' ' + )1 i M.Y.Q. ,_.a�g:gn,'ita rux� )3 ;0;1::'- ` ... s `zE.... , r "MOSIV! f -n x IV. ,.. 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97 0.91 1.00 0.97 0.91 Peak -hour factor, PHF 4X1 4144. 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1 00 1.00 1.00 10A0 1.00 Mtebt4"`L', .� �. n{+A,z_e9 i' �. �,7��.6 Y 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 $ 1.00 0.95 1.00 P v 4 A S 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 �a TK„Mnz 0.84 0.84 0.84 0.87 0.87 0.87 0.98 0.98 0.98 0.89 0.89 0.89 RTOR Reduction (vph) 0 0 220 0 940:Mik ` ©' o Conti. Peds. (Mr) 0 319 0 0 196 0 7 4 0 11 Protected Phases Actuated Green, G ( Actuated gIC Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) VAS 9.7 22.3 10.7 13.4 26.0 20.3 10.7 0.06 0.17 0.07 0.09 0.20 0.15 0.07 1.5 - 2.0 1.5 .. 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 39.0 13.4 20.3 48.6 0.32 0.09 0.15 0.40 4.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 F h `'per i,s�o ems' tr y vis Ratio Prot vlc Ratio 0.05 cO.15 0.01 c0.08 c0.11 0.10 0.06 0.17 0.01 c0.19 c0.32 0.82 0.89 0.15 0.88 0.54 0.65 anti • 0.85 0.52 0.13 1.22 0.79 ro Apa % w.e a u''o4 =7 "t: Progression Factor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Delay (s) L �;I 0.4 Approach Delay (s) 1.00 1.00 1 .00 1.00 1.00 1.00 73.9 60.9 49.8 73.6 40.6 49.6 74.3 31.9 47.3 161.4 31.6 60.5 52.4 41.2 68.7 .itsry .t51 ,s+`Q HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.93 pp Intersection Capacity Utilization Critical Lane Group 79.0% ICU Level of Service KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 } Ex+Ambi-CP-Roripaugh Sun 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility J Lane Configurations T, rI 4+4 . .„, 1+4 Ideal Flow (vphpl) 314411"g:lb;' 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 -e--.4":1U-AAA%--$V,MitOt4m. - voTity,5-N m5e: Aft: 1.00 1.00 0.97. 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 0.91 MIATEMA*14;44014rg :"V'S 4.6%- rlifu 000}PlairCANAK ,kNA0i41/4;abalftliP 4:04-;z• Lane Util. Factor Flpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected Flt Permitted Etair • 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 . . AIPSE-Ar" ZfOrg:WeiMM,., LIWISWIRPENVIV6?-151a4P49.0: 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 • 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 IftEmai Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) g-A-*'UNKT)fiA-I1,0% Confi. Peds. (#/hr) AV.1 0.67 0.67 0.67 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.88 0.88 0.88 20 124:4. e :q-iA A .5-1.434VA . 159 lAa 117 k'"" 4 ,..z.#-ZWI...)...,2041g4:-'!..0.4'.4.3•1•W.e. Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) iffilerfkr--!` 25.1 39.1 !AY, 29.4 43.4 43.4 -A • gEf5..-T:klaglrggag. .7-'1.4*40*1.-.A•trAl. "•••. `..?'z?"4'• ; . , Actuated g/C Ratio 0.13 0.22 Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 2.0 0.16 0.24 0.24 70: 2 8.0 4a2 staj 49.2 • 31.8 c,,e04-00. 1.5 • 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 =Wall, • '=q6p5=''''. 4.0 2.0 73.0 TiaDite2., 0.42 4.0 ' tt4V.1.-A vis Ratio Prot v/c Ratio 0.01 0.01 .a‘4' --•`" . •A•2,4P-', 0.06 • 0.04 w:41,541.+:13r-V_E*st,0;zv.V Progression Factor Delay (s) .1•••• '44:1 t;.L,r6 11:Y=Z.ItZ4FS-., 2'.1:4z1-.1.91WAX1t74,171V-0,*4,51.•;4' n c0.16 0.01 • f4 ;i 1.03 1.03 0.03 •44:11.-W, , 401 s ..t•• 14! • 0.03 c0.24 igkef.*Ule,42, c0.17 0.30 raY5-tal, '6* Pe, 0.13 0.94 0.88 0.34 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.01 0.71 101-tite'- .00 1.00 1.00 1.00 64.1 52.2 117.0 48.6 49.8 181.7 65.1 49.1 122.1 41.5 Approach Delay (s) 55.8 98.1 66.1 55.1 t','&4,E,AX;i:AciliOr-lk,..VIT...-C411a.4-tkiktvoi,..,„(wisaitiv5givyi-il-i-Aww-2,1mtp-AitoxemA-oet HCM Volume to Capacity ratio, 0.74 glaW4,-Ft3:eltatarl tifreeiff- " Intersection Capacity Utilization 89.3% • • • •• • .."10 c Critical Lane Group ICU Level of Service AriN t•m• KOA Corporation Synch ro - Report • Page 2 Exp-Amb+CP-Roripaugh Sun 3: Nicolas Rd & General Kearny Rd ICN Religious Facility V Ideal Flow (vphpl) Lane Util. Factor AvAIATAF 8aNgt p 1900 1900 1900 ��v3 qe:A< `b 1.00 095 -wrgiOn. 1.00 1.00 Flpb ped/bikes Ate N Fit Protected Fit Permitted 1900 '1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 100 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 i ext 4,_'�'. 8D5 , , , �$ i r ,. . ; l , 1 `i ' .0 0.95 1.00 0.68 1.00 3 0.95 1.00 Lbeer 100t 1.00 100 100 .r. d 0.95 1.00 0.76 1.00 Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) Confl. Peds. (#Ihr) 0.88 0.88 0.88 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.71 �q+ 0 0 2 0 0 0.71 0.71 0.88 0.88 0.88 e`''�; 99 1444111-7.0 Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated qIC Ratio Vehicle Extension (s) sP 5.5 16.2 0.05 0.29 1.5 4.0 SVA .-48*:n:Pt:ktVif*eP 141K 5 2 xa �� rs y -ry-�'E• 5.9 16.6 0=06 0.30 1.5 4.0 S 9.7 9.7 0.15 0.15 2.0 2.0 SIA 9.7 0.15 0.15 2.0 9.7 2.0 1:00011-At0 , v/s Ratio Prot Atiratikar vlc Ratio 0.06 1.02 0.33 1.00 1.00 0.10 Progression Factor Delay (s) Approach Delay (s) 117.7 13.1 36.6 AWE 4.,0¢® c0.07 c0.14 1.04 0.47 1.00 1.00 118.0 13.6 33.6 0.00 0.28 0.00 1.00 1.00 17.7 16.7 17.7 0.01 0.10 0.09 1.00 1.00 17.0 17.0 zF 17.0 �;��^�'�'� C f i y < <., .. =�.� u.k,.,c. • J 3 a'`� �?' 'm' v"'. �' g ,,s,f krid"* ?4 r" ` : 4i �' S HCM Volume to Capacity ratio Intersection Capacity Utilization c Critical Lane Group 0.35 44.7% ICU Level of Service KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 3 Ex+Amb+CP-Roripaugh Sun 4: Nicolas Rd & Calle Colibri ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations Sign Control Free '4%a 4- 4 v Free Stop Peak Hour Factor 0.�9�7,, .0.97g-406741.44611 '`,44 0.98 0.98 Pedestrians Walking Speed (ftls) Right turn flare Median storage veh) pX, platoon unblocked 0.62 0.62 - nteA . �gr�T'FR'-iX 'Jf J. .� C'L A' F '.T• 3,.�.� - - vC1, s#a9 e 1 conf vol vCu, unblocked vol IC, 2 stage (s) 386 692 371 »r",r��:v'�s�Y.,���'°�e-s'-����':�';�3���,a. - - - •."w'�.����ea�"ac•4r��4�.�.��_�'-�_�,_ p0 queue free % Volume eft 100 99 100 4,Tlfrk;,tiaragfAVAFI;15 V441 -- 504.7 V4q,e ANie- NAP F1 -"tom' "^A� kF'} cam^ �S®1�dO',vti : +`rt' * r.aU.;..'hk. ��l S,. •F n�.e�Ga sY`��s ..t+: :F�?-'`-w'3iiY;� V10031 - cSH Queue Length 95th (ft) i3y .r. —`� ,,, G� .51.3 ��._r:;.�ii�'4'�St''�z�:;.�•x,,�r � 9.3�.� ��`.,r-�����.v'����.��'F$'!�'�.r`s ����".v �'��-a�.�'s��' ����..� Lane LOS R ‘4I13.4 -ft T610141::,X?..z21044-it 1700 1184 413 �. r.-... +. 1 �: •�`� ...a�".°r„ a tu... --. r-.,... ,.�.yS,�-aod?�'�.,�"R. ��._ �'.s.�_`��°,v�= k�a�`n�s"°�i} �`?������� Approach LOS B Average Delay 0.1 '-4044-4;41,1 ..11.-affitriitaci-itA"4:41:Kiekg,4-t-ittk Analysis Period (min) 15 41'" - 4f:S er Q KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 4 Ex+Amb+CP-Roripaugh Sun 5: La Serena Way & Walcott Ln ICTV Religious Facility Lane Configurations 33 Volume (vph) Hourly flow rate (vph) 40 Volume Total (vph) Volume Right Right (vph) y...Lacq Departure Headway (s) lt Capacity (vehlh) Approach Delay (s) 3,9 HCM Level of Service 40 ,e4V .81".„ 1 TP. 46 17 10 57 98 19 tPi •„.. - 010 56 21 14 77 132 30 21 555 8.0 628 14 209 44 169 93 AtTi, 132 9 0 86 4k- _ - 569 8.8 681 586 9.1 - 6.1 5.4 6.0 5.0 5.7 5.9 579 9.0 4.8 • 712 125 5 64 • >1,-,?..WP•Aai'41.t.' ,Itii:A.5.-ingfAMONI:1-0442414vZ ht4r rkA, Analysis Period (min) 15 44.14t1.4.41.5--elt7409.t!za,a, KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 5 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK APPENDIX H Mitigation Measures - Cumulative Year 2013 Mitigation Measures KOA Corporation November 2010 Ex +Amb +Project Fri 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility f --fg• Lane Configurations '11 To III + r ) +44 ri 1 fil, -, r ,„„--,_w.,„,..w.t....,,-,.is,„..4..,gli,: .,,v,i,m.-..„,.-„,,vck:.yf..:,t:,,,,hit_g,-,4,,,,,,k.tis._e,tv.,,,k=,:ao,w_,..fa,w..0 ,,,.::7,,4.,,.--0 dil NAsge,Vulki4 -illgl:: gq4';:!;%rgagart*Wsia+2 V. - f'1,t0oPiNzif..zo,"50,•24.gf-114V-1.6.Vit mlmiz---4- ' °IP :,",--i-A-' ! ° -.,. Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 tftitt§:fllfgr413lli9DM5r §"'''"-'-*UtnN 1.00 1.00 0.97 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 0.91 - .- -Itikv-,14A: Lane Util. Factor Flpb, ped/bikes atft--.41.*441:dr '0172, Fit Protected Flt Permitted grIt;i-rf01064:1 Afilehtf: e e - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 "ltialittgalatsj43SUMMOSSISIM.14,01 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 g 1'5= AV,lg);klOfaingtirr,'',_:.,Lreng4E4.ctfkOjff-oktg 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 cr4V-..outriNAAr Peak -hour factor, PHF 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.72 0.72 0.72 .0.82 0.82 0.82 0.88 0.88 0.88 C-15ri.4,10731.1)t.0.4-ae.,?'ii:4_44$-Id,;%21,01-2tRAiiit9s, LA°141%.!,L.itg, RTOR Reduction (vph) 11 187 170 r-0.1 Conti. Peds. (#/hr) 287 295 169 y,04-417-1„ 630 ,)-4-06w, .-Plo .4-1471A -41t ,,v.ctz 4441'1 Protected Phases P*,:0,04.0.0.40AitAff?Aapop*Alivz,.,0414i4i1V-Ai% Actuated Green, G (s) 19.5 45.0 q.;;;;>:;18.eagi*A15:,-;;e0R,046etilkti,:oLut:4?-16-- Actuated gIC Ratio 4i41.4001,:;t: 22.5 48.0 48.0 16.2 58.0 58.0 26.5 68.3 0.10 0.25 0.11 0.26 0.26 0.08 0.32 0.32 0.14 0.38 !:,,:l'oaqqQ4:ZiWerAtkOzitfitt*.620:31-r-74t-t-WW:tigeiV24,4-adOina40,9P.-ie41," Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 2.0 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 l'AP(242114-MW:r -6;:t1t;%4NVOtifg4t;15A-61105PNIM'IP-RVENSTRNEOWA''.., 'Veri40 560:3'" vis Ratio Prot 0.15 ..•ivre‹.1.oi-.4 e • 2"..4r.,*1.: v/c Ratio 1.58 c0.28 1.15 c0.20 0.05 1.74 0.21 0.07 c0.45 c0.24 0.33 0.50 0.92 1.40 0.85 1.75 0.85 'Al 1th afigijA 144e:, rXVZtag 4; Progression Factor 1-21 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.27 0.46 0.15 1.00 1.00 'I'zikt2,FFO-Wrilii:3WP:Z15.71.Rilkil'IY,:-A5=-F-7.1:1MOP4q?A,$:'16"7,.2-.43W-.A.,:ARS'n.Wg;e--$3 41-5- #Valf.V.-". Delay (s) 362.1 155.2 420.1 48.7 53.5 107.8 206.8 10.1 427.7 52.8 .Z:-.:"...t,'-.;;;---0,--DIVZ.V215-7-5A*1-1Z:4-'4 Approach Delay (s) 231.8 278.9 169.8 134.2 1 `1‘7-11:,--'1'elL11-4e41.14„1:iheeVte.T.11-:11,:cnIrei:efe.:;4> e1z:Peejg j5E-3',.a,:i_.E.:;:;to:ro,kk,:a-,Aqvi-1,mm-Ak-2'93--t_;*ec_-kt:o,,,ttm6.-..-- HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 1.52 Ylf:Millekr:Irigr:gtet7,444;NE-SX4 toP„Lir-3. Intersection Capacity Utilization i',Y.VAWSMAIN-14.AT-PS*4-0"Aeliff*alr-e44', 1 30.4% ICU Level of Service Critical Lane Group KOA Corporation Synchro 7- Report Page 2 . • • • • • • • • Ex + Amb + Project Sun 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility • 1 Lane Configurations r ft+ T latu, -.00-paa-trAgso7v 074tpall.-66%wiNtipswyosomm4-040migi,Ali • . - • ...Avfv,^ Ideal Flow (vphpl) 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 YMANI-...42•40-taAttig$ 'W*12MMCIEr'"IMINifittaiging Lane Util. Factor 1.00 1.00 0.97 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 0.91 $1644034446gIkkilM! V°50:471fAbiLIZIA21 P,••• Flpb, ped/bikes 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Y.4,`42:tAt14*-57:4'"W4410*44W,c1-. VO, -1., a r e ,%tQJ 4.4-kA4' Akg _ - Fit Protected satitaest 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 MOW rittegtmonaitz.„ . • Flt Permitted 0.95 1.00 • 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 • Peak -hour factor, PHF itCPANagrio, RTOR Reduction (vph) d'PakkikleXig.ziaTIVVWAN:7AINzsrott:7.-:76t4w4:w..,3.v 1.00 1.00 1.00 A1,31.74,',4•4 0.67 0.67 0.67 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.88 31F, -4,•• • Tr.•- • ::•rng•O le"liAT•11X-Yt.W4a..15.2F-WArArtXf-,:iliAket • •• 0 20 0 130 4.1444,Agjgi'49t Confi. Peds. (#/hr) 0.88 0.88 R.44-,AN.A1:0422A;a4P-44 123 Protected Phases *JiVOIMVigai401%."7 ;7410 f"%, V12D4E Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated g/C Ratio 8.5 39.5 32.0 63.0 63.0 Mia.'4444fig.E.-ig;9440141§,146 4zts'AttirDt-h- '4.417t;S:V4.1-7'4144., 8.0 47.4 47.4 33.1 72.5 0.03 0.21 0.17 0.35 0.35 0.03 0.26 0.26 0.18 0.41 474 • - r - • .0„) • - ill-taWabWreV4L4' '7'0" - ,-reV-- Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 2.0 1.5 2.0 -0-605ZAA7.4.0.!;"'i''-: VIWIII:feSg:nitVAMPligan? vis Ratio Prot 0.01 0.01 '11,10-'6ktr'-4.31q-SZ 0.26 0.04 1.00 0.02 0.12 0.96 0.93 0.42 0.99 0.72 v/c Ratio c0.17 0.01 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 f%W"'•.: .•fg • -1;F:44-,111;14r*.11V-WP5Pahttit,04.10*, 0.03 c0.24 c0.18 0.30 „. Tg-1:4K-ritk;i414'*-F Progression Factor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.27 0.74 0.37 1.00 1.00 ifq(Kike`2:4404tA-:44`,.d a*-,Zbeetkit.4-;*:--11-PV:ANW%-1--v,45-VAI--tOM' Delay (s) Approach Delay (s) 90.8 53.1 64.4 106.1 35.9 37.3 205.3 56.8 21.7 117.4 44.4 87.8 55.0 56.9 Pr. !..1•7•2: HCM Volume to Capacity ratio 0.71 D,-±1MqNr1.--100ta.exv-4' IAA :lefid*Atg"-h-M02,-k14itArt ,:ta*. Intersection Capacity Utilization 00.k606111,iite-4r -"iv- Critical Lane Group 89.5% ICU Level of Service *V.,W*4#41#4.,-..,qtia0-444-0t- •,, KOA Corporation Synch ro 7 - Report Page 2 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Protected Phases Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 1: Margarita Rd & Winchester Rd ICN Religious Facility With Project Lane Configurations f�%+TT�4 r 1' 14 ' 1' f14 j('� 1, lgp� Ideal Flow(vphpl) 1900 ri1900 1900 1900 1900, 19 0r 0 ° .1900 a: 1900 1900 S 1900 1900 1900 900 -11.R7 A. 1.00 0.97 0.95 1.00 0.97' 0.91 :.'t416* 146 1.00 ; .9" 0 G4-40 Lane Util. Factor Flpb, ped/bikes Flt Protected Flt Permitted 0.97 0.95 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 401 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 ra k 4 k .}Seit'� . .. �,`i�� _1Plik5?•ii _ Stt.vt 414 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 0.95 1 .00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 4651 VZ • 34.0;)c-wo-Pil -'.yea Peak -hour factor, PHF RTOR Reduction (vph) Cont Peds. (#/hr) 0.94 0.94 0.94 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 0 0 138 0 257 1 0 0 76 0 0 4 v/c Ratio r.7 ps6rp�et{t r� { e 3?0� o P€`®. .-t.L 7yi,;:f qa ark' Y' s -x+i "a gta f' to ireen: � � .(.-�"F�'S����;_ ���:¢��'''�`4.-; o � �r�`'��.��rT-� kgs. „fir Ue Progression Factor Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated g1C Ratio 9.5 31.0 0.04 0.1 26.6 14.5 8 36.0 41.5 26.6 65.0 14.5 41.5 79.9 6 0.14 0.07 0.19 0.23 0.14 0.36 0.07 0.23 4.7.:YWAC4t-'9r9 n i4 n :'Sire -r' ._'�" Vehicle Extension (s) 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 2.0 1.5 1.5 4.0 1.5 0.45 1.5 4.0 vls Ratio Prot 0.05 0.18 0.07 0.08 c0.22 c0.36 1.28 1.11 0.14 c0.41 c0.09 0.22 0.38 0.49 1.15 1.15 1.60 0.98 1.13 1.30 0.96 0.84 Delay (s) • Approach Delay (s) 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.84 0.47 `r�"` r �,��,,��x�-.��,��a�?� ..,�,c '`��,,✓ sf m�,'����-���...i"�-�a� 251.5 143.4 68.3 184.9 150.7 347.8 107.9 118.3 265.4 �.�y_.t kir3rt�Y gm 71.3 21.7 143.3 242.1 127.9 35.6 Z C T� H P.-3 t .,;�5��s.•.a.< �� sem:: �s��.��3 �r`aaFr-" �.-,s'' HCM Volume to Capacity ratio Intersection Capacity Utilization c Critical Lane Group 1.31 ,.�d�l ( f C "�- c+ t Ic'y}fir P�`'�-r`a �' x3 a r t:..•4c� n,.v-�,(� - '�..ka 105.5% ICU Level of Service VliKa 4 r�: 'as`. w KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 1 Ex+Amb+CP+Roripaugh Fri 2: Nicolas Rd & Winchester Rd ICTV Religious Facility With Project t pL�ane Configurations + + T� vim +ps �{�" 'VI - rjT 'i tilt '1� b` :- ;I: -�i, `� i�.� a7 T`3Sn `'a iii 5 '6 x 13 �7Y .,`x-�' Y 5 w.,,4 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 irSakr cap 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.94 1.00 1.00 0.97 0.86 0.88 0.97 0.86 1.00 Ideal Flow (vphpl) Lane UtiI. 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Factor Flpb, ped/bikes Fit Protected 30:€3 Fit Permitted t 1900 1900 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 0.95 1.00 1 1900 1900 1900 1900 0.97 1.00 1.00 +J r 44 '247z0444.40121 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1900 1.00 0.91 1.00 1.00 0.91 4 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 y° { x ,,�-T} - 0.95 1 00 100 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 1.00 0.95 1.00 me's 1.00 1.00 4, olt 01„-A-, , 5msi,-ttxze �tatu 00`Te.., 1:71<4. Peak -hour factor, PHF .,}.: 1j, x` 6 jf � °` " r 9 Q.i 0 G '-0' i..`r�a� .T '`. C 't '� 1"c' RTOR Reduction (vph) 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.72 0.72 0.72 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.88 0.88 0.88 0 11 0 0 0 187 0 0 175 0 5 0 Confl. Peds. 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(#/hr) Protected Phases Actuated Green, G (s) Actuated gIC Ratio taiinfiainrv Vehicle Extension (s) 0.67 0.67 0.67 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.88 0.88 0.88 20 8.5 39.0 0.03 0.21 1.5 2.0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 33.5 64.0 64.0 146 0.18 0.36 1.5 2.0 8.0 e g 45.3 130 Vi -Age! 45.3 34.2 71.5 0.36 0.03 0.25 0.25 0.18 0.40 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 fx'ikt v/s Ratio Prot RAlt vlc Ratio Progression Factor Delay (s) 0.01 0.01 0.26 0.04 .00 1.00 90.8. 53.5 ezb c0.18 0.01 0.03 c0.24 'xY4 fdB; 1.00 0.02 0.14 0.96 0.98 1.00 1.00 1.00 t26 0.74 c0.18 0.30 0.46 0.99 0.38 1.00 0.73 1.00 104.5 35.2 36.8 204.4 65.9 23.7 116.1 45.4 • R. .<.>c>gitifugeri:.1-eR443).1.4.644b*A..<t0r -� .,':�€-r Aa-;vf -VA EINR.:a .. y Approach Delay (s) 64.7 85.7 62.1 57.8 ° [ � I L-si r �` i�;, R �.� ��.. ��� exp � � '''-�' � § ^s.. ,� �.�?,��T�.--� 'E������ �.'�•� ai �� +.t' .,,, h�,A�.�s� ;�fc„ UCw � n-�}o i �I bw �a�. �o�.r �•,�T� � �G '�i� �' � � ��`=� e� �� � p '�"�°'tu� ;;a€,. ��.. .� � ��-"3 �..._,� � � f�.�,�,,�,,'y+ �s.� .. RCM Volume to Capacity ratio Intersection Capacity Utilization 0.73 90.1% Critical Lane Group ICU Level of Service 444M`e : OP - KOA Corporation Synchro 7 - Report Page 2 Patrick Richardson From: John Steinmetz[johnsteinmetz@globalrecordings.net] Sent: Monday, November 01, 2010 10:08 AM To: Patrick Richardson Subject: Mosque Dear Sir, I just spoke with you and wanted to offer my support to Imam Mahmoud Harmoush and those who wish to build a mosque here in Temecula. Please stay here and enjoy our community and help us to be a better community! John Steinmetz 1 October 11, 2010 City of Temecula Planning Commission, My name is Brian Bell. 1 am the pastor of Calvary Murrieta. My wife and land two adult children have been residents in Temecula since March of 1985,.and we love our city. 1 am writing you regarding the building of a Mosque in our city. I would first point out I am not writing in regards to the Mosques building codes, noise ordinance, etc. as I know they will obviously need to comply, as would any new development. I am simply writing in regards to the recent "bad press" that the Islamic Center of Temecula Valley (ICTV) has received. I have called the center's Imam, Mahmoud Harmoush, to share my endorsement of a permanent house of worship for them. My reasoning is because our country was built on Freedom of Religion, all religions, not just the one I hold to. I believe there has been some in our community who assume all Muslims are extremists...which is as foolish as all Christians believe in blowing up abortion clinics. I have traveled to many Muslim countries and have enjoyed sharing my faith with them and hearing of their faith as we reasoned together. I know many beautiful Muslim families who are all about providing for and loving their family, community, and loving their country where they reside. Last I checked our Statue of Liberty still reads: "Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to, I lift my lamp beside the golden door.!" I hope the planning commission will make their decision based on the building, the area, the codes, but not in any way hold prejudice against a people group, nor a religious group. I will be praying for your decision. I appreciate all your hard work for our city. Thanks for listening, Pastor Brian Bell Calvary Murrieta 24225 Monroe Ave. • Murrieta, Ca. 92562 • Phone 951.677.5667 • Fax 951.698.4896 City of Temecula Planning Commission 43200 Business Park Drive Temecula, CA 92589 Dear Planning Commission Members: 27601 Sun City Blvd., #270 Sun City, CA 92586 August 20, 2010 This letter is in response to certain actions reported in the Riverside Press - Enterprise in regards to Commission consideration of a mosque in Temecula. [ am in favor of allowing the plans for a mosque to move forward. I am not a Muslim, but instead a practicing Christian. I am not a resident of Temecula, although I live nearby. I strongly support our U.S. Constitution's protection of freedom of religion and freedom of speech. This means that I must condone the tea party or individuals when they express their fear of local Muslims. I think it is a great disservice to label these law-abiding, peaceful Muslims as terrorists. I do not believe they are war -mongering fanatics, but rather responsible individuals who contribute in positive ways to this country. The hallmark of our country is that we allow all faiths and beliefs to be practiced and that we, as a country, tend to give people the benefit of the doubt until they prove differently. The best way to turn U.S. Muslims into terrorists would be to take away their rights, label them as subversives, and treat them as "the enemy within." I was heartened to see such a large turnout in July in support of the mosque. I hope the Planning .Commission will move forward to grant a permit for the mosque to be built. This will, hopefully, counteract Temecula being presented as a city of bigoted, insensitive individuals who do not hold the U.S. Constitution in high regard. Thank you for your attention to this matter. If you have questions or comments, you may contact me at my address above or call me at 951-679-3838. Respectfully, ()c_ Ada J. Hand cc: Council on Islamic -American Relations Eric Jones From: Patrick Richardson Sent: Monday, August 23, 2010 7:46 AM To: Eric Jones Subject: FW: COPY: Citizen Web Contact: General Feedback/Requests » General Feedback (Supervisor Version) FYI and for the file. From: Grant Yates Sent: Monday, August 23, 2010 7:32 AM To: Patrick Richardson; Bob Johnson Subject: FW: COPY: Citizen Web Contact: General Feedback/Requests » General Feedback (Supervisor Version) From: City Website Sent: Saturday, August 21, 2010 5:03 PM To: Grant Yates Subject: COPY: Citizen Web Contact: General Feedback/Requests » General Feedback (Supervisor Version) This' copy is,sent to ;you becauseyou are the Director/Supervisor contact for'this topic. If the prinaryper-son (Sue.Steffen(c cityo;€tern$ecula.org) is absent, pleascTfollo.,w`uprw th the:'crt�zen. A Contact Us Web Form has been submitted to: General Feedback/Requests » General Feedback First Name: Cindy Last Name: Beech Email Address: cstu112004@yahoo.com Type of Request: Problem Description: Courage!! !Please take a stand in your City for freedom of religion and ALLOW THE BUILDING OF THE MOSQUE. I know that non -citizens of Temecula protested the building of a mosque. I live in Hemet and do shop in Temecula so I feel that I can at least voice my opinion regardingthis subject. i Rev. Dr. Gwynn* Guibord Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles Jihad Turk Islamic Canter of Southern California Parldetpating Organizations Bishop Steve Gilliland Church of Jesus Christ of Latter -Day Saints Sherrci A. Johnson Council on American -Islamic Relations Greater Los Angeles Area Rev. Ginny Wegener Southwest California Synod Evangelical Lutheran Cfwrch in America Dr. Grace Dyrnass institute for Urban Research and Development Dr. Maher Hathout Islamic Center of Southern California Shakers' Syed Islamic Shura Council of Southern Ceiifomie Dr. Musammif Siddigi Islamic Society of Orange County Salam AI-Marayati, Adze Hasan, and Edina Lckovic JMusJim Public Affairs Council Defer a Dekhii Omar Ibn AlIEhattab Foundation Dr. Lisa Patriquin Synod of Southam California and Hawaii, Presbyterian Church (USA) Virginia C'assick Progressive Christians Uniting Rt. Rcpt Alexei Smith Roman Catholic Archdiocese Sufi John Ishvaradas Abdallah South Coast Interfaith Council Acv. Dr. Paul Lance Southern California Ecumenical Council Rev. Jerry Stinson Southern California -Nevada Conference United Church of Christ Mary Marjorie 13cthoa St. John's Cathedral Rev. tfark Nakagawa United Methodist. Church The Christian -Muslim Consultative Group 137 N. Larchimont Blvd. Suite 689 Los Angeles CA 90004 323-309-4061 www.thecmcg org Carl R. Carey Chairman Temecula Planning Commission 43200 Business Park Dr Temecula, California 92589 Dear Commissioner Carey, 16 August 2010 On behalf of the Christian representation of The Christian - Muslim Consultative Group we stand in full support of our Muslim brothers and sisters building a mosque in Temecula. As our Muslim neighbors have begun their observance of Ramadan with fasting, re- dedicating themselves to God and God's service, we as Christians are troubled by fellow Christians who are expressing intolerance against Muslims in words and actions. We are reminded that The United States Constitution guarantees that there will not be an established religion in our nation and that all citizens will be free to exercise their religion. The guarantees in our constitution allow various expressions of religion to flourish; our country's diverse religious heritage is our greatest asset. It is our fervent prayer that the Temecula Planning Commission will say 'no' to the non- inclusive rhetoric of hatred and 'yes' to promoting respect and love of neighbor, in order that as a community of faithful people all may live out the commandment to love our neighbor and to promote peace. Faithfully yours, The Feverer :-.anon Dr. Gwynne Guibord Co-founder and Co-chair Temecula Planning Commission Temecula City Hall 43200 Business Park Drive Temecula, California 92589 Re: Temecula Valley Islamic Center Though not a resident of your community, I am writing to ask that you give fully impartial consideration to the proposal to establish the Center when it comes before you. I of course cannot say whether it complies with the various land use requirements under which you must evaluate such submissions. But as an American citizen who believes deeply in our long tradition of religious freedom I ask that you give it the same treatment that you would give that of any group seeking to establish such a facility. I have read accounts in the news of demonstrations both for and against the planned mosque. I believe that those who are attacking the proposal have confused a relatively small number of terrorists and criminals who hide behind Islam with a peaceful & productive community that is very much an asset and yet another valuable different perspective in our diverse and pluralistic country. Nick ` cNaughton PO Box 27612 Los Angeles, Calif. 90027 nickfmcn@yahoo.com 37670 Early Lane Murrieta, CA, 92563 July 26, 2010 To Chairman Carl R. Carey and the Temecula City Planning Comm Gentlemen: My name is Merle Lehman and I am writing to support granting permission to the Islamic Center of Temecula Valley to build a worship and community center on Nicolas Road. I am a member of the Murrieta -Temecula Interfaith Council and have known Imam Mahmoud Harmoush and other members of his congregation for five years. I am a retired United Methodist pastor, campus minister and college teacher and have known Muslims, both academically and personally, for over 40 years. Before the first mosque was built in San Diego, the Islamic Society of San Diego met for Friday services in the social hall of the Wesley United Methodist Church when I was the pastor. I made many Muslim friends and we had Christian -Muslim dialogues at our church. Most of the San Diego Muslims were professional people: doctors, lawyers, engineers, architects, teachers, business people, etc. This is typical of American Muslims and is also true of the members of our Temecula mosque. The Islamic Society of San Diego met at the Wesley United Methodist Church until they built on land sold to them by a Lutheran Church. This was in a residential neighborhood next to the Lutheran Church. Now they have a beautiful mosque, a school and a shop which sells Middle Eastern food and other items. I` realize that the Planning Commission's task is not to pass judgment on the character or the religion of groups asking permission to build. However, those who oppose building a mosque in Temecula will use criteria like increased traffic congestion and noise levels to mask the true motivation for their opposition which is religious discrimination based on fear and ignorance. How do I know this? When an article was published in the Riverside Press - Enterprise earlier this month which quoted me as supporting building the mosque, a woman phoned me to scold me. She told me that I should not support it because all Muslims are extremists who want to conquer the world. She said they are devious and only pretend to be tolerant of others. The mosque should not be built, she said, because Islam is not a religion, it is "a business and an ideology." I think the most appropriate description of this woman's remarks is "slander:" "The utterance of false charges or misrepresentations which defame and damage another's reputation." I have seen the proposed building site. It is not in a residential neighborhood and there is plenty of room for the Islamic Center as well as the two churches which will be its neighbors. My view of Muslims is not just personal; it also reflects the teaching of The United Methodist Church. The church's statement on "Our Muslim Neighbors" includes: "We urge United Methodists to promote understanding between Christians and Muslims in local communities through:... ---upholding the dignity of individuals, families, and communities, and --seeking to remedy situations in which Muslims encounter misunderstandings, 2 prejudice, stereotyping, or even hostility from the neighborhood or population when they desire to express their faith in everyday life." Hostility toward Muslims in Temecula has received national attention. I am sure the Planning Commission will not want to promote the perception that our community is ruled by fear and ignorance by denying permission to build the mosque. Sincerely, td/t/cet Rev. Merle Lehman Note: Duplicate informational packets were sent to all five Planning C . Fssioners PLANNING COMMISSION A very important decision will be made soon that can affect the lives of the people of Temecula and surrounding communities. Enclosed are articles for your review that give a look at how things may change for this area. We live side-by-side with many religions but none want to change our way of life or infringe on the United States Constitution. It is my hope that Temecula and other areas will remain as safe and enjoyable as i ey are, which is the reason we moved here. Sincerely, KenFaz 37 ► Galil Murrieta, CA. 92563 fG'iL�v� August 19, 2006 The Real Teachings of the Koran By Cal Thomas During the Cold War, American intelligence loved getting its hands on defectors from communism. The reasoning was that these people had the best information about the plans of the other side, information that would help America defeat thern. In the present war against what President Bush has properly labeled "Islamic fascism," defectors are just as valuable. The Israel Project, an international nonprofit organization devoted to educating the press and the public about Israel, recently made a former leading imam and radical Islam expert available for media interviews and I had a chance to speak with him. He goes by the name of Sam Soloman because of death threats from those not happy with the information he has about their plans to dominate the world. Soloman was brought up in the Islamic tradition and became a "recruiter," which he says is something like an assistant teacher. One of his responsibilities was "brainwashing people in the Koran." He tells me "The suicide bombers go throu h stages, and the most important stage is not when they low themse ves up. The most important stage is conforming them to the (Muslim) ideology. Once they are conformed to the ideology, tiexrest rs `easy. a s e ro e I had." Soloman is in double trouble. Not only did he abandon Islam and the terrorists' objectives, he has also become a Christian, which has marked him for death. Born in the Middle East, he visited Washington from his adopted country, which he declines to name to protect his family. Soloman speaks with knowledge, credibility and conviction. He has memorized large sections of the Koran and tells me, "There's nota single verse in the Koran talkin about peace with a non- uslim, with the Jews and the Christians. Islam means submission. Islam means surrender. It means you surrender and accept Islamic hegemony over yourselves..." What is a Mosque? An Interview with Sam Solomon by Jerry Gordon (August 2010) Gordon: Greetings Mr. Solomon and thank you for consenting to this interview. Let us start with the simple question, what is a mosque and what is its basic function in the Muslim community? Solomon: A mosque, totally unlike a church or a synagogue, serves the function of orchestrating and mandating every aspect of "life" in a Muslim community from the religious, to the political, to the economic, to the social, to the military. In Islam, religion and life are not separate. They are indivisible. In Islam religion is not just a part of life, but "life" is absorbed and regulated to the tiniest detail by religion (See Figure 1). In other words every aspect of a man or woman's life must be defined and governed by religion. So there is no concept of personal choice whatsoever, or in theological terms, there is no "free will," but only limited preferences between prescribed courses of action. In addition, there is no concept of a personal relationship between the person and the entity being worshiped, so "worship" itself, is of a different nature than that performed in a church or synagogue. c Figure 1: Comparison of Non -Islamic vs Islamic views of one's freedom of choice and options in life. So we see that a mos ue is a seat of government. A mosque is a school. A mosque is a cou . A mosque is a training center. A mosque is a gathering place, or social center. It is not a place of "worship" per se as understood and as prac ice in Western societies, Specifically, how is a mosque a threat to the community within which it is built? Every single mosque in the world, by definition, is modeled on the mosque of Muhammad in Medina in accordance with the Sunnah. The Sunnah interprets the Qur'an by reporting exhaustively on everything that Muhammad said, did, or consented to. Therefore, his Medina mosque, ,the first mosque was a place where he gave judgments, where he decided who would be executed, where he instituted policy— domestic and military-- where Jihad war strategies were designed. Consequently, it was a storage place for arms, a military training base, and was where troops were blessed and dispatched. Literally they were sent to conquer - first the whole of Arabia, and then the rest of the known world. Therefore if the present-day mosque is modeled as per the Sunnah of Muhammad then there should be very serious concern. As is well-known, Muslims are required to ollow the example (Sunnah) of Muhammad—and according to Sura 33:36 it is not an option or a matter of opinion: "It is not for a believer, man or woman, when Allah and His Messenger have decreed a matter that they should have any option in their decision. And whoever disobeys Allah and His Messenger, he has indeed strayed in a plain error." This explains and establishes beyond doubt why arms have been found in mosques in various countries, and in different Capital cities. In addition to the undisputed significance of the Medina mosque as the role model for all Mosques, there is also the Islamic policy of establishing strateis Mos ues as eachheads with interconnected networks. Taken together, ese two policies do constitute a clear and present danger— and a need for concern. For example, when Abu Hamza[ i.] was the Imam of the Finsbury Park mosque in the United Kingdom, he trained (..., people, he sent out terrorists and British authorities found arms stored there. He was well within his Islamic mandate as these activities were sanctioned b Islam. a didn't find it . wrong because it is in the Islamic manuals. Another prime example of a mosque being found to have engaged in high- level political, military and intelligence activities is the Munich Mosque, which is now considered by Islamists to be on a par with some of highest -ranked Mosques in Muslim countries.[2 ] What comment do you have on the significance of the Ground Zero Mosque set to open on 9/111 2011? First of all, the sponsors and supporters of the Ground Zero Mosque insist that the significance of the building of this mosque is that it constitutes a refutation of the radical "fringe" within Islam, and as such, is a gesture of peace and reconciliation toward America and the victims of 9/11. But, it is ludicrous for anybody to accept that this is a gesture o f peace in t e es ern sense—rather it is a different definition of "peace." It is the Islamic definition of "peace" as a suspension of "struggle" which is ultimately said to emerge once opposition ceases,, and Islam reigns supreme as Muhammad has stated, "Islam rises and nothing rises above it." The rationale of the sponsors is that acts of terrorism are being carried out by misguided "radicals" rather than true Muslims and that as a consequence, Islam itself has been victimized and defamed and needs to be defended. Their solution is to appear to decry all "radicalism", and to take the bold symbolic act of erecting a 13 to 15 -story Mosque— ostensibly representing true Islam—on the site itself, in their words, to "bridge and heal this divide." w ] So, if allowed to be built, this mosque would consolidate, solidify, and embody a fallacious and pernicious interpretation of what really happened at the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.[4] In one fell swoop, it will be a re -writing of American history with American cooperation, and will achieve another major Islamic goal of setting a high profile beachhead at a strategic location in the seat of American economic power. When you speak of setting a "beachhead," is building this mosque tactically similar to Muslims building the Al Aqsa Mosque adjacent to the Western Wa in erusa em _ Most Westerners do not realize that there are two Mos ues on the Temple Mount. One is called Masjid Al-Agsa, the Mosque of Ascension, and the other is called "Qubbat Al- Sakhra"f the Dome of the Rock. To provide the groundwork for answering your question more specifically, the basic principle is, that a mosque, totally unlike a church or synagogue, is a "sign" and a "symbol" of the establishment of "authority"—both religious and political—not just a place of worship o lts adherents. A mosque is the symbol of the establishment of an Islamic authority, and an announcement of the beginning of the "ri htful restoration" of the land according to Islamic claims that the "whole world is a mosque," and is echoed in Muhammad's words, "the whole earth has been declared unto me a mosque." Therefore it is a matter of "restoring" rather than "claiming" the land to Islam, as an land not in current submission is at virtual war with sl wand mus •e brought "back" according to the Qur'anic version of history. This process of "bringing back" has a name, it is called "Islamisation," and is implemented progressively though immrgratin• se•reuating, •a€ning rig s, an s owly asse in• the supremacy of Is am po i iT c� ally, socially and even culturally. So, yes, e roun• ero Mosque wou • •e a beachhead—and an important one, but it is not exactly the same as in the case of the Al Aqsa Mosque. The building of the Al Aqsa Mosque adjacent to the Western Wall was a necessary consolidation of prior Qur'anic claims to the Holy Land and the spiritual base of Judeo-Christian Monotheism,[51 whereas the building of the Ground Zero Mosque would be more in line with the tactical aspect of spreading the base. (See footnote 3) Having said that, some "beachhead" mosques are more strategic than others. As we have seen earlier the Munich Mosque became the most influential of those built outside Muslim lands prior to the proposed Ground Zero Mosque. (If built, the Ground Zero Mosque will be the most influential sign and symbol of Islamic authority in the Western World., C Can you explain the significance of the `Hijra' or migration? You need to understand an important distinction: In Islam migration is a mental concept as well as a physical action. To answer your question about the significance of the Hijra itself, it was the physical migration of Muhammad and his followers from Mecca to Yathrib [Medina] in 622 AD, making it the most important event in Islamic history and the reason for starting the Islamic calendar—while at the same time instituting it as the model for future expansion by immigration. [6] However, the concept of migration in its broader sense is highly significant. Conceptually, mental migration can be from one mode of operation to another, in other words from a non -Islamic mode to an Islamic mode. The non -Islamic mode is known as Al-Jahiliyyah meaning "the age of ignorance," which has nothing to do with the Western concept of ignorance. So Al-Jahiliyyah, is a broad title given to all sorts of practices which might be regarded as un -Islamic. For example a woman who used to dress in Western-style, (considered as Jahiliyyah practice), her "migration" toward Islamic practice would be that she now adorns herself with the Hijab (head scarf) or total Nikab (full face and body cover). This movement from Western dress to Islamic veil would constitute a migration in dress code and behaviour. Examples of other conceptual migrations would be im osin Islamic values and systems within host countries, such as Sharjah -complaint finance. It is all to achieve one purpose, the Islamisation first of the Muslim community by bringing it more and more in line with Islamic principles and, second to condition and transform the host society. The foregoing was an explanation of a conceptual,spiritual, or mental transformation. • The physical migration of Muslim communities, from one country to another or from one area to another is just as important. It is to extend the rule of Islam. For instance, there would be no need for s auric schools if there were no Muslim children. There would be no need for Halal meat if there were no Muslim consumers. There would be no debate about the Hijab if there were no Muslim women to wear it. Therefore, any such demand by the Muslim community within a host country is an expression of their desire to be governed by Islam. Demanding Islamic banking is a direct imposition of the S ariah Law on non Muslims, even if there may not be any Muslims in the community. Why does Islam celebrate Mohammad's journey from Mecca to Yathrib (Medina) annually rather than his birthday? The celebration of Muhammad's birthday is controversial within the community of Islamic scholars, as it is considered as an innovation (a "Bid'a")—though practically, it is recognized as a holiday in most Muslim countries. However, your point is well taken. All Muslims do celebrate the Islamic New Year, based on the Islamic Calendar—which after deliberations regarding other dates in Muhammad's life, was dated from the Hijra, his journey from Mecca to Medina, rather than from his birthday. The Islamic calendar was established by Umar bin Ai- Khattab, the second Khalifah in response to letters of concern from the various judges and governors in the new Islamic empire saying to him, your letters are undated. Thus he was confronted with a dilemma, as any dating system at that time was un -Islamic. So he called a committee to look into it and they initially decided not to start the Islamic calendar with the birth of Mohammed, and then considered various other important events that occurred in Muhammad's life as the starting point of the new calendar. However. Umar concluded that it would be appropriate to start the calendar from the day of Muhammad's flight or Hijra, because from that day forward he was transformed from a haunted man to a victorious ruler. Thus the Islamic calendar, called the "Anno Hijrah Calendar," or "Immigration Calendar," abbreviated as "A. H." replaced all existing calendars and was established as a declaration of the victory of Islam over the rest of the World. What is the most important thing for us to know about Islam? The most important thing for a non -Muslim to understand about Islam is that Islam is not simply a religion. Islam is a social and political system, an indivisible melding of religion and state. It is a socio-political, socio -religious, socio -economical, socio -educational, socio -judiciary, legislative militaristic system cloaked and garbed in religious terminology. We must never forget that Islam is an all-encompassing ideological system and as such wherever there is a Muslim • community there will be $haria_and wherever there is a -- Sharia there is an Islamisation of the territory and ultimately -.._ of the nation. Why Sharjah? By Noah Feldman, Adjunct Senior Fellow March 23, 2009 1 .introduction 2. What is Sharia? 3.Controversy: Punishment and Equality under Sharia 4.Sharia vs. Secularism S.Modern Economies and Sharia Introduction Sharia, or Islamic law, influences the legal code in most Muslim countries. A movement to allow sharia to govern personal status law, a set of regulations that pertain to marriage, divorce, inheritance, and custody, is even expanding into the West. "There are so many varying interpretations of what sharia actually means that in some places it can be incorporated into 7 political systems:relatively easily," says Steven A. Cook, CFR senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies. Sharia s influ�erce on bothsonal status law and criminal law is highly controver though. Some interpretations are used to justify crue punishments such as amputation and stoning as well as unequal treatment of women in inheritance, dress, and independence. 'The debate is growing as to whether sharia can coexist with secularism, democracy, or even modernity. What is Sharia? Also meaning "path" in Arabic, sharia guides all aspects of Muslim life including daily routines, familia an re igzous o h�ations and financial zags. It is derived primarily from the Quran and the Sunna--the sayings, practices, and teachings of the Prophet Mohammed. Precedents and analogy applied by Muslim scholars are used to address new issues. The consensus of the Muslim community also plays a role in defining this theological manual. Sharia developed several hundred years after the Prophet Mohammed's death in 632 CE as the Islamic empire expanded to the edge of North Africa in the West and to China in the East. Since the Prophet Mohammed was considered the most pious of all believers, his life and ways became a model for all other Muslims and were collected by scholars into what is known as the hadith. As each locality tried to reconcile local customs and Islam, hadith literature grew and developed into distinct schools of Islamic thought: the Sunni schools, Hanbali, Maliki, Shafi'i, Hanafi; and the Shiite school, Ja'fari. Named after the scholars that inspired them, they differ in the weight each applies to the sources from which sharia is derived, the Quran, hadith, Islamic scholars, and consensus of the community. The Hanbali school, known for following the most Orthodox form of Islam, is embraced in Saudi Arabia and by the Taliban. The Hanafi school, known for being the most liberal and the most focused on reason and analogy, is dominant among Sunnis in Central Asia, Egypt, Pakistan, India, China, Turkey, the Balkans, and the Caucasus. The Maliki school is dominant in North Africa and the Shafi'i school in Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei Darussalam, and Yemen. Shia Muslims follow the Ja'fari school, most notably in Shia -dominant Iran. The distinctions have more impact on the legal systems in each country, however, than on individual Muslims, as many do not adhere to one school in their personal lives. Controversy: Punishment and Equality under Sharia Marriage and divorce are the most significant aspects of sharia, but criminal law is the most controversial. In sharia, there are categories of offenses: those that are prescribed a specific punishment in the Quran, known as hadd punishments, those that fall under a judge's discretion, and those resolved through a tit-for-tat measure (ie., blood money paid to the family of a murder victim). There are five hadd crimes: unlawful sexual intercourse (sex outside of marriage and adultery), false accusation of unlawful sexual intercourse, ..--X---wine drinking sometimes extended to include all alcohol drinking), theft, and highway robbery. Punishments or has I o fenses--flogging, stoning, amputation, exile, or execution --get a significant amount of media attention when they occur. These sentences are not often prescribed, however. "In -� reality, most Muslim countries do not use traditional classical Islamic punishments," says Ali Mazrui of the Institute of Global Cultural Studies in. a Voice of America interview. These punishments remain on the books in some countries but lesser penalties are often considered sufficient. Despite official reluctance to use hadd punishments, vigilante justice still takes place. Honor killings, murders committed in retaliation for bringing dishonor on one's family, are a worldwide problem. While precise statistics are scarce, the UN estimates thousands of women are killed annually in the name of family honor (National Geographic). Other practices that are woven into the sharia debate, such as female genital mutilation, adolescent marriages, polygamy, and gender -biased inheritance rules, elicit as much controversy. There is significant debate over what the Quran sanctions and what practices were pulled from local customs and predate Islam. ose that seek to eliminate or at least modify these controversial practices cite the religious tenet of tajdid. The concept is one of renewal, where Islamic society must be reformed constantly to keep it in its purest form. "With the passage of time and changing circumstances since traditional classical jurisprudence was founded, people's problems have changed and conversely, there must be new thought to address these changes and events," says Dr. Abdul Fatah Idris, head of the comparative jurisprudence department at Al- Azhar University in Cairo. Though many scholars share this line of thought, there are those who consider the purest form of Islam to be the one practiced in the seventh century. ,Sharia vs. Secularism In a 2007 University of Maryland poll (PDF), more than 60 percent of the populations in Egypt, Morocco, Pakistan, and Indonesia responded that democracy was a good way to govern their respective countries, while at the same time, an average of 71 percent agreed with requiring "strict application of [sharia] law in every Islamic country." Whether democracy and Islam can coexist is a topic of heated debate. Some Islamists argue democracy is a purely Western concept imposed on Muslim countries. Others feel Islam necessitates a democratic system and that democracy has a basis in the Quran since "mutual consultation" among the people is commended (42:38 Quran). John L. Esposito and John O. Voll explain the debate in a 2001 article in the journal Humanities. Noah Feldman, CFR adjunct senior fellow, writes in a 2008 New York Times Magazine article that the full incorporation of Islamic law is viewed as creating "a path to just and legitimate government in much of the Muslim world." It places duplicitous rulers alongside their constituents under the rule of God. "For many Muslims today, living in corrupt autocracies the call for [sharia] is not a call for sexism, obscurantism or savage punishment but for an Islamic version of what the West considers its most prized principle of political justice: the rule of law," Feldman argues. On the other hand, some Muslim scholars say that secular government is the best way to observe sharia. "Enforcing a [sharia] through coercive power of the state negates its religious nature, because Muslims would be observin the law of the state and not freel s erformin their reli g ious obligation as Muslims," says • • dullahi Ahmed An-Na'im, a professor o acv at Emory University and author of a book on the future of sharia. Opinions on the best balance of Islamic law and secular law vary, but sharia has been incorporated into political systems in three general ways: •Dual Legal System. Many majority Muslim countries have a dual system in which the government is secular but Muslims can choose to bring familial and financial disputes to sharia courts. The exact jurisdiction of these courts varies from country to country, but usually includes marriage, divorce, inheritance, and guardianship. Examples can be seen in Nigeria and Kenya, which have sharia courts that rule on family law for Muslims. A variation exists in Tanzania, where civil courts apply sharia or secular law according to the religious backgrounds of the defendants. Several countries, including Lebanon and Indonesia, have mixed jurisdiction courts based on residual colonial legal systems and supplemented with sharia. Ahmad Nizar Hamzeh of the American University of Beirut says only Qatar has an official dual legal system where Adlia courts, or civil courts, are independent of the sharia system and legislate secular laws. Western countries are also exploring the idea of allowing Muslims to apply Islamic law in familial and financial disputes. In late 2008, Britain officially allowed sharia tribunals (NYT) governing marriage, divorce, and inheritance to make legally binding decisions if both parties agreed. The new system is in line with separate mediation allowed for Anglican and Jewish communities in England. Criminal law remains under the gavel of the existing legal system. "There is no reason why principles of sharia law, or any other religious code, should not be the basis for mediation," Britain's top judge, Lord Nicholas Phillips, said in a July 2008 speech (PDF). Supporters of this initiative, such as the archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, argue that it would help maintain social cohesion (BBC) in European societies increasingly divided by religion. However some research su ests the r cess to be discriminatory toward women BBC). Other analysts suggest the system has led to grey areas. Britain's Muslims come from all over the world, Ishtiaq Ahmed, a spokesperson for the Council for Mosques in England, told the BBC, noting that this makes it hard to discern at times "where the rulings of the sharia finish and long -held cultural practices start." 1,/ •Government under God. In those Muslim countries where Islam is the official religion listed in the constitution, sharia is declared to be a source, or the source, of the laws. Examples include Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Yemen, and the United Arab Emirates, where the governments derive their legitimacy from Islam. In Pakistan, Egypt, Iran, and Iraq, among others, it is also forbidden to enact legislation that is antithetical to Islam. Saudi Arabia employs one of the strictest interpretations of sharia. Women are not allowed to drive, are under the guardianship of male relatives at all times, and must be completely covered in public. Elsewhere, governments are much more lenient, as m the United Arab Emirates, where alcohol is tolerated. Non - Muslims are not expected to obey sharia and in most countries, they are the jurisdiction of special committees and adjunct courts under the control of the government. -Completely Secular. Muslim countries where the government is declared to be secular in the constitution include Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, Chad, Somalia, and Senegal. Islamist parties rtrn for office occasionally in these countries and sharia often influences local customs. Popular Islamist groups are often viewed as a threat by existing governments. As in Azerbaijan in the 1990s, secularism is sometimes upheld by severe government crackdowns on Islamist groups and political parties. Similar clashes have occurred in Turkey. Under the suspicion that the majority party, the Islamist Justice and Development Party, was trying to establish sharia, Turkey's chief prosecutor petitioned the constitutional court (Economist) in March 2008 to bar the party from politics altogether. One of the politicians indicted, Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, told Newsweek, "Turkey has achieved what people said could never be achieved --a balance between Islam, democracy, secularism and modernity." Secular Muslim countries are a minority, however, and the popularity of Islamist political parties are narrowing the z gap between religion and state. V Modern Economies and Sharia Growing at an estimated 15 percent annually, Islamic banking and finance is a worldwide industry that modifies modern business practices to conform to the rules of sharia. Centra to this field is riba, the charging or payment of interest, banned under Islamic law. Clever twists on standard financial products like credit cards, savings accounts, mortgages, loans, and even trust funds bypass the interest business model. A 2008 report by the General Council for Islamic Banks and Financial Institutions estimates the Islamic banking industry to stand at $442 billion. Even big name banks such as Citigroup, HSBC, and Deutsche Bank are developing Islamic banking sectors to cater to the demand. The industry is small in comparison to the global market, but may grow as some non -Muslims are turning to sharia - compliant services. Some of the ethically minded are also switching over to sharia -compliant investments. Businesses are required to avoid transactions related to forbidden things, such as weapons, alcohol, tobacco, gambling, pornography and pork, and investors are guaranteed that their money won't 1 end up financing those industries. Governments are also looking to get a piece of the pie: Malaysia is the largest issuer of sharia -compliant bonds and Indonesia launched its own in January 2009. Islam is no different from CANCER, they are working their way into every culture like a disease & if we don't do something NOW (as described above) then all other cultures will be in serious trouble. WW3 will be Islam against what remains of the free western world. WE CANNOT LET THIS HAPPEN IN OUR COMMUNITY! IF OUR CITY PLANNERS WON'T FIGHT FOR OUR COMMUNITY'S --"--- FREEDOM --FREEDOM WE MUST FIND THOSE THAT WILL! Subject: Denmark, a must read? ? ? ? ? A good place to start a discussion about immigration and reli ion. Not to mention what will happen if we remain . oliticall correct and refuse o do not wish us well. Iwe do not make some tough decisions very soon we will have them made for us by people who want to do us harm. This article could be seen as racist by some but on the other hand it could also be seen as a reflection of our own reality that somehow our politicians refuse to see. Tie interpretation is up to t e teader, however it is food for thought... at there are t ose among us w SALUTE to Denmark... They are trying to fix a huge problem. This could very well happen here on our Continent... Susan MacAllen, a Canadian citizen, is a contributing editor for (FamilySecurityMatters.org ) Salute the Danish Flag - it's a Symbol of Western Freedom By Susan MacAllen In 1978-9 I was living and studying in Denmark. But in 1978 - even in Copenhagen, one didn't see Muslim immigrants. The Danish population embraced visitors, celebrated the exotic, went out of its way to protect each of its citizens. It was proud of its new brand of socialist liberalism one in development since the conservatives had lost power in 1929 - a system where no worker had to struggle to survive, where one ultimately could count upon the state as in, perhaps, no other western nation at the time. The rest of Europe saw the Scandinavians as free -thinking, progressive and infinitely generous in their welfare policies. Denmark boasted low crime rates, devotion to the environment, a superior educational system and a history of humanitarianism. Denmark was also most generous in its immigration policies - it offered the best welcome in Europe to the new immigrant: generous welfare payments from first arrival plus additional perks in transporous�ng an education. It was determined to set a world example for inclusiveness and multiculturalism. How could it have predicted that one day in 2005 a series of political cartoons in a newspaper would spark violence that would leave dozens dead in the streets - all because its commitment to multiculturalism .176"c to bite? Dy the 1990's the growing urban Muslim population was obvious - and its unwillin_ness to inte:rate into Danish society was obvious. Years of immigrants had settled into Muslim -exclusive enclaves. As the Muslim leadership became more voca a out what they const tired the decadence of Denmark's liberal way of life, the Danes - once so welcoming - began to feel slighted. Many Danes had begun to see Islam as incompatible with their long-standing va u.es. el;ef in persona i • erty an s free speech, in equality for women, in tolerance for other ethnic groups, and a deep pride in Danish heritage and history. An article by Daniel Pipes and Lars Hedegaard, in which they forecasted, accurately, that the growing immigrant problem in Denmark would explode. In the article they reported: 'Muslim immigrants constitute 5 percent of the population but consume upwards of 40 percent of the welfare spending.' 'Muslims are only 4 percent of Denmark's 5.4 million people but make up a majority of the country's convicted rapists, an especially combustible issue C given that practically all the female victims are non -Muslim. Similar, if lesser, disproportions are oan rn other crimes:. 'Over time, as Muslim immigrants increase in numbers they wish less to mix with the indi^enous po .ulation. A recent survey finds that only 5 percent o young Muslim immigrants would readily marry a Dan& 'Forced marriages - promising a newborn daughter in Denmark to a male cousin in the home country, then compelling her to marry him, sometimes on pain of death - are one problem.' 'Muslim leaders openl declare their _oal of introducin_ Islamic law once Denmark's Muslim population grows large enoug - a not -that -remote prospect. If presen trens persis , one socio ogist estimates, every third inhabitant of Denmark in 40 years will be Muslim.' It is easy to understand why a growing number of Danes would feel that Muslim immigrants show little respect for Danish values and laws. An example is the phenomenon common to other European countries and - A' - Canada: some Muslims in Denmark who o •ted to leave the Muslim faith have been mindere• in the name of Islam, while others hide in fear for their lives. Jews are also threatened an grassed o• enl by Muslim leaders in Denmark, a country where once Christian citizens worked to smuggle out nearly all of their 7,000 Jews by night to Sweden - before the Nazis could invade. I think of my Danish friend Elsa - who, as a teenager, had dreaded eros nis g the street to the bakery every morning under the eyes of occupying Nazi soldiers - and I wonder what she would say today. In 2001, Denmark elected the most conservative government in some 70 years - one that had some decidedly non -generous ideas about liberal 7/ unfettered immigration. Today, Denmark has the strictest immigration policies in Europe. (Its c " ort to protect itse as been met wit accusa ions -o 'racism by liberal media across Europe - even as other governments struggle to right the social problems wrought by years of too -lax immigration.) If you wish to become Danish, you must attend three years of language classes. You must pass a test on Denmark's history, culture, and a Danish language test, r 3. You must lire in Denmark for 7 years before applying for citizenship.You must demonstrate an intent to work, and have a job waiting. if you wish to bring a spouse into enrn.ark, you must boti be over 24 years of age, and you won't find it so easy anymore to move your friends and family to Denmark with you. You will not be allowed to build a mosque in Copenhagen. Although your children have a choice of some 30 Arabic culture and language schools in Denmark, they will be strongly encouraged to assimilate to Danish society in ways that past immigrants weren't. In 2006, the Danish minister for employment, Claus Hjort Frederiksen, spoke publicly of the burden of Muslim immi_rants on the Danish welfare system, and it was hor�fyin : the government's welfare committee had calculated that if immigration from Third World countries were blocked, 75 percent of the cuts needed to sustain the huge welfare system in coming decades would be unnecessary. In other words, the welfare stem, as it existed, was bein ex lo.ited by immigrants to theint of�ventu ilY bankrupting the government. 'We are simply forced to adopt a new policy on immigration. 'The calculations of the welfare committee are terrifying and show how unsuccessful the integration of immigrants has been up to now,' he said. A large thorn in the side of Denmark's imams is the Minister of Immigration and Integration, ' 1'1 e Hvilshoj. She makes no bones about the new policy toward immigration, The number of foreigners coming to the country makes a difference,Hvilshoj says, 'There is an inverse correlation between how man come here and how well. we can receive the foreigners that come. And on us im immigrants needing to demonstrate a willingness to end in, 'In my view, Denmark should be a country with room for different cultures and religions. Some values, however, are more important than others. We refuse to question democracy, equal rights, and freedom of speech.' Hvilshoj has aid a price for her show of backbone. Perhaps to test her resolve, the leading radical imam in Denmark Ahmed Abdel Rahman Abu Laban, demanded that t e government pay lood move to the family of a Muslim who was murdered in a suburb of Copenhagen, stating that the family's thirst for reverwe could be thwarted for money. When Hvilshoj dismissed his deman , e argued that in Muslim culture the payment of retribution money was common, to which Hvilshoj replied that what is done in a Muslim country is not necessarily what is done in Denmark. the Muslim reply carpe soafter: henhouse was torched while her husband and children slept. All managed to escape unharmed but she an her family were moved to a secret location and she and other ministers were assigned bodyguards for the first time - in a country where such murderous violence was once so scarce. Her government has slid to the right, and her borders have tightened. Many believe that what happens in the next decade will determine whether Denmark survives as a bastion of good living, humane thinking and social responsibility, or whether it becomes a nation at civil war with supporters of Sharia law. And meanwhile, Canadians clamor for stricter immigration . oli_cies, and demand an end to state welfare programs that allow many immigrants to live on the public dole. As we in Canada look at the enclaves of Muslims amongst us, and see those who enter our shores too easily, dare live on our taxes, yet refuse to embrace our culture, respect our traditions, participate in our legal system, obey our laws, speak our language, appreciate our history. We would do well to look to Denmark, and say as prayer for her future and for our own. Islam is no different from CANCER, they are working their way into every culture like a disease & if we don't do something NOW (as described above) then all other cultures will be in serious trouble. WW3 will be Islam against what remains of the free western world. 17 October 2010 Last updated at 03:51 German Chancellor, Angela Merkel: "immigrants should learn to speak German" Attempts to build a multicultural society in Germany have "utterly failed", Chancellor Angela Merkel says. She said the so-called "multikulti" concept - where people would "live side- by-side" happily - did not work, and immigrants needed to do more to integrate - including learning German. The comments come amid rising anti -immigration feeling in Germany. A recent survey suggested more than 30% of people believed the country was "overrun by foreigners". The study - by the Friedrich Ebert Foundation think-tank - also showed that roughly the same number thought that some 16 million of Germany's immigrants or people with foreign origins ha cometo the country for its social bene its. Foreign workers Mrs Merkel told a gathering of younger members of her conservative Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party on Saturday that at "the beginning of the 60s our country called the foreign workers to come to Germany and now they live in our country." She added: "We kidded ourselves a while, we said: 'They won't stay, sometime they will be gone', but this isn't reality." The words "utterly failed" are very strong, but there are also nuanced messages about the usefulness of immigrants in a count that needs skilled labour. She is pitching it very carefully, with important elections coming up in the spring. The tone is very important. The chancellor is basically saying that Germany needs immigrants but im miaants need to do something to get into the society. Germany's charged immigration debate "And of course, the approach [to build] a multicultural [society] and to live side-by-side an. to enjoy eac -r... as failed, utterly al es . In her speech in Potsdam, however, the chancellor made clear that immigrants were welcome in Germany. She specifically referred to recent comments by German President Christian Wulff who said that Islam was "part of Germany", like Christianity and Judaism. Mrs Merkel said: "We should not be a country either which gives the impression to the outside world that those who don't speak German immediately or who were not raised speaking German are not welcome here." Mounting debate There has been intense debate about multiculturalism in Germany in recent months. Correspondents say Mrs Merkel faces pressure from within her CDU and its allies to take a tougher stance and require immigrants to do more to adapt to German society. Earlier this week, Horst Seehofer, the leader of the CDU's Bavarian sister party, the CSU, said it was "obvious that immigrants from different cultures like Turkey and Arab countries, all in all, find it harder" to integrate. Continue reading the main story Your Say: Does multiculturalism work? "'Multikulti' is dead," Mr Seehofer said. Earlier this month the chancellor held talks with Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, in which the two leaders pledged to do more to improve the often poor integration record of Germany's estimated 2.5 million -strong Turkish community. The debate first heated up in August when Thilo Sarrazin, a senior official at Germany's central bank, said that "no immigrant group other than Muslims is so strongly connected with claims on the- wfare state and crime". Mr Sarrazin has since resigned. `yw - Such recent strong anti -immigration feelings from mainstream politicians come amid an anger in Germany about high unemployment, even if the economy is growing faster than those of its rivals, our correspondent says. He adds that there also seems to be a new strident tone in the country, perhaps leading to less reticence about no -go -areas of the past. April 15, 2010 Geert Wilder?s speech to Holland's Parliament Madam Speaker, allow rye, first, to express my sincere thanks to you personally for having planned a debate on Islam on the very day of my birthday. I could not have wished for a nicer present? Madam Speaker, approximately 1400 years ago war was declared on us by an ideology of hate and violence which arose at the time and was proclaimed by a barbarian who called himself the Prophet Mohammed. I am referring to Islam. Madam Speaker, let me start with the foundation of the Islamic faith, the Koran.The Koran's core theme is about the duty o a ushnas o g t non - Muslims; an Islamic Mein Kampf, in which fight means war, jihad. The Koran is above all a book of war "" a call to butcher non-Muslims.,(2:191, 3:141, 4:91, 5:3), to roast them (456 :330- 9 ~32), and to cause bloodbaths amongst them (47:4). Jews are compared to monkeys and pigs (2:65, 5:60, 7:166), while people who believe in Jesus Christ as the Son of God must according to the Koran be fought (9:30). Madam Speaker, the West has no problems with Jews or Christians, but it does have problems with Islam. It is still possible, even today, for Muslims to view the Koran, which they regard as valid for all time, as a licence to kill. And that is exactly what happens. The Koran is worded in sric away that its instructions are addressed to Muslims for eternity, which includes today's Muslims. This in contrast to texts in the Bible, which is formulated as a number of historical narratives, placing events in a distant past. Let us remind ourselves that it was Muslims, not Jews or Christians, who committed the catastrophic terrorist attacks in New York, Madrid and London; and that it was no coincidence that Theo van Gogh was brutally murdered by a Muslim, Mohammed Bouyeri. Madam Speaker, I acknowledge that there are people who call themselves Muslims and who respect our laws. My party, the Freedom Party, has nothing against such people, of course. However, the Koran does have something against them. For it is stated in the Koran in Sura 2, verse 85, that those believers who do not believe in everything the Koran states will be humiliated and receive the severest punishment; which means that they will roast in Hell. in other words, people who call themselves Muslims but who do not believe, for example, in Sura 9, verse 30, which states that Jews and Christians must be fought, or,rampie, in ura 5, verse 38, , hie status that the hard of a t,aref mit be cut off, such people will be humiliated and roast in Hell. Note that it is not me who is making this up. All this can be found in the Koran. The Koran also states that Muslims who believe m only part of the Koran are in fact apostates, and we know what has to happen to apostates. They have to be killed. Madam Speaker, the Kor2n is a book that incites to violence. I rernind the House that the distribution of such texts is unlawful according to Article 132 of our Penal Code. In addition, the Koran incites to hatred and calls for murder and mayhem. The distribution of such texts is made punishable by Article 137(e). The Koran is therefore a highly dangerous book; a book which is completely against our legal order and our democratic institutions. In this light, it is an absolute necessity that the Koran be banned for the defence and reinforcement of our civilisation and our constitutional state. I shall propose a second -reading motion to that effect. Madam Speaker, there is no such thing as "moderate Islami".... As Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan said the other day, and T quote, "There is no moderate or immoderate Islam. Islam is Islam and that's it".... Islam is in pursuit of dominance. It wishes to exact its imperialist agenda by force on a worldwide scale (8:39). This is clear from European history. Fortunately, the first Islamic invasion of Europe was stopped at Poitiers in 732; the second in Vienna in 1683. Madam Speaker, let us ensure that the third Islamic invasion, which is currently in full spate, will be stopped too in spite of its insidious nature and notwithstanding the fact that, in contrast to the 8th and 17th centuries, it has no need for an Islamic army because the scared "dhimmis"® in the West, also those in Dutch politics, have left their doors wide open to Islam and Muslims. Apart from conquest, Madam Speaker, Islam is also bent on installing a totally different form of law and order, namely Sharia law. This makes Islam, apart from a religion for hundreds ofion rmil s of Muslims also, and in particular, a political ideology (with political/constitutional/Islamic basic values, etc). Islam is an ideology without any respect for others; not for Christians, not for Jews, not for non -believers and not for apostates. Islam aims to dominate, subject, kill and wage war. Madam Speaker, the Islamic incursion must be stopped. Islam is the Trojan Horse in Europe. If we do not stop Islamification now, Eurabia and Netherabia will just be a matter of time. One century ago, there were approximately 50 Muslims in the Netherlands. Today, there are about 1 million Muslims in this country. were will it end? We are heading for the end of European and Dutch civilisation as we know it. Where is our Prime Minister in all this? In reply to my questions in the House he said, without batting an eyelid, that there is no question of our country being Islamified. Now,. this reply constituted a historical error as soon as it was uttered. Very many Dutch citizens, Madam Speaker, experience the presence of Islam around them. And I can report that they have had enough of burkas, headscarves, the ritual slaughter of animals, so-called honour revenge, blaring minarets, female circumcision, hymen restoration operations, abuse of homosexuals, Turkish and Arabic on the buses and trains as well as on town hall leaflets, halal meat at grocery shops and department stores, Sharia exams, the Finance Minister's Sharia mortgages, and the enormous overrepresentation of Muslims in the area of crime, including Moroccan street terrorists. In spite of all this, Madam Speaker, there is hope. Fortunately. The majority of Dutch citizens have become fully aware of the danger, and regard Islam as a threat to our culture. My party, the Freedom Party, takes those citizens seriously and comes to their defence. Many Dutch citizens are fed up to the back teeth and yearn for action. However, their representatives in The Hague are doing precisely nothing. They are held back by fear, political correctness or supply electoral motives. This is particularly clear in the case of PvdA, the Dutch Labour Party, which is afraid of losing Muslim voters. The Prime Minister said in Indonesia the other day that Islam does not pose any danger. Minister Donner believes that Sharia law should be capable of being introduced in the Netherlands if the majority want it. Minister Vogelaar babbles about the future Netherlands as a country with a Judeo-Christian-Islamic tradition, and that she aims to help Islam take root in Dutch society. In saying this, the Minister shows that she has obviously gone stark raving mad. She is betraying Dutch culture and insulting Dutch citizens. Madam Speaker, my party, the Freedom Party, demands that Minister Vogelaar retract her statement. If the Minister fails to do so, the Freedom Party parliamentary group will Withdraw its support for her. No Islamic, tradition must ever be established in the Netherlands: not now and also not in a few centuries' time. Madam Speaker, let me briefly touch on the government's response to the WRR [Netherlands Scientific Council for Government Policy] report. On page 12 of its response, the government states that Islam is not contrary to democracy or human rights. All 1 can say to that is that things can't get much more idiotic than this. Madam. Speaker, it is a few minutes to twelve. If we go on like this, Islam will herald the end of our Western civilisation as well as Dutch culture. I would like to round off my first -reading contribution with a personal appeal to the Prime Minister on behalf of a great many Dutch citizens: stop the Islamification of the Netherlands! Mr Balkenende, a historic task rests on your shoulders. Be courageous. Do what. many Dutch citizens are screaming out for. Do what the country needs. EtStop all immigration from Muslim countries, ban all building of new mosques, close all Islamic schools, ban burkas anle Koran. Expel all criminal Muslims from the country, including those Moroccan street errorists that drive people mad. Accept your responsibility! . Stop Islamification! Enough is enough, Mr Balkenende. Enough is enough. Courts Placate Islamists by David J. Rusin ® Mar 5, 2010 at 10:39 am Even as Shari'a courts sprout up like mushrooms on UK soil, secular ones across Europe increasingly bend to an Islamist worldview. Consider the phenomenon of exempting Muslims from the standard practice of rising before judges. In January, seven radicals on trial for shouting insults at British soldiers during`a 2009 homecoming parade refused to stand when the judge entered — because, in the words of one of their lawyers, "it is a grave and cardinal sin to show respect in this way to anyone other than God himself." The response from Judge Carolyn Mellanby? Appeasement and more appeasement: Eventually, a compromise was reached where they would enter the court. after her during the trial, which is expected to last six days. The maximum penalty each of the men can receive is a £1,000 fine. The defendants were given an extra 20 minutes on top of their lunch break to go to pray at a mosque a few minutes' walk away. A separate "quiet" room has been set aside for their regular prayer intervals for the rest of the week. Mellanby "said she did not wish to 'set a precedent' by charging them with contempt of court." Instead, it was the defendants themselves who apparently "set a precedent" here. Also of note: Five were convicted in the harassment case but went unpunished. Ordered to reimburse court costs only, the men gleefully declared that, as they are on welfare, taxpayers will foot the bill. In the Netherlands, the bar association is leading the way to mollify Islamists. An appeals chamber of that organization recently overturned a reprimand of attorney Mohammed Enait, who had been censured because he does not rise for judges and dons an Islamic hat in court sessions. It ruled that he can remain seated and wear his head covering; as the article explains, the panel found that "his refusal to rise and his headgear are not meant to show contempt of court." (Be sure to read the humorous passage about Enait and his "secretaries" at the above link.) Other events demonstrate the growing deference to Islam in Europe's courtrooms: A woman made history last summer by becoming the first in Denmark to testify while wearing a niqab. Earlier this year, Judge Cherie Blair, wife of Tony, drew fire for her leniency toward a British Muslim convicted of assault, to whom she said, "You are a religious man and you know this is not acceptable behavior." Finally, foot -washing basins have been installed in a German courthouse so Muslims can clean themselves before prayer; a spokesman justified the facility by "saying that in the past toilets have been stopped up with toilet paper and used for feet washing." How drenching one's feet with toilet water advances cleanliness is unclear. Equally difficult to grasp is how Europe's legal establishment could think that this spate of accommodations will inspire anything but more and more outrageous demands from Islamists. 1 Council on American -Islamic Relations Launches `Islamophobia' Division Tuesday, October 12, 2010 By Patrick Goodenough Nihad Awad, national executive director for the Council on American - Islamic Relations (CAIR), speaks at a news conference in Washington on Dec. 9, 2009. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) (CNSNews.com) — Spurred by the controversies over Quran-burning and the planned Ground Zero mosque, the most visible Islamic advocacy organization in the United States says it is launching a department to deal with "Islamophobia." In doing so, the Council on American -Islamic Relations (CAIR) is following the example of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), the 57 - member bloc of Islamic states. The OIC set up an "observatory" five years ago to monitor and report on incidents and trends around the world it regards as amounting to "Islamophobia." CAIR, which calls itself "America's largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization," said in a statement Monday that its executive director, Nihad Awad, had announced the move at the group's annual banquet, held in Arlington, Va. on Saturday. ( Why insult Americans?) "We have seen a small but vocal group of bigots and hate -mongers manufacture an atmosphere of anti -Islam hysteria through smear campaigns that rely on distortions, misinformation and outright falsehoods," Awad said. The statement said the new "Islamophobia" department would produce an annual report tracking "trends in rhetorical attacks on Islam and Muslims and will offer accurate and balanced information to be used in the struggle for tolerance and mutual understanding." It would also "organize conferences, seminars, cultural exchanges, and other activities and events designed to provide opportunities for education and dialogue." "It will take joint efforts by people of goodwill of all faiths to challenge this epidemic of hate," Awad said. (How about if they would be transparent) The term "Islamophobia" has become widely used in recent years despite criticism — even from some Muslims — about a term which etymologically suggests an irrational fear or horror of Muslims or Islam. (The horror is in Sharia Law and the Quran) Critics say proponents use the word to cover everything from acts of unjustified discrimination targeting Muslims to legitimate opposition to Islamic tenets, practices, leaders or institutions. CAIR itself has labeled "Islamophobes" critics who have drawn attention to the fact that the organization was named by federal prosecutors in 2007 among "unindicted co-conspirators" in a case against the Holy Land Foundation in Texas. Five former Holy Land organizers were convicted the following year of providing support to the Palestinian terrorist group, Hamas. Islamophobia is "a wretched concept that confuses criticism of Islam as a religion and stigmatization of those who believe in it," a group of writers and intellectuals, including British author Salman Rushdie, said in a joint 2006 statement condemning Islamism as a "reactionary ideology." Although increasingly fashionable since 2001, the term "Islamophobia" predated the 2001 terror attacks and their aftermath. A Nexis search suggests that the earliest usage in media reports came around 1990, when a Soviet Academy of Sciences academic told an Uzbekistan - based newspaper that "Islamophobia" on the part of Soviet leaders could lead to an "Islamic explosion." In 1995, Jordan's Prince Hassan, brother of the late King Hussein, used the word in an address at the U.N. General Assembly. "The attention of this body should be turned to the spreading of Islamophobia," he said. "This phenomenon occurs in all manner of ways, from the purely verbal to the bluntly physical. Its proponents deal in inflammatory rhetoric. They preach the inevitability of cultural apocalypse, tarring all Moslems with the brush of fanatical extremism." ( Like strapping bombs on children?) In 1996 a British think tank focused on multiethnic affairs, the Runnymede Trust, set up a body called the Commission on British Muslims and Islamophobia, which the following year produced a report entitled "Islamophobia: A challenge for us all." As the decade progressed Iranian diplomats used the term more and more frequently at the U.N. and its now -defunct Commission on Human Rights, describing the phenomenon as "the perception of Islam and its followers as threats to the West." (In their words to kill Christians, Jews and Americans.) The OIC in 1999 introduced its first resolution at the Commission on Human Rights on what it calls "religious defamation" and over the ensuing decade has passed one at the U.N. every year. Initially the annual resolutions referred to problems like "stereotyping" or "xenophobia" but from the middle of the 1990s the term "Islamophobia" was introduced. Today it appears regularly in U.N. documents, and the OIC last month called on the U.N.'s top human rights official to start tracking "Islamophobia." The U.S. State Department has in recent years used the term periodically — sometimes in quotes, sometimes not — m annual human rights and religious freedom. (As in free speech) In a joint op-ed published in several European newspapers last month, President Obama's envoy to the OIC, Rashad Hussain, and special envoy to monitor and combat anti-Semitism, Hannah Rosenthal, wrote, "We are deeply aware of the growing anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, and other forms of hatred, rhetoric and bigotry that have blossomed worldwide." makaigsPP ifinihedred Aaron C1erU fit4 pikom fiscimafters. IcTV shoulaCl33.%, fthelz nfcr.dasobedierice. 0 e ..-Center ofTemeciila tiiia*Tt lecture ° If the IC'EV des not bo ei06 witht :tffe1a;r,,ps,e•rea-. qsuze, the; P.fl`duid. 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Store By Erick Stakeibeck CBN News Terrorism Analyst Wednesday, June 02, 201ORSS WASHINGTON -- Some U.S. intelligence officials believe al Qaeda cleric Anwar al-Awlaki is now the worlds most influential Islamic terrorist, surpa.ssinrg even Osarna bin Laden. In recent months, al-A1waki's jihad ''street creel" has risen to new levels. He exchanged e-mails with Fort Hood shooter Nidal Hassan and rnentored. Christmas Day "underwear bomber" Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab. He also reportedly served as the inspiration for Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad. For more on this investigation, Pat Robertson spoke with CBN News Terrorism Analyst Erick Stakelbeck on the Wednesday, June 2 edition of The 700 Club. Click play to watch the interview. U.S. officials want al-Awlaki taken out. hey missed that chance just a few years back, when al-Awlaki was imam of .)ifthe D.. al-Hijrah mosque in Falls Church, Va., a suburb of Washington, D.C. Al-Awlaki has since fled to Yemen. But a CBN News investigation has revealed that the al Qaeda cleric's presence is still being felt in the leafy suburb of Falls Church, just minutes from the nation's capital. The Last Place You'd Look It seems like the last place you'd find CDs and DVDs by al Awlaki. But that's exactly what CBN News found during a recent visit to Halalco, a Muslim supermarket in Falls Church. Halalco is the largest store of its kind in the Washington, D.C. area. In addition to halal meat, the store carries a large selection of Islamic books, recordings and clothing. In an exclusive investigation, CBN News discovered that Halalco was also selling CDs and DVDs by none other than aI-Awl