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HomeMy WebLinkAbout072710 CC AgendaIn compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the office of the City Clerk (951) 694-6444. Notification 48 hours prior to a meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to that meeting [28 CFR 35.102.35.104 ADA Title II] AGENDA TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL A REGULAR MEETING CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 43200 BUSINESS PARK DRIVE JULY 27, 2010 — 7:00 PM At approximately 9:45 P.M., the City Council will determine which of the remaining agenda items can be considered and acted upon prior to 10:00 P.M. and may continue all other items on which additional time is required until a future meeting. All meetings are scheduled to end at 10:00 P.M. 6:00 P.M. - Closed Session of the City Council/Temecula Redevelopment Agency pursuant to Government Code Section: 1) Conference with City Attorney pursuant to Government. Code Section 54956.9(b) with respect to one matter of potential litigation. With respect to such matter, the City Attorney has determined that a point has been reached where there is a significant exposure to litigation involving the City and City related entities based on existing facts and circumstances. Public Information concerning existing litigation between the City and various parties may be acquired by reviewing the public documents held by the City Clerk. Next in Order: Ordinance: 10-13 Resolution: 10-58 CALL TO ORDER: Mayor Jeff Comerchero Prelude Music: CuoreCanto Cox Family Trio Invocation: Pastor John Wells of Mountain View Community Church of Temecula Flag Salute: Council Member Edwards ROLL CALL: Edwards, Naggar, Roberts, Washington, Comerchero PRESENTATIONS/PROCLAMATIONS Certificate of Achievement - Eagle Scout Christopher Schreiber PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 30 minutes is provided so members of the public may address the Council on items that appear within the Consent Calendar or ones that are not listed on the agenda. Speakers are limited to two (2) minutes each. If you desire to speak to the Council on an item which is listed on the Consent Calendar or a matter not listed on the agenda, a pink "Request to Speak" form should be filled out and filed with the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. For all Public Hearing or Council Business matters on the agenda, a "Request to Speak" form must be filed with the City Clerk prior to the Council addressing that item. There is a five minute (5) time limit for individual speakers. CITY COUNCIL REPORTS Reports by the members of the City Council on matters not on the agenda will be made at this time. A total, not to exceed, ten (10) minutes will be devoted to these reports. CONSENT CALENDAR . [el: [a]:1111 t0111::1:8 01-14 [« All matters listed under Consent Calendar are considered to be routine and all will be enacted by one roll call vote. There will be no discussion of these items unless Members of the City Council request specific items be removed from the Consent Calendar for separate action. Standard Ordinance and Resolution Adoption Procedure RECOMMENDATION: 1.1 Motion to waive the reading of the text of all ordinances and resolutions included in the agenda. Action Minutes RECOMMENDATION: 2.1 Approve the action minutes of July 13, 2010. List of Demands RECOMMENDATION: 3.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A Authorization for redemption of all outstanding CFD 88-12 (Ynez Corridor) Bonds, in addition to the partial prepayment of the Civic Center Certificates of Participation Bonds RECOMMENDATION: 4.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE REDEMPTION OF OUTSTANDING BONDS OF THE $18,690,000 COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 88-12 OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA (YNEZ CORRIDOR) SPECIAL TAX REFUNDING BONDS, 1998 SERIES A" 4.2 Authorize the City Manager to allocate $4.8 million towards the CFD 88-12 redemption of outstanding bonds and up to $7.2 million for the Civic Center Certificates of Participation early prepayment for a total of up to $12 million from the General Fund as previously authorized. City Treasurer's Statement of Investment Policy RECOMMENDATION: 5.1 Adopt the Treasurer's Statement of Investment Policy which provides safety, liquidity, compliance, and yield for City funds. Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant RECOMMENDATION: 6.1 Approve the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Application for a proposed amount of $23,055. Approve FY2010-11 Economic Development Operating Agreement with the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce RECOMMENDATION: 7.1 Approve the operating agreement and authorize the Mayor to execute the agreement with the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce in the amount of $136,260. Approval of the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau FY2010-11 Tourism Rack Brochure/Map RECOMMENDATION: 8.1 Approve the funding in the amount of $40,000 to the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau (TVCVB) for publication and distribution of the Temecula Valley Tourism Rack Brochure/Map. Contract with Canon Financial Services, Inc. through Innovative Document Solutions RECOMMENDATION: 9.1 Approve a five-year contract with Canon Financial Services, Inc. through Innovative Document Solutions for the lease of 11 new copiers for an annual amount of $36,060 for a total contract amount of $180,300. 10 Amendment to Office Lease Agreement regarding the leasing of space in the Civic Center parking garage storefront to the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau RECOMMENDATION: 10.1 Approve Amendment to Office Lease Agreement for the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau. 11 Second Reading of Ordinance No. 10-12 RECOMMENDATION: 11.1 Adopt an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 10-12 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AMENDING THE TEMECULA MUNICIPAL CODE BY ADDING A NEW CHAPTER 5.06, LAWFUL HIRING COMPLIANCE, AMENDING SECTIONS 5.04.270, 5.04.280, AND 5.04.300, ADDING SECTION 5.04.310 AND REPEALING SECTION 5.04.200 REQUIRING EMPLOYERS TO VERIFY THE WORK AUTHORIZATION STATUS OF NEWLY HIRED WORKERS UNDER FEDERAL LAW AS A CONDITION OF RECEIVING A BUSINESS LICENSE, PROVIDING FOR REMEDIES FOR VIOLATIONS AND PROVIDING FOR APPEALS OF ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS CONCERNING SUCH REQUIREMENTS RECESS CITY COUNCIL MEETING TO SCHEDULED MEETINGS OF THE TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT, THE CITY OF TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY, AND THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT MEETING Next in Order: Ordinance: No. CSD 10-01 Resolution: No. CSD 10-05 CALL TO ORDER: President Chuck Washington ROLL CALL: DIRECTORS: Comerchero, Edwards, Naggar, Roberts, Washington CSD PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 15 minutes is provided so members of the public may address the Board of Directors on items that are not listed on the agenda or on the Consent Calendar. Speakers are limited to two (2) minutes each. If you decide to speak to the Board of Directors on an item not on the agenda or on the Consent Calendar, a pink 'Request to Speak" form should be filled out and filed with the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. For all other agenda items, a 'Request to Speak" form must be filed with the City Clerk Prior to the Board of Directors addressing that item. There is a five (5) minute time limit for individual speakers. Anyone wishing to address the Board of Directors should present a completed pink "Request to Speak" form to the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. CSD CONSENT CALENDAR 12 Action Minutes RECOMMENDATION: 12.1 Approve the action minutes of July 13, 2010. CSD DEPARTMENTAL REPORT 13 Community Services Departmental Reoort CSD DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SERVICES REPORT CSD GENERAL MANAGERS REPORT CSD BOARD OF DIRECTORS REPORTS CSD ADJOURNMENT Next regular meeting: Tuesday, August 10, 2010, at 5:30 P.M., for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM., City Council Chambers, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California. TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY MEETING Next in Order: Ordinance: No. RDA 10-01 Resolution: No. RDA 10-10 CALL TO ORDER: Chair Person Mike Naggar ROLL CALL: AGENCY MEMBERS: Comerchero, Edwards, Roberts, Washington, Naggar RDA PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 15 minutes is provided so members of the public may address the Redevelopment Agency on items that are not listed on the agenda or on the Consent Calendar. Speakers are limited to two (2) minutes each. If you decide to speak to the Board of Directors on an item not on the agenda or on the Consent Calendar, a pink "Request to Speak" form should be filled out and filed with the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. For all other agenda items, a "Request to Speak" form must be filed with the City Clerk Prior to the Board of Directors addressing that item. There is a five (5) minute time limit for individual speakers. Anyone wishing to address the Board of Directors should present a completed pink "Request to Speak" form to the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. RDA CONSENT CALENDAR 14 Action Minutes RECOMMENDATION: 14.1 Approve the action minutes of July 13, 2010. RDA DEPARTMENTAL REPORT 15 Redevelopment Department Monthly Report RDA EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS REPORT RDA AGENCY MEMBERS REPORTS RDA ADJOURNMENT Next regular meeting: Tuesday, August 10, 2010, at 5:30 P.M., for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM., City Council Chambers, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California. [9 TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING CORPORATION MEETING CALL TO ORDER ROLL CALL: Next in Order: Ordinance: No. TPFA 10-01 Resolution: No. TPFA 10-02 Chair Person Jeff Comerchero AGENCY MEMBERS: Edwards, Naggar, Roberts, Washington, Comerchero TPFA PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 15 minutes is provided so members of the public may address the Temecula Public Financing Authority on items that are not listed on the agenda or on the Consent Calendar. Speakers are limited to two (2) minutes each. If you decide to speak to the Board of Directors on an item not on the agenda or on the Consent Calendar, a pink "Request to Speak" form should be filled out and filed with the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name for the record. For all other agenda items, a "Request to Speak" form must be filed with the City Clerk Prior to the Board of Directors addressing that item. There is a five (5) minute time limit for individual speakers. Anyone wishing to address the Board of Directors should present a completed pink "Request to Speak" form to the City Clerk. When you are called to speak, please come forward and state your name and address for the record 16 Action Minutes RECOMMENDATION: 16.1 Approve the action minutes of July 28, 2009. 17 Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-1 (Crowne Hill) RECOMMENDATION: 17.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-1 (CROWNE HILL) 18 Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 01-2 (Harveston) RECOMMENDATION: 18.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 01-2 (HARVESTON) 19 Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-6 (Harveston 11) RECOMMENDATION: 19.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-6 (HARVESTON II) 20 Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-2 (Roripaugh Ranch RECOMMENDATION: 20.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-2 (RORIPAUGH RANCH) 21 Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-3 (Wolf Creek) RECOMMENDATION: 21.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: 10 RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-3 (WOLF CREEK) 22 Community Facilities District No. 2003-02 (Roripaugh Ranch) Initiation of Action Necessary to Foreclose Delinquent Special Tax Liens RECOMMENDATION: 22.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DECLARING ITS INTENTION TO REMOVE DELINQUENT SPECIAL TAXES FROM THE COUNTY TAX ROLL AND ORDERING JUDICIAL FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST DELINQUENT PROPERTY WITHIN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT 03-02 (RORIPAUGH RANCH) TPFA ADJOURNMENT 11 RECONVENE TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING Any person may submit written comments to the City Council before a public hearing or may appear and be heard in support of or in opposition to the approval of the project(s) at the time of the hearing. If you challenge any of the project(s) in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing or in written correspondence delivered to the City Clerk at, or prior to, the public hearing. 23 Revisions to the adopted City of Temecula 2008-2014 Housing Element Update (Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017) RECOMMENDATION: 23.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ADOPTED REVISIONS TO THE ADOPTED GENERAL PLAN 2008-2014 HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE (LR08-0017) 24 Weed Abatement Lien Resolution for FY 2009-2010 RECOMMENDATION: 24.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ORDERING CONFIRMATION OF THE SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS AGAINST PARCELS OF LAND WITHIN THE CITY OF TEMECULA FOR COSTS OF ABATEMENT AND REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS VEGETATION FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2009-2010 CITY COUNCIL BUSINESS 25 Donation of Art for Civic Center 25.1 Approve an agreement between the City of Temecula and Paul J. Price and Kathi L. Price for the assignment of all rights to the "Santa Margarita Creek" painting. 12 DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS 26 Planning Department Monthly Report 27 City Council Travel/Conference Report - June 2010 28 Public Works Department Montle Report 29 Police Department Monthly Report CITY MANAGER REPORT CITY ATTORNEY REPORT ADJOURNMENT Next regular meeting: Tuesday, August 10, 2010, at 5:30 PM, for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM, City Council Chambers, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California. 13 PRESENTATIONS The City of Temecula Certificate of Achievement The City Council of the City of Temecula commends the outstanding achievement of: Christopher Schreiber of Troop #301 We congratulate Christopher for his achievement on receiving the rank of Eagle Scout. We are proud to present Christopher with this Award, and we wish him success in his future accomplishments. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto affixed my hand and official seal this twenty-seventh day of July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Mayor Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk CONSENT CALENDAR Item No. 1 Item No. 2 ACTION MINUTES TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL A REGULAR MEETING CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 43200 BUSINESS PARK DRIVE JULY 13, 2010 — 7:00 PM 6:00 P.M. - Closed Session of the City Council/Temecula Redevelopment Agency pursuant to Government Code Section: 1) Conference with City Attorney pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9(b) with respect to one matter of potential litigation. With respect to such matter, the City Attorney has determined that a point has been reached where there is a significant exposure to litigation involving the City and City related entities based on existing facts and circumstances. With respect to such matter, the City Council will also meet pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9(c) to decide whether to initiate litigation. 2) Public Employee Performance Evaluation for the incumbent position of City Manager pursuant to Government Code Section 54957. Public Information concerning existing litigation between the City and various parties may be acquired by reviewing the public documents held by the City Clerk. At 6:00 P.M., Mayor Comerchero called the City Council meeting to order and recessed the meeting to Closed Session to consider the matters described on the agenda for Closed Session. The City Council meeting convened at 7:02 P.M. CALL TO ORDER: Mayor Jeff Comerchero Prelude Music: Jennifer Cox Invocation: Shawn Nelson ROLL CALL: Edwards, Naggar, Roberts, Washington, Comerchero PRESENTATIONS/PROCLAMATIONS Parks and Recreation Month Proclamation City County Schools (CCS): Foster Youth Task Force Presentation 1 PUBLIC COMMENTS The following individuals addressed the City Council with matters as noted on the speaker request from: • Patrice Lynes • Raymond Herrera • Tom Vining • Jennaya Dunlap • Chuck Rear • Tina Nicholas • Ted Wegener CITY COUNCIL REPORTS CONSENT CALENDAR Arizona Resolution — SB 1070 Support Arizona Resolution - Opposed to SB 1070 - Water Wastage — Segregated Trash - Racial profiling against the undocumented who live in Lake Elsinore - Support of Arizona Resolution 1 Standard Ordinance and Resolution Adoption Procedure - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 1.1 Motion to waive the reading of the text of all ordinances and resolutions included in the agenda. 2 Action Minutes - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 2.1 Approve the action minutes of June 22, 2010; 2.2 Approve the action minutes of July 2, 2010. 3 List of Demands - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 3.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10-54 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A z 4 City Treasurer's Report as of May 31, 2010 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 4.1 Approve and file the City Treasurer's Report as of May 31, 2010. 5 Substitute Agreements and Bonds for Public Improvements in Tract Map No. 24188 (located southeasterly of the intersection of Meadows Parkway and Pauba Road) - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 5.1 Accept substitute Subdivision Improvement Agreement and Subdivision Faithful Performance and Labor and Materials Bonds as security for improvements and labor and materials for Tract Map No. 24188; 5.2 Accept substitute Subdivision Monument Agreement and Subdivision Monument Bond as security for monumentation for Tract Map No. 24188; 5.3 Authorize the release of the existing Faithful Performance, Labor & Materials, Erosion Control, and Monumentation Bonds for Tract Map No. 24188; 5.4 Direct the City Clerk to so advise the developer and surety. 6 Substitute Agreements and Bonds for Public Improvements in Tract Map No. 24188-2 (located East of Meadows Parkway. South of Pauba Road, and West of Butterfield Stage Road) - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 6.1 Accept substitute Subdivision Improvement Agreement and Subdivision Faithful Performance and Labor and Materials Bonds as security for improvements and labor and materials for Tract Map No. 24188-2; 6.2 Accept substitute Subdivision Monument Agreement and Subdivision Monument Bond as security for monumentation for Tract Map No. 24188-2; 6.3 Authorize the release of the existing Faithful Performance, Labor & Materials, Erosion Control, and Monumentation Bonds for Tract Map No. 24188-2; 6.4 Direct the City Clerk to so advise the developer and surety. 7 Approval of the Plans and Specifications and Authorization to Solicit Bids for Maintenance of Landscape Improvements on Caltrans Right of Way Adjacent to the Civic Center and Parking Structure, Project No. PW06-07(1 D) - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 7.1 Approve the Plans and Specifications and authorize the Department of Public Works to solicit bids for the Maintenance of Landscape Improvements on Caltrans right of way adjacent to the Civic Center and Parking Structure Projects, Project No. PW06-07(D). 8 Acceptance of Improvements and Notice of Completion for Old Town Infrastructure Project — Parking Structure, Project No. PW06-07(1 D) - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 8.1 Accept the Old Town Infrastructure Project — Parking Structure, Project No. PW06-07(1 D), as complete; 8.2 Direct the City Clerk to file and record the Notice of Completion and accept a rider to the Performance Bond to serve as one (1) year Maintenance Bond in the amount of 10% of the final contract amount; 8.3 Release the Labor and Materials Bond seven months after filing of the Notice of Completion if no liens have been filed. 9 Award of a Construction Contract for Citywide Storm Drain Improvements — Rancho California Road at Vincent Moraga Drive, Project No. PW09-09 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION 9.1 Award a construction contract for Project No. PW09-09, Citywide Storm Drain Improvements — Rancho California Road at Vincent Moraga Drive, to KZC Construction, Inc. in the amount of $109,590; 9.2 Authorize the City Manager to approve change orders not to exceed the contingency amount of $10,959 which is equal to 10% of the contract amount; 9.3 Make a finding that the Citywide Storm Drain Improvement — Rancho California Road at Vincent Moraga Drive project is exempt from Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) fees. 10 Approval of the Eleventh Amendment to the Consultina Aareement with Moffatt & Nichol Engineers for French Valley Parkway/ Interstate -15 Over -Crossing and Interchange Improvements, Phase I — Project No. PW07-04 -Approved Staff Recommendation (5- 0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 10.1 Approve the Eleventh Amendment to the consulting agreement with Moffatt & Nichol Engineers in an amount not to exceed $569,760 for additional services necessary to complete the construction Plans, Specifications, and Estimate for the French Valley Parkway / Interstate -15 Over -Crossing and Interchange Improvements, Phase I — Project No. PW07-04, and extend the term of the Agreement through June 30, 2011. 11 Amendment No. 1 to the Professional Enaineerina Services Aareement with RBF Consulting for the design of the 1-15/SR-79S Ultimate Interchange, Project No. PW04-08 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 11.1 Approve Amendment No. 1 to the Agreement For Professional Engineer Services with RBF Consulting for design of the 1-15/SR-79 South Ultimate Interchange, authorizing an additional $182,000 for added work. 12 Award a Contract to Time Warner Cable for a Municipal Area Network (MAN) - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 12.1 Approve a five-year agreement with Time Warner Cable Business Class for Municipal Area Network (MAN) connectivity at the annual cost of $50,799.96. 13 Second Amendment to Aareement between the Citv of Temecula and Blanca Y. Price for Landscape Plan Check and Inspection Services - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 13.1 Approve a budget transfer to the Planning Department's Operating Budget from Building and Safety Budget in the amount of $20,000; 13.2 Approve a Second Amendment to Agreement with Blanca Y. Price in the amount of $20,000 for Landscape Plan Check and Inspection Services for a total agreement of $90,000 for Fiscal Year 2009-2010. Consent Calendar Item No. 14 was pulled for separate discussion 14 Authorize the preparation of documents necessary to file an aDDlication with the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) for a modification to the City's Sphere of Influence, as mandated by LAFCO as a condition of approval for the Annexation of certain uninhabited territory described as the Santa Margarita Area Annexation (No. 2) comprised of approximately 4,510 acres located southwest of the City - Approved Staff Recommendation as amended (5-0-0) — Council Member Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Edwards; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 14.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10-55 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE PREPARATION OF DOCUMENTS NECESSARY TO FILE AN APPLICATION WITH RIVERSIDE COUNTY LOCAL AGENCY FORMATION COMMISSION (LAFCO) FOR A MODIFICATION TO THE CITY'S SPHERE OF INFLUENCE, AS MANDATED BY LAFCO AS A CONDITION OF APPROVAL TO ANNEX CERTAIN UNINHABITED TERRITORY DESCRIBED AS THE SANTA MARGARITA AREA ANNEXATION (NO. 2) COMPRISED OF APPROXIMATELY 4,510 ACRES LOCATED SOUTHEAST OF THE CITY PURSUANT TO THE CORTESE-KNOX-HERTZBERG LOCAL GOVERNMENT REORGANIZATION ACT OF 2000 (LR09-0024) Planning and Redevelopment Director Richardson presented the staff report as per agenda material (of record). The following individuals addressed the City Council with regard to this item: • Paul Jacobs LAFCO Sphere of Influence Giveaway • Wayne Hall • Joseph Hudson LAFCO Sphere of Influence 15 Support for H.R. 891 and S. 322, the Commuter Benefits Equity Act (at the request of Mayor Comerchero) - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Roberts; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 15.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10-56 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA TO SUPPORT H.R. 891 AND S. 322, THE COMMUTER BENEFITS EQUITY ACT, WHICH WOULD MAKE PERMANENT THE PARITY BETWEEN EMPLOYEE PARKING AND TRANSIT PASS TAX BENEFITS IN THE INTERNAL REVENUE CODE THAT WAS CREATED TEMPORARILY IN LAST YEAR'S AMERICAN REINVESTMENT AND RECOVERY ACT (ARRA) At 8:09 P.M., the City Council convened as the Temecula Community Services District and the Redevelopment Agency. At 8:12 P.M., the City Council resumed with regular business. PUBLIC HEARING 19 ADDroval of a New Freewav Aareement with the State of California — French Valle Parkway / Interstate -15 Over -Crossing and Interchange Improvements, Phase I and II - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Edwards; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 19.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10- 57 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING A NEW FREEWAY AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA AND THE CITY OF TEMECULA Public Works Director Butler reviewed the staff report (as per agenda material). There being no public input, the public hearing was closed. CITY COUNCIL BUSINESS 20 Proposed Lawful Hirina Compliance (E-verifv) Ordinance reauirina emDlovers to check the work authorization status of newly hired workers - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Council Member Naggar made the motion; it was seconded by Council Member Edwards; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 20.1 Introduce and read by title only an ordinance entitled: ORDINANCE NO. 10-12 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AMENDING THE TEMECULA MUNICIPAL CODE BY ADDING A NEW CHAPTER 5.06, LAWFUL HIRING COMPLIANCE, AMENDING SECTIONS 5.04.270, 5.04.280 AND 5.04.300, ADDING SECTION 5.04.310 AND REPEALING SECTION 5.04.200 REQUIRING EMPLOYERS TO VERIFY THE WORK AUTHORIZATION STATUS OF NEWLY HIRED WORKERS UNDER FEDERAL LAW AS A CONDITION OF RECEIVING A BUSINESS LICENSE, PROVIDING FOR REMEDIES FOR VIOLATIONS, AND PROVIDING FOR APPEALS OF ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS CONCERNING SUCH REQUIREMENTS City Attorney Thorson provided a detailed overview of the staff report (as per written material of record.) The following individuals spoke in support of the proposed recommendation: • George DiLeo • Amy LaBruyere • Patrice Lynes • Ernie White • Mike Witous • Magdalena Hannigan • Jane Lauhou • Peter Maroosis • Raymond Herrera • Robin Hvidston • Ana Bradfield • Pete De La Torres • Ned Messer • Tom Vining • James Baca • Eugene Stock • Rebecca Dunhoff • Glenn Jones • Michael Mudd 0 • William Prouty • Ted Wegener • Lisa Dana The following individual spoke in opposition to the proposed recommendation: • Bob Eilek • Rudy Navarro • Jennaya Dunlap CITY MANAGER REPORT CITY ATTORNEY REPORT City Attorney Thorson advised that with regard to the Closed Session item, under the Brown Act, there was no reportable action. ADJOURNMENT At 10:18 P.M., the City Council meeting was formally adjourned to Tuesday, July 27, 2010, at 5:30 P.M., for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 P.M., City Council Chambers, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California. ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] In memory of Bradley Eckhardt 0 Jeff Comerchero, Mayor Item No. 3 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: List of Demands PREPARED BY: Pascale Brown, Accounting Manager Leah Thomas, Accounting Specialist RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council: 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A BACKGROUND: All claims and demands are reported and summarized for review and approval by the City Council on a routine basis at each City Council meeting. The attached claims represent the paid claims and demands since the last City Council meeting. FISCAL IMPACT: All claims and demands were paid from appropriated funds or authorized resources of the City and have been recorded in accordance with the City's policies and procedures. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution List of Demands RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ALLOWING CERTAIN CLAIMS AND DEMANDS AS SET FORTH IN EXHIBIT A THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. That the following claims and demands as set forth in Exhibit A, on file in the office of the City Clerk, has been reviewed by the City Manager's Office and that the same are hereby allowed in the amount of $3,941,276.45. Section 2. The City Clerk shall certify the adoption of this resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 27th day of July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Mayor r_T40r:61n Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 27th day of July, 2010, by the following vote: F-Ayd:.�Ko1l1►[MIN diIAdi1:l4:63 NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk CITY OF TEMECULA LIST OF DEMANDS 07/08/2010 TOTAL CHECK RUN 07/15/2010 TOTAL CHECK RUN 07/08/2010 TOTAL PAYROLL RUN: 649,474.59 2,792,162.97 499,638.89 TOTAL LIST OF DEMANDS FOR 07/27/2010 COUNCIL MEETING: $ 3,941,276.45 DISBURSEMENTS BY FUND: CHECKS: CITY OF TEMECULA LIST OF DEMANDS 001 GENERAL FUND $ 2,066,350.67 130 RECOVERY ACT JAG FUNDING 1,550.90 140 COMMUNITY DEV BLOCK GRANT 3,210.00 165 AFFORDABLE HOUSING 317,913.04 190 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT 455,079.75 192 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL B 76,538.77 193 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL"C" LANDSCAPE/SLOPE 91,494.34 194 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL D 4,387.18 196 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. 15,421.90 197 TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND 17,321.33 210 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS FUND 234,788.90 280 REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY - CIP PROJECT 33,307.57 300 INSURANCE FUND 8,995.39 320 INFORMATION SYSTEMS 42,420.59 330 SUPPORT SERVICES 30,096.69 340 FACILITIES 20,832.96 375 SUMMER YOUTH EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM 4,222.58 460 CFD 88-12 DEBT SERVICE FUND 1,464.23 472 CFD 01-2 HARVESTON A&B DEBT SERVICE 1,863.56 473 CFD 03-1 CROWNE HILL DEBT SERVICE FUND 1,597.34 474 AD03-4 JOHN WARNER ROAD DEBT SERVICE 532.45 475 CFD03-3 WOLF CREEK DEBT SERVICE FUND 1,464.23 476 CFD 03-6 HARVESTON 2 DEBT SERVICE FUND 1,464.23 477 CFD- RORIPAUGH 2,129.79 501 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 1 SADDLEWOOD 113.59 502 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 2 WINCHESTER CREEK 75.78 503 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 3 RANCHO HIGHLANDS 90.61 504 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 4 THE VINEYARDS 16.71 505 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 5 SIGNET SERIES 184.46 506 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 6 WOODCREST COUNTRY 33.10 507 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 7 RIDGEVIEW 47.75 508 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 8 VILLAGE GROVE 313.14 509 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 9 RANCHO SOLANA 2.58 510 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 10 MARTINIQUE 14.09 511 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 11 MEADOWVIEW 8.82 512 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 12 VINTAGE HILLS 208.60 513 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 13 PRESLEY DEVELOP. 44.77 514 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 14 MORRISON HOMES 25.93 515 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 15 BARCLAY ESTATES 22.32 516 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 16 TRADEWINDS 52.40 517 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 17 MONTE VISTA 4.18 518 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 18 TEMEKU HILLS 193.36 519 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 19 CHANTEMAR 103.68 520 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 20 CROWNE HILL 280.74 521 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 21 VAIL RANCH 473.89 522 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 22 SUTTON PLACE 11.19 523 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 23 PHEASENT RUN 12.51 524 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 24 HARVESTON 267.34 525 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 25 SERENA HILLS 86.03 526 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 26 GALLERYTRADITION 3.53 527 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 27 AVONDALE 12.66 528 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 28 WOLF CREEK 393.85 529 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 29 GALLERY PORTRAIT 6.75 700 CERBT CALIFORNIA BE RETIREE-GASB45 4,084.81 $ 3,441,637.56 CITY OF TEMECULA LIST OF DEMANDS 001 GENERAL FUND $ 253,481.12 165 AFFORDABLE HOUSING 10,798.76 190 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT 136,073.98 192 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL B 149.34 194 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL D 1,376.29 196 TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. 1,272.42 197 TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND 422.39 280 REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY - CIP PROJECT 6,642.16 300 INSURANCE FUND 1,323.89 320 INFORMATION SYSTEMS 23,611.36 330 SUPPORT SERVICES 6,549.44 340 FACILITIES 8,410.27 375 SUMMER YOUTH EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM 25,121.13 501 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 1 SADDLEWOOD 132.14 502 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 2 WINCHESTER CREEK 88.48 503 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 3 RANCHO HIGHLANDS 104.20 504 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 4 THE VINEYARDS 19.24 505 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 5 SIGNET SERIES 211.98 506 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 6 WOODCREST COUNTRY 38.25 507 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 7 RIDGEVIEW 54.54 508 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 8 VILLAGE GROVE 360.07 509 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 9 RANCHO SOLANA 2.99 510 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 10 MARTINIQUE 16.12 511 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 11 MEADOWVIEW 10.16 512 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 12 VINTAGE HILLS 239.81 513 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 13 PRESLEY DEVELOP. 51.27 514 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 14 MORRISON HOMES 29.73 515 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 15 BARCLAY ESTATES 25.56 516 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 16 TRADEWINDS 60.02 517 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 17 MONTE VISTA 5.03 518 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 18 TEMEKU HILLS 222.22 519 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 19 CHANTEMAR 119.17 520 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 20 CROWNE HILL 322.68 521 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 21 VAIL RANCH 545.25 522 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 22 SUTTON PLACE 12.98 523 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 23 PHEASENT RUN 14.27 524 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 24 HARVESTON 307.26 525 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 25 SERENA HILLS 98.77 526 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 26 GALLERYTRADITION 4.22 527 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 27 AVONDALE 14.46 528 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 28 WOLF CREEK 452.98 529 SERVICE LEVEL"C"ZONE 29 GALLERY PORTRAIT 8.12 700 CERBT CALIFORNIA BE RETIREE-GASB45 20,834.37 TOTAL BY FUND: 499,638.89 $ 3,941,276.45 apChkLst 07/08/2010 2:38:34PM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 1 Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 1501 07/08/2010 000245 PERS-HEALTH INSUR PERS Health Admin Cost Payment 75,172.18 PREMIUM Blue Shield HMO Payment 0.00 75,172.18 1502 07/08/2010 010349 CALIF DEPT OF CHILD Support Payment 553.84 553.84 SUPPORT 1503 07/08/2010 000246 PERS (EMPLOYEES' PERS ER Paid Member Contr Payment 129,121.34 129,121.34 RETIREMENT) 1504 07/08/2010 000642 TEMECULA CITY FLEXIBLE Child Care Reimbursement Payment 8,648.02 8,648.02 1505 07/08/2010 001065 NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT Nationwide Retirement Payment 14,294.56 14,294.56 SOLUTION 1506 07/08/2010 000389 NATIONWIDE RETIREMENT OBRA- Project Retirement Payment 7,357.78 7,357.78 SOLUTION 1507 07/08/2010 000283 INSTATAX (IRS) Federal Income Taxes Payment 86,679.50 86,679.50 1508 07/08/2010 000444 INSTATAX (EDD) State Disability Ins Payment 26,953.79 26,953.79 139634 07/08/2010 003552 AFLAC AFLAC Cancer Payment 3,409.70 3,409.70 139635 07/08/2010 007186 AB MAILING SOLUTIONS Mail Services: Theater Brochure 3,000.00 3,000.00 139636 07/08/2010 004973 ABACHERLI, LIN DI TCSD instructor earnings 880.00 880.00 139637 07/08/2010 005068 ADKISSON, CANDICE reimb:supplies MPSC events 7/1 & 7/4 145.62 145.62 139638 07/08/2010 012855 AITCHISON & WATTERS INC conservation: Vail Rch artifacts 700.00 700.00 139639 07/08/2010 004767 ALERT ALL CORPORATION educational items: Fire Prev 3,115.14 3,115.14 139640 07/08/2010 012943 ALPHA MECHANICAL SERVICE HVAC maint: Library 551.89 INC HVAC maint: TCC 168.94 HVAC maint: MPSC 467.25 HVAC maint: TV Museum 235.06 HVAC maint: Ch Museum 140.00 1,563.14 139641 07/08/2010 004240 AMERICAN FORENSIC NURSES DUI & drug screenings: Police 306.50 (AFN) DUI & drug screenings: Police 316.00 622.50 Pagel apChkLst Final Check List Page: 2 07/08/2010 2:38:34PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139642 07/08/2010 000936 AMERICAN RED CROSS lifeguard cert cards:aquatics pgm 456.00 456.00 139643 07/08/2010 001323 ARROWHEAD WATER INC Bottled wtr svcs: CM 12.76 credit: returned items CHS aquatics -14.41 Bottled wtr svcs: PBSP 25.39 Bottled wtr svcs: Ch Museum 31.29 Bottled wtr svcs: TCC 17.54 Bottled wtr svcs: CRC 124.70 Bottled wtr svcs: Skate Park 6.51 Bottled wtr svcs: Theater 53.72 Bottled wtr svcs: TV Museum 18.25 Bottled wtr svcs: CH 283.98 Bottled wtr svcs: Fld Op Ctr 142.46 Bottled wtr svcs: Maint Facility 197.77 Bottled wtr svcs: Library 65.72 Bottled wtr svcs: VRMS 20.69 Bottled wtr svcs: TES pool 51.45 1,037.82 139644 07/08/2010 003203 ARTISTIC EMBROIDERY unifonns:summer pgrm staff shirts 881.96 881.96 139645 07/08/2010 006209 ASSOCIATION OF CHILDREN'S 10/11 ACM mbrshp:Ch Museum 885.00 885.00 139646 07/08/2010 010189 BANNER AMERICAN lamination supplies: Central Svcs 986.91 986.91 PRODUCTS 139647 07/08/2010 011007 BARNETT, KIRK reimb:equip marking Engine 84 90.00 90.00 139648 07/08/2010 002541 BECKER CONSTRUCTION north archway repair: Old Town 1,667.00 1,667.00 SRVS INC 139649 07/08/2010 005665 BLACK'S TOWING towing svc: Police 451.00 credit: billing adj VICR fee refunded -116.00 335.00 139650 07/08/2010 012583 BLANCA Y PRICE 5/10-271dscp plan ck:planning 4,550.00 4,550.00 139651 07/08/2010 011421 BRODART COMPANY (1) BOOK: LIBRARY 11.53 (4) BOOKS: LIBRARY 62.70 (5) BOOKS: LIBRARY 102.89 177.12 139652 07/08/2010 009082 CBC TECHNICAL INC misc electrial supplies: Theater 66.43 66.43 139653 07/08/2010 001159 CALIF DEPT OF JUSTICE MAY FINGERPRINTING SVCS: HR/PD 5,962.00 5,962.00 Page2 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 3 07/08/2010 2:38:34PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139654 07/08/2010 009431 CALIF, STATE OF-FRANCHISE SUPPORT PAYMENT 84.42 84.42 TAX 139655 07/08/2010 011301 CALLAWAY MOTORSPORTS partsAabor svcs:PD motorcycle 101.13 101.13 139656 07/08/2010 004228 CAMERON WELDING SUPPLY misc welding supplies: PW Maint 157.70 misc welding supplies: PW Maint 131.29 288.99 139657 07/08/2010 004971 CANON FINANCIAL SERVICES, Jun copier lease: Fire 182.55 INC Jun copier lease: Library 2,836.52 3,019.07 139658 07/08/2010 004609 CINTAS DOCUMENT 6/18 doc shred svcs:citywide 132.48 132.48 MANAGEMENT 139659 07/08/2010 012627 CLEAR IMAGE ENTERPRISES window cleaning: Library 1,200.00 1,200.00 INC 139660 07/08/2010 004405 COMMUNITY HEALTH Community Health Chanties Payment 66.00 66.00 CHARITIES 139661 07/08/2010 009905 COMPRISE TECHNOLOGIES equip repair/maint:APM Machine 2,446.28 2,446.28 INC 139662 07/08/2010 002945 CONSOLIDATED ELECTRICAL misc electrical supplies: CRC 107.66 DIST. misc electrical supplies: TV Museum 217.50 325.16 139663 07/08/2010 001264 COSTCO WHOLESALE misc supplies: fire 223.57 misc supplies: fire 19.58 artist hospitality supplies: theater 383.17 supplies: FAM,Fun Nights,4th July 959.85 supplies:Aglow event Lake Skinner 179.12 refreshments: MSYEP wkshp 6/30 226.48 artist hospitality supplies: theater 114.52 2,106.29 139664 07/08/2010 013662 CRISP, DEANA refund:sec dep:rm rental:crc 150.00 150.00 139665 07/08/2010 003272 DAISYWHEEL RIBBON plotter paper &ink: info sys 300.07 300.07 COMPANY INC 139666 07/08/2010 001393 DATA TICKET INC May parking citation svc: Police 1,778.70 1,778.70 139667 07/08/2010 011202 E M H SPORTS & FITNESS TCSD instructor earnings 539.00 TCSD instructor earnings 1,463.00 2,002.00 Pages apChkLst Final Check List Page: 4 07/08/2010 2:38:34PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139668 07/08/2010 001056 EXCEL LANDSCAPE MAY LANDSCAPE MAINT:CITY 9,685.00 FACILITIES landscape maint: Pala park 733.00 landscape rehab:Harveston slopes 4,947.99 irrigation repairs: hintergardt park 178.83 irrigation repairs: library 188.43 15,733.25 139669 07/08/2010 000478 FAST SIGNS exhibit signage: TV Museum 96.97 96.97 139670 07/08/2010 002982 FRANCHISE TAX BOARD SUPPORT PAYMENT 50.00 50.00 139671 07/08/2010 013665 FRIEDRICH, AMBER refund:tiny tots 1045.203 102.40 102.40 139672 07/08/2010 011967 FULL VALUE ENTERTAINMENT Live at the Merc 6/25/10 190.00 rental sttlmnt: Live at the Merc 6/25 -57.00 133.00 139673 07/08/2010 007866 G C S SUPPLIES INC toner & ink supplies: info sys 4,088.54 toner & ink supplies: info sys 2,391.46 6,480.00 139674 07/08/2010 007804 GAZER, GEOFFREY entertainment: Hot Summer Nights 250.00 250.00 139675 07/08/2010 001937 GALLS INC uniform svcs:police volunteers 12.00 uniform svcs:police volunteers 1.00 13.00 139676 07/08/2010 000173 GENERAL BINDING office supplies: central secs 441.58 CORPORATION sales tax/office supplies: central svcs -35.53 406.05 139677 07/08/2010 009608 GOLDEN VALLEY MUSIC sttlmnt: Classics at the Merc Jun '10 1,116.00 SOCIETY rent sttlmnt: Classics at the Merc Jun -334.80 781.20 139678 07/08/2010 003792 GRAINGER equip maint supplies: Stn 84 225.56 225.56 139679 07/08/2010 010279 GRIFFITH AIR TOOL INC equip maint/repair parts: PW Maint 1,801.10 1,801.10 139680 07/08/2010 005311 H2O CERTIFIED POOL WATER maint/repair: tes pool heater 700.00 SPCL. maint/repair: crc pool heater 700.00 pool supplies: crc 2,993.50 4,393.50 139681 07/08/2010 006250 HAZMATTRANSINC hazardous waste disposal:pwmaint 862.03 862.03 139682 07/08/2010 002109 H D SUPPLY CONSTR. SUPPLY maint supplies: Stn 84 511.35 511.35 LTD 139683 07/08/2010 004811 HEWLETT PACKARD H P Touchsmart 9100: Info Sys 1,870.70 1,870.70 Page:4 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 5 07/08/2010 2:38:34PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139684 07/08/2010 007792 HINTON, BEVERLY L. TCSD instructor earnings 238.00 238.00 139685 07/08/2010 010210 HOME DEPOT SUPPLY INC, misc supplies: TCSD 691.63 THE misc supplies: Fld Op Ctr 596.60 1,288.23 139686 07/08/2010 003198 HOME DEPOT, THE misc maint supplies: Theater 38.86 misc maint supplies: Theater 83.39 misc supplies: Old Town boardwalk 257.13 379.38 139687 07/08/2010 007618 HOT AUGUST NIGHT perfonnance:aglow in the park 3,000.00 3,000.00 139688 07/08/2010 000194 I C M A RETIREMENT-PLAN I C M A Retirement Trust 457 Payment 6,384.14 6,384.14 303355 139689 07/08/2010 013666 IDEARC MEDIA CORP verizon pg advertising:TV Museum 2,502.00 2,502.00 139690 07/08/2010 009693 INLAN D VALLEY CLASSICAL sttlmnt: Beauty& the Beast Jun10 12,676.00 BALLET rental sttlmnt: Beauty &the Beast Jun -7,793.31 4,882.69 139691 07/08/2010 006914 INNOVATIVE DOCUMENT May copier maint/usage: library 1,440.75 SOLUTIONS May copier maint/u sage: citywide 3,940.97 5,381.72 139692 07/08/2010 004884 J & W REDWOOD LUMBER CO lumber supplies: PW Maint 99.76 99.76 INC 139693 07/08/2010 012883 JACOB'S HOUSE INC Jacob's House Charity Payment 220.00 220.00 139694 07/08/2010 010412 JOHNSON POWER SYSTEMS generator maint:library 546.64 generator maint: city hall 424.98 generator maint: fld op ctr 796.01 generator maint: Stn 92 536.80 generator maint: Stn 73 537.08 generator maint: Stn 84 423.30 generator maint: CRC 424.90 3,689.71 139695 07/08/2010 004546 KING, JAMES N. perfonnance:Old Town 7/9 1,250.00 1,250.00 139696 07/08/2010 013660 L & L PRINTERS CARLSBAD, PRINTING SVCS: THEATER 6,677.25 6,677.25 LLC BROCHURE 139697 07/08/2010 000209 L & M FERTILIZER INC maint supplies: Stn 84 182.82 182.82 139698 07/08/2010 004412 LEANDER, KERRY D. TCSD instructor earnings 1,197.00 1,197.00 Pages apChkLst Final Check List Page: 6 07/08/2010 2:38:34PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139699 07/08/2010 002634 LITELINES INC Old Town banner supplies: PW 3,126.56 3,126.56 139700 07/08/2010 003782 MAIN STREET SIGNS Signs:cnme prevention pgrm 652.50 652.50 139701 07/08/2010 011179 MC MILLIN REDHAWK LLC TCSD Instructor Earnings 175.00 175.00 139702 07/08/2010 003076 MET LIFE INSURANCE MetLife Dental Insurance Payment 7,689.06 7,689.06 COMPANY 139703 07/08/2010 007210 MIDORI GARDENS Irngation repairs: vail ranch park 4/15 300.00 Mainline repairs:loma linda park 6/21 181.56 Ldscp maint swcs:vail ranch 6/8 384.73 866.29 139704 07/08/2010 013661 MILLER, CAROL M. release claims agreement pmt 4,719.00 4,719.00 139705 07/08/2010 004002 MILNER, DAVID Sign Replacement: Sta 73 1,055.71 1,055.71 139706 07/08/2010 012580 MINUTEMAN PRESS Stationery for City Council 310.51 credit:billing adj/inv#41017 -32.40 278.11 139707 07/08/2010 012264 MIRANDA, JULIO C. TCSD Instructor Earnings 269.50 TCSD Instructor Earnings 365.75 TCSD Instructor Earnings 96.25 731.50 139708 07/08/2010 003135 MOORE WALLACE Qty 1000 Inspection forms:police 210.49 210.49 139709 07/08/2010 004490 MUSCO SPORTS LIGHTING INC field lights replace/maint:rrsp 22,900.08 22,900.08 139710 07/08/2010 004508 NAGGAR, MICHAEL S. Reimb:Jun '10 internet services 34.99 34.99 139711 07/08/2010 002925 NAPA AUTO PARTS Auto parts & misc supplies: CAP 26.03 Auto parts & misc supplies: Stn 84 30.07 Auto parts & misc supplies: Stn 84 6.83 62.93 139712 07/08/2010 010244 NO LIMITS SILK SCREEN adult softball avrards:sprts prgm 905.80 905.80 139713 07/08/2010 003964 OFFICE DEPOT BUSINESS SVS Misc office supplies:centml services 227.19 227.19 DIV 139714 07/08/2010 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE &SERVICE CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS: PW MAINT 80.07 CITYVEHICLE MAINT SVCS: PW MAINT 55.98 136.05 139715 07/08/2010 001171 ORIENTAL TRADING COMPANY Misc supplies: summer day camp 324.86 324.86 INC Pages apChkLst Final Check List Page: 7 07/08/2010 2:38:34PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139716 07/08/2010 013664 PADGETT, TRACIE refund:sec dep:rm rental:crc 150.00 refund:rm rental CRC 271.00 421.00 139717 07/08/2010 002652 PAT & OSCARS RESTAURANT add'I refreshments: 4th of July events 243.95 243.95 139718 07/08/2010 001958 PERS LONG TERM CARE PERS Long Term Care Payment 91.00 91.00 PROGRAM 139719 07/08/2010 000249 PETTY CASH Petty Cash Reimbursement 703.36 Petty Cash Reimbursement 32.54 735.90 139720 07/08/2010 010338 POOL & ELECTRICAL Misc pool parts & supplies:aquatics pgm 1,174.59 PRODUCTS INC Misc pool parts & supplies:aquatics pgm 743.29 Misc pool parts & supplies:aquatics pgm 53.30 1,971.18 139721 07/08/2010 005820 PRE-PAID LEGAL SERVICES Prepaid Legal Services Payment 366.70 366.70 INC 139722 07/08/2010 001416 QUICK CRETE PRODUCTS INC Waste containers: various park sites 3,300.57 3,300.57 139723 07/08/2010 004483 RECREONICS INC Pool equipment supplies:Aquatics 358.39 358.39 139724 07/08/2010 003591 RENES COMMERCIAL Trash & debris clean up:city R.O.W 15,199.00 15,199.00 MANAGEMENT 139725 07/08/2010 013138 RISCH, VICKI G. TCSD Instructor Earnings 79.10 79.10 139726 07/08/2010 001592 RIVERSIDE CO INFO Jun radio rental & maint:police/prk 1,568.58 1,568.58 TECHNOLOGY 139727 07/08/2010 000406 RIVERSIDE CO SHERIFFS Street Painting patrol services 6/26 1,717.00 1,717.00 DEPT 139728 07/08/2010 000406 RIVERSIDE CO SHERIFFS Explorer Academy 8/1-67 explorers 1,500.00 1,500.00 DEPT 139729 07/08/2010 004822 RIVERSIDE TRANSITAGENCY May co-op agnnnt:temecula trolley 25,000.00 25,000.00 139730 07/08/2010 000873 ROBERTS, RONALD H. Reimb:Jul '10 intemet service 44.99 44.99 139731 07/08/2010 007582 SAFEGUARD DENTAL & VISION SafeGuard Vision Plan Payment 907.93 907.93 139732 07/08/2010 009980 SANBORN, GWYN Country @ the Merc 6/26/10 240.00 rental:Country @ the Merc 6/26/10 -60.00 180.00 Page:7 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 8 07/08/2010 2:38:34PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor 139733 07/08/2010 008529 SH ERI FFS CIVIL DIV - CENTRAL 139734 07/08/2010 008529 SH ERI FFS CIVIL DIV - CENTRAL 139735 07/08/2010 008529 SH ERI FFS CIVIL DIV - CENTRAL 139736 07/08/2010 009213 SH ERRY BERRY MUS IC 139737 07/08/2010 000645 SMART & FINAL INC 139738 07/08/2010 000537 SOCALIFEDISON 139739 07/08/2010 001212 SO CALIF GAS COMPANY 139740 07/08/2010 000519 SOUTH COUNTY PEST CONTROL INC 139744 07/08/2010 007762 STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY 139745 07/08/2010 012723 STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY 139746 07/08/2010 002015 STAR WAY PRODUCTIONS 139747 07/08/2010 011667 T&TJANITORIAL INC 139748 07/08/2010 000305 TARGET BANK BUS CARD SRVCS (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total SUPPORT PAYMENT 200.00 200.00 SUPPORT PAYMENT 100.00 100.00 SUPPORT PAYMENT 100.00 100.00 rental:Jazz @ the Merc 6/24/10 -157.50 Jazz @ the Merc 6/24/10 525.00 367.50 Misc supplies: tiny tot pgnn 355.36 Misc supplies: FAM prgm 458.68 Misc supplies: summer day camp 145.32 959.36 June 2-02-502-8077:43210 bus pk dr 2,139.78 June 2-30-220-8749:45850 N VNf Crk 411.00 June 2-29-953-8447:31738 wtf vly PED 24.02 June 2-29-657-2332:45538 redwood 24.02 June 2-28-629-0507:30600 pauba rd 9,167.31 June 2-00-397-5067:var slopes:tcsd 2,022.01 13,788.14 June 091-085-1632-0 TES pool 967.57 967.57 pest control swcs:PBSP 94.00 pest control swcs:Theater 94.00 pest control swcs:Tem.Crk Trail Park 94.00 pest control swcs:SAFETTCC 90.00 pest control swcs:MPSC 94.00 pest control swcs:Calle Tajo/R.C. Rd 282.00 pest control swcs:Code Enf 6/18 94.00 842.00 Mandatory Life Insurance Payment 9,585.72 9,585.72 Voluntary Supp Life Insurance Payment 677.90 677.90 Audio equipment rentalAth of July 915.00 915.00 Jun cleaning swcs:police storefront 790.00 Jun janitorial swcs:city fac's 7,073.83 7,863.83 Hospitality su pplie s:th eater 199.27 Misc supplies: summer day camp 796.78 996.05 PageE apChkLst 07/08/2010 2:38:34PM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 9 Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139749 07/08/2010 001547 TEAMSTERS LOCAL 911 Union Dues Payment 5,132.00 5,132.00 139750 07/08/2010 000168 TEMECULA FLOWER CORRAL Sunshine fund 70.69 70.69 139751 07/08/2010 010848 TEMECULA PLANTSCAPE Jun plant lease srvcs: Library 200.00 200.00 139752 07/08/2010 004274 TEMECULA VALLEY SECURITY locksmith srvcs: crc 12.50 12.50 CENTR 139753 07/08/2010 003862 THYSSENKRUPP Fire Safety Test:West Wing 132.50 ELEVATOR.BRNCH 37 Fire Safety Test:FOC 198.75 331.25 139754 07/08/2010 010276 TIME WARNER CABLE July high speed internet:42081 main st 58.28 58.28 139755 07/08/2010 004759 TWIN GRAPHICS vehicle gmphics:police 1,141.88 1,141.88 139756 07/08/2010 002065 UNISOURCE Copier paper:central srvcs 4,958.02 4,958.02 139757 07/08/2010 000325 UNITED WAY United Way Charities Payment 62.00 62.00 139758 07/08/2010 012549 UPODIUM cleaning supplies:Stn 84 90.34 90.34 139759 07/08/2010 000854 URBAN LAND INSTITUTE Prof srvcs:Tech.Panel 6/23/10 12,500.00 12,500.00 139760 07/08/2010 003730 WEST COAST ARBORISTS INC Tree trimming srvcs:hary lake park 6,400.00 Tree trimming srvcs: harveston 4,150.00 10,550.00 139761 07/08/2010 004567 WITCHER ELECTRIC Electncal repairs: nicholas park 1,200.00 install 14 bollard lights: Nicolas Road 13,500.00 14,700.00 139762 07/08/2010 000348 ZIGLER, GAIL Reimb:Team PACE supplies 127.40 127.40 Grand total for UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA: 649,474.59 Page9 apChkLst 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 1 Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 1509 07/15/2010 013670 CHASE Temecula Gardens LP pledge pymt 305,000.00 305,000.00 139763 07/15/2010 013667 ACADEMY OF MUSIC, INC. entertainment: hot summer nights 600.00 600.00 139764 07/15/2010 010851 ADAM IAK, DAWN reimb: car decorating supplies 7/4 109.98 109.98 139765 07/15/2010 004802 ADLERHORST INTERNATIONAL Jun training: Police K-9 Casper 141.67 141.67 INC 139766 07/15/2010 013626 ALLAIN, KIMBERLY refund:sec dep:rm rental:crc 250.00 250.00 139767 07/15/2010 009033 ALLEN, STEVEN L. photography: 4th July Parade 425.00 425.00 139768 07/15/2010 006915 ALLIE'S PARTY EQUIPMENT rental equip: Street Painting Fest 706.25 706.25 139769 07/15/2010 009787 ALTEC INDUSTRIES INC vehicle repair: PW Traffic 1,046.00 1,046.00 139770 07/15/2010 004422 AMERICAN BATTERY vehicle repair: Stn 84 GEM 714.59 714.59 CORPORATION 139771 07/15/2010 012985 ANDERSON & HOWARD JUN CABLING CIVIC CENTER 52,471.15 52,471.15 ELECTRIC INC 139772 07/15/2010 002187 ANIMAL FRIENDS OF THE Jun animal control services 13,000.00 13,000.00 VALLEYS 139773 07/15/2010 008732 ANSWERBAND INC, THE entertainment: concert series 7/22 1,200.00 1,200.00 139774 07/15/2010 005709 BAMM PROMOTIONAL T-shirts: day camp pgrm 2,153.25 PRODUCTS T-shirts: day camp pgnn 179.44 2,332.69 139775 07/15/2010 011448 BEARCOM OPERATING L.P. radio rental: 4th July Parade 605.51 605.51 139776 07/15/2010 004040 BIG FOOT GRAPHICS TCSD instructor earnings 168.00 TCSD instructor earnings 168.00 336.00 139777 07/15/2010 012583 BLANCA Y PRICE 6/29-301dscp pin ck/insp:planning 1,710.00 1,710.00 139778 07/15/2010 013475 BONINO, STEPHEN entertainment: concert series 7/15 1,200.00 1,200.00 Page:1 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 2 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139779 07/15/2010 011421 BRODART COMPANY (1) BOOK: LIBRARY 24.03 24.03 139780 07/15/2010 013672 BUSTOS, STEVEN refund:viol dismissed:prkg cite 75013 325.00 325.00 139781 07/15/2010 006908 C C & COMPANY INC entertainment: summer concerts 500.00 entertainment: summer concerts 1,250.00 1,750.00 139782 07/15/2010 003138 CAL MAT PW PATCH TRUCK MATERIALS 247.79 247.79 139783 07/15/2010 001159 CALIF DEPT OF JUSTICE JUN FINGERPRINTING SVCS: HR/PD 4,231.00 4,231.00 139784 07/15/2010 004248 CALIF DEPT OF May DUI & drug screenings: PD 2,240.00 2,240.00 JUSTICE-ACCTING 139785 07/15/2010 000152 CALIF PARKS & RECREATION 10/11 CPRS mbrshp:Harrington, Kevin 140.00 140.00 SOC 139786 07/15/2010 011301 CALLAWAY MOTORSPORTS partsAabor svc:Police motorcycle 595.52 595.52 139787 07/15/2010 007843 CALVARYCHAPEL BIBLE refund:sec dep:picnic rental: RRSP 150.00 150.00 139788 07/15/2010 004228 CAMERON WELDINGSUPPLY Helium tanks rental/refill:TCSD 46.60 welding supplies: PW Maint 525.18 571.78 139789 07/15/2010 000131 CARL WARREN &COMPANY JUN CLAIM ADJUSTER SVCS: FINANCE 2,911.12 2,911.12 INC 139790 07/15/2010 009640 CERTIFION CORPORATION Jun inv dbas subsc: Police 176.85 176.85 139791 07/15/2010 000137 CHEVRON AND TEXACO City vehicles fuel: Police 1,460.60 1,460.60 139792 07/15/2010 004609 CINTAS DOCUMENT 6/25 doc shred svcs:citywide 59.48 59.48 MANAGEMENT 139793 07/15/2010 002945 CONSOLIDATED ELECTRICAL electrical supplies: CRC/Library 218.08 DIST. electrical supplies: CRC 190.55 electrical supplies: TV Museum 114.19 522.82 139794 07/15/2010 010650 CRAFTSMEN PLUMBING& plumbing repair: TCC 4,000.00 4,000.00 HVACINC 139795 07/15/2010 010461 DEMCO INC acrylic sign holder: Central Svcs 80.31 80.31 Page2 apChkLst 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM Final Check List CITY OF TEMECULA Page: 3 Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139796 07/15/2010 007057 DERNBACH, ESTHER MARIE TCSD instructor earnings 1,102.50 1,102.50 139797 07/15/2010 003945 DIAMOND ENVIRONMENTAL generator rental: 4th July 545.00 SRVCS portable toilet svc: 4th July 5,607.17 portable restrooms:St Painting Fest 395.00 6,547.17 139798 07/15/2010 013587 DISC DOGS IN SOUTHERN entertainment:fam fun night 7/16 800.00 800.00 CALIF 139799 07/15/2010 004192 DOWNS COMMERCIAL Fuel for Cityvehicles: Police 106.84 FUELING INC Fuel for Cityvehicles: PW Traffic 461.91 Fuel for Cityvehicles: PW Maint 1,139.77 Fuel for City vehicles: B&S 378.12 Fuel for City vehicles: PW C IP 169.23 Fuel for Cityvehicles: Code Enf/Pln 562.25 Fuel for Cityvehicles: TCSD 1,795.50 Fuel for Cityvehicles: PW Lnd Dv 156.40 4,770.02 139800 07/15/2010 009594 DULCHICELLA entertainment: hot summer nights 650.00 650.00 139801 07/15/2010 004068 ECALDRE MANALILI-DE VILLA, TCSD Instructor Earnings 364.00 AILEEN TCSD Instructor Earnings 350.00 TCSD Instructor Earnings 238.00 TCSD Instructor Earnings 126.00 TCSD Instructor Earnings 224.00 TCSD Instructor Earnings 126.00 1,428.00 139802 07/15/2010 005115 ENTERPRISE RENT CAR INC vehicle rental: teen excursion 167.71 167.71 139803 07/15/2010 003665 EXCEL COMMERCIAL Jun long distance phone svcs 55.17 55.17 Pages apChkLst Final Check List Page: 4 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor 139805 07/15/2010 001056 EXCEL LANDSCAPE 139806 07/15/2010 000165 FEDERAL EXPRESS INC (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total mainline repairs:morrison homes 136.25 Jun Indscp maint: north slopes 39,158.00 JUN LNDSCP MAINT: SPORTS PARKS 43,040.00 landscape svcs: town square 1,500.00 landscape svcs: town square 460.00 landscape maint: medians 6,000.00 irrigation repairs: mirada 200.96 VALVE REPLACEMENT: 79 S/PRESLEY 640.00 mainline repair: villages 290.01 mainline repairs: temeku hills 40.67 irrigation repairs: vail ranch 608.11 irrigation repairs: villages 356.88 irrigation repairs: RRSP 272.63 mainline repairs: medians, parks 177.23 JUN LNDSCP MAINT: MEDIANS 16,487.00 Jun Indscp maint: north slopes 21,860.00 landscape maint: La Mirada 237.19 landscape maint: Rancho Vista 334.24 landscape maint: Meadows 152.76 landscape maint: Meadows 52.97 landscape maint: Meadows 189.52 landscape maint: Ovedand Trail 92.98 landscape maint: Vail Ranch 126.71 landscape maint: Ovedand Trail 97.63 landscape maint: Rancho Calif 252.34 landscape maint: Rancho Highlands 286.87 landscape maint: Rancho Highlands 295.36 landscape maint: Meadows 284.71 133,631.02 6/10-25 citywide express mail svcs 400.04 400.04 Page:4 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 5 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139807 07/15/2010 003347 FIRST BANKCARD CENTER 010773 SWEET LUMPY BBQ LLC GR lunch: Finance Team Bldg 6/9 224.11 003395 TEMECULA, CITY OF GR business lic test credit card sys 5.00 003395 TEMECULA, CITY OF GR business lic test credit card sys 5.00 003964 OFFICE DEPOT BUSINESS SVS RR paper shredder replacement 173.99 DIV 006942 ONTARIOAIRPORT RR pkg:APTA cf Vancouver BC 6/6-10 90.00 001060 HYATT RR htI:APTA cf Vancouver BC 6/6-10 278.38 001060 HYATT RR htl:foreign currencytran fee 8.35 011890 WILSHIRE GRAND HOTEL RR htl:NLC TIS steering cm mtg 6/17-18 392.12 000845 NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES JC regist:NLC COC '10 Denver 415.00 000845 NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES RR regist:NLC COC 10 Denver 415.00 001060 HYATT RR htI:APTA cf Vancouver BC 6/6-10 848.09 006952 PAYPAL H P Verisign Pay0ow Pro Transaction 179.60 006952 PAYPAL GR Verisign Pay0ow Pro Transaction 59.95 001060 HYATT RR htl:foreign currencytran fee 25.44 000871 HILTON RR htI:SCAG RC mtg 6/2 121.00 3,241.03 139808 07/15/2010 000380 FIRST STUDENT CHARTER TRANSPORTATION: SUMMER DAY 432.33 432.33 CAMP 139809 07/15/2010 011145 FOSTER, JILL C. TCSD instructor earnings 1,310.40 1,310.40 139810 07/15/2010 007804 GAZER, GEOFFREY performance:hot summer nights 250.00 250.00 139811 07/15/2010 001937 GALLS INC uniform svc: police volunteers 4.90 4.90 139812 07/15/2010 000173 GENERAL BINDING OFFICE SUPPLIES: CENTRAL SVCS 80.75 CORPORATION office supplies: central svcs 309.75 office supplies: central svcs 472.48 862.98 Pages apChkLst Final Check List Page: 6 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139813 07/15/2010 000177 GLENN IES OFFICE PRODUCTS OFFICE SUPPLIES: FINANCE 433.37 INC OFFICE SUPPLIES: PLANNING 167.38 Office Supplies: TCSD 4,195.69 Office Supplies: TCSD 2,185.34 Office supplies: PW 2,795.10 Office Supplies: Fire Dept 2,583.22 Office Supplies: Central Svcs 213.81 Office Supplies: B&S/Code Enf 158.85 Office Supplies: Info Sys 1,783.13 14,515.89 139814 07/15/2010 013673 GOMEZ, JODY refund:overpmt:prkg cite 71883 60.00 60.00 139815 07/15/2010 013107 GRANT, GLENN advertising:St Painting Fest 725.00 725.00 139816 07/15/2010 005311 H2O CERTIFIED POOL WATER Jun pool maint svcs: crc & tes 900.00 SPCL. Jun svc/cleanup: town square 345.00 1,245.00 139817 07/15/2010 000186 HANKS HARDWARE INC Hardware supplies: Fire Dept 1,988.89 Hardware supplies: PW/CIP 1,424.88 Hardware supplies: Aquatics 101.61 Hardware supplies: City Hall 33.95 Hardware supplies: Library 16.31 Hardware supplies: Ch Museum 49.32 Hardware supplies: B&S 52.18 Hardware supplies: TCC 27.80 Hardware supplies: Theater 46.11 Hardware supplies: PW Maint 451.43 Hardware supplies: TCSD 1,582.40 Hardware supplies: CRC/Aquatics 833.81 Hardware supplies: info sys 517.95 7,126.64 139818 07/15/2010 012748 HARDY& HARPER INC release retention w/h PW06-10 137,492.06 137,492.06 139819 07/15/2010 006250 HAZ MAT TRANS INC haz mat services: PW Maint 2,044.38 2,044.38 139820 07/15/2010 001135 HEALTHPOINTE MEDICAL Pre-employment physicals: HR 25.00 GROUP INC Pre-employment physicals: HR 75.00 industrial care svcs: Ebon, E 35.00 Pre-employment physicals: HR 25.00 160.00 139821 07/15/2010 012204 HERITAGE FAMILY MINISTRIES TCSD Instructor Earnings 2,625.00 2,625.00 139822 07/15/2010 002701 HUB INTL INSURANCE June special events premiums 339.81 339.81 SERVCSINC Pages apChkLst Final Check List Page: 7 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139823 07/15/2010 005579 INLAND EMPIRE PROPERTY inv# 542 void apn:921-381-008 -100.00 June weed abatement: Code Enf 36,334.37 36,234.37 139824 07/15/2010 006914 INNOVATIVE DOCUMENT Jun copier maint/usage:library 676.75 SOLUTIONS Jun copier maint/usage:citywide 3,257.29 3,934.04 139825 07/15/2010 001407 INTER VALLEY POOL SUPPLY pool chemicals: aquatics pgrm 688.93 688.93 INC 139826 07/15/2010 000501 INTL INSTITUTE OF MUNICIPAL 10/11 IIMC mb:Jones/Ballreich/Flores 340.00 340.00 139827 07/15/2010 003266 IRON MOUNTAIN OFFSITE Jun back up tape storage:IS/CC 355.64 355.64 139828 07/15/2010 012981 JONES, LORING A. entertainment: hot summer nights 500.00 500.00 139829 07/15/2010 003046 K F R O G 95.1 FM RADIO broadcasting:St Painting Fest 1,039.00 1,039.00 139830 07/15/2010 001091 KEYSER MARSTON May -Jun cn slt:Afford able Housing 1,325.01 1,325.01 ASSOCIATES INC 139831 07/15/2010 001282 KN OR SYSTEMS INC emergency pool repair: CHS 3,337.71 3,337.71 139832 07/15/2010 003726 LIFE ASSIST INC medical supplies: Paramedics 3,764.88 medical supplies: Paramedics 55.60 medical supplies: Paramedics 55.60 3,876.08 139833 07/15/2010 004813 M & J PAUL ENTERPRISES INC equip rental:Summer Day Camp 7/1 1,000.00 equip rentalAth of July 3,800.00 4,800.00 139834 07/15/2010 008716 MAGEE, BILL Entertainment: hot summer nights 7/16 650.00 650.00 139835 07/15/2010 013675 MCFARLIN, HAYDE refund:A pup named scooby bk 14.99 14.99 139836 07/15/2010 006571 MELODY'S AD WORKS INC. Reimbursements Hot Summer Nights 56.76 Reim bursements:Bluegrass Festival 173.85 Reim bursements:Bluegrass/Street Painting 114.51 Jul mrktg/promo swcs:Hot Summer Nites 6,000.00 6,345.12 139837 07/15/2010 007210 MIDORI GARDENS Irrigation repairs:pbsp 6/7/10 113.56 Jun Idscp maint swcs:var parks 70,105.00 70,218.56 139838 07/15/2010 004522 MULLIGANS FAMILY FUN Day camp excursion: 06/24/2010 1,769.19 CENTER Day camp excursion: 06/24/2010 233.82 2,003.01 Page:7 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 8 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139839 07/15/2010 009443 MUNYON, DENNIS G. Jul-Sep'10 lease pmt:O.T. prkg lot 2,375.00 2,375.00 139840 07/15/2010 005006 NBS GOVERNMENT FINANCE 5/24-8/23/10 spcl tax admin svcs:finance 10,515.83 10,515.83 GROUP 139841 07/15/2010 002139 NORTH COUNTY TIMES May advertising:Western Days 608.04 JUN ADVERTISING: THEATER EVENTS 476.28 Jun advertising: PW/City Clerk/Pln 894.24 Jun advertising:HR Dept 159.00 Jun advent sing: Street Painting Festival 438.69 2,576.25 139842 07/15/2010 002139 NORTH COUNTY TIMES 7/20/10-7/19/11 subscr:PW 93072 138.00 138.00 139843 07/15/2010 009570 OC B REPROGRAPHICS REPROGRAPHIC 1,633.75 1,633.75 SERVICES:PW/CENTRAL SRVCS 139844 07/15/2010 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE &SERVICE CITY VEHICLE MAINT SVCS: PW LAND 2,275.88 2,275.88 DEV 139845 07/15/2010 002105 OLD TOWN TIRE & SERVICE City Vehicle Maint Svcs:TCSD 65.00 City Vehicle Maint Svcs:TCSD 142.22 City Vehicle Maint Svcs:TCSD 614.34 821.56 139846 07/15/2010 001171 ORIENTAL TRADING COMPANY misc supplies:Tiny Tots Prgm 183.07 183.07 INC 139847 07/15/2010 013677 PATTY'S FANTASTIC PARTY refund:sec dep:rm rental:crc 400.00 400.00 139848 07/15/2010 004538 PALLEY EQUIPMENT equipment rental:TCSD 351.00 351.00 COMPANY 139849 07/15/2010 013676 PAVLOVICS, JULIE L. refund:summer explorers 1050.202 210.00 210.00 139850 07/15/2010 013115 PETERSON NUGENT, KRISTIN TCSD Instructor Earnings 1,224.30 TCSD Instructor Earnings 1,155.70 2,380.00 139851 07/15/2010 001999 PITNEY BOWES Postage meter su ppl ies: Central Srvcs 467.89 467.89 139852 07/15/2010 011660 PLANNET CONSULTING Nov-Jun consulting srvcs: Civic Cntr 10,000.00 10,000.00 139853 07/15/2010 000254 PRESS ENTERPRISE 7/23/10-7/21/11 subscr:PW 6178628 165.36 165.36 COMPANY INC 139854 07/15/2010 012904 PRO ACTIVE FIRE DESIGN Jun plan check svc: Fire Prev 6,496.08 6,496.08 PageE apChkLst Final Check List Page: 9 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139855 07/15/2010 013683 PROFESSIONAL HOSPITAL refund:eng grad dep:APN909-310-072 16,920.00 16,920.00 139856 07/15/2010 004529 QUAID TEMECULA Jun motorcycle maint swcs: Police 863.23 863.23 HARLEY-DAVIDSON 139857 07/15/2010 000262 RANCHO CALIF WATER Jun varwater meters 27415 enterprise 16.36 DISTRICT Jun varwater meters: 27415 enterpnse 300.32 Jun varwater meters: Fire Stns 448.25 Jun various water meters:TCSD 29,994.85 Jun varwater meters 28640 pujol st 8.18 Jun varwater meters 41000 main st 2,117.52 Jun var water meters:mercedes st 287.03 Jun varwater meters 28922 pujol st 96.95 Jun var water meters:mercedes st 760.26 Jun var water meters:mercedes st 251.91 Jun var water meters:mercedes st 16.36 JUN WATER METERS MAIN ST:TOWN S( 112.68 Jun varwater meters main st:town sq 63.74 Jun floating mtr- const:PW 449.13 Jun var water meters:TCSD 289.57 Jun var water meters:TCSD 17,991.28 53,204.39 139858 07/15/2010 000418 RIVERSIDE CO CLERK & ntc/exemption fee:Calle Fiesta stone drn 64.00 64.00 RECORDER 139859 07/15/2010 000406 RIVERSIDE CO SHERIFFS May'10 booking fees:Police 5,380.36 DEPT 4/22-5/19/10: law enforcement 1,491,511.94 1,496,892.30 139860 07/15/2010 013250 RIVERSIDE COUNTY OF, Jan-Jun guard& bailiff swcs:youth 850.09 850.09 SHERIFF 139861 07/15/2010 003544 ROBERT SHEA PERDUE REAL Appraisal report:Overand Bndge Ext 14,667.00 14,667.00 ESTATE 139862 07/15/2010 000277 S & S ARTS & CRAFTS INC Misc supplies: summer day camp 136.10 136.10 139863 07/15/2010 009980 SANBORN, GWYN Country @ the Merc 7/3/10 250.50 250.50 139864 07/15/2010 013678 SCHREIBER, DIANA refund:sec dep:rm rental:TCC 150.00 150.00 139865 07/15/2010 010089 SECURITAS SECURITYSRVCS JUN SECURITY SRVCS:HARVESTON 840.00 840.00 USA LAKE 139866 07/15/2010 001919 SENIOR CITIZENS SERVICE FY09/10 CDBG Reimbursement 3,210.00 3,210.00 CENTER Page9 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 10 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA (Continued) Check # Date Vendor Description Amount Paid Check Total 139867 07/15/2010 006554 SHAFFER, FRED Entertainment: hot summer nights 7/16 450.00 450.00 139868 07/15/2010 009213 SHERRY BERRY MUSIC Jazz @ the Merc 7/1/10 399.00 399.00 139869 07/15/2010 009746 SIGNS BYTOMORROW Jun sign posting xx0160:Planning 289.02 Jun sign posting xx0125:Planning 148.50 Jun sign posting xx0117:Planning 109.30 Jun sign posting xx0045:Planning 148.50 Jun sign posting xx0010:Planning 297.00 Jun sign posting xx0063:Planning 297.00 1,289.32 139870 07/15/2010 000537 SO CALIF EDISON Jun 2-29-479-2981:31454 tem pkwy 98.17 Jun 2-01-202-7603:var arterial stlt 27,855.98 Jun 2-31-031-2590:28301 mcho cal 42.76 Jun 2-29-974-7899:26953 ynez LS3 169.34 Jun 2-28-171-2620:40820 Winchester rd 1,376.66 Jun 2-30-608-9384:28582 hrvstn dr 1,217.81 Jun 2-29-657-2563:42902 buttefield 185.55 Jun 2-01-202-7330:var LS-1 allnite 76,372.37 Jun 2-31-419-2659:26706 ynez tc1 84.59 Jun 2-27-805-3194:42051 main st 6,585.79 Jun 2-31-936-3511:46488 pechanga 45.56 Jun 2-05-791-8807:31587 tem pkwy 9,870.75 Jun 2-20-798-3248:42081 main st 2,479.38 Jun 2-10-331-2153:28816 pujol st 1,454.56 Jun 2-02-351-5281 CRC 7,982.19 Jun 2-30-066-2889:30051 mcho vista 24.02 135,845.48 139871 07/15/2010 000519 SOUTH COUNTY PEST pest control srvcs:calle tajo 6/28 168.00 168.00 CONTROL INC 139872 07/15/2010 012652 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA July general phone usage 507.36 507.36 139873 07/15/2010 008141 SOUTHWESTERN ASSN fy 10/11 mbrshp dues:LL/JG/DH 270.00 270.00 TECHNICAL 139874 07/15/2010 005786 SPRINT May 26-Jun 25 cellular usage/equip 5,791.09 5,791.09 139875 07/15/2010 000293 STADIUM PIZZA INC rfrshmnts:summer day camp 7/1 474.36 474.36 139876 07/15/2010 002366 STEAM SUPERIOR CARPET Cleaning srvcs:pbsp snack bar 950.00 950.00 CLEANING 139877 07/15/2010 003924 SWEDISH AMERICAN CORP FY04/05 CFD 88-12 Reimbursement 3,451.86 3,451.86 Page:10 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 11 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: Check # union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Date Vendor 139878 07/15/2010 000305 TARGET BANK BUS CARD Motorcycle repair/maint:Tem. P.D. 503.58 503.58 SRVCS 139879 07/15/2010 013335 TEMECULA ACE HARDWARE 149.61 refund:viol dismissed:prkg cite 76801 330.00 INC 139880 07/15/2010 012558 TEMECULA HILLS CHRISTIAN 139881 07/15/2010 003677 TEMECULA MOTORSPORTS July high speed internet:43200 bus pk 241.48 LLC 139882 07/15/2010 007340 TEMECULA VALLEY FIRE 2,442.00 2,442.00 On-site tmining:PW Maint EQUIP. CO 139883 07/15/2010 003941 TEMECULA WINNELSON May '10 postage meter deposit 2,984.40 COMPANY 139884 07/15/2010 013674 THOMPSON, BEN 139885 07/15/2010 003862 THYSSENKRUPP rental equipAth of July sports park 916.00 ELEVATOR.BRNCH 37 139886 07/15/2010 010276 TIME WARNER CABLE 139887 07/15/2010 000668 TIMMY D PRODUCTIONS INC 139888 07/15/2010 000978 TIP OF SW RIVERSIDE COUNTY INC 139889 07/15/2010 003031 TRAFFIC CONTROL SERVICE INC 139891 07/15/2010 002702 U S POSTAL SERVICE 139892 07/15/2010 007766 UNDERGROUND SERVICE ALERT 139893 07/15/2010 002065 UNISOURCE 139894 07/15/2010 008977 VALLEY EVENTS (Continued) Description Amount Paid Check Total Misc supplies: summer day camp 123.41 123.41 tool & maint supplies:Fire Prev 672.45 672.45 refund:sec dep:picnic rental:marg com 150.00 150.00 Motorcycle repair/maint:Tem. P.D. 503.58 503.58 Fire extinguisher maint svc:mpsc 205.00 205.00 plumbing supplies:var.parks 149.61 149.61 refund:viol dismissed:prkg cite 76801 330.00 330.00 Annual relieftest:West Wing 1,276.00 Annual relieftest:FOC 1,276.00 2,552.00 July high speed internet: FS#92 44.95 July high speed internet:43200 bus pk 241.48 286.43 Dj swcs:Balloon Glow Concert 7/9 1,500.00 1,500.00 Apr -Jun Emerg. Response Vol. Prgm 2,442.00 2,442.00 On-site tmining:PW Maint 1,000.00 1,000.00 Jun '10 postage meter deposit 3,293.74 May '10 postage meter deposit 2,984.40 Apr'10 postage meter deposit 5,744.27 12,022.41 Jun undrgmd svcs alert tickets:PW 211.50 211.50 Copier paper & su pplie s: central swcs 4,906.44 4,906.44 rental equipAth of July sports park 916.00 rental equipAth of July parade 555.00 rental equip:community swcs expo 6/5 4,050.75 5,521.75 Page 11 apChkLst Final Check List Page: 12 07/15/2010 3:14:31PM CITY OF TEMECULA Bank: union UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA Check # Date Vendor 139895 07/15/2010 004261 VERIZON (Continued) Description Jun xxx-0049 gen usage:comerchero Jun xxx-1999 general usage July xxx-1341 gen usage:Theater Julyxxx-7530 gen usage:Library Julyxxx-5180 gen usage:79S img cntr Julyxxx-3910 gen usageAst st img Julyxxx-4200 general usage Julyxxx-8900 gen usage:Library July xxx-1941 gen usage:pta cd ttacsd 139896 07/15/2010 004848 VERIZON SELECT SERVICES Jun long distance phone svcs 41.22 INC 448.93 430.67 Jun long distance phone svcs 139897 07/15/2010 009101 VISION ONE INC Jun shovsare ticketing srvcs:theater 139898 07/15/2010 010637 WESTERN CENTER Summer explorers excursion 7/16/10 72.70 COMMUNITY 139899 07/15/2010 000621 WESTERN RIVERSIDE Jun'10TUMF Payment 2,186.00 2,186.00 COUNCIL OF 84.00 139900 07/15/2010 008402 WESTERN RIVERSIDE Jun '10 MSHCP payment COUNTY 139901 07/15/2010 011959 WESTSIDE BUSINESS CENTRE refund:eng grad dep:PM28471 LLC 139902 07/15/2010 013679 WILSON, KAREN refund:sec dep:rm rental CRC 139903 07/15/2010 006290 WOODCREST VEHICLE City vehicle repair/maint swcs: Police CENTER Amount Paid Check Total 36.55 41.22 448.93 430.67 39.58 39.29 957.47 807.54 72.70 2,873.95 39.75 75.15 114.90 2,186.00 2,186.00 84.00 84.00 67,594.00 67,594.00 13,804.00 13,804.00 34,000.00 34,000.00 150.00 150.00 1,161.14 1,161.14 Grand total for UNION BANK OF CALIFORNIA: 2,792,162.97 Page 12 Item No. 4 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Council FROM: Shawn Nelson, City Manager DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Authorization for redemption of all outstanding CFD 88-12 (Ynez Corridor) Bonds, in addition to the partial prepayment of the Civic Center Certificates of Participation bonds PREPARED BY: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance David Bilby, Senior Debt Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council: 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE REDEMPTION OF OUTSTANDING BONDS OF THE $18,690,000 COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 88-12 OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA (YNEZ CORRIDOR) SPECIAL TAX REFUNDING BONDS, 1998 SERIES A 2. Authorize the City Manager to allocate $4.8 million towards the CFD 88-12 redemption of outstanding bonds and up to $7.2 million for the Civic Center Certificates of Participation early prepayment for a total of up to $12 million from the General Fund as previously authorized. BACKGROUND: On February 23, 2010, the City Council authorized the City Manager to initiate the prepayment of up to $12 million of the 2008 Certificates of Participation (COPs) for the Civic Center. This early prepayment would result in a reduction to the debt service payments by approximately $770,000 annually and an overall interest savings to the General Fund of approximately $10.07 million over the term of the bonds. Upon further analysis, staff reviewed the status of the outstanding CFD 88-12 bonds (Ynez Corridor) to determine if additional budgetary savings could result from an early redemption of the bonds. Since the CFD 88-12 bonds have an average interest rate of approximately 5.6% while the Certificates of Participation have an average interest rate of approximately 4.6%, significant interest savings are realized by calling the CFD 88-12 bonds. CFD 88-12 was originally formed by Riverside County in 1989, and the original bonds were issued in June of 1992 in order to construct road improvements along Ynez Road. In 1991 the City and County entered into a joint agreement to reimburse district property owners for special taxes paid using sales tax dollars generated within the District. In 1997, the County transferred the full governance of the District to the City which then refunded the District bonds outstanding with the current 1998 Series A bonds in June of 1998. Currently, the City reimburses 100% of all special taxes paid (excluding delinquencies) from the General Fund with the sales tax revenue generated within the District in the amount of approximately $1.55 million annually. CFD 88-12 has a current outstanding principal balance of $9,645,000 which includes a scheduled principal payment of $995,000 due September 1, 2010. The City has approximately $1.63 million in the General Improvement Fund, $1.64 million in surplus City held redemption funds, and $1.57 million in the Reserve Fund that are available for the bond call. This leaves a remaining required General Fund contribution of approximately $4,805,000. Staff has determined that by using the available CFD funds ($4.8 million) and using a portion ($4.8 million) of the $12 million previously authorized for the COPS prepayment and redeeming the remaining CFD 88-12 bonds, the City would eliminate its annual sales tax reimbursement obligation of $1.55 million annually and save an additional $720,000 annually in debt service payments until 2017. The balance of the $12 million previously authorized would be applied to the prepayment of up to $7.2 million of COPS resulting in annual debt service savings of $450,000 annually. This combination bond call will result in a reduction to the debt service/reimbursement payments of approximately $2 million annually in the General Fund for the next seven years and $450,000 for the following 20 years. With the Council adoption of the resolution attached, staff will proceed to process the necessary documents in order to redeem all outstanding CFD 88-12 bonds as of September 1, 2010. FISCAL IMPACT: A redemption of the total outstanding $9.6 million of CFD 88-12 bonds and a partial prepayment in the amount of $7.2 million of the Certificates of Participation will result in a reduction to the debt service/reimbursement payments of approximately $1.55 million annually from CFD 88-12 and $450,000 annually from the Certificates of Participation for a total of $2,000,000 annually in the General Fund for the next seven years and $450,000 for the following 20 years. Fund Balance Designated for Economic Uncertainty remains untouched at $10.88 million. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution No. 10- RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE REDEMPTION OF OUTSTANDING BONDS OF THE $18,690,000 COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 88-12 OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA (YNEZ CORRIDOR) SPECIAL TAX REFUNDING BONDS, 1998 SERIES A THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: SECTION 1. Recitals. The City Council finds, determines and declares as follows: (a) Prior to incorporation of the City of the City of Temecula ("City"), the County of Riverside (the "County") initiated and conducted proceedings pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982, as amended, Chapter 2.5 (commencing with § 53311) of Division 2 of Title 5 of the Government Code (the "Mello -Roos Act'), for the establishment of Community Facilities District No. 88-12 (Ynez Corridor) of the County of Riverside, State of California (the "District'), the authorization of a bonded indebtedness for the District in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $60,000,000, and the levy of special taxes on parcels of taxable property therein to pay the principal of and interest on bonds which may be issued to represent such bonded indebtedness and to finance the design and construction of certain public facilities through the adopted Resolution Nos. 89-390, 89-89-449 and 90-046. (b) The County issued 119,000,000 Community Facilities District No. 88-12 of the County of Riverside (Ynez Corridor) Series 1992 Special Tax Bonds" ("1992 Bonds") (c) Among the public facilities financed with the proceeds of the bonds of the District are the construction and widening of Ynez Road to a six (6) lane width from the north property line of the property where the Advanced Cardiovascular Systems (now owned by Abbott Laboratories) building is located southerly to its intersection with Rancho California Road, the construction of the Apricot Street (now known as Overland Drive) over -crossing of Interstate 15, including the acquisition of the right-of-way therefor, the addition of loop -ramps and related bridge widenings at the entrances of Rancho California Road and Winchester Road to Interstate 15, the acquisition of land for the future development of regional and local parks, and the acquisition of all or a portion of Solano Way, a portion of Ynez Road at its intersection with Solano Way and all or a portion of certain water, sewer and storm drain improvements located therein (the "Public Facilities"), all of which projects are required by the City and the County and which will be of general benefit to residents throughout the City and the surrounding area. (d) On June 14, 1991, the City and the owners of real property in the District ("Owners") entered into that certain agreement entitled "Agreement Regarding Sales Tax Revenues as to Businesses Located within the Boundaries of Community Facilities District No. 88-12 (Ynez Corridor) of the County of Riverside, State of California" ("Reimbursement Agreement'). 1) The purpose of the Reimbursement Agreement is to set forth terms and conditions whereby the City would appropriate and make available for the payment of the principal of and interest on the Bonds of the District a portion of the sales and use tax revenues received by the City from businesses located within the District. 2) The territory within the District is located entirely within the City and has been developed for commercial, industrial and residential uses, and such commercial and industrial uses has provide significant sales and use tax revenues to the City as contemplated by the City at the time the Reimbursement Agreement was approved. 3) The City has benefited both from the construction of the Public Facilities and the increase in sales and use tax revenues that have been derived from commercial and industrial businesses located within the District. 4) Prior to incorporation of the City, the Board of Supervisors of the County, as an inducement to the Owners to proceed with the financing of the construction of the Public Facilities and the development of their property to provide such sales and use tax revenues, agreed with the Owners to annually appropriate and make available for the payment of principal of and interest on the bonds of the District a portion of the sales and use tax revenues received by the County from commercial and industrial businesses located within the District. 5) To the extent that the Public Facilities are a community -wide benefit, it was the intent of the City to make a portion of the sales and use tax revenues received from businesses located within the District to reimburse Owners for payment of the principal and interest on the Bonds of the District (e) The County transferred the administration of the District to the City by that certain "Agreement for Transfer of Governance of Community Facilities District No. 88- 12 of the County of Riverside (Ynez Corridor)" between the County and the City dated October 15. 1997. (f) The 1992 Bonds were refunded in 1998 by 118,690,000 Community Facilities District No. 88-12 of the City of Temecula (Ynez Corridor) Special Tax Refunding Bonds, 1998 Series A" (the "Bonds"). As part of the issuance of the Bonds, the City entered into various agreements described in the Official Statement that provided for the issuance and administration of the Bonds, including but not limited to the redemption of the Bonds. -2- (g) The purposes of the Reimbursement Agreement have been fulfilled. By redeeming the Bonds, the City will eliminate its obligation under the Reimbursement Agreement while the benefits of the Public Improvements will continue to be enjoyed by the Owners in the District. SECTION 2. The City Council hereby approves the redemption of the outstanding Bonds and hereby directs and authorizes the City Manager, or his designee, to undertake and complete all actions required pursuant to the Bond Documents to effectuate the redemption of the outstanding Bonds. SECTION 3. The City Council hereby authorizes the use of money from the City's general fund for the redemption of the Bonds. SECTION 4. The Mayor, City Manager, Finance Director, Treasurer and City Clerk of the City, and any and all other officers of the City, are hereby authorized and directed, for and in the name and on behalf of the City, to do any and all things and take any and all actions, including execution and delivery of any and all assignments, certificates, requisitions, agreements, notices, consents, instruments of conveyance, warrants and other documents which they, or any of them, may deem necessary or advisable in order to consummate the lawful redemption of the Bonds as described herein. SECTION 5. The City Clerk shall certify to the adoption of this Resolution. SECTION 6. This Resolution shall be effective on the date of its adoption. -3- PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 27th day of July 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 27th day of July 2010, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: -4- Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk Item No. 5 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: City Treasurer's Statement of Investment Policy PREPARED BY: Rudy J. Graciano, Revenue Manager RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council adopt the Treasurer's Statement of Investment Policy which provides safety, liquidity, compliance, and yield for City funds. BACKGROUND: Prior to the 2003-04 Budget Act, California Government Code Section 53646 required the Treasurer or Chief Fiscal Officer of California local governments to render an annual statement of investment policy and quarterly reports containing specified information regarding investments and deposits to the chief executive officer and the legislative body of the local agency. These requirements were intended to provide the legislative body the ability to meet its fiduciary obligations as a trustee and to increase the exposure of the public agency's investment activities to those outside the agency. Even though local governments are no longer mandated, they are encouraged to render an annual statement of investment policy and quarterly reports. The attached Treasurer's Statement of Investment Policy conforms to the California Government Code and to the requirements and guidelines established by the California Municipal Treasurer's Association (CMTA) and the California Society of Municipal Finance Officers (CSMFO). The City of Temecula has a majority invested in the State of California Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF). This investment is consistent with the City's investment policy that prioritizes safety and liquidity. While investing in LAIF remains a viable option for the City and provides excellent liquidity to address the City's cash flow needs, staff continues to diversify the portfolio and manage investments in an effort to maximize earnings, to protect the City during a changing economy, while preserving our principal objective of protecting the City's treasury within the parameters of prudent risk management. The attached investment policy reflects no changes from the previous policy adopted by the City Council on July 28, 2009. FISCAL IMPACT: None. ATTACHMENTS: Proposed Statement of Investment Policy CITY OF TEMECULA 19 U207 Investment Policy INTRODUCTION: The intent of this Investment Policy is to establish the limits within which the City's Investment Program shall be conducted. Investment goals and objectives are defined. Authorized investments and reporting requirements are identified. The City's Broker/Dealer Questionnaire is included. The monies entrusted to the City Treasurer will be referred to as the "Fund" throughout the remainder of this document. OBJECTIVES: The investment policies and practices of the City of Temecula are based upon State law and prudent money management. The primary goals of these policies include: To protect the principal monies entrusted to this office. Safety of principal is the foremost objective of the City of Temecula. Each investment transaction shall seekto ensurethat capital losses are avoided, whetherfrom securities default, broker-dealer default, or erosion of market value. The City shall seek to preserve principal by mitigating the two types of risk: credit risk and market risk. Credit risk, defined as the risk of loss due to failure of the issuer of a security, shall be mitigated by investing only with issuers whose financial strength and reputation can be verified to be the highest as rated by nationally known rating agencies, and by diversifying the investment portfolio so that the failure of any one issuer would not unduly harm the City's cash flow. Market risk, the risk of market value fluctuations due to overall changes in the general level of interest rates, shall be mitigated by (a) structuring the portfolio so that securities mature earlier than or concurrent with the timing of major cash outflows, thus eliminating the need to sell securities prior to their maturity, (b) prohibiting the use of leverage and margin accounts, and (c) prohibiting the taking of short positions — that is, selling securities which the City does not own. It is explicitly recognized herein, however, that in a diversified portfolio, occasional measured losses are inevitable. and must be considered within the context of the overall investment return. 2. To orovidesufficientliauiditvtomeet normal ooeratinaand unexoectedexpenditures The portfolio will be structured with sufficient liquidity to allow the City to meet expected cash requirements. This will be accomplished by structuring the portfolio so that securities mature concurrent with cash needs to meet anticipated demands. Since all possible cash demands cannot be anticipated, the portfolio will maintain a liquidity buffer and invest primarily in securities with active secondary and resale markets. 3. To assure compliance with all Federal. State. and Local laws aovernina the investment of monies under the control of the City Treasurer. The legal basis forthe City's investment activities isthe City of Temecula Municipal Code, Chapter 3.04, Revenue and Finance, Fiscal Provisions Generally and Government Code Sections 5922, 16429.1, 53600 to 53609, and 53630 to 53686, which include parameters for authorized investments, report of investments and investment authority. Last Revised: July, 2007 City of Temecula INVESTMENT POLICY Page 2 4. To generate a maximum amount of investment income within the parameters of prudent risk management and consistent with the above policies. The City's investment portfolio shall be designed to attain a market -average rate of return through economic cycles. The market -average rate of return is defined as the average return on three- month U.S. Treasury bills. Whenever possible, and consistent with risk limitations and prudent investment principles, the Treasurer shall seek to augment returns above the market average rate of return. The policy will also address risk management because it is such an integral part of the investment policy. To concentrate only on maximizing return would be dangerous. Therefore, policy issues will be directed to: 1) limiting the Fund's exposure to each issue and issuer of debt, and 2) determining a minimum credit requirement that firms must have in order to hold City money. SCOPE: This investment policy applies to all funds under the control of the City Treasurer, including but not limited to the general fund, special revenue funds, enterprise funds, debt service funds, capital improvement funds, trust funds and proceeds of bonds sale in the custody of the Treasurer and any other funds under his control. California Government Code Section 53601 (1) permits money from bond proceeds, obligations under a lease, installment sales or other agreements to be invested in any security that meets the statutory provisions governing the issuance of the bond or other agreements made by the issuing agency. Furthermore, California Government Code Section 5922(d) provides that notwithstanding any other provision of law, proceeds of bonds and any moneys set aside and pledged to secure payment of the bonds or certain other contracts specified in Section 5922, may be invested in securities or obligations described in the ordinance, resolution, indenture, agreement, or other instrument providing for the issuance of the bonds or the contract. INVESTMENT AUTHORITY: The City of Temecula Municipal Code delegates to the City Treasurer the authority to invest and reinvest moneys of the city, to sell or exchange securities, and to depositthem and provide for their safekeeping. The City Treasurer is responsible for daily management of the investment program, including ✓ Establishing procedures for operation consistent with the investment policy. ✓ Approving daily investment transactions. ✓ Developing projections of the City's cash requirements for operating needs. ✓ Reviewing the liquidity position of the investment portfolio. ✓ Ensuring that the City's cash position is consistent with operating requirements. ✓ Preparing appropriate investment reports. ✓ Developing, implementing and monitoring controls over investments. ✓ Developing record keeping for investment transactions. The City Treasurer may delegate investment authority to qualified and competent officials and City employees such as the Finance Director, Assistant Finance Director, or Revenue Manager. All persons authorized to make investment decisions on behalf of the City are trustees of the public funds and therefore fiduciaries subject to the following prudent investor standard as defined in California Government Code Section 53600.3: Last Revised: July, 2007 City of Temecula INVESTMENT POLICY Page 3 When investing, reinvesting, purchasing, acquiring, exchanging, selling, or managing public funds, a trustee shall act with care, skill, prudence, and diligence under the circumstances then prevailing, including, but not limited to, the general economic conditions and the anticipated needs of the agency, that a prudent person acting in a like capacity and familiarity with those matters would use in the conduct of funds of a like character and with like aims, to safeguard the principal and maintain the liquidity needs of the agency. Within the limitations of this section and considering individual investments as part of an overall strategy, investments may be acquired as authorized by law. SAFEKEEPING OF SECURITIES: To protect against potential losses by collapse of individual securities dealers, all securities owned by the City, including collateral on repurchase agreements, shall be held in safekeeping by a third party bank trust department, acting as agent for the City under the terms of a custody agreement executed by the bank and by the City. All securities will be received and delivered using standard delivery versus payment procedures (i.e., the City's safekeeping agent will only release payment for a security after the security has been properly delivered). This section is intended to comply with Government Code Sections 53601 and 53608. REPORTING: The City Treasurer shall render a monthly report to the City Manager and City Council showing the type of investment, issuing institution, selling institution, date of maturity, par and dollar amount of deposit, current market value for all securities, return on the City's investment portfolio expressed as an annual percentage rate, yield to maturity, cash flow information demonstrating that the City can meet its upcoming financial obligations, and such data as may be required by the City Council. The report shall also state its relationship to this statement of investment policy, as directed under the Code. The Treasurer shall at least annually submit a recommended updated Investment Policy to be reviewed and approved by the City Council. The City's investment reporting policy meets or exceeds the requirements of Section 53646 of the California Government Code. QUALIFIED DEALERS: The City shall transact investments only with banks, savings and loans, state -licensed investment security broker-dealers, the State of California Local Agency Investment Fund, or brokerage firms designated as primary government dealers by, and regularly reporting to, the New York Federal Reserve Bank. Investment staff shall investigate dealers who wish to do business with the City in order to determine if they are adequately capitalized, market securities appropriate to the City's needs, and are recommended by managers of portfolios similar to the City's. The City's Broker/Dealer Questionnaire (Attachment A) will be used in this investigation. The City shall at least annually send a copy of the current investment policy to all dealers approved to do business with the City. Confirmation of receipt of this policy shall be considered as evidence that the dealer understands the City's investment policies, and intends to show the City only appropriate investments. Last Revised: July, 2007 City of Temecula INVESTMENT POLICY Page 4 AUTHORIZED INVESTMENTS: Investments shall be made in the context of the "prudent investor" rule, which states: "Investments shall be made with judgment and care, under circumstances then prevailing, which persons of prudence, discretion, and intelligence exercise in the management of their own affairs, notfor speculation, but for investment, considering the probable safety of their capital as well as the probable income to be derived." The City is further governed by the California Government Code, Sections 5922, 16429.1, and 53600 et seq. Within the context of these limitations, the following investments are authorized, as further limited herein: United States Treasury Bills, Bonds, and Notes, or those for which the full faith and credit of the United States are pledged for payment of principal and interest. There is no limitation as to the percentage of the portfolio that can be invested in this category. Maturity is not to exceed the projected dates of the City's cash needs or five years, whichever is less. Obligations issued by the Federal Farm Credit Bank System (FFCB), the Federal Home Loan Bank Board (FHLB), the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (FHLMC), the Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA), and other United States agency obligations with maturities of five years or less. Although there is no percentage limitation on the dollar amount that can be invested in these issues, the "prudent investor" rule shall apply for a single agency name. Maturity is not to exceed the projected dates of the City's cash needs or five years, whichever is less. Bills of exchange or time drafts drawn on and accepted by a commercial bank, otherwise known as banker's acceptances. Banker's acceptances purchased may not exceed 180 days to maturity or 40% of the market value of the portfolio. No more than 10% of the market value of the portfolio may be invested in banker's acceptances issued by any one bank. Commercial paper ranking of the highest letter and number rating by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization (NRSRO), and issued by a domestic corporation having assets in excess of $500,000,000 and having an "A-1" or better rating on its long-term debentures as provided by a NRSRO. Purchases of eligible commercial paper may not exceed 15% of the market value of the portfolio. No more than 10% of the market value of the portfolio may be invested in commercial paper issued by any one corporation. The City may invest in no more than 10% of a single corporation. The City may invest in no more than 10% of a single corporation's commercial paper. Maturity is not to exceed 180 days. Last Revised: July, 2007 City of Temecula INVESTMENT POLICY Page 5 Negotiable certificates of deposit issued by nationally or state -chartered banks or state or federal savings and loan associations. Negotiable certificates of deposit (NCDs) differ from other certificates of deposit by their deposit liquidity. They are issued against funds deposited for specified periods of time and earn specified or variable rates of interest. NCDs are traded actively in secondary markets. When feasible, an independent trading service will be used as part of the evaluation process. Issuers must be rated "B" or better by Thomson Bank Watch or equivalent rating service, or rated A-1 for deposits by Standard & Poors, or P-1 for deposits by Moodys or comparably rated by a national rating agency. Transactions in NCDs shall not collectively exceed 30% of the total portfolio in effect immediately after any such investment is made. Repurchase Agreements. The City may invest in repurchase agreements with banks and dealers with which the City has entered into a master repurchase agreement which specifies terms and conditions of repurchase agreements. Transactions shall be limited to the primary dealers and the top banking institutions according to the rating agency based on liquidity, profitability, and financial strength. The maturity of repurchase agreements shall not exceed 30 days. The market value of securities used as collateral for repurchase agreements shall be monitored daily by the investment staff and will not be allowed to fall below 102% of the value of the repurchase agreement plus the value of collateral in excess of the value of the repurchase agreement. In order to conform with provisions of the Federal Bankruptcy Code which provide for the liquidation of securities held as collateral for repurchase agreements, the only securities acceptable as collateral shall be certificates of deposit, eligible bankers' acceptances, or securities that are direct obligations of, or that are fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by, the United States or any agency of the United States. No more than 50% of the portfolio may be invested in repurchase agreements, and a "perfected security interest" shall always be maintained in the securities subject to a repurchase agreement. Local Agency Investment Fund. The City may invest in the Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) established by the State Treasurer for the benefit of local agencies up to the maximum permitted by State law. Time Deposits. As to the deposits of non -surplus funds, the City may invest in non- negotiable time deposits collateralized in accordance with the California Government Code (including, but not limited to, entering into a contract with the depository institution pursuant to California Government Code Section 53649) in those banks and savings and loan associations that meet the requirements for investment in negotiable certificates of deposit. Since time deposits are not liquid, no more than 15% of the portfolio may be invested in this category. The depository institution should have been in existence for at least five years. The City may waive the first $100,000 of collateral security for such deposits if the institution is insured pursuant to federal law. In order to secure the uninsured portions of such deposits, an institution shall maintain at least 10% in excess of the total amount deposited. Real estate mortgages may not be accepted as collateral. The maximum term for deposits shall be one year. In general, the depository institution must have a minimum 6% net worth to assets ratio or the minimum ratio established by the Comptroller of the Currency. The depository institution's operation must have been profitable during their last reporting period. Last Revised: July, 2007 City of Temecula INVESTMENT POLICY Page 6 Money Market Funds. The City may invest in money market funds that invest solely in U.S. Treasuries, obligations of the U.S. Treasury, and repurchase agreements relating to such treasury obligations. To be eligible, the money market fund must have attained the highest ranking available as evaluated by a nationally recognized rating service and retained an investment advisor with not less than five years experience and that is registered with the SEC, and which advisor has assets under management in excess of $500 million. Except as otherwise noted, this list of authorized investments is intended to applyto the investment of all operating and surplus funds. The investment of bond proceeds shall be governed by the permitted investments as specified in the official statement for each bond issue. INELIGIBLE INVESTMENTS: Investments not described herein, including, but not limited to, reverse repurchase agreements, mutual funds (other than money market funds), zero coupon bonds, inverse floaters, mortgage - derived securities, common stocks and corporate notes and bonds are prohibited from use in the City's investment portfolio. SWAPPING OF SECURITIES: A swap is the movement from one security to another and may be done for a variety of reasons, such as to increase yield, lengthen or shorten maturities, to take a profit, or to increase investment quality. The purchase transaction and the sale transaction must each be recorded separately and any losses or gains on the sale must be recorded. PORTFOLIO ADJUSTMENTS: Should an investment percentage -of -portfolio limitation be exceeded due to an incident such as fluctuation in portfolio size, the affected securities may be held to maturity to avoid losses. When no loss is indicated, the Treasurer shall consider reconstructing the portfolio basing his or her decision, in part, on the expected length of time the portfolio will be unbalanced. POLICY REVIEW: This investment policy shall be reviewed at least annuallyto ensure its consistencywith the overall objectives of preservation of principal, liquidity, and return, and its relevance to current law and financial and economic trends. The City Council shall be responsible for maintaining guidance over this investment policy to ensure that the City can adapt readily to changing market conditions, and shall approve any modification to the investment policy prior to implementation. Last Revised: July, 2007 City of Temecula INVESTMENT POLICY Page 7 ETHICS AND CONFLICT OF INTEREST: Officers and employees involved in the investment process shall refrain from personal business activity that conflicts with the proper execution of the investment program or impairs their ability to make impartial investment decisions. In addition, no funds shall be invested in negotiable certificates of deposit issued by, or non-negotiable time deposits under contract with a State or Federal credit union if a member of the City Council or any person with investment decision making authority in the administrative office, manger's office, budget office, auditor -controller's office, or treasurer's office of the City also serves on the board of directors, or any committee appointed by the board of directors, orthe credit committee or the supervisory committee of the State or Federal credit union issuing the negotiable certificates of deposit or in which the non-negotiable time deposit is proposed to be deposited. Additionally, officers and staff involved in the investment of public funds are required to annually file a Fair Political Practices Commission Statement of Economic Interest form. Last Revised: July, 2007 Item No. 6 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Andre O'Harra, Chief of Police DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant PREPARED BY: Heidi Schrader, Senior Management Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council approve the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Application for a proposed amount of $23,055. BACKGROUND: The Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program (JAG) is awarded by Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). This grant is generally awarded annually and allows local governments to support a broad range of activities to prevent and control crime. Requirements for submission of the JAG grant proposal to the BJA include: 1. Thirty (30) day review period by the community with an opportunity to comment. 2. Approval of the application by the City Council. A notice was published in the local papers on Tuesday June 22, 2010, outlining the grant application. The notice invited the public to review a copy of the grant application posted at the public information counter at City Hall and to submit written comments or to make verbal comments in person on the date of action. The 2010 JAG proposal requests funds for the Temecula Police Department to purchase law enforcement technology in order to streamline operations. This technology will be used by Temecula's Special Enforcement Team and Traffic Division. It is anticipated that purchase of this equipment will increase the efforts of our Officers as it relates to graffiti and traffic enforcement. The JAG grant is a non-competitive grant with funds allocated for the City of Temecula based on crime statistics and population. Submission of the grant package is a requirement for funding the grant. It is anticipated that the grant will be awarded and funds will be made available by September 2010. FISCAL IMPACT: Appropriation of funds for the grant will be made upon notification of the final award amount for the programs noted above. ATTACHMENTS: Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant. City of Temecula Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Proposal Page 1 of 8 Program Narrative Proposal to Utilize Technology to Streamline Temecula Police Department Processes Program Challenges As one of the fastest-growing cities in Riverside County, Temecula faces a significant challenge to keep pace with rapid population growth. Between 1990 and 2010, Temecula grew in population from 27,099 to 105,029, a 288% growth rate. As new homes were built and many new businesses located within the City, traffic congestion and associated traffic collisions have become a major concern. In addition, as of 2000, 42.6% of Temecula's households were reported to have children under the age of 18. As these children mature and reach driving age we encounter additional traffic challenges such as speed related accidents associated with a lack of experience. This rapid growth has also led to a significant increase in graffiti incidents throughout the City of Temecula. The amount of graffiti to be removed has increased exponentially. The total square footage of graffiti damage for February 2009 was 4,003 square feet. That amount nearly doubled by February 2010 when the amount was 7,678 square feet. The City of Temecula has maintained a proactive enforcement program. Our traffic enforcement division is comprised of thirteen motorcycle Officers and six automobile Officers. Our Special Enforcement Team consists of 7 Officers and 1 Sergeant who focus on quality of life crimes throughout the City. As the City continues to grow, however, we must continue work smarter to maintain the quality of life our residents have come to expect. Utilizing JAG funds from the previous year as well as a grant from the Office of Traffic Safety, we have outfitted our traffic division with handheld citation devices which greatly reduce the time it takes to process citations and gather statistics. We have purchased equipment such as two Tripwire systems and covert recording units using funds retrieved through the asset forfeiture process. With rapid growth and limited resources, it is a constant challenge for our Officers to keep up with the resulting property crime and traffic issues. The City of Temecula is therefore requesting funds to purchase proven law enforcement technology which will allow our Officers to work smarter and safer, while increasing their ability to document evidence. Program Solutions Tripwire Svstem In November 2009, the Temecula Police Department was loaned one Tripwire unit to assist in monitoring the graffiti hot spots. Prior to placing the Tripwire in the area, all prior existing graffiti was removed. The first time the unit was deployed it successfully photographed a subject as he was leaving the area. The Tripwire provided such a timely notification of the vandal's presence that Officers were able to contact the subject as he was returning to his vehicle, which was parked a short distance from the graffiti area. When the photographed subject was contacted he had wet paint on his fingers and the paint was the same color as the new graffiti on the walls. He was subsequently arrested and convicted of vandalism. This case would not have been possible without the Tripwire. The Tripwire has repeatedly proved to be a very useful and covert tool in the fight against vandalism. The subjects who commit graffiti have told us they routinely check their intended target area for other people and they avoid it when others are present. The Tripwire is easily concealed and thus far has been very reliable. The units can be hidden along the anticipated approach route and in the actual target area to ensure several quality photographs of the subjects are captured and a reasonable response time is provided R:\AgendaMmagu\2010 Meetings\07-27-10\JAG - Grmt.docx City of Temecula Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Proposal Page 2 of 8 to the Officers. The ability to place the Tripwire units in a concealed location also allows the members of the Special Enforcement Team to perform other proactive duties rather than sitting in one area waiting for a potential violator to arrive. Night Vision Apparatus The Special Enforcement Team has conducted an extensive amount of research into taggers and discovered that many of them prefer to commit their crimes at night, with only enough light for them to see their work. It is also very common for them to have friends or associates standing nearby to look for people approaching because most people will need a light source in order to approach the area they are tagging. Temecula Police Officers could easily avoid detection and increase the amount of graffiti arrests by utilizing night vision equipment as they approach these night-time tagging locations. The ability to see clearly and effectively in total darkness would enable the Officers to get very close to where the crime is occurring while avoiding detection. This ability to get closer to the crime would also allow the Officers to witness the offense taking place, further solidifying their case and the circumstances included in the criminal report. Lapel Camcorder Devices The Temecula Police Department Traffic Division consists of a Motor Enforcement Team and Collision Investigators. As a primary function of the Division, the Traffic Officers enforce the traffic laws of the State of California within the jurisdictional boundaries of the City of Temecula. Officers assigned to the Traffic Division make approximately 2000 traffic contacts a month. Many times, Officers encounter irate motorists due to violations committed and the issuing of a citation. Each of these encounters are potentially dangerous to the Officer both physically as well as the potential of complaint by the motorist. The micro DV camcorder is a lapel style camcorder that connects to the uniform shirt of the Officer and is capable of recording both audio and video of the violation, the enforcement stop and contact with the violator. The use of this camera will provide vital enforcement evidence to augment courtroom testimony and will be instrumental in providing evidence regarding possible accusations of misconduct. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) LIDAR will allow the Temecula Police Department to monitor and enforce traffic laws related to speed in an effort to reduce injury and loss of property due to traffic collisions. The purchase of two LIDAR will allow the Temecula Police Department Motor Enforcement Officers to have an accurate device that is recognized in the Riverside County Courts as a speed measuring device that is reliable and accurate. The LIDAR will assist the Motor Officers in maintaining the safety of the motorists of the City of Temecula as well as to assist in collision investigation through the internal measuring system. This system allows the Motor Officer or Collision Investigator to take measurements from a safe location; out of the roadway and traffic. Tattletale Svstems Of the various traffic related enforcement duties assigned to the Traffic Bureau, a primary duty is that of violations related to traffic signals. The Temecula Police Department participates in a dedicated enforcement program related to signals titled; Signal Light Abuse Program (S.L.A.P.). Officers target specific high volume intersections and monitor traffic for violators running red lights. To conduct these enforcement programs, the Officer is forced to position himself a distance from the intersection, typically within a painted median, so the Officer can monitor the phasing of the signal light. These devices will increase Officer and motorist safety when it comes to making enforcement stops in heavily congested traffic locations. Installation would be completed by City staff at no additional cost. The Tattletale devices will be permanently mounted on specific traffic signals at seven of the heaviest used intersections within the City. The device emits a blue light when the signal switches to red which will be visible only to the Officer, who can remain out of traffic and in a safe location to observe the R:\AgendaMmagu\2010 Meetings\07-27-10\JAG - Grmt.docx City of Temecula Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Proposal Page 3 of 8 intersection, the traffic flow as well as the device. The Officer will then be in a position that is both more advantageous and safe in order to conduct an enforcement stop. R:\AgendaMmagu\2010 Meetings\07-27-10\JAG - Grmt.docx City of Temecula Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Proposal Page 4 of 8 Budget Narrative E. Supplies —List items by type (office supplies, postage, training materials, copying paper and expendable equipment items costing less than $5,000, such as books, hand held tape recorders) and show the basis for computation. (Note: Organization's own capitalization policy may be used for items costing less than $5,000). Generally, supplies include any materials that are expendable or consumed during the course of the project. Purpose Area — Law Enforcement Programs This project will purchase 2 Tripwire Systems which will be used by Officers to monitor graffiti hot spots, take a picture of the offender and notify Officers when a location has been entered. Two night vision apparatus will be used in order to approach night time tagging locations without being detected. 19 Lapel camcorders will be purchased for use by Traffic Officers to document each enforcement stop in order to provide vital enforcement evidence to augment courtroom testimony. 2 LIDAR will be purchased to augment traffic enforcement operations. 7 Tattletale systems will be purchased in order to allow traffic officers to view traffic signal transitions to red from a safe location. Supply Items Computation Cost Tripwire Systems Night Vision Apparatus Camcorder Devices LIDAR Tattletale Systems ($2882.00%ach x 2) ($3719.00%ach x 2) ($131.00%ach x 19) ($3304.00%ach x 2) ($110.00%ach x 7) R:\AgendaMmagu\2010 Meetings\07-27-10\JAG - Grmt.docx $5,764.00 $7,438.00 $2,489.00 $6,608.00 $770.00 TOTAL $23,069.00 City of Temecula Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Proposal Page 5 of 8 Budget Summary — When you have completed the budget worksheet, transfer the totals for each category to the spaces below. Compute the total direct costs and the total project costs. Indicate the amount of Federal requested and the amount of non -Federal funds that will support the project. Budget Category Amount A. Personnel $0 B. Fringe Benefits $0 C. Travel $0 D. Equipment $0 E. Supplies $23,069.00 F. Construction $0 G. Consultants/Contracts $0 H. Other $0 Total Direct Costs $23,069.00 I. Indirect Costs $0 TOTAL PROJECT COSTS $23,069.00 Federal Request $23,055.00 Non -Federal Amount $14.00 R:\AgendaMmagu\2010 Meetings\07-27-10\JAG - Grmt.docx City of Temecula Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Proposal Page 6 of 8 Review Narrative On Tuesday, 6/22/10 the following notice will be published in the local media, on the City of Temecula website at City Hall, and at two additional locations within City limits. Notice of Availability for review and comment THE CITY OF TEMECULA 43200 Business Park Drive Temecula, CA 92590 CONSIDERATION OF A GRANT APPLICATION has been scheduled before the CITY COUNCIL to consider the matter described below. Case No: Grant Application — Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Applicant: City of Temecula Police Department Location: Citywide Proposal: The City of Temecula Police Department is applying for grant funds in order to utilize technology to streamline Temecula Police Department processes. Environmental Action: N/A Any person may submit written comments to the City Council before the hearing or may appear and be heard in support of or opposition to the approval of the project at the time of hearing. Any petition for judicial review of a decision of the City Council is controlled by the statute of limitations provisions set forth in Sections 1094.5 and 1094.6 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. In any such action or proceeding seeking judicial review of, which attacks or seeks to set aside, or void any decision of the City Council, shall be limited to those issues raised at the hearing as provided in Chapter 2.36 of the Temecula Municipal Code. Copies of the procedures for the conduct of City Council, Planning Commission, and Planning Director public hearings are available from the City Clerk. If you wish to challenge the above [project] in court, the challenge will be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing or in written correspondence delivered to the City Clerk at, or prior to, the public hearing described in this notice, and must be commenced within the time limit specified in Section 1094.5 and Section 1094.6 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. The proposed project application may be viewed at the public information counter, Temecula City Hall, 43200 Business Park Drive, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Questions concerning the project may be addressed to Heidi Schrader, City of Temecula Finance Department, (951) 693-3923. PLACE OF ACTION DATE OF ACTION TIME OF HEARING R:\AgendaMmaga\2010 Meetings\07-27-10\JAG - Grmt.docx Citv Council Chambers 43200 Business Park Drive Temecula. California July 27, 2010 7:00 PM City of Temecula Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Proposal Page 7 of 8 On the date of 7/27/10, the following agenda report will be sent to the Temecula City Council for consent and approval by the local governing body. TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Andre O'Harra. Chief of Police DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant PREPARED BY: Heidi Schrader, Senior Management Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council approve the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Application for a proposed amount of $23,055. BACKGROUND: The Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program (JAG) is awarded by Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). This grant is generally awarded annually and allows local governments to support a broad range of activities to prevent and control crime. Requirements for submission of the JAG grant proposal to the BJA include: 1. 30 day review period by the community with an opportunity to comment. 2. Approval of the application by the City Council. A notice was published in the local papers on Tuesday June 22"d outlining the grant application. The notice invited the public to review a copy of the grant application posted at the public information counter at City Hall and to submit written comments or to make verbal comments in person on the date of action. The 2010 JAG proposal requests funds for the Temecula Police Department to purchase law enforcement technology in order to streamline operations. This technology will be used by Temecula's Special Enforcement Team and Traffic Division. It is anticipated that purchase of this equipment will increase the efforts of our Officers as it relates to graffiti and traffic enforcement. The JAG grant is a non-competitive grant with funds allocated for the City of Temecula based on crime statistics and population. Submission of the grant package is a requirement for funding the grant. It is anticipated that the grant will be awarded and funds will be made available by September 2010. FISCAL IMPACT: Appropriation of funds for the grant will be made upon notification of the final award amount for the programs noted above. ATTACHMENTS: Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant. R:\AgendaMmaga\2010 Meetings\07-27-10\JAG - Grmt.docx City of Temecula Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Proposal Page 8 of 8 Abstract Applicant Name: City of Temecula Project Title: Proposal to Utilize Technology to Streamline Temecula Police Department Processes Project Goals: 1. To reduce the amount of graffiti and vandalism within the City of Temecula through increased enforcement utilizing night vision technology and Tripwire systems. 2. To increase accountability and the collection of traffic enforcement evidence in order to augment courtroom testimony through the use of lapel camcorders 3. To improve Officer and motorist safety and reduce traffic collisions through the use of LIDAR and Tattletale systems. Strategies to Be Used: This proposal identifies equipment to be used by the City of Temecula Special Enforcement Team and Traffic Bureau in order for them to work more efficiently and safely. The equipment includes: 1. Tripwire Systems — The systems remotely photograph offenders in high graffiti and high crime areas and notify Police immediately when the offense occurs. 2. Night Vision Apparatus — Allow Officers to get close to offenders in the dark without alerting them to their presence. 3. Lapel Camcorder Devices — Record traffic enforcement operations to ensure accountability and to augment courtroom testimony. 4. LIDAR — Enhance the enforcement of traffic laws related to speed in order to reduce traffic collisions. Allow traffic collision investigators to safely take measurements out of the flow of traffic in the event of a collision. 5. Tattletale Systems — Emit a blue light when the traffic signal switches to red at an angle that allows Motorcycle Officers to safely position themselves to observe the intersection and conduct an enforcement stop. R:\AgendaMmaga\2010 Meetings\07-27-10\JAG - Grmt.docx Item No. 7 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Aaron Adams, Assistant City Manager DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Approve FY2010-11 Economic Development Operating Agreement with the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce PREPARED BY: Gloria Wolnick, Economic Development Specialist II RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council approve the operating agreement and authorize the Mayor to execute the agreement with the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce in the amount of $136,260. BACKGROUND: The City of Temecula and Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce have held a successful partnership for many years which has helped to create a stable economy and enhance the city's exceptional quality of life. The Economic Development Subcommittee of the City Council (Mayor Pro Tem Roberts and Council Member Washington) and staff met to discuss the Economic Development funding requests on January 6, 2010. The subcommittee has recommended approval in the amount of $136,260 to the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce. The City Council approved this funding in the FY2010/11 Operating Budget. The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce has provided a summary of materials including their work plan, financials and services that they provide (see Attachment B). Also, attached is the Operating Agreement (see Attachment A) for the organization for the FY2010-11 term. Funding of the program of $136,260 will be allocated to the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce. Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce For 44 years, the Chamber has represented business in the Temecula Valley in a positive manner. The Chamber continues to encourage growth of existing member industries and businesses, to assist legitimate firms seeking to relocate to Temecula and to provide them with exceptional customer service. The Chamber strives to coordinate aggressive programs and activities to stimulate economic development of the area's substantial resources. The Chamber provides access to a complete list of members who have the expertise needed to assist member businesses to manage their financial, organizational and marketing issues. As a reliable source of information the Chamber services all inquiries; requesting area information such as visitor guides, demographics, city maps, relocation, homes & rental information, six newsletters, e-commerce news and an online 2009/10 Business Resource Guide and Business Directory. In 2009 the Chamber responded to over 16,000 requests for relocation, tourism, and business information via phone, walk-in, email, and mail. In addition, the Chamber's CEO assisted the City with site visits to businesses throughout the year. The Chamber's CEO is the liaison between the City/Utility companies and the business community on specific issues facing the business. Raising awareness of the benefits fo shopping locally was a primary objective of the 2009 "Shop Temecula First' program. Incorporated into the year-long program was a Sweepstakes offering residents the opportunity to win a $1,000 cash, a South Coast Winery Resort & Spa package as well as other prize packages. 95 local businesses participated in the program. The program also included launching a "Shop Temecula First' website, three prominent billboard ads along I- 15 and the distribution of 3,000 reusable "Shop Temecula First' shopping bags to members and residents. The Chamber serves as a representative for business legislative issues that affect the overall welfare of the business community. The Temecula Valley Chamber, as founder and partner in the Southwest California Legislative Council (SWCLC), tracked 35 potential new state laws in 2009 that may have impacted the regional business community. With a coordinated effort of four local Chambers of Commerce, SWCLC, discussed and took a position on each potential new law and communicated those positions with state legislators throughout 2009. The SWCLC focused its efforts on such controversial issues impacting business such as water and restrictive government regulations on business. SWCLC delivered 1,500 letters from concerned business and community members to Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger's Riverside Office urging the Governor to assist in opening the completed expansion at Rancho Springs Hospital. The Chamber organizes a wide variety of business programs and events throughout the year including the State of the City Address, Business & Healthcare Expo, Awards Gala, Legislative Summit, Women In Business Event & Expo, and Partners In Learning. In 2009, the Chamber organized 216 networking events to provide local businesses the opportunity to build their business by generating professional business and personal development, business networking tips and techniques. In partnership with the Small Business Development Center (SBDC), the Chamber provides meeting space for the SBDC for counseling sessions twice monthly. In 2009 the SBDC provided counseling services to 107 individuals and businesses. The SBDC facilitates the success of small business through business management counseling and training, resulting in economic impacts such as the creation and retention of jobs, increases in sales and profits, new business starts and more. The SDBC also provides quarterly Small Business Training Workshops. The Temecula Chamber provides meeting space to SCORE representatives who offer weekly counseling services to individuals, assisting them to start, grow, and manage their businesses. In 2009, SCORE representatives counseled over 200 potential entrepreneurs. The Valley Young Professionals (VYP) is a dynamic new division of the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce, with the purpose of engaging and connecting both existing and future young professionals in the area. In 2009, the VYP launched a new website which includes member profiles, member spotlights, testimonials and member to member discounts. FISCAL IMPACT: Appropriate funding for the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce is available in the FY2010-11 Economic Development Operating Budget Line Item. ATTACHMENTS: City/Chamber Operating Agreement Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce Support Information OPERATING AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE CITY OF TEMECULA AND TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE This Agreement is made and effective as of this 27th day of July. 2010 , by and between the CITY OF TEMECULA ("City"), and TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ("CHAMBER"), a California nonprofit corporation. In consideration of the mutual covenants, conditions and undertakings set forth herein, the parties agree as follows: 1. RECITALS. This Agreement is made with respect to the following facts and purposes which each of the parties acknowledge and agree are true and correct: A. The City is desirous of promoting its advantages as a business, industrial, tourist and resident center; disseminating information relative thereto, and of properly following up and giving consideration to inquiries made relative to the various activities of City of Temecula ("City) and its possibilities as such to residential, industrial, tourist and business interests. B. The CHAMBER has special knowledge, experience and facilities for disseminating information; and is organized for and equipped to carry on promotional activities on behalf of City; and to publicize and exploit its advantages. C. Such activities are recognized by law as being in the public interest and serving public purpose. 2. TERM. This Agreement shall commence on July 27, 2010, and shall remain and continue in effect until tasks described herein are completed, but in no event later than June 30, 2011, unless sooner terminated pursuant to the provisions of this Agreement. 3. SERVICES. CHAMBER shall perform the services and tasks described and set forth in Exhibit A, attached hereto and incorporated herein as though set forth in full. CHAMBER shall complete the tasks according to the schedule of performance which is also set forth in Exhibit A. 4. PERFORMANCE. CHAMBER shall at all time faithfully, competently and to the best of his or her ability, experience, and talent, perform all tasks described herein. CHAMBER shall employ, at a minimum, generally accepted standards and practices utilized by persons engaged in providing similar services as are required of CHAMBER hereunder in meeting its obligations under this Agreement. 5. PAYMENT. a. The City agrees to pay quarterly, in accordance with the payment rate and term and the schedule of payment as set forth in Exhibit B, Payment Rates and Schedule, attached hereto and incorporated herein by this reference as though set forth in full, based upon actual time spend on the services. Any terms in Exhibit B other than the payment rate and schedule of payment are null and void. This amount shall not exceed One Hundred Thirty -Six Thousand, Two Hundred Sixty Dollars and No Cents C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx ($136,260) for the total term of the Agreement unless additional payment is approved as provided in this Agreement. b. CHAMBER shall not be compensated for any services rendered in connection with its performance of this Agreement which are in addition to those set forth herein, unless such additional services are authorized in advance and in writing by the City Manager. CHAMBER shall be compensated for any additional services in the amounts and in the manner as agreed to by City Manager and CHAMBER at the time City's written authorization is given to CHAMBER for the performance of said services. In the event the City should desire any additional service, CHAMBER shall, upon request of City, furnish a proposal including an itemized statement of the estimated cost thereof, and the City may modify or alter the proposal in its sole discretion or may direct the submission of a new proposal which may be accepted, altered or rejected. Upon the final approval of any such proposal and execution thereof, by the City and the CHAMBER, as herein provided, the City will pay to CHAMBER the cost thereof, and the CHAMBER shall perform the work. All money due for carrying out said plan or proposal shall be supported by a detailed statement of CHAMBER showing the basis of said claims, and certified by proper officers of CHAMBER. CHAMBER shall not be entitled to receive any compensation for the normal services or expenses. C. CHAMBER will submit invoices quarterly for actual services performed. Payment shall be made within thirty (30) days of receipt of the invoice. 6. SUSPENSION OR TERMINATION OF AGREEMENT WITHOUT CAUSE. a. The City may at any time, for any reason, with or without cause, suspend or terminate this Agreement, or any portion hereof, by serving upon the consultant at least ten (10) days prior written notice. Upon receipt of said notice, the Consultant shall immediately cease all work under this Agreement, unless the notice provides otherwise. If the City suspends or terminates a portion of this Agreement such suspension or termination shall not make void or invalidate the remainder of this Agreement. b. In the event this Agreement is terminated pursuant to this Section, the City shall pay to CHAMBER the actual value of the work performed up to the time of termination, provided that the work performed is of value to the City. Upon termination of the Agreement pursuant to this Section, the CHAMBER will submit an invoice to the City pursuant to Section 5. 7. DEFAULT OF CONSULTANT. a. The CHAMBER's failure to comply with the provisions of this Agreement shall constitute a default. In the event that CHAMBER is in default for cause under the terms of this Agreement, City shall have no obligation or duty to continue compensating CHAMBER for any work performed after the date of default and can terminate this Agreement immediately by written notice to the CHAMBER. If such failure by the CHAMBER to make progress in the performance of work hereunder arises out of causes beyond the CHAMBER's control, and without fault or negligence of the CHAMBER, it shall not be considered a default. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx b. If the City Manager or his delegate determines that the CHAMBER is in default in the performance of any of the terms or conditions of this Agreement, it shall serve the CHAMBER with written notice of the default. The CHAMBER shall have (10) days after service upon it of said notice in which to cure the default by rendering a satisfactory performance. In the event that the CHAMBER fails to cure its default within such period of time, the City shall have the right, notwithstanding any other provision of this Agreement, to terminate this Agreement without further notice and without prejudice to any other remedy to which it may be entitled at law, in equity or under this Agreement. 8. OWNERSHIP OF DOCUMENTS. a. CHAMBER shall maintain complete and accurate records with respect to sales, costs, expenses, receipts and other such information required by City that relate to the performance of services under this Agreement. CHAMBER shall maintain adequate records of services provided in sufficient detail to permit an evaluation of services. All such records shall be maintained in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and shall be clearly identified and readily accessible. CHAMBER shall provide free access to the representatives of City or its designees at reasonable times to such books and records, shall give City the right to examine and audit said books and records, shall permit City to make transcripts there from as necessary, and shall allow inspection of all work, data, documents, proceedings and activities related to this Agreement. Such records, together with supporting documents, shall be maintained for a period of three (3) years after receipt of final payment. b. Upon completion of, or in the event of termination or suspension of this Agreement, all original documents, designs, drawings, maps, models, computer files containing data generated for the work, surveys, notes, and other documents prepared in the course of providing the services to be performed pursuant to this Agreement shall become the sole property of the City and may be used, reused or otherwise disposed of by the City without the permission of the CHAMBER. With respect to computer files containing data generated for the work, CHAMBER shall make available to the City, upon reasonable written request by the City, the necessary computer software and hardware for purposes of accessing, compiling, transferring and printing computer files. 9. INDEMNIFICATION. The CHAMBER agrees to defend, indemnify, protect and hold harmless the City, District, and/or Agency, its officers, officials, employees and volunteers from and against any and all claims, demands, losses, defense costs or expenses, including attorney fees and expert witness fees, or liability of any kind or nature which the City, District and/or Agency, its officers, agents, employees or volunteers may sustain or incur or which may be imposed upon them for injury to or death of persons, or damage to property arising out of CHAMBER's negligent or wrongful acts or omissions arising out of or in any way related to the performance or non-performance of this Agreement, excepting only liability arising out of the negligence of the City. 10. INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS. CHAMBER shall procure and maintain for the duration of the contract insurance against claims for injuries to persons or damages to property, which may arise from or in connection with the performance of the work hereunder by the CHAMBER, its agents, representatives, or employees. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx a. Minimum Scope of Insurance. Coverage shall be at least as broad as: 1) Insurance Services Office Commercial General Liability form No. CG 00 01 11 85 or 88. 2) Insurance Services Office Business Auto Coverage form CA 00 01 06 92 covering Automobile Liability, code 1 (any auto). If the CHAMBER owns no automobiles, a non -owned auto endorsement to the General Liability policy described above is acceptable. 3) Worker's Compensation insurance as required by the State of California and Employer's Liability Insurance. If the CHAMBER has no employees while performing under this Agreement, worker's compensation insurance is not required, but CHAMBER shall execute a declaration that it has no employees. b. Minimum Limits of Insurance. CHAMBER shall maintain limits no less than: 1) General Liability: One million ($1,000,000) per occurrence for bodily injury, personal injury and property damage. If Commercial General Liability Insurance or other form with a general aggregate limit is used, either the general aggregate limit shall apply separately to this project/location or the general aggregate limit shall be twice the required occurrence limit. 2) Automobile Liability: One million ($1,000,000) per accident for bodily injury and property damage. 3) Worker's Compensation as required by the State of California; Employer's Liability: One million dollars ($1,000,000) per accident for bodily injury or disease. c. Deductibles and Self -Insured Retentions. Any deductibles or self- insured retentions must be declared to and approved by the City Manager. At the option of the City Manager, either the insurer shall reduce or eliminate such deductibles or self- insured retentions as respects the City, its officers, officials, employees and volunteers; or the CHAMBER shall procure a bond guaranteeing payment of losses and related investigations, claim administration and defense expenses. d. Other Insurance Provisions. The general liability and automobile liability policies are to contain, or be endorsed to contain, the following provisions: 1) The City, its officers, officials, employees and volunteers are to be covered as insured's as respects: liability arising out of activities performed by or on behalf of the CHAMBER; products and completed operations of the CHAMBER; premises owned, occupied or used by the CHAMBER; or automobiles owned, leased, hired or borrowed by the CHAMBER. The coverage shall contain no special limitations on the scope of protection afforded to the City, its officers, officials, employees or volunteers. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx 2) For any claims related to this project, the CHAMBER's insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the City, its officers, officials, employees and volunteers. Any insurance or self-insured maintained by the City, its officers, officials, employees or volunteers shall be excess of the CHAMBER's insurance and shall not contribute with it. 3) Any failure to comply with reporting or other provisions of the policies including breaches of warranties shall not affect coverage provided to the City, its officers, officials, employees or volunteers. 4) The CHAMBER's insurance shall apply separately to each insured against whom claim is made or suit is brought, except with respect to the limits of the insurer's liability. 5) Each insurance policy required by this agreement shall be endorsed to state: should the policy be canceled before the expiration date the issuing insurer will endeavor to mail thirty (30) days' prior written notice to the City. 6) If insurance coverage is canceled or, reduced in coverage or in limits the CHAMBER shall within two (2) business days of notice from insurer phone, fax, and/or notify the City via certified mail, return receipt requested of the changes to or cancellation of the policy. e. Acceptability of Insurers. Insurance is to be placed with insurers with a current A.M. Best's rating of no less than A:VII, unless otherwise acceptable to the City. Self insurance shall not be considered to comply with these insurance requirements. f. Verification of Coverage. CHAMBER shall furnish the City with original endorsements effecting coverage required by this clause. The endorsements are to be signed by a person authorized by that insurer to bind coverage on its behalf. The endorsements are to be on forms provided by the City. All endorsements are to be received and approved by the City before work commences. As an alternative to the City's forms, the CHAMBER's insurer may provide complete, certified copies of all required insurance policies, including endorsements effecting the coverage required by these specifications. 11. INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR. a. CHAMBER is and shall at all times remain as to the City a wholly independent contractor. The personnel performing the services under this Agreement on behalf of CHAMBER shall at all times be under CHAMBER's exclusive direction and control. Neither City nor any of its officers, employees, agents, or volunteers shall have control over the conduct of CHAMBER or any of CHAMBER's officers, employees, or agents except as set forth in this Agreement. CHAMBER shall not at any time or in any manner represent that it or any of its officers, employees or agents are in any manner officers, employees or agents of the City. CHAMBER shall not incur or have the power to incur any debt, obligation or liability whatever against City, or bind City in any manner. b. No employee benefits shall be available to CHAMBER in connection with the performance of this Agreement. Except for the fees paid to CHAMBER as provided in the Agreement, City shall not pay salaries, wages, or other compensation to C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx CHAMBER for performing services hereunder for City. City shall not be liable for compensation or indemnification to CHAMBER for injury or sickness arising out of performing services hereunder. 12. LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES. The CHAMBER shall keep itself informed of all local, State and Federal ordinances, laws and regulations which in any manner affect those employed by it or in any way affect the performance of its service pursuant to this Agreement. The CHAMBER shall at all times observe and comply with all such ordinances, laws and regulations. The City, and its officers and employees, shall not be liable at law or in equity occasioned by failure of the CHAMBER to comply with this section. 13. RELEASE OF INFORMATION. a. All information gained by CHAMBER in performance of this Agreement shall be considered confidential and shall not be released by CHAMBER without City's prior written authorization. CHAMBER, its officers, employees, agents or subcontractors, shall not without written authorization from the City Manager or unless requested by the City Attorney, voluntarily provide declarations, letters of support, testimony at depositions, response to interrogatories or other information concerning the work performed under this Agreement or relating to any project or property located within the City. Response to a subpoena or court order shall not be considered "voluntary" provided CHAMBER gives City notice of such court order or subpoena. b. CHAMBER shall promptly notify City should CHAMBER, its officers, employees, agents or subcontractors be served with any summons, complaint, subpoena, notice of deposition, request for documents, interrogatories, request for admissions or other discovery request, court order or subpoena from any party regarding this Agreement and the work performed there under or with respect to any project or property located within the City. City retains the right, but has no obligation, to represent CHAMBER and/or be present at any deposition, hearing or similar proceeding. CHAMBER agrees to cooperate fully with City and to provide City with the opportunity to review any response to discovery requests provided by CHAMBER. However, City's right to review any such response does not imply or mean the right by City to control, direct, or rewrite said response. 14. NOTICES. Any notices which either party may desire to give to the other party under this Agreement must be in writing and may be given either by (1) personal service, (ii) delivery by a reputable document delivery service, such as but not limited to, Federal Express, that provides a receipt showing date and time of delivery, or (iii) mailing in the United States Mail, certified mail, postage prepaid, return receipt requested, addressed to the address of the party as set forth below or at any other address as that party may later designate by Notice. Notice shall be effective upon delivery to the addresses specified below or on the third business day following deposit with the document delivery service or United States Mail as provided above. To City via U.S. Mail: City of Temecula Mailing Address: P.O. Box 9033 Temecula, California 92589-9033 C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx To City via Courier Service: 43200 Business Park Drive Temecula, California 92590 Attention: Aaron Adams, Assistant City Manager To Consultant: Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A Temecula, CA 92591 Attention: Alice Sullivan, IOM, President/CEO 15. ASSIGNMENT. The CHAMBER shall not assign the performance of this Agreement, nor any part thereof, nor any monies due hereunder, without prior written consent of the City. Upon termination of this Agreement, CHAMBER's sole compensation shall be payment for actual services performed up to, and including, the date of termination or as may be otherwise agreed to in writing between the City Council and the CHAMBER. 16. LICENSES. At all times during the term of this Agreement, CHAMBER shall have in full force and effect, all licenses required of it by law for the performance of the services described in this Agreement. 17. GOVERNING LAW. The City and CHAMBER understand and agree that the laws of the State of California shall govern the rights, obligations, duties and liabilities of the parties to this Agreement and also govern the interpretation of this Agreement. Any litigation concerning this Agreement shall take place in the municipal, superior, or federal district court with geographic jurisdiction over the City. In the event such litigation is filed by one party against the other to enforce its rights under this Agreement, the prevailing party, as determined by the Court's judgment, shall be entitled to reasonable attorney fees and litigation expenses for the relief granted. 18. PROHIBITED INTEREST. No officer, or employee of the City shall have any financial interest, direct or indirect, in this Agreement, the proceeds thereof, the CHAMBER, or CHAMBER's sub -contractors for this project, during his/her tenure or for one year thereafter. The CHAMBER hereby warrants and represents to the City that no officer or employee of the City of Temecula has any interest, whether contractual, non - contractual, financial or otherwise, in this transaction, or in the business of the CHAMBER or CHAMBER's sub -contractors on this project. CHAMBER further agrees to notify the City in the event any such interest is discovered whether or not such interest is prohibited by law or this Agreement. 19. ENTIRE AGREEMENT. This Agreement contains the entire understanding between the parties relating to the obligations of the parties described in this Agreement. All prior or contemporaneous agreements, understandings, representations and statements, oral or written, are merged into this Agreement and shall be of no further force or effect. Each party is entering into this Agreement based solely upon the representations set forth herein and upon each party's own independent investigation of any and all facts such party deems material. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx 20. AUTHORITY TO EXECUTE THIS AGREEMENT. The person or persons executing this Agreement on behalf of CHAMBER warrants and represents that he or she has the authority to execute this Agreement on behalf of the CHAMBER and has the authority to bind CHAMBER to the performance of its obligations hereunder. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed the day and year first above written. CITY OF TEMECULA Jeff Comerchero, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: Peter M. Thorson, City Attorney TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A Temecula, CA 92591 (951) 676-5090 By: Stan Harter Chairman of the Board Bv: Name: Alice Sullivan, IOM Title: President/CEO By: Name: Janet Scott Beck Title: Secretary By: Name: Jerry Konchar Title: Treasurer C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx EXHIBIT "A" SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce shall undertake, during the 2010-11 fiscal year, to carry on promotional activities on behalf of the City of Temecula and to particularly render the following services: 1. To maintain suitable quarters and employ competent professional personnel to carry on the promotional activities herein stated. 2. To promptly answer correspondence relative to the local business, industrial, and residential advantages and opportunities in the City of Temecula, and to disseminate information by correspondence, newspaper public Agency and personal contacts favorably advertising such advantages and opportunities. 3. Respond to legislative issues through the Chamber's Southwest California Legislative Council. Track legislation through the Legislative Advocacy Policy. 4. Offer meeting space to SCORE representatives to offer counseling services to newly starting and expanding businesses. Offer meeting space for counseling from the Small Business Development Department. Offer meeting space to local non-profit organizations such as Safe Alternatives For Everyone (SAFE), Dorland Mountain Arts Colony, The Arts Council and Rotary. 5. Develop and execute marketing seminars. 6. To assist potential businesses in opening, expanding and relocating to Temecula. 7. To promote and invite trade and business meetings and celebrations whereby outside interests and individuals may become acquainted with the advantages and opportunities in Temecula. 8. To support the City in all ways possible in the furtherance of the activities of the City of Temecula. 9. To maintain a public office within the business area of City, easily accessible and fully equipped for the purpose of disseminating information and answering correspondence and inquiries regarding the City. Said office shall be open to the public not less than eight hours a day, except Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays. Chamber shall employ a full time President/CEO, a portion of whose duties shall be to promote the welfare and activities of the City of Temecula; its industries, business activities and opportunities, residential advantages; and other matters of general public interest. 10. Retention Committee for community businesses to sustain and nurture existing businesses in Temecula. 11. Produce and update relocation packets for new residents. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx 12. Provide demographic information to interested individuals. 13. Organize events to promote goodwill in the City such as the Legislative Summit (1) Table for 10, Business Expo (1) Expo Table, Candidates Forum, State of the City Event (30 seats), Annual Awards Gala (20 seats), Chamber Golf Tournament (5 entries) and Economic Forecast Conference (10 seats). 14. Maintain and update Chamber web site. 15. Update and reprint City Maps. The Chamber shall supply City with a minimum of 2,000 City Maps for distribution at no cost to City. 16. Provide networking activities to assist women and minority business owners. 17. The President/CEO of the CHAMBER shall provide to the City Manager and Assistant City Manager a copy of the activities monthly report submitted to the CHAMBER Board of Directors. Said report shall be prepared in a format acceptable to the City and is requested by the second Wednesday of each month. 18. CHAMBER shall provide complete financial statements including a balance sheet, income statement and budget to actual comparison report of the CHAMBER. This financial audit of the CHAMBER should to the City no later than February 28, 2011. The financial summary report on how funds were expended and used to and shall include documentation, including but not limited to and cancelled checks to support the Operations Funding. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx be completed and submitted audit shall provide a general benefit Temecula residents , copies of invoices, receipts EXHIBIT "B" PAYMENT RATE AND SCHEDULE That in consideration of the promotional activities and services performed by the CHAMBER for the City of Temecula, as set forth in Exhibit "A" hereof, City hereby agrees to pay CHAMBER, during the term of this Agreement, the sum of One Hundred Thirty -Six Thousand, Two Hundred Sixty Dollars and No Cents ($136,260) for the fiscal year 2010-11. The sum of $136,260 for the fiscal year 2010-11, is payable upon receipt of invoice quarterly beginning on execution of the Agreement. C:\Program Files\Neevia.Com\Document Conver1er\temp\974611.docx QUESTIONS Application Page 3 Professional Organization 1. Describe your organization, goals, operations, and activities and how it benefits the economic development of Temecula? For 44 years, the Chamber has represented business in the Temecula Valley in a positive manner. The TVCC continues to encourage growth of existing member industries and businesses, to assist legitimate firms seeking to relocate to Temecula and to provide them with exceptional customer service. The Chamber strives to coordinate aggressive programs and activities to stimulate economic development of the area's substantial resources. With the combined efforts of the Chamber Board of Directors, staff and volunteers we will continue to coordinate the efforts of commerce, industry and professional services in maintaining and strengthening a sound and healthy business environment in the Temecula Valley. In partnership with the Southwest California Legislative Council, the NCC tracked 35 potential new laws in 2009 and will continue to serve as the voice of business in legislative matters and to promote legislation that affects the overall welfare of our community. Mission Statement: The mission of the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce is to promote positive economic growth while protecting the environment for all businesses and by doing so, support the programs which preserve and improve the quality of life for the entire community. Goals: To serve as a responsible representative for all business legislation and as an informational resource center for members and the community at large. Continue to serve as a positive liaison between, city, utilities and other organization. The Chamber will strive to be technology driven, innovative and proactive, increase membership and create new programs. Strategic Alliance will strive to develop programs which will assist medium size businesses in the community. Core Values: Create a strong locale economy; Represent business with local government; Provide networking opportunities; Promote the community and Influence political action. We believe that the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce must assist both member and non- member employers and the community. In response to member requests, the NCC initiated a payment plan option, allowing members the opportunity to select a payment plan to fit their budgets. Economic recovery begins with each of us and we must continue to partner in coordinating positive events and forums such as: Activities The Chamber provides access to a complete list of members who have the expertise needed to assist member businesses to manage their financial, organizational and marketing issues. As a reliable source of information the TVCC services all inquiries requesting area information such as visitors guides, demographics, city maps, relocation, homes & rental information, six newsletters, e-commerce news and an online 2009/10 Business Resource Guide and Business Directory. In 2009 the NCC responded to over 16,000 requests for relocation, tourism, and business information via phone, walk- in, email, and mail. In addition, the Chamber's CEO assisted the City with site visits to large businesses throughout the year. The Chamber's CEO is the liaison between the City/Utility companies and the business community on specific issues facing the business. This service serves as a positive benefit for the economic development of the business community. 1 2. Does your organization submit to Staff the required information, monthly reports, financials, etc. on time? Yes. The NCC provides the City of Temecula with monthly activity reports as well as results of our annual financial audit. 3. Explain how your organization has worked well with the business community and Temecula residents to achieve your goals? o Ben -E -Lett Program Insurance Program - In 2010 The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce will begin offering a discounted health insurance program to members through the Ben -E -Lett program. The BEN-E-LECT insurance program is designed to help Employers with 2 or more employees lower the cost of healthcare coverage provided to employees by an average of over 30% per year. o Reference USA — The NCC now offers businesses access to the Reference USA database. This tool provides access to information on more than 20 million businesses, 22 million consumers, new businesses, homeowners and recently relocated, making research fast and easy. This information can also assist job seekers and students conducting research projects. o Strategic Alliance — This new program is aimed to assist the medium sized businesses (11 — 100 employees) with components including cooperative advertising and events offering input from key market segments. o The Chamber continues to offer the community a job link page which has been added to assist `-- employers and potential job seekers. o Affinity Programs —The NCC offers several cost saving programs for the business community, including the Office Depot, Sherwin Williams, Smart Card and First National Bank Merchant Services. o Employer Compliance Materials — The NCC provides employers easy access to compliance products at a minimal cost, including Employment posters and required notice kits. o Conference Room Access - The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce provides meeting space to many local non-profit organizations such as SAFE, Dorland Mountain Arts Colony, Susan G. Komen, The Arts Council and Rotary, as well as small and large businesses who occasionally ask to use the conference room for meetings. SBDC and SCORE for counseling sessions and quarterly special topic events are provided at no charge to the business community. 4. Please describe your financial reporting? The TVCC operates on a modified cash basis. An independent accounting firm compiles our financial information and provides statements of financial position and activity to the Board of Directors for their review on a monthly basis. The Chambers financial statements are audited annually. The financial statements for 2007/08 were audited, providing a standard clean opinion with no internal control weaknesses. The 2008/09 financial statements are currently in the audit process. Overall the Chamber has been proactive in revising its budget and cutting expenses, such as payroll decreases, and decreasing operational costs. 2 5. If your organization received City of Temecula funding in the previous year, please provide a brief recap of the organization's accomplishments. Are there any notable operations and/or program changes? If so, please explain. Shop Temecula First Program Raising awareness of the benefits of shopping locally was a primary objective of the 2009 Shop Temecula First program. Shopping locally is an investment in our community and the NCC worked to educate the general public about the economic benefits of shopping, dining and buying locally. Incorporated into the year-long program was a Sweepstakes offering residents the opportunity to win $1,000 cash, a South Coast Winery Resort & Spa package as well as other prize packages. 95 local businesses participated in the program, distributing sweepstake tickets and displaying window decals in store fronts. A Shop Temecula First website was launched, listing all participants and highlighting the impact they have on local economy. The NCC partnered with the Temecula Auto Dealers and The Promenade Temecula in sponsoring three prominent billboard ads along I-15 displaying the Shop Temecula First logo. Through the continuation of this program, the NCC strives to improve our business climate, quality of life and economic prosperity. The Chamber also distributed 3,000 reusable "Shop Temecula First" shopping bags to members and residents. Site Visits In 2009 the NCC organized meetings between the Mayor, City staff and DCH Acura, Chrysler, Dodge, Honda and Jeep, John Hine Temecula Mazda, Rancho Ford Lincoln Mercury, Paradise Chevrolet Cadillac, Quality Nissan, and Toyota of Temecula Valley. In addition, the President/CEO participated in the City's Site Visits. We believe these visits help foster positive relationships between the business community, the City of Temecula and the NCC. Throughout 2009 the President/CEO and Membership Director organized Business Outreach visits with Chamber members to discuss current issues, business friendly inquiries and thank them for doing business in the City of Temecula. Partnerships The NCC partnered with other organizations to expand and diversify our services for greater benefit to the business community. The NCC acted in partnership with the EDC of Southwest California on their inaugural Business Summit, a Day of Collaboration and Procurement. This event offered local business the opportunity to meet with city and county representatives as well as major businesses related to job procurement. TVCC assisted in marketing this event to our members and the community at large. SBDC In partnership with the Small Business Development Center, the Chamber provided meeting space for the SBDC for counseling sessions twice monthly. In 2009 the Small Business Development Center provided counseling services to 107 individuals and businesses. The SBDC facilitates the success of small business through business management counseling and training, resulting in economic impacts such as the creation and retention of jobs, increases in sales and profits, new business starts and more. The SBDC also provides quarterly Small Business Training Workshops, offering detailed information on key business issues such as: o QuickBooks for Beginners o Employee versus Independent Contractor o How to Start a Business o QuickBooks o QuickBooks, Hands on Workshop 3 SCORE The NCC provides meeting space to SCORE representatives who offer weekly counseling services to individuals, assisting them to start, grow, and manage their businesses. In 2009 SCORE representatives counseled over 200 potential entrepreneurs. Student of the Month The Chamber assists with the coordination of the Student of the Month and Student of the Year programs, designed to promote, acknowledge, and praise our local high school students for their efforts to succeed in academics, athletics, and/or community activities or the ability to overcome adverse life situations. Staff coordinates the program with schools to schedule each event, collect names of each month's recipients, sends out monthly reminders to schools sites. NCC staff also creates the monthly program for the events as well as create, score and deliver the Student of the Year applications. Staff prepares press packets for each event. Partners In Learning The NCC Business Development Resource Committee partnered with Friends of the Temecula Libraries creating the Partners In Learning program and to assist in raising monies for the purchase of books to fill the shelves of both Temecula libraries. Media Partnerships Spreading the word about the TVCC's programs was vastly increased in 2009 through multiple media partnerships. Chamber events and programs were promoted in The Californian, The Valley Business Journal, KFRG radio, Valley News, Q 103.3 radio, Smart Card, The Press- Enterprise, Driven Media, Action Mail Direct, Integrity Business & Consumer Journal and only 2 degrees radio show. Southwest California Legislative Council Representing 7VCC J The SWCLC tracked 35 potential new state laws in 2009 that may have impacted the regional business community. With a coordinated effort of four local chambers of Commerce, the Southwest California Legislative Council (SWCLC), discussed and took a position on each potential new law and communicated those positions with state legislators throughout 2009. The SWCLC focused its efforts on some of the most controversial issues impacting business such as water and restrictive government regulations on business. The Chambers' official positions on each of the 35 bills have been available online at www.SouthwestCA.biz and will use this resource to raise awareness on particular harmful new laws by issuing call to action eALERTs via the advocacy website. These eALERTS are sent out to over 2,500 members of the SWCLC. The Southwest California Legislative Council (SWCLC) delivered 1,500 letters from concerned business and community members to Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger's Riverside Office urging the Governor to assist in opening the completed expansion at Rancho Springs Hospital. Networking events In 2009 the NCC organized 216 networking events to provide local businesses the opportunity to build their business by generating professional business leads and referral systems. The Chamber provided workshops and seminars for business and personal development, business networking tips and techniques. o (11) Power Networking Workshops o (75) Ribbon Cutting and Grand Openings to promote businesses o (10) Networking Mixers o (10) Networking Breakfast events o (3) New Member Receptions o (3) Networking Luncheons o (6) 5 -Minute Networking events 9 o (6) Ambassador Luncheons; Topics include social marketing; business motivation and business coaching o (12) Friday Morning Coffee Connections o (12) Membership Committee Meetings o (5) Ambassador Training sessions o (6) Sphere of Influence events o Sexual Harassment training seminar o (12) Business Success Forums — Topics for 2010 include: Social Networking Referral Institute Develop Your Plan for Success Customer Service Put PR Back Into your Marketing Campaign HR Overview Does Your Brand Reflect Your Business Incorporating Your Business How To speak Like A Leader Business Technology Business Insurance Facts. o Technology Workshop o (11) Monthly Restaurant Association Forums o (12) Lobby Spotlight o Ambassadors assist in monthly survey/retention calls to members Special Events o State of the City Address o Awards Gala o Legislative Summit o Business & Healthcare Expo o Women In Business Event and Expo o Partners In Learning o Wine & Bingo o Wine Country Golf Classic Community Events o Youth Job and Career Expo o Temecula Valley College and Vocational Invitational o Candidates Forum o E -Waste Events (Collected over 300,000 lbs of electronic waste, ensuring items are properly recycled. o Old Town Marketing Meetings o Team 150 participation (Throughout 2009 TVCC staff assisted in the coordination of several events commemorating the 150"' anniversary of the Temecula Post Office. o Participated with City staff in City staff/Code Enforcement regarding signage and temporary use permits. o Chamber staff presented information to local organizations, including Temecula Noon Rotary, Sunrise Rotary and Soroptimist International of Tri -Valley o The NCC will again coordinate a Chamber Trip to China, allowing 50 + travelers the opportunity to tour Beijing and Shanghai as well as attend a Business Partners Conference for a unique opportunity to meet with other business leaders in China. Additional travel opportunities include Shades of Ireland, Discover the French Riviera, South Pacific Wonders, Alaskan Cruise and Cruise 5' Canada, New England and Boston. Each of these travel opportunities offer community members an affordable means to travel. Valley Young Professionals Valley Young Professionals is a dynamic new division of the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce, with the purpose of engaging and connecting both existing and future young professionals in the area. By building relationships with other young professionals and business leaders, VYP seeks to empower and inspire young professionals to advance their careers and ultimately have a positive impact on the community. In 2009 the VYP launched a new website includes member profiles, member spotlights, testimonials and member to member discounts. Throughout 2009 members of the VYP coordinated and participated in the following events: o (12) Monthly committee meetings o (12) Monthly VYPER events o Attended a Back of the House tour at Temecula City Hall 0 2 civic events with Oak Grove Center for Education Treatment & The Arts Football Camp Dorm room decoration o (2) Civic events with Rotary of Temecula Food basket delivery for Thanksgiving Food/toy basket delivery for Christmas 0 3 educational speaking engagements for the Assisteen program with the Assistance League of Temecula Valley Communication Efforts NCC Newsletter — The newsletter is printed every other month. Fifteen hundred copies of Temecula Today newsletter are distributed to the business membership, city and legislative officials. The publication contains relevant labor law changes, business issues as well as an "Ask the Expert" section. The NCC provides the City a full-page every other month, highlighting programs and other pertinent community information. Expanding our methods of communication, members receive weekly e-mail calendars informing them of upcoming programs and events. The TVCC continues to provide a monthly E-commerce Newsletter to NCC members and courtesy member. This newsletter has been very successful at keeping the membership up-to-date on current issues and programs. Each month approximately 2,000 visitors view the NCC On -Line Directory, providing them with area information and demographics, frequently called phone numbers as well as a complete listing of NCC members. The newly added Shop Temecula First website has received approximately 1,500 visitors since it has launched. In 2009 nearly 4,600 unique visitors logged on to the SWCLC's website, www. Southwestca.biz. 2,500 members within the Southwest California area received E -Alerts regarding legislative issues of key importance to businesses in the area, urging them to take action regarding pending legislation. The SWCLC is diligent in creating partnerships with various groups and coalitions in an effort to strengthen our position and ultimately expand the credibility of the coalition. Awards Gala State of the City Address Women In Business Legislative Summit Chamber Mixer Networking Luncheon Ribbon Cuttings Valley Young Professionals 2009/2010 FINAL BUDGET 2009 2009 2009 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 1 2010 2010 2010 October November December January February March April May June July August September TOTAL INCOME 10000 New Members 7,950 4,565 5,680 6,365 4,200 4,875 6,125 3,790 6,225 5,000 5,000 5,000 64,775 - - New Member Admin Fee 300 300 $00 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 3,600 Membership Drive 15,000 15,000 1,,,,J7 Renewals total M,einbe}8hip:Heventie 15,_025 13,750 17,250 26,000 16,700 22,350 22,275 17,320 .. , I,,^ .. ,ML,v�,, �, ��;". 20,455 17,000 •" r� 17,000 17,000 222,125 10002 Operating Income Certificate of Origin 25 25 25 25 1 25 25 1 150 Business/Employer Kits 250 500 1 500 1 1 1 1,250 RTA Ticket Sales 450 450 450 450 1 450 450 450 450 1 450 450 450 1 450 1 5,400 Conference Room Rental Totatto" aZln9 income'. - 300 300 300 _ 300 1 300 300 300 300 300 .._r."a^�'_.., 4 m� 300 - 300 30o 3,500 , 10003 Ci Contract 34,000 34,000 34,000 34,000 136,000 10004 Map Contract 10005 Office Lease Income 1 4,014 4,014 4,014 4,014 4,014 4,014 4,014 4,014 4,014 4,014 4,014 4,014 48,168 100071nterest Earned 250 250 250 250 5,850 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 8600 10009 Profile Display Total Contract Income 2,100 1 2,100 11001 Business Dev. Resource Sphere of Influence 80 80 80 80 80 80 480 Tech Expo Total Business Dev. Haa.kF*yeRSx 1,000 I 1,000 Communications . Ativertisin Income 355 2,760 355 2,410 7054140 355 2,135 355 2,135 705 2,135 16,816 110021Membershi Committee 3rd Category 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 600 _ i 5 -Minute Networking- Affinity Programs - Chairman's Elite 140 1,840 140 140 1,000 1,915 140 1,840 140 140 1,840 140 8,555 1,000 Lobby Spotlight 150 150 150 150 1 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 1,800 _ Membership Appreciation _ Mixers 750 750 750 750 1 750 750 750 750 750 6,750 Networkin Breakfast 600 ! 600 600 600 600 600 600 600 600 600 6,000 _ Networkin Luncheon 1 1,300 1,300 11300 3,900 New Member Reception PlanningConference Sponsor 1,000 1,000 Power Networking Workshop 1 SBDC Sponsorship Speed Networking 50 25 50 25 50 25 50 2,500 1 25 50 1 25 50 - 1 25 50 25 50 25 50 25 50 21500.,: 25 50 25 50 25 600 5,000.: 300 WP Members 200 100 200 100 200 100 200 100 200 100 200 100 1,800 WPER 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 750 150 150 1,800 Website Loo Ad 300 300 300 300 300- 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 3,600 Wine & Bingo 5,675 1 1 5,675 11,350 Women In Business 1 Total Membership 6,100 1 1- 6,100 11003 1 Legislative Council 3,000 3,000 6,000 Legislative Breakfast 2,750 2,750 Sacramento Legislative Conference Total Legislative. Council .,,, "- 110041Special Events Committee 1 ! Business Expo 1 14,000 1 14,000 Awards Gala 76.2 1 1 76,250 1 State of the 1 25,000 1 1 1 25,000 October November December January February March April May June July August September TOTAL 20000 Operating Expenses Accountin Pa roll 325 325 325 750 5,100 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 9,100 Alarm Maintenance 265 265 1 265 265 1,060 Association Fees 415 415 415 415 1,660 Auto Expense/Maintenance 650. 650 650 650 650 650 900 650 650 650 650 650 8,050 _ _ Bank/C-C Fees 700 700 700 700 700 700 700 700 700 700 700 700 8,400 _ Business/Employer Kits 450 350 800 Computer Maintenance 520 520 520 520 520 520 520 520 520 520 520 520 6,240 Co ier Maintenance 1,500 1,500 1,500 1,500 1,500 1,500 1,900 1,500 1,500 1,500 1,500 1,500 18,400 Oues/Subscd tions 365 130 715 180 370 750 2,510 Furniture & E ui ment Insurance-Auto 1,400 1,400 2,800 Insurance-Director & Officer 2,200 - 2,200 Insurance-E Equip Breakdown/Boiler Insurence-General Liability 2,553 1,300 1,300 1,300 1,300 1,300 9,053 Insumnce-Health 1,325 1,325 1,325 1,325 1,325 1,325 1,325 1,325 1,325 1,325 1,325 1,325 15,900 Insurence-Grou Life 210 210 210 210 840 Insurance-Workman's Comp 320 495 320 320 320 320 320 320 320 320 320 320 4,015 Janitorial Services 350 350 350 350 350 350 350 350 350 350 350 350 4,200 Loan Payment Princi al) 1,689 1,576 1,705 1,593 1,601 1,971 1,619 1,748 1,637 1,765 1,654 1,663 20,221 Loan Payment Interest 3,666 3,769 3,640 3,752 3,744 3,375 3,726 3,598 3,708 3,581 3,691 3,682 43,932 Marketing 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 4,000 Meals 50 50 50 300 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 850 Mileage 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 300 Payroll Commission 100 100 100 1,500 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2,600 Ad Sales Commission 515 515 515 515 515 515 3,090 Payroll 29,000 29,000 29,000 29,000 29,000 29,000 29,000 29,000 29,000 29,000 29,000 29,000 348,000 Payroll Bonus Payroll Taxes 2,850 2,850 2,850 2,850 2,850 2,850 2,850 2,850 2,850 2,850 2,850 2,850 34,200 Pension Plan Phones/Fax 1,100 1,100 1,100 1,100 1,100 1,100 1,100 1,100 1,100 1,100 1,250 1,100 13,350 Postage 600 1,100 1,100 600 600 600 600 600 600 600 600 600 1 8,200 Postage Equipment 675 675 675 675 Printing-Office 100 300 300 1,200 300 Re airs/Mainlenance 300 300 600 300 300 300 300 600 300 300 600 300RTA Bus Tickets 425 425 425 425 425 425 425 425 425 425 425 425SeminarsSofware 02,200 100 80 100 80 100 80 100 350Store a 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 Supplies 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000. 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 12,000 Taxes-Federal/State 2,500 2,500 Taxes-Property 7,575 7,575 15,150 Trash Service 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1,200 Travel Expenses Utilities 800 800 800 800 800 800 800 800 800 1,100 1,100 1,100 10,500 Web Maintenance ..54�,5,2Q 20005 Education Committee Student of the MonthNear Tibial'fr?ut,"ek�.�.z'a 1 1,600 1 600 , 2,200 20010 SWC Legislative Council Le islative Advocacv 2,500 2,500 3,000 3,000 11,000 Legislative Breakfast TotalLsglelgtWe 1875 1,875 20015 Business Development Resourc ' Sphere of Influence 50 50 50 150 Tech Expo 200 200 20016I Communications Newsletter 3,300 1 3,300 1 3,300 3,300 3,300 1 19,800 October November December January February March April May June July August September TOTAL New Member Orientation 40 40 80 Plaques Power Networking Workshop 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 480 Ribbon Cuttings/Mixers 50 50 50 50 50 250 SBDC 2,500 2,500 5,000 WP Events WP Member Expense 700 100 100 300 Wine & Bingo 2,750 2,750 51500 Women In Business 4,600 4,600 -ShopTemecula First 500500 500 500 2,000 20030 Special Events Committee Business Expo 1,900 1,900 Awards Gala 64,710 64,710 State of the Ci 18,408 18,408 Chamber Golf Classic 17,385 17,385 Monte Carlo 9,900 9,900 Le islative Summit 14,528 14,528 2010 China Trip 76,460 76,460 152,920 2010 Travel Opportunities E -Waste Events 475 475 950 Special Topic Seminars Total Ways & Means TOTAL EXPENSES NET INCOMEIIXPENSE 62,¢90 12,258 53,650 11,734 135,406 15,556 70,468 11,929 119,410 28074 63,729 18385 65 29P �' ., w� " ..kc3 eo�4aE. s3'�'9,Zw 7i 6W 7 r.. - r•^., >4,. Econ. Uncertainty Transfer 1500 1,500 1,500 11500 1,500 1,500 1500. 1,500%1.: a. .�kA` .1 X09:: #,SOA^„. s` �'� .a 2 IMM TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (A California Public Benefit Corporation) INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FISCAL YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2009 WONG JOHNSON&ASSOCIATES, A PROF SSION LCORPORATION CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS SURE 210 27450 YNEZ ROAD, TEMECULA, CALIFORNIA 92591-0680 TELEPHONE 951-693-1120 • FACSIMILE 951-693-1189 WONG JOHNSON & ASSOCIATES, A PROPESS10"L CORP nory CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS SUITE 210 27450 YNEZ ROAD, TEMECULA, CALIFORNIA 92591-4680 TELEPHONE 951-693-1120 • FACSIMILE 951-693-1189 INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT February 15, 2010 To the Board of Directors Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce Temecula, California We have audited the accompanying statement of financial position of the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce (a California public benefit corporation) as of September 30, 2009, and the related statements of activities and of cash flows for the fiscal year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the organization's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce as of September 30, 2009, and its activities and its cash flows for the fiscal year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. '�/r7_'✓r! L/t�nc✓1a ✓[�- �J%ol.9Tt� WONG JOHNSON & ASSOCIATES A Professional Corporation Temecula, California TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (A California Public Benefit Corporation) STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION Cash and cash equivalents Board designated cash City contract receivable Other accounts receivable Prepaid expenses and other current assets Land, building and equipment, net Total assets September 30, 2009 ASSETS LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS LIABILITIES Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Note payable Total liabilities NET ASSETS Unrestricted Designated by the board for economic uncertainties Undesignated Temporarily restricted Total net assets Total liabilities and net assets The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. $ 168,993 147,003 34,065 30,817 16,161 1,045,767 $ 1,442,806 $ 21,237 747,218 768,455 147,003 493,248 34,100 674,351 $ 1,442,806 TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (A California Public Benefit Corporation) STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2009 UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS Revenue: Membership dues $ 322,773 City of Temecula 147,615 Special event - Awards Gala dinner 80,871 Special event - Golf tournament 31,440 Special event - State of the City 29,065 Special event - Legislative Summit 25,080 Special event - Economic Outlook 13,560 Special event - Monte Carlo 15,313 Special event - Business Expo 5,615 Special events - Other 11,996 China trip 148,840 Lease income 48,168 Membership committee 71,648 Interest 3,980 Other revenues 29,952 Total unrestricted revenues 985,916 Net assets released from restrictions 15,270 Total unrestricted revenue and other support 1,001,186 Expense: Special event - Awards Gala dinner 60,679 Special event - Golf tournament 14,212 Special event - State of the City 19,902 Special event - Legislative Summit 22,489 Special event - Economic Outlook 13,024 Special event - Monte Carlo 8,054 Special event - Business Expo 9,405 Special events - Other 310 China trip 134,683 Membership committee 27,556 Education committee 4,489 Salaries and related employer taxes 420,697 Other employee expenses 30,348 Interest 46,226 Insurance 17,477 Publications and printing 24,202 . The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (A California Public Benefit Corporation) STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES (continued) Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2009 Depreciation 40,874 Repairs and maintenance 33,938 Office supplies 10,411 Telephone 12,235 Property taxes 12,364 Postage and delivery 9,917 Utilities 10,935 Credit card fees 9,374 Professional services 12,337 Miscellaneous 44,168 Total unrestricted expenses 1,050,307 Decrease in unrestricted net assets 49,121 TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED NET ASSETS Contributions for special events to be held in the next fiscal year 34,100 Net assets released from restriction due to completion of event (15,270) Increase in temporarily restricted net assets 18,830 Decrease in net assets (30,291) Net assets at beginning of fiscal year 704,642 Net assets at end of fiscal year $ 674,351 The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (A California Public Benefit Corporation) STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2009 CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Decrease in unrestricted net assets $ (49,121) Adjustments to reconcile decrease in unrestricted net assets to net cash provided by operating activities: Depreciation 40,874 (Increase) decrease in operating assets Board designated cash (1,542) Receivables (24,807) Prepaid expenses and other current assets 1,683 Increase (decrease) in operating liabilities Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (10,306) Funds received in advance of special event .18,830 Net cash used by operating activities 24,389 CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES Principal payments on note payableI( 7,919) Net cash used by financing activities 17,919 Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents (42,308) Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of fiscal year 211,301 Cash and cash equivalents at end of fiscal year $ 168,993 SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION: Interest paid. $ 46,226 Income taxes paid $ 3,375 The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMM (A California Public Benefit Corporation) NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS SEPTEMBER 30, 2009 NOTE 1 — ORGANIZATION AND NATURE OF ACTIVITIES: The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce (the "Chamber") was established in 1966 pursuant to the general non-profit corporation law of the State of California. The Chamber was formed to promote and extend trade and commerce in the City of Temecula and vicinity, to advance the commercial, industrial, social and public interest in and around Temecula and to foster and promote the educational facilities of Temecula. The Chamber is funded through membership dues, performance of services for the City of Temecula (the "City") and sponsorships from businesses and the general public in conjunction with its fundraising efforts. NOTE 2 — SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES: Basis ofpresentation The Chamber accounts for transactions on the accrual basis. Recognition ofrevenue Effective September 1, 2009, the Board of Directors began allowing members to remit payment for membership dues over a period not to exceed six -months. As of September 30, 2009, approximately $7,900 and $3,700 in new membership fees and renewals, respectively, were included in other accounts receivable. No allowance for uncollectible accounts has been provided since management believes that the balance is fully collectible. Management believed that recording the revenue on a monthly pro -rata basis would have an immaterial effect on the statement of activities. Special event revenues are recorded when the event is held. Membership committee revenues, which include mixers, royalties from affinity programs, contributions for shop Temecula first and chairman's circle, are also recorded when the event is held. Other revenues, which include advertising income, rental of conference room and sale of local maps, are recorded when the transaction is executed. The Chamber has entered into a fixed fee agreement with the City to perform various functions to promote and extend trade in the City. The City remitted $147,615 for such services during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009. The agreement is renewable annually and may be terminated by either party giving 10 days written notice. In this event, all monies paid by the City and unspent by the Chamber shall be refunded. As of September 30, 2009, $34,065 had not yet been collected and was included in City Contract receivable. –1 NOTE 2 — SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES: (Continued) Grants and other contributions of cash and assets are reported as temporarily restricted support if they are received with donor -imposed restrictions that limit the use of the donated assets or if they relate to activities or events which have not yet occurred. When a donor -imposed restriction expires, that is, when a stipulated time restriction ends or purpose restriction is accomplished, temporarily restricted net assets are reclassified to unrestricted net assets and reported in the Statement of Activities as net assets released from restrictions. Land, building and equipment Purchases of land, building and equipment are recorded at cost. Donated items are recorded at estimated fair value when received. Depreciation and amortization on both purchased and donated items are recorded on a straight-line basis using lives ranging from three to 40 years. Expenditures to purchase assets over $1,000 with an estimated useful life exceeding one year are capitalized and depreciated. Management evaluates useful lives regularly in order to determine recoverability taking into consideration current technological conditions. Maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred. Upon retirement or sale, the cost and related accumulated depreciation of the disposed assets are removed, and any resulting gain or loss is credited or charged to operations. Donated services The Chamber's accounting policy for donated materials and equipment is to record these items as contributions at their estimated fair market value at the date they are received. Numerous hours of volunteer services were performed on behalf of the Chamber during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009 in support of its special events. Since these services do not meet the criteria specified in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 116, Accounting for Contributions Received and Contributions Made, for recognizing a monetary value of these services, no such value has been assigned to these services in the Chamber's financial statements. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009, use of the facility for the Chamber's Monte Carlo event, having an estimated value of $2,500, was donated. This donation is included as a component of in- kind service revenue in the Statement of Activities. Cash and cash equivalents The Chamber considers cash on hand and investments with maturity dates of three months or less at the date of investment to be cash and cash equivalents. Board Designated cash The Chamber has designated funds in case an economic uncertainty occurs. As of September 30, 2009, the Chamber had approximately $147,000 in cash on hand restricted for such use. At September 30, 2009, $100,000 was held in a short-term certificate of deposit. WM Concentration ofrisk The Chamber maintains its cash in various accounts at several financial institutions. At various times during the year, the amount on deposit with a single financial institution may exceed federal depository insurance limits. At September 30, 2009, the Chamber did not maintain any cash in excess of such limits Management does not believe that this represents a significant risk to the Chamber. Use of estimates The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Accordingly, actual results may differ from those estimates. The collectibility of accounts receivable and estimated lives and depreciation methods for building and equipment are based on management estimates. Management reviews its estimates on an annual basis and, where necessary, makes adjustments prospectively. Fair Value Measurements On January 1, 2008, the Chamber adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 157, Fair Value Measurements, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value under generally accepted accounting principles and enhances disclosures about fair value measurements. The fair values of the Company's cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate their carrying values due to the relatively short periods to maturity of these instruments. Income taxes The Chamber is a non-profit public benefit corporation organized under the laws of California and, as such, is recognized as exempt from federal and state income taxes under Section 501(c)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code and corresponding state statutes, except for taxes on unrelated business income. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2008 the organization had unrelated business income of approximately $10,500, and paid $3,375 in federal and state unrelated business income taxes during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009. No provision for income taxes has been provided for in the September 30, 2009 financial statements, as the organization does not believe the amount, if any, to be significant. —3— NOTE 3 — LAND, BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT: Land, building and equipment as of September 30, 2009 consisted of the following: Land $ 220,000 Building and improvements 998,465 Office furniture and equipment 122,692 Vehicle 15,000 2014 1,356,157 Less: accumulated depreciation (310,390) During September 2009, the Chamber wrote off $60,989 in fully depreciated equipment which was no longer being utilized by the organization. Depreciation expense was $40,874 for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009. NOTE 4 — NOTE PAYABLE: During February 2005, the Chamber entered into a credit agreement with a financial institution to refinance the mortgage of approximately $818,000 on its existing office building. The credit agreement bears interest at 6 percent and is payable through March 2, 2015. The credit agreement does not contain any restrictive debt covenants. Principal payments due on the loan for the next five years are: Fiscal year ending September 30, Amount 2010 $ 19,029 2011 20,220 2012 21,364 2013 22,821 2014 24,578 Thereafter 639,206 747 218 Interest expense was $46,226 for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009. —4— NOTE 5 – TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED NET ASSETS: Temporarily restricted net assets are based upon future events and lapse when the events are completed. As of September 30, 2009, the Chamber has received funds for the following special events which have not yet been held: Legislative Summit $17,990 Business Expo 7,990 Woman in Business 6,275 Other special events 1,845 NOTE 6 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS: The organization and its directors have financial transactions among each other through the sponsorship of special events or the donation of funds. Management believes that these transactions are on commercial terms which approximate an arms -length transaction. NOTE 7 — COMMITMENTS: There were no significant legal proceedings against the Chamber with respect to matters arising in the ordinary course of business. In the opinion of management, no material liability exists with respect to outstanding matters. NOTE 8 — EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT PLAN: The Chamber maintains a defined contribution retirement plan conforming to the provisions of Section 401(k) of the Internal Revenue Code for its eligible employees. Such employees become eligible to participate in the Plan after 90 days of service with the Chamber. Effective August 1, 2009, the Chamber discontinued matching employee contributions to the plan. Prior to August 1, 2009, the Chamber matched employee contributions to a maximum of three percent of each employee's eligible compensation, as defined in the Plan, and could also make discretionary contributions. Employee contributions are fully vested at all times. Employer matching and discretionary contributions vest ratably over a five-year period. If an employee terminates employment prior to age 65, the distribution from employer matching and discretionary accounts is limited to the vested portion based upon years of eligible service. The Chamber's matching contributions were $7,172 for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009. NOTE 9 – SUBSEQUENT EVENT During June 2007, the Chamber entered in an agreement to lease a portion of its building to the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau ("TVCVB"). The lease required TVCVB to occupy the space commencing August 2007. The lease requires monthly payments ranging from $3,860 to $4,175 through July 31, 2010. –5– NOTE 9 — SUBSEQUENT EVENT: (Continued) As of September 30, 2009, the Chamber has been informed by the TVCVB that the TVCVB will not be renewing its lease and will relocate. Management believes, that given the current economic environment, it will not be able to lease the space at its current lease rate. , -c CERTIFICATE OF LIABILITY INSURANCE `'� DDIYYYYI 7/E15 /2010 7/15/2010 PRODUCER (949) 472-6560 FAX: (949) 588-8348 THIS CERTIFICATE IS ISSUED AS A MATTER OF INFORMATION California Southwestern Insurance License Number 0443354 ONLY AND CONFERS NO RIGHTS UPON THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. THIS CERTIFICATE DOES NOT AMEND, EXTEND OR ALTER THE COVERAGE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES BELOW, 21 Orchard POLICY EFFECTIVE DATE MMIDD/Y1'YY Lake Forest CA 92630 INSURERS AFFORDING COVERAGE NAIC # INSURED INSURER A: Philadelphia Insurance Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce INSURER B: 26790 Ynez Court INSURER C: INSURER D: A Temecul CA 92591 INSURER E: THE POLICIES OF INSURANCE LISTED BELOW HAVE BEEN ISSUED TO THE INSURED NAMED ABOVE FOR THE POLICY PERIOD INDICATED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY REQUIREMENT, TERM OR CONDITION OF ANY CONTRACT OR OTHER DOCUMENT WITH RESPECT TO WHICH THIS CERTIFICATE MAY BE ISSUED OR MAY PERTAIN, THE INSURANCE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES DESCRIBED HEREIN IS SUBJECT TO ALL THE TERMS, EXCLUSIONS AND CONDITIONS OF SUCH POLICIES. AGGREGATE LIMITS SHOWN MAY HAVE BEEN REDUCED BY PAID CLAIMS. IR LT LTR DD' NSRE TYPE OF INSURANCE POLICY NUMBER POLICY EFFECTIVE DATE MMIDD/Y1'YY POLICY EXPIRATION DATE MMIDD/YYYY LIMITS GENERAL LIABILITY EACH OCCURRENCE $ 1,0( ;0 00 01 A % COMMERCIAL GENERAL LABILITY CLAIMS MADE 1x] OCCUR PHPK510257 1/21/2010 1/21/2011 PREMISES Ea occurrence $ 100,000 MED EXP (Any one person) It 5,000 PERSONAL & ADV INJURY S OO , 000 GENERAL AGGREGATE $ 2,000,0001 GENT AGGREGATE LIMIT APPLIES PER: PRODUCTS - COMP/OP AGG $ 2,000,000 POLICY PRO LOC JECT AUTOMOBILE LIABILITY ANY AUTO COMBINED SINGLE LIMIT (Ea accident) $ BODILY INJURY $ (Per person) ALL OWNED AUTOS SCHEDULED AUTOS BODILY INJURY (Per accidern) $ HIRED AUTOS NON -OWNED AUTOS PROPERTY DAMAGE $ (Per accident) GARAGELIABILITY AUTO ONLY - EA ACCIDENT $ OTHER THAN EA ACC $ ANY AUTO AUTO ONLY: AGG $ EXCESS/ UMBRELLA LIABILITY EACH OCCURRENCE $ AGGREGATE $ OCCUR r7 CLAIMS MADE $ DEDUCTIBLE $ RETENTION $ WORKERS COMPENSATION VJC STATU- OTH- AND EMPLOYERS'LIABILITY YIN TORY LIMITS ER E.L. EACH ACCIDENT g ANY PROPRIETORRARTNERIEItECUTIVE F7OFFICER/MEMBER EXCLUDED? E . DISEASE- EA EMPLOY $ (Mandatory in NH) It yes, dewdbe under SPECIAL PROVISIONS below E.L. DISEASE - POLICY LIMIT $ OTHER LI I DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS / LOCATIONS I VEHICLES I EXCLUSIONS ADDED BY ENDORSEMENT /SPECIAL PROVISIONS. Certificate holder is named as additional insured with respect to general liability. *Except: 10 day notice of cancellation for non payment of premium kathi. Byers@c£te: City of Temecula and Redevelopment Agency 43200 Business Park Drive WOO Temecula, CA 92590 (7o A//Y�( O ACORD 25 (2009101) SHOULD ANY OF THEABOVE DESCRIBED POLICIES BE CANCELLED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION DATE THEREOF, THE ISSUING INSURER WILL ENDEAVOR TO MAIL `Y30 DAYS WRITTEN NOTICE TO THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER NAMED TO THE LEFT, BUT FAILURE TO DO SO SHALL IMPOSE NO OBLIGATION OR LIABILITY OF ANY KIND UPON THE INSURER, ITS AGENTS OR REPRESENTATIVE McCloskey, McCloskey, CI SR/JLM �U/1�'r"`''',r_ ✓t ©1988-2009 ACORD CORPORATION. All rights reserved. RNJULO (030901) The ACORD name and logo are registered marks of ACORD �Rv CERTIFICATE OF LIABILITY INSURANCE OPID ECDATE(MM/DD/YYYY) 0 /1, /10 THIS CERTIFICATE IS ISSUED AS A MATTER OF INFORMATION ONLY AND CONFERS NO RIGHTS UPON THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. THIS7 CERTIFICATE DOES NOT AFFIRMATIVELY OR NEGATIVELY AMEND, EXTEND OR ALTER THE COVERAGE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES BELOW. THIS CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE A CONTRACT BETWEEN THE ISSUING INSURER(S), AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE OR PRODUCER, AND THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. IMPORTANT: If the certificate holder is an ADDITIONAL INSURED, the policy(ies) must be endorsed. If SUBROGATION IS WAIVED, subject to the terns and conditions of the policy, certain policies may require an endorsement. A statement on this certificate does not confer rights to the Certificate holder in lieu of such endomement(s). PRODUCER NAMEPRUN: Sawyer Cook Insurance 1200 California St., Ste 260 Redlands CA 92374 Phone:909-435-0230 Fax:909-798-7971 AIC, No, Ext): ADDRESS: CUSTOMERID p: TEMECIO INSURER(S) AFFORDING COVERAGE NAIC# INSURED Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce INSURER A: Southern Insurance Com any INSURER B: Laura Turnbow 26790 Ynez Ct Temecula CA 92591 INSURERC: INSURER D: INSURER E; INSURER F; THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT THE POLICIES OF INSURANCE LISTED BELOW HAVE BEEN ISSUED TO THE INSURED NAMED ABOVE FOR THE POLICY PERIOD INDICATED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY REQUIREMENT, TERM OR CONDITION OF ANY CONTRACT OR OTHER DOCUMENT WITH RESPECT TO WHICH THIS CERTIFICATE MAY BE ISSUED OR MAY PERTAIN, THE INSURANCE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES DESCRIBED HEREIN IS SUBJECT TO ALL THE TERMS, EXCLUSIONS AND CONDITIONS OF SUCH POLICIES. LIMITS SHOWN MAY HAVE BEEN REDUCED BY PAID CLAIMS. LTR TYPE OF INSURANCE - PIER WVD POLICYNUMBER (MM/DOIYYYY) (MMIODIYYYY) LIMITS GENERALLIABILITY EACH OCCURRENCE $ COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY CLAIMS -MADE ❑ OCCUR PREMISES (Ea occurrence) $ MED EXP (Any one person) $ PERSONAL S ADV INJURY $ GENERAL AGGREGATE $ GEN'L AGGREGATE LIMIT APPLIES PER PRODUCTS - COMP/OP AGO $ POLICY JEa LOC b AUTOMOBILE LIABILITY COMBINED SINGLE LIMIT ANY AUTO (Ea accident) $ BODILY INJURY (Per person) $ ALL OWNED AUTOS BODILY INJURY (Per accident) $ SCHEDULEDAUTOS PROPERTY DAMAGE $ HIRED AUTOS (Per accident) NON-OWNEDAUTOS It $ UMBRELLA LIAB OCCUR EACH OCCURRENCE S EXCESS LIAB CLAIMS -MADE AGGREGATE g DEDUCTIBLE $ RETENTION $ $ A WORKERSCOMPENSATION AND EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY WBIO 345980 11/21/09 11/2]/10 }{ - TORY LIMITS ER YIN E.L. EACH ACCIDENT $ 1000000 ANY PROPRIETORIRIEXECUTIV OFFICER/MEMBER EXCLUDED? � /A (Mandatory In NH) If yes, describe under E.L. DISEASE-EAEMPLOYEE $1000000 POLICY LIMIT 1 $1000000 DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS below I DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS I LOCATIONS I VEHICLES (Attach ACORD 101, Additional Remarks Schedule, If more space is required) *except l0days notice for cancellation for non payment of premium. CER I IPIWA I G HOLUCK CANCELLATION City of Temecula Po box 9033 Temecula CA 92589 SHOULD ANY OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED POLICIES BE CANCELLED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION DATE THEREOF, NOTICE WILL BE DELIVERED IN e //a ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICY PROVISIONS, AUTHORIZFD RFPRFSFNTGTIVc rca.vrxu AD tzuunma) I no ACORD name and logo are registered marks of ACORD JUN -20-2010 06:14 From: To:6946499 Paae:2�5 Commercial Certificate of Insurance Agency • Craig Davis Name. . 28900 OLD TWN FRNT S'1' Nl U4 & • Temecula, CA 92590-2856 Address • 951.699-1776 St. 99 Dist. 87 Agent 393 Insured . TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMBER Name , OF COMMERCE & . 26790 YNEZ CT 11 A Address • TEMECULA, CA 92591 .coves Issue Date (MM/DD/YY) 07/20/2010 This certificate is issued as a matter of informatlon only and confers no rights upon the certificate holder. This f.ertillcate does not amend• extend or alter the coverage afforded by the policies shown below. Companies Providing Coverage Company A 'l.'rudc hiuvrusce Exehan�,c IAELb Company B Farmers insurance Exchange Lyles Company C Mid.Century Lcner Insurance Company Company D Lytes' Coverages This is to certify that the policies of insurance listed below have been issued to the Insured nwried above for the policy period indicated. Notwithstanding any requirement, term or condition of any contract or other document with respect to which this certificate may be issued or may pertain, the insurance afforded by the policies described herein is subject to all the terms, exclusions and condiLiuns of such policies. Limits shown may have been reduced by paid claims, Co.I Type of Tnsirance I.rr. General Liability Commercial General I.lahlllty - Occurrence Version Contractual - Incidental Only Owners & Contractors Prot. Automobile Liability All Owned Commercial Autos Scheduled Autos Hired Autos Non -Owned Autus Garage Liability Umbrella Liability Workers' Compensation and Employers' Liability Description of Operations/Vehicles/RCstrictioris/Special items: Vehicle(s): 2004 FORD FR EEt+SPAR 2FMZA50964BA56038 Endorsement- (IF APPLICABLE, WILL BE DELIVERED WITH POLICY). Polis Number Policy Effective Policy Expleadon y I)a I Date (mmtuljivyl I Policy Litters 602379922 1 05/06/2010 Certificate Holder CITY OF TEMECULA Name & PO BOX 9033 Address TEMECULA, CA 92589 na 2492 a na Cancellation Should any of the ahovo described polities be cancelled before the expiration date thereof, the issuing company will endeavor to mall 3U days written notice to the cerdlicate n1 to the left, bul failure to mall such notice shall Impose mu oblig or li tlity u any kind n e company, its agents or representatives. OF Copy Distribution: Service Center Copy and Agent's Copy H-ul Central Aggregate $ Products-Comp/OPS Aggregate g Personal & Advertising Injury $ Each Occurrence $ Fire Damage (Any one fire..) $ Medical Expense ny one person) Combined Single Limit $ 05/06/2011 $1,000,000 Bodily Ii ury (Perpersuni $ Bodily Injury $ (Per aeddenr) Property Damage $ 1,1.100,900 Garage Aggregate $ Limit Statutory $ I+ash Accident $ Disease - Each Employee $ Disease - Policy Limit Cancellation Should any of the ahovo described polities be cancelled before the expiration date thereof, the issuing company will endeavor to mall 3U days written notice to the cerdlicate n1 to the left, bul failure to mall such notice shall Impose mu oblig or li tlity u any kind n e company, its agents or representatives. OF Copy Distribution: Service Center Copy and Agent's Copy H-ul JUN -20-2010 06:15 From: POLICY NUMBER: 602379922 To:6946499 Pase:3/5 COMMERCIAL AUTO CA 20 48 02 99 THIS ENDORSEMENT CHANGES THE POLICY. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. DESIGNATED INSURED This endorsement modifies insurance provid7ur the following: BUSINESS AUTO COVERAGE FORM GARAGE COVERAGE FORM MOTOR CARRIER COVERAGE FORM TRUCKERS COVERAGE FORM With respect to coverage provided by this endorsement, the provisions of the Coverage Form apply unless modified by this endorsement. This endorsement identifies person(s) or organization(s) who are "insureds" under the Who Is An Insured Provi. sion of the Coverage Form. This endorsement does not alter coverage provided in the Coverage Form. This endorsement changes the policy effective on the inception date of the policy unless another date is indi- cated below. Endorsement Effective: Countersigned By - y �-� 05106/2010 2010 v Name Named Insured: TEMECULA VALLEY CHAMRFR OP COMMERCE �,�� Authorized le resentative SCHEDI u c Name of Persons) or Organlzation(s): CITY OF TEMECULA (If no entry appears above, information required to complete this endorsement will be shown in the Declarations as applicable to the endorsement.) Each person or organization shown in the Schedule is an "insured" for Liability Coverage, but only to the extent that person or organization qualifies as an "insured" under the Who Is An Insured Provision contained in Section 11 of the Coverage Form. rl�od�lZo(t& CA 20 48 02 99 Copyright, insurance Services Office, Inc., 1998 Page 1 of 1 13 JUN -20-2010 06:15 From: To:6946499 Pa9e:4/5 Commercial Certificate of :Insurance Agency • Craig Davis Name . 28900 OLD TWN FRNT ST #104 & • Temecula, CA 92590.2856 Address • 951-699-1776 St. 99 Dist. 87 Agent 393 Insured $ Personal &. . TEMECUi.A VALLEY CHAMBER Name OF COMMERCE & 26790 YNEZ C'I' 4 A Address TEMF.CLJ LA, CA 92591 Issue Date (MM/DD/YY) 07/20/2010 This certificate is issued as a matter of information only and confem no rights upon the Certificate holder. This certificate does not amend, extend or alter the coverage alfurded by the policles shown below - Companies Providing Coverage: Company A Tmck lnsurancc C:xchangc Lento company B Farmers Insurance Exchange Letter Company C Mid-Cenrury Insurance Company IAfu co,n,wq D Lever Coverages This is to cei Lify that the policies of Insurance listed below have been issued to the insured named above for the policy period indicated. Notwithstanding any requirement, term or condition of any contract ur other document wick respect to which this cerLlacate may be issued or may pertain, the insurance afforded by the policies described herein is subject to all the terns, exclusions and conditions of such policies. Limits shown may have buen reduced by paid claims. Co. Ltr. Iype of Insurance Getteral Liability Commercial General Liability - Occurrence Version Contractual - incidental Only Owners Ni. Cnnrractors I B Automobile Liability All Owned Commercial Autos X Scheduled Autos K Hired Autos X Nol-Owned Autos Carage Liability Umbrella Liability PolicyNumber Policy Effective Policy Expiration pulse Limits DutC (MRNr)ll/YY) Date (mmmrvyv) Y 602379922 1 05/06/2010 1 05/06/2011 Workers' Compensation and Fmployers' Liability Description of OperationsNehlclos/12estrictions/Specl<'tl items: Vchicic(s): 2004 FORD FREESTAR 2FMZA50964BA56038 Endorsement - (117 APPLICABLE, WILL BF. DRLI V L+RED WITH POLICY). Certificate Holder . CITY OF TEMECULA AND Name . REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY�rqA`O & • PO BOX 9033 61 Address • TEMECULA, CA 925$9 CeneralAggregate I $ Products-Coup/OPS Aggregate. $ Personal &. Advertising Injury $1,000,000 Each Occurrence g Fire Damage $ (Any one tire) $ tiny one persona $ ConibLtod Single Limit $1,000,000 Bodily Injury (Per person) $ Bodily injury (Per accident) $ Property Damage $ 1,000,000 Garagc Apgrcgatc $ $ Limit Statutory Each Accident $ Disease - Each Fri,16yix $ Disease - PulicyLimir $ Cancellation Should any of the above described policies be cancelled before the expiration date thereof, the issum nrnpany will endeavor to mail 30 days written notice to the certificate I r owded M the left, b a re to mail such nutice shall Impose no obligati orllablll of any kinds t cons ry,its agents urrepresentatives, As --Z402 494 Copy Distribution: Service Center Copy and Agent's Copy H -01 JUN -20-2010 06:15 From: POLICY NUMBER: 602379922 To:6946499 Pa9e:5/5 COMMERCIAL AUTO CA 20 48 02 99 THIS ENDORSEMENT CHANGES THE POLICY, PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. DESIGNATED INSURED This endorsement modifies insurance provided under the following: BUSINESS AUTO COVERAGE FORM GARAGE COVERAGE FORM MOTOR CARRIER COVERAGE FORM TRUCKERS COVERAGE FORM With respect to coverage provided by this endorsement, the provisions of the Coverage Form apply unless modified by this endorsement. This endorsement identifies person(s) or organization(s) who are "insureds" under the Who Is An Insured Provi- sion of the Coverage Form. This endorsement does not alter coverage provided in the Coverage Form. This endorsement changes the policy effective on the inception date of the policy unless another date is indi- cated below. Endorsement Effective: Countersi 05/06/2010 Named Insured: TEML'CULA VAI,I.EY CLAMBER O.F COMMERCE. �� Au rfM$ ized Representative) SCHEDULE Name of Person(s) or Organization(s): CITY OF TEMECULA AND REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY (If no entry appears above, information required to complete this endorsement will be shown in the Declarations as applicable to the endorsement.) Each person or organization shown in the Schedule is an "insured" for Liability Coverage, but only to the extent that person or organization qualifies as an "insured" under the Who Is An Insured Provision contained in Section 11 of the Coverage Form. CA 20 48 02 99 Copyright, Insurance Services Office, Inc., 1998 Page 1 of 1 ❑ Item No. 8 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Grant Yates, Deputy City Manager DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Approval of the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau FY2010-11 Tourism Rack Brochure/Map PREPARED BY: Gloria Wolnick, Economic Development Specialist II RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council approve the funding in the amount of $40,000 to the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau (TVCVB) for publication and distribution of the Temecula Valley Tourism Rack Brochure/Map. BACKGROUND: Temecula is an attractive tourism destination offering a host of appealing events, activities and attractions which is located with close proximity to Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange County. In order to entice visitors to expand their trip to include Temecula in their day trip or vacation plans, the tourism rack brochure/map was created. Rack brochures is one of the most widely -used source of information for trip planning. They are used by a broad cross-section of travelers, even those who access the internet via WiFi. They are also very effective notjust for information, but to change travel plans and result in new reservations. The Economic Development Subcommittee of the City Council (Mayor Pro Tem Roberts and Council Member Washington) and staff met to discuss the Economic Development funding requests on January 6, 2010. The subcommittee has recommended approval of $40,000 for the Temecula Valley Tourism Rack Brochure/Map and its distribution. The City Council approved this funding in the FY2010/11 Operating Budget. The TVCVB also receives funds from the Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District. The Temecula Valley Tourism Business Improvement District (TVTBID) for FY2010-2011 is currently in place and is separate from the City of Temecula Economic Development proposed funding for FY2010-2011. The TVTBID is a separate lodging district ordinance that focuses on hotel -specific goals of increasing occupancy through multi -market segments. The publication and distribution of the Temecula Valley Tourism Rack Brochure/Map is currently designed for a very specific drive market; primarily for the leisure traveler who already has their vacation plans scheduled, but might be looking for day trip activities to add to their itinerary. This brochure/map is not designed to generate overnight stays for this immediate traveler, but may plant the seed for future overnight stays. The day-tripper (known as the leisure traveler who dines, shops, plays golf, etc.) still plays a vital and important role for Temecula's economy. The beautifully designed rack brochure provides information on Old Town, Wine Country, Pechanga, local hotels and accommodations, recreation, shopping, city facilities, activities and events. In addition, this publications helps drive business to the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitor's Bureau, Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association and City of Temecula websites. The tourism rack brochure/map serves many purposes. The principle use has been in the rack distribution service primarily in hotel lobbies and airports in the surrounding areas including Los Angeles, San Diego, Orange County, and Palm Springs. The rack distribution service coverage also includes some corporate settings in areas as Phoenix - AZ, San Diego and Orange Countywhich is very limited and only consists of approximately 10% of the distribution locations. These areas are key drive markets for Temecula. The tourism rack brochure/map is distributed by the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau, Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce, City of Temecula and is distributed at trade shows. It is also included in the City's business kit. The TVCVB plans to produce 200,000 rack brochures/maps. The Temecula Valley Tourism Rack Brochure/Map has proven to be an effective marketing piece for the leisure traveler, who is already coming to our surrounding regions, and it continues to produce a sound return on investment. FISCAL IMPACT: Adequate funds for the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau Tourism Rack Brochure/Map have been included in the FY2010-11 Operating Budget (Economic Development line item, account #001-11-999-5264) for the recommended amount of $40,000. Describe the fiscal impact here. ATTACHMENTS: A. FY2010 — 11 City/TVCVB Agreement B. 2009 Marketing and Community Relations Highlights MARKETING AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE CITY OF TEMECULA AND TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU This Agreement is made and effective as of this 27th day of July. 2010 , by and between the CITY OF TEMECULA ("City"), and TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU ("TVCVB"), a California nonprofit corporation. In consideration of the mutual covenants, conditions and undertakings set forth herein, the parties agree as follows: 1. RECITALS. This Agreement is made with respect to the following facts and purposes which each of the parties acknowledge and agree are true and correct: A. The City is desirous of promoting its advantages as a business, industrial, tourist and resident center; disseminating information relative thereto, and of properly following up and giving consideration to inquiries made relative to the various activities of City of Temecula ("City) and its possibilities as such to residential, industrial, tourist and business interests. B. The TVCVB has special knowledge, experience and facilities for disseminating tourist information; and is organized for and equipped to carry on promotional activities on behalf of City; and to publicize and exploit its tourism advantages. C. Such tourism activities are recognized by law as being in the public interest and serving public purpose. 2. TERM. This Agreement shall commence on July 27, 2010, and shall remain and continue in effect until tasks described herein are completed, but in no event later than June 30, 2011, unless sooner terminated pursuant to the provisions of this Agreement. 3. SERVICES. TVCVB shall perform the services described and set forth in Exhibit A, attached hereto and incorporated herein as though set forth in full. TVCVB shall complete the services according to the schedule of performance which is also set forth in Exhibit A. 4. PERFORMANCE. TVCVB shall at all time faithfully, competently and to the best of his or her ability, experience, and talent, perform all services described herein. TVCVB shall employ, at a minimum, generally accepted standards and practices utilized by persons engaged in providing similar services as are required of TVCVB hereunder in meeting its obligations under this Agreement. 5. PAYMENT. a. The City agrees to pay TVCVB in two equal payments, in accordance with the payment rate and term and the schedule of payment as set forth in Exhibit B, Payment Rates and Schedule, attached hereto and incorporated herein by this reference as though set forth in full, based upon actual time spend on the services. Any terms in Exhibit B other than the payment rate and schedule of payment are null and void. This amount shall not exceed Forty Thousand Dollars and No Cents ($40,000) for the total term of the Agreement unless additional payment is approved as provided in this Agreement. b. TVCVB shall not be compensated for any services rendered in connection with its performance of this Agreement which are in addition to those set forth herein, unless such additional services are authorized in advance and in writing by the City Manager. TVCVB shall be compensated for any additional services in the amounts and in the manner as agreed to by City Manager and TVCVB at the time City's written authorization is given to TVCVB for the performance of said services. In the event the City should desire any additional service, TVCVB shall, upon request of City, furnish a proposal including an itemized statement of the estimated cost thereof, and the City may modify or alter the proposal in its sole discretion or may direct the submission of a new proposal which may be accepted, altered or rejected. Upon the final approval of any such proposal and execution thereof, by the City and the TVCVB, as herein provided, the City will pay to TVCVB the cost thereof, and the TVCVB shall perform the work. All money due for carrying out said plan or proposal shall be supported by a detailed statement of TVCVB showing the basis of said claims, and certified by proper officers of TVCVB. TVCB shall not be entitled to receive any compensation for the normal services or expenses. C. TVCVB will submit two separate invoices for actual services performed. Payment shall be made within thirty (30) days of receipt of the invoice. 6. SUSPENSION OR TERMINATION OF AGREEMENT WITHOUT CAUSE. a. The City may at any time, for any reason, with or without cause, suspend or terminate this Agreement, or any portion hereof, by serving upon the consultant at least ten (10) days prior written notice. Upon receipt of said notice, the TVCVB shall immediately cease all work under this Agreement, unless the notice provides otherwise. If the City suspends or terminates a portion of this Agreement such suspension or termination shall not make void or invalidate the remainder of this Agreement. b. In the event this Agreement is terminated pursuant to this Section, the City shall pay to TVCVB the actual services performed up to the time of termination, provided that the work performed is of value to the City. Upon termination of the Agreement pursuant to this Section, the TVCVB will submit an invoice to the City pursuant to Section 5. 7. DEFAULT OF CONSULTANT. a. The TVCVB's failure to comply with the provisions of this Agreement shall constitute a default. In the event that TVCVB is in default for cause under the terms of this Agreement, City shall have no obligation or duty to continue compensating TVCVB for any service performed after the date of default and can terminate this Agreement immediately by written notice to the TVCVB. If such failure by the TVCVB to make progress in the performance of service hereunder arises out of causes beyond the TVCVB's control, and without fault or negligence of the TVCVB, it shall not be considered a default. b. If the City Manager or his delegate determines that the TVCVB is in default in the performance of any of the terms or conditions of this Agreement, it shall serve the TVCVB with written notice of the default. The TVCVB shall have (10) days after service upon it of said notice in which to cure the default by rendering a satisfactory performance. In the event that the TVCVB fails to cure its default within such period of time, the City shall have the right, notwithstanding any other provision of this Agreement, to terminate this Agreement without further notice and without prejudice to any other remedy to which it may be entitled at law, in equity or under this Agreement. 8. OWNERSHIP OF DOCUMENTS. a. TVCVB shall maintain complete and accurate records with respect to sales, costs, expenses, receipts and other such information required by City that relate to the performance of services under this Agreement. TVCVB shall maintain adequate records of services provided in sufficient detail to permit an evaluation of services. All such records shall be maintained in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and shall be clearly identified and readily accessible. TVCVB shall provide free access to the representatives of City or its designees at reasonable times to such books and records, shall give City the right to examine and audit said books and records, shall permit City to make transcripts there from as necessary, and shall allow inspection of all work, data, documents, proceedings and activities related to this Agreement. Such records, together with supporting documents, shall be maintained for a period of three (3) years after receipt of final payment. b. Upon completion of, or in the event of termination or suspension of this Agreement, all original documents, designs, drawings, maps, models, computer files containing data generated for the work, surveys, notes, and other documents prepared in the course of providing the services to be performed pursuant to this Agreement shall become the sole property of the City and may be used, reused or otherwise disposed of by the City without the permission of the TVCVB. With respect to computer files containing data generated for the work, TVCVB shall make available to the City, upon reasonable written request by the City, the necessary computer software and hardware for purposes of accessing, compiling, transferring and printing computer files. 9. INDEMNIFICATION. The TVCVB agrees to defend, indemnify, protect and hold harmless the City, District, and/or Agency, its officers, officials, employees and volunteers from and against any and all claims, demands, losses, defense costs or expenses, including attorney fees and expert witness fees, or liability of any kind or nature which the City, District and/or Agency, its officers, agents, employees or volunteers may sustain or incur or which may be imposed upon them for injury to or death of persons, or damage to property arising out of TVCVB's negligent or wrongful acts or omissions arising out of or in any way related to the performance or non-performance of this Agreement, excepting only liability arising out of the negligence of the City. 10. INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS. TVCVB shall procure and maintain for the duration of the contract insurance against claims for injuries to persons or damages to property, which may arise from or in connection with the performance of the work hereunder by the TVCVB, its agents, representatives, or employees. a. Minimum Scope of Insurance. Coverage shall be at least as broad as: 1) Insurance Services Office Commercial General Liability form No. CG 00 01 11 85 or 88. 2) Insurance Services Office Business Auto Coverage form CA 00 01 06 92 covering Automobile Liability, code 1 (any auto). If the TVCVB owns no automobiles, a non -owned auto endorsement to the General Liability policy described above is acceptable. 3) Worker's Compensation insurance as required by the State of California and Employer's Liability Insurance. If the TVCVB has no employees while performing under this Agreement, worker's compensation insurance is not required, but TVCVB shall execute a declaration that it has no employees. b. Minimum Limits of Insurance. TVCVB shall maintain limits no less than: 1) General Liability: One injury, personal injury and property damage. other form with a general aggregate limit is used separately to this project/location or the genera occurrence limit. 2) Automobile Liability: bodily injury and property damage. million ($1,000,000) per occurrence for bodily If Commercial General Liability Insurance or either the general aggregate limit shall apply l aggregate limit shall be twice the required One million ($1,000,000) per accident for 3) Worker's Compensation as required by the State of California; Employer's Liability: One million dollars ($1,000,000) per accident for bodily injury or disease. c. Deductibles and Self -Insured Retentions. Any deductibles or self-insured retentions must be declared to and approved by the City Manager. At the option of the City Manager, either the insurer shall reduce or eliminate such deductibles or self-insured retentions as respects the City, its officers, officials, employees and volunteers; or the TVCVB shall procure a bond guaranteeing payment of losses and related investigations, claim administration and defense expenses. d. Other Insurance Provisions. The general liability and automobile liability policies are to contain, or be endorsed to contain, the following provisions: 1) The City, its officers, officials, employees and volunteers are to be covered as insured's as respects: liability arising out of activities performed by or on behalf of the TVCVB; products and completed operations of the TVCVB; premises owned, occupied or used by the TVCVB; or automobiles owned, leased, hired or borrowed by the TVCVB. The coverage shall contain no special limitations on the scope of protection afforded to the City, its officers, officials, employees or volunteers. 2) For any claims related to this project, the TVCVB's insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the City, its officers, officials, employees and volunteers. Any insurance or self-insured maintained by the City, its officers, officials, employees or volunteers shall be excess of the TVCVB's insurance and shall not contribute with it. 3) Any failure to comply with reporting or other provisions of the policies including breaches of warranties shall not affect coverage provided to the City, its officers, officials, employees or volunteers. 4) The TVCVB's insurance shall apply separately to each insured against whom claim is made or suit is brought, except with respect to the limits of the insurer's liability. 5) Each insurance policy required by this agreement shall be endorsed to state: should the policy be canceled before the expiration date the issuing insurer will endeavor to mail thirty (30) days' prior written notice to the City. 6) If insurance coverage is canceled or, reduced in coverage or in limits the TVCVB shall within two (2) business days of notice from insurer phone, fax, and/or notify the City via certified mail, return receipt requested of the changes to or cancellation of the policy. e. Acceptability of Insurers. Insurance is to be placed with insurers with a current A.M. Best's rating of no less than A:VII, unless otherwise acceptable to the City. Self insurance shall not be considered to comply with these insurance requirements. f. Verification of Coverage. TVCVB shall furnish the City with original endorsements effecting coverage required by this clause. The endorsements are to be signed by a person authorized by that insurer to bind coverage on its behalf. The endorsements are to be on forms provided by the City. All endorsements are to be received and approved by the City before work commences. As an alternative to the City's forms, the TVCVB's insurer may provide complete, certified copies of all required insurance policies, including endorsements effecting the coverage required by these specifications. 11. INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR. a. TVCVB is and shall at all times remain as to the City a wholly independent contractor. The personnel performing the services under this Agreement on behalf of TVCVB shall at all times be under TVCVB's exclusive direction and control. Neither City nor any of its officers, employees, agents, or volunteers shall have control over the conduct of TVCVB or any of TVCVB's officers, employees, or agents except as set forth in this Agreement. TVCVB shall not at any time or in any manner represent that it or any of its officers, employees or agents are in any manner officers, employees or agents of the City. TVCVB shall not incur or have the power to incur any debt, obligation or liability whatever against City, or bind City in any manner. b. No employee benefits shall be available to TVCVB in connection with the performance of this Agreement. Except for the fees paid to TVCVB as provided in the Agreement, City shall not pay salaries, wages, or other compensation to TVCVB for performing services hereunder for City. City shall not be liable for compensation or indemnification to TVCVB for injury or sickness arising out of performing services hereunder. 12. LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES. The TVCVB shall keep itself informed of all local, State and Federal ordinances, laws and regulations which in any manner affect those employed by it or in any way affect the performance of its service pursuant to this Agreement. The TVCVB shall at all times observe and comply with all such ordinances, laws and regulations. The City, and its officers and employees, shall not be liable at law or in equity occasioned by failure of the TVCVB to comply with this section. 13. RELEASE OF INFORMATION. a. All information gained by TVCVB in performance of this Agreement shall be considered confidential and shall not be released by TVCVB without City's prior written authorization. TVCVB, its officers, employees, agents or subcontractors, shall not without written authorization from the City Manager or unless requested by the City Attorney, voluntarily provide declarations, letters of support, testimony at depositions, response to interrogatories or other information concerning the work performed under this Agreement or relating to any project or property located within the City. Response to a subpoena or court order shall not be considered "voluntary" provided TVCVB gives City notice of such court order or subpoena. b. TVCVB shall promptly notify City should TVCVB, its officers, employees, agents or subcontractors be served with any summons, complaint, subpoena, notice of deposition, request for documents, interrogatories, request for admissions or other discovery request, court order or subpoena from any party regarding this Agreement and the work performed there under or with respect to any project or property located within the City. City retains the right, but has no obligation, to represent TVCVB and/or be present at any deposition, hearing or similar proceeding. TVCVB agrees to cooperate fully with City and to provide City with the opportunity to review any response to discovery requests provided by TVCVB. However, City's right to review any such response does not imply or mean the right by City to control, direct, or rewrite said response. 14. NOTICES. Any notices which either party may desire to give to the other party under this Agreement must be in writing and may be given either by (1) personal service, (ii) delivery by a reputable document delivery service, such as but not limited to, Federal Express, that provides a receipt showing date and time of delivery, or (iii) mailing in the United States Mail, certified mail, postage prepaid, return receipt requested, addressed to the address of the party as set forth below or at any other address as that party may later designate by Notice. Notice shall be effective upon delivery to the addresses specified below or on the third business day following deposit with the document delivery service or United States Mail as provided above. To City via U.S. Mail: City of Temecula Mailing Address: P.O. Box 9033 Temecula. California 92589-9033 To City via Courier Service: 43200 Business Park Drive Temecula, California 92590 Attention: Grant Yates, Deputy City Manager To Consultant: Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau 26790 Ynez Court, Suite B Temecula, CA 92591 (951) 491-6085 Attention: Kimberly Adams, President/CEO 15. ASSIGNMENT. The TVCVB shall not assign the performance of this Agreement, nor any part thereof, nor any monies due hereunder, without prior written consent of the City. Upon termination of this Agreement, TVCVB's sole compensation shall be payment for actual services performed up to, and including, the date of termination or as may be otherwise agreed to in writing between the City Council and the TVCVB. 16. LICENSES. At all times during the term of this Agreement, TVCVB shall have in full force and effect, all licenses required of it by law for the performance of the services described in this Agreement. 17. GOVERNING LAW. The City and TVCVB understand and agree that the laws of the State of California shall govern the rights, obligations, duties and liabilities of the parties to this Agreement and also govern the interpretation of this Agreement. Any litigation concerning this Agreement shall take place in the municipal, superior, or federal district court with geographic jurisdiction over the City. In the event such litigation is filed by one party against the other to enforce its rights under this Agreement, the prevailing party, as determined by the Court's judgment, shall be entitled to reasonable attorney fees and litigation expenses for the relief granted. 18. PROHIBITED INTEREST. No officer or employee of the City that has participated in the development of this Agreement or its approval shall have any financial interest, direct or indirect, in this Agreement, the proceeds thereof, the TVCVB, or TVCVB's sub- contractors for the work to be performed under this Agreement, during his or her tenure. The TVCVB hereby warrants and represents to the City that no officer or employee of the City of Temecula that has participated in the development of this Agreement or its approval has any interest, whether contractual, non -contractual, financial or otherwise, in this Agreement, the proceeds thereof, the TVCVB, or TVCVB's sub -contractors for the work to be performed under this Agreement. TVCVB further agrees to notify the City in the event that any such interest is discovered whether or not such interest is prohibited by law or this Agreement. 19. ENTIRE AGREEMENT. This Agreement contains the entire understanding between the parties relating to the obligations of the parties described in this Agreement. All prior or contemporaneous agreements, understandings, representations and statements, oral or written, are merged into this Agreement and shall be of no further force or effect. Each party is entering into this Agreement based solely upon the representations set forth herein and upon each party's own independent investigation of any and all facts such party deems material. 20. AUTHORITY TO EXECUTE THIS AGREEMENT. The person or persons executing this Agreement on behalf of TVCVB warrants and represents that he or she has the authority to execute this Agreement on behalf of the TVCVB and has the authority to bind TVCVB to the performance of its obligations hereunder. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed the day and year first above written. CITY OF TEMECULA Jeff Comerchero, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: Peter M. Thorson, City Attorney TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU 26790 Ynez Court, Suite B Temecula, CA 92591 (951) 491-6085 By: Denis Ferguson Chairman of the Board Bv: Name: Kimberly Adams Title: President/CEO Name: Terri Delhamer Title: Secretary Bv: Name: Katherine Bailey Title: Treasurer EXHIBIT "A" SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau (TVCVB) shall undertake, during the 2010-11 fiscal year, to carry on marketing/advertising promotional activities for the Leisure Travel Market on behalf of City and to particularly render the following services: 1. Produce 200,000 tourism rack brochures/maps. The TVCVB shall supply City with rack brochures to include in City's business attraction efforts at no cost to City. 2. Distribute the tourism rack brochure/map through certified rack service in Los Angeles, San Diego, Orange County and Palm Springs and include Corporate markets for Phoenix, AZ, San Diego and Orange County. 3. The President & CEO of the TVCVB shall provide to the Deputy City Manager a copy of the activities monthly report submitted to the TVCVB Board of Directors. Said report is requested by the second Wednesday of each month. 4. This agreement for the $40,000 of economic development funding does not require the TVCVB to provide a financial audit as this requirement is satisfied through their annual financial audit they provide to the City per the current Management Agreement (relating to the BID). SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA��J WINE COUNTRY U Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau 2010- 2011 City Marketing Tourism July 1, 2010 -June 30, 2011 Temecula Tourism Brochure $20,000 Rack Service $20,000 Total Tourism $40,000 For the 2010-2011 Budget Period the Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors will maintain the programs developed by the City of Temecula. Tourism Rack Brochures /rack service Expense $40,000 1. Reprint and design updates for Temecula tourism rack brochures 2. Distribute brochure through rack service in SD, Orange County, LA County and Palm Springs to include Corporate markets for Phoenix, AZ, SD and OC. Total Tourism Marketing. $40,000 2009 Marketing and Community Relations Highlights January 2009 • Held collaborative marketing meetings with Old Town Merchants, Wine Country and the Golf industry • Held Annual TID Advisory Board meeting at City Hall February 2009 • Approval of Tourism Improvement District for 4th year • Held Media FAM Tour for CTTC Japan March 2009 Held 3rd Annual Meeting for Membership/Stakeholders Attended City of Temecula Economic Development Committee meeting for continued City funding, which was approved Met with Ron Roberts regarding County/CVB partnerships April 2009 • Presentation to Pechanga Development Corp. regarding continued marketing & funding opportunities • Attended CTTC Media Event in Los Angeles with Pechanga representative • Created "75o Things to do in Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country" for Temecula's 750th celebration • Initiated destination marketing e -blast campaigns • Outdoor Billboard Marketing on I-97 freeway promoting Lodging, Balloon & Wine Festival and City's 750th celebration May 2009 • Awarded first Hospitality Spotlight Award for exemplary customer service to Joel Reese of Leonesse Cellars • Supported Western Days by providing volunteers to help with visitor information and event directions • Met with County of Riverside regarding funding mechanisms for the Temecula Valley wine region June 2009 • Held Quarterly Membership meeting on Social Media and new web site sneak peak • Participated at Pechanga's Micro Brew Festival distributing information and maps to attendees • Presentations given to meeting planners of Southern California Edison and HelmsBriscoe SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA WINE COUNTRY (-Y Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau July 2009 • Held 2nd of three joint Summer Socials with TVWA • Confirmed exclusive partnership with Pechanga Resort & Casino to Pala Casino's marketing agency • Assisted with creation of new County Wine Country web site August 2009 • Initiated Flickr Photo Contest to capture imagery with new brand elements and style • Supported Temecula Valley Int'l Film & Music Festival by providing regional information at their Media Recp. September 2009 • Along with City of Temecula, presented award to South Coast Winery Resort & Spa for winning the Golden Bear Award for 2009 • Held Sales Panel Discussion for members regarding how to capture meeting planner business • Created new destination CD, in partnership with the City of Temecula October 2009 • Launched new brand web site • Held Quarterly Membership Meeting with focus on getting people "fired up for tourism" • Supported TVWA at the Miramar Air Show November 2009 • Hosted Fall FAM Tour for 60 meeting planners, tour operators and guests • Held Press Panel Discussion for the membership regarding "how to get your story told" • Partnered with City Community Services and Arts & Culture departments regarding 2010 marketing Initiatives and seasonal themed marketing December 2009 Delivered proclamation to City of Temecula for their 20 year anniversary celebration Met with Japanese dignitaries through Temecula Sister City program and distributed destination packets Met with Mt. San Jacinto College and University of Redlands regarding Hospitality and Tourism Education programs 05-27-I O: 04: 03PM; Data. 3/31/2010 Time, 11:32 AN To. TVCVB 0 951.491.60892/ 2 949-472.6568 Pagel Due A ROC v® CERTIFICATE OF LIABILITY INSURANCE 3/20M203.0 3/20/2010 PRODUCER 949..472. 6560, Fax949. 588.8348 THIS CERTIFICATE IS ISSUED AS A MATTER OF INFORMATION California Southwestern Insurance Agency ONLY AND CONFERS NO RIGHTS UPON THE CERTIFICATE License Number 0443354 HOLDER. THIS CERTIFICATE DOES NOT AMEND, EXTEND OR 21 Orchard ALTER THE COVERAGE AFFORDED BV THE POLICIES BELOW. - Lake Forest CA 92630 INSURERS AFFORDING COVERAGE NAIC# INSURED - - INSURER A: Philadelphia insurance Temecula Valley convention and Visitors Bureau INSURERS 26790 Yenz Court INSURER C. INSURER D: COVERAripS THE POLICIES OF INSURANCE LISTED BELOW HAVE BEEN ISSUED TO THE INSURED NAMED ABOVE FOR THE POLICY PERIOD INDICATED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY REQUIREMENT. TERM OR CONDITION OF ANY CONTRACT OR OTHER DOCUMENT WITH RESPECT TO WHICH THIS CERTIFICATE MAY BE ISSUED OR MAY PERTAIN.7HE INSURANCE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES DESCRIBED HEREIN IS SUBJECT TO ALL THE TERMS. EXCLUSIONS AND CONDITIONS OF SUCH POLICIES. AGGREGATE LIMITS SHOWN MAY HAVE BEEN REDUCED BY PAID CLAIMS. MSR 0-1 POLICYNUMBEA POLICY EFFECTIVE p LILY ECPo ATION LIMITS GENt-RAL LUIBILRY RHPK631410 03/20/2010 03/20/201- EACHOCCURRENCE $ 1 000.000 X COMMERCIALGENERALLIABILITY A PRETAISFS(Ea accutrcNe) S 100,000 UOCI;UR CLAIMS MACE MEDW AW.. eern S $ ODD PIERSONAL8ADVINJURY S 1,000,000 GE SE AGGREGATE S 2,000,00 GEN LAGGR GATE MIT APPLIES PER: PRODUCTS-COMPIOPAW S 2 OOO 000 PLI- LOC X POLICY 'Re AUTOMOBILELIABILITY PNPK53141P 03/20/2010 03/20/2011. ANYAUTO COMBINEDSINGLEUMIT L'caudden0 S 1,000, ODO A ALL OWN®AUTOS GODLY INJURY S SCHtDULEO AUTOS IPerpelson) X HIREJAUTOS R NON-0WNW AUTOS PODILYYlldNenR S PROPERTY OHMAGE S _ - IPerazuem) GARAGELIABILITY AUTO ON LY -FA ACCODNF i ANY AUTO OTHER THAN Fa AGO $ AUTOONLY: AGO S EXCESS /UMBRELLA LIABILITY EACH OCCURRENCE S OCCUR n CLAIMS MADE AGGREGATE i S DEDUCTIBLE $ DETENTION S i WORKFRSCOMPENSATION WCST TU• 0TH• ANDEMPLOYERS' URBIRY YIN E.L. EACH ACCIDENT S ANY PROPm!TORIPARTNER=EOUTIVE❑ ORTCERIMEMBER EXCLUDED? NH) [MaIMalddtd bIN CescribeNH) El. DISEASE -EA EMPLOYE S SPEC IAL PRONSIONS below ELDISEASE.POUCYUMR i OTRER DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS/ LOOATIONSI VEHICLES I EXCLUSIONSADDED BY ENDORSEMENT I SPECIAL PROVISIONS Certificate holder is named as addtional insured per endorsement to follow from carrier xith respect to General Liability OnLY. *=Cept: 10 day notice of cancellation due to non payment of pxemium. SHOVLOANYOP THEABOVEDESCRIBED POLICIW WcANCELLED BEFORE THEEXPMATION City of weaeoula DATE THEREOF, THE ISSUING INSURER WAD. ENDEAVOR TO MAIL X31) CAYS WRITTEN RDA of dCNOTICE70 THECERTIFICATE HOLDER NAMED TO THE LEFT. BUT FAILURE TOM SOSHALL Works Melody'ss AAd Works 43200 Business Park DX IMPOSE NO OBLIGATION OR LIABILITY OF ANY RIND VPON THE INSURER ITS AGENTS OR Temecula, CA 92592 RERRESENTATIVES. Jennifer McCloskey, ACORD 25 (2009/01) ®7988-2009 ACORD CORPORATION. All rights reserved. INS 025)2 aq The ACORD name and Togo are registered marks of ACORD .11 I ...... . 07-19-10:10:40AM: POLICYHOLDER COPY P.O. BOX 420807, SAN FRANCISCO,CA 94142-0807 CERTIFICATE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION INSURANCE ISSUE DATE: OB -09-2010 -if�vp POLICY NUMBER: 1626931-2010 SUN 1 2�1� CERTIFICATE ID: 7 CERTIFICATE EXPIRES: 06-01-20111 06-01-2010/09-01-20 1 BY: CITY OF TEMECULA SK R.D.A. OF TEMECULA PO BOX 9033 TEMECULA CA 92569-9033 This is to certify that we have issued a valid Workers' Compensation insurance Policy in a form approved by the California Insurance Commissioner to the employer named below for the policy period Indicated. GROUP: This policy is not subject to cancellation by the Fund except upon 30 days advance written notice to the employer. We will also give you 30 days advance notice should this policy be cancelled prior to its normal expiration. This certificate of insurance is not an insurance policy and does not amend, .extend or alter the coverage afforded by the policy listed herein, Notwithstanding any requirement, term or condition of any contract or other document with respect to which this certificate of insurance may be issued or to which it may pertain, the insurance afforded by the policy described herein is subject to all the terms, exclusions, and conditions, of such policy. thorized Representative Interim President and CEO EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY LIMIT INCLUDING DEFENSE COSTS: $1,000,000. PER OCCURRENCE. ENDORSEMENT MEM ENTITLED CERTIFICATE HOLDERSe NOTICE EFFECTIVE 06-01-2009 IS ATTACHED TO AND FORMS A PART OF THIS POLICY. EMPLOYER TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION &VISTORS BURS DBA: TEMECULA VALLEY CONVNTN & VSTRS BR 26790 YNEZ CT STE B TEMECULA CA 92591 PMG.CS] tftEv.t 2ots1.. PRINTED : 013709-2010 SK Item No. 9 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Susan W. Jones, City Clerk DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Contract with Canon Financial Services, Inc. through Innovative Document Solutions PREPARED BY: Michaela A. Ballreich, Deputy City Clerk RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council approve a five-year contract with Canon Financial Services, Inc. through Innovative Document Solutions for the lease of 11 new copiers for an annual amount of $36,060 for a total contract amount of $180,300. BACKGROUND: In 2002, the City Council, after a Request for Proposal process, approved a three-year contract with Canon Financial Services, Inc. through Innovative Document Solutions (previously known as Temecula Copiers) for the lease of 12 copiers for City Hall as well as its outlining facilities. In 2005, the City Council approved a five-year agreement with Canon Financial Services, Inc. for the lease of an additional 12 copiers for City Hall and its outlining facilities. Then, in 2006, with the completion of the Temecula Public Library, Canon Financial Services, Inc. was awarded a five-year contract to provide, install, and network 16 copiers for this facility. The Canon copiers are a proven product for the City which has enabled staff to become efficient and knowledgeable with this product and, thereby, enabling them to trouble shoot which, in turn, reduces the need for a service call. With the upcoming completion and relocation to the new Civic Center, it was determined that additional copiers would be required to meet the copier/scanning demands. On March 30, 2010, a Request for Proposal (RFP) on PlanetBids for the purchase/lease, delivery, installation, and networking of 11 new copiers was solicited. The bid closed on April 26, 2010 and the following four vendors submitted proposals to this RFP: * As was requested on PlanetBids, one bidder included the cost for additive bid alternate which included the addition of an Imagepass Al to one copier and the needed requirement of a Memory 31 for another copier which was not specified in the RFP. The noted additives were included in the proposed cost. After the panel's review of the submitted proposals, the evaluation panel recommended that the contract be awarded to Canon Financial Services, Inc. through Innovative Document Solutions. Staff determined that 11 copiers would be leased through a Municipal Lease Agreement — a lease option whereby at the end of the five-year contract, the Citywould own these 11 leased copiers at a cost of $1 each. This lease option has been utilized with the City's existing Canon copiers at the current City Hall as well as its outlining facilities. Innovative Document Solutions (IDS) is a Murrieta -based business that has the expertise with Canon copier products but most importantly is quite familiar with the City's copier needs/requirements, including networking abilities. FISCAL IMPACT: The annual lease cost of $36,060 has been budgeted in the Support Services Budget for fiscal year 2010-2011. ATTACHMENTS: Agreement with Canon Financial Services, Inc. Old Town Civic Center Copier RFP Results 1. Innovative Document Solutions — (CFS) $3,004.54 monthly — with Ima a ass Al for IRC 7065 2. Canon Business Solutions - * $2,812.46 monthly — uote did not include Ima a ass Al for IRC 7065 3. Toshiba $8,569.26 (quarterly) — unable to determine monthly unit cost by the way it was submitted 4. Sharp $1,286.74 — paper folding unit on comparable Sharp unit not available * As was requested on PlanetBids, one bidder included the cost for additive bid alternate which included the addition of an Imagepass Al to one copier and the needed requirement of a Memory 31 for another copier which was not specified in the RFP. The noted additives were included in the proposed cost. After the panel's review of the submitted proposals, the evaluation panel recommended that the contract be awarded to Canon Financial Services, Inc. through Innovative Document Solutions. Staff determined that 11 copiers would be leased through a Municipal Lease Agreement — a lease option whereby at the end of the five-year contract, the Citywould own these 11 leased copiers at a cost of $1 each. This lease option has been utilized with the City's existing Canon copiers at the current City Hall as well as its outlining facilities. Innovative Document Solutions (IDS) is a Murrieta -based business that has the expertise with Canon copier products but most importantly is quite familiar with the City's copier needs/requirements, including networking abilities. FISCAL IMPACT: The annual lease cost of $36,060 has been budgeted in the Support Services Budget for fiscal year 2010-2011. ATTACHMENTS: Agreement with Canon Financial Services, Inc. Canon CANON FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. ('CFS") REMITTANCE ADDRESS: 14904 Collections Center Dr. Chicago, Illinois 60693 (800) 220-0200 MUNICIPAL LEASE AGREEMENT CFS -1045 (02108) AGREEMENT NUMSER CUSTOMER (RAL LEGAL NNVE) DEA ('Customer') PHONE BllNGATDRESS CRY COUNTY STATE IIP EOUPb£MADDRESS CITY COUNTY STATE ZIP EQUIPMENT INFORMATION NUMBER AND AMOUNT OF PAYMENTS QuanEty Serial Number MakelModeliDescription Number of Payments Total Pa ent` Term (in monms) ` Plus Applicable Taxes Payment Frequency I] Monthly ❑ Quadedy Other: THIS AGREEMENT IS EFFECTIVE ONLY UPON SIGNING BY BOTH PARTIES. THIS AGREEMENT IS NON -CANCELABLE BYCUSTOMER EXCEPT AS DESCRIBED IN THE FISCAL FUNDING PROVISION HEREIN. CUSTOMER REPRESENTS THAT ALL ACTION REQUIRED TO AUTHORIZE THE EXECUTION OF THIS AGREEMENT ON BEHALF OF THE CUSTOMER BY THE FOLLOWING SIGNATORIES HAS BEEN TAKEN. ACCEPTED AUTHORIZED CUSTOMER SIGNATURE CANON FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. ^ By X Title: Title: By. X Printed Name: Title: To: CwoonFinanchIIServidas, Inc. ("CFS') ACCEPTANCE CERTIFICATE The Customer certifies #wife) the Equipment referred to in the above Agreementhas been received, (b) installation has been completed, (c) the Eguipmenthas been examined by Customer and is in good operating order and cenditionand is, in all respects, satlsfactory to the Customer, and (d) the Equipment isirrevocably accepted by the Cuslamerfor all purposes under the Agreement Accordingly, Customer herebyaulharizes billing under thisAgreement Signabfe: X Printed Name: Title (danyR Dale: TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1. AGREEMENT: CFS leases to Customer, a [slate name or political subdivision or agency] of [State name] with its chief executive office at , and Customer leases from CFS, with its place of business at 158 Gaither Drive, Suite 200, Mount Laurel, New Jersey 08054, all the equipment described above, together with al replacement pads and substitutions for and additions to all such eghipment(the'Equipment"), upon The terms and conditions set forth in this Lease Agreement ("Agreement"). d 2. AGREEMENT PAYMENTS: Customer agrees to pay to CFS, as invoiced, during the term of this Agreement, (a) the Payments specified under 'Number and Amount of Payment" above, and (b) such other amount permitted hereunder as invoiced by CFS ('Payment') and (c) on Schedule 1 attached hereto. Such Payment are comprised of the principal and interest thereon. 3. APPLICATION OF PAYMENTS: All Payment received by CFS from Customer under this Agreement will be applied to amount due and payable hereunder chronologically, based on the dale of CFS's charge shown on the invoice for each such amount and among amount having the some date in such order as CFS, in it discretion, may determine. 4. TERM OF AGREEMENT: The term of this Agreement shall commence on the date the Equipment is delivered to Customer, provided Customer executes CFS' Acceptance Certificate or otherwise accepts the Equipment as specified in this Agreement. The term of this Agreement shall end, unless sooner terminated by CFS after an event of default or under the Fiscal Funding provision, when all amount required to be paid by Customer under this Apreementhave been Paid asprovided. Except asset forth herein, Customer has noriohttoreturn the EcuipmenttoCFS . 5. NO CFS WARRANTIES: CUSTOMER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT CFS IS NOT A MANUFACTURER, DEALER, OR SUPPLIER OF THE EQUIPMENT. CUSTOMER AGREES THAT THE EQUIPMENT IS LEASED "AS IS" AND IS OF A SIZE, DESIGN AND CAPACITY SELECTED BY CUSTOMER, CFS HAS MADE NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY WITH RESPECT TO THE SUITABILITY OR DURABILITY OF THE EQUIPMENT, THE ABSENCE OFANY CLAIM OF INFRINGEMENT OR THE LIKE, OR ANY OTHER REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, WITH RESPECT TO THE EQUIPMENT INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Any warranty with respect to the Equipment made by the supplier, dealer, or manufacturer is separate from, and is not a pad of, this Agreement and shall be for the benefit of CFS, Customer, and CFS's purchaser or assignee, if any. So long as Customer is not in breach or default of this Agreement, CFS assigns to Customer, solely for the purposes of making and prosecuting any such claim, the rights if any, which CFS may have against the supplier, dealer, or manufacturer for breach of warranty or other representation respecting any item of Equipment. CUSTOMER ACKNOWLEDGES AND AGREES THAT NEITHER THE SUPPLIER NOR ANY DEALER IS AUTHORIZED TO WAIVE OR ALTER ANY TERM OF THIS AGREEMENT. OR MAKE ANY REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY WITH RESPECT TO THIS AGREEMENT OR THE EQUIPMENT ON BEHALF OF CFS. 6. FISCAL FUNDING: The Customer warrant that it has funds available to pay Payment payable pursuant to this Agreement until the end of its current appropriation period and warrant that it presently intends to make Payment in each appropriation period from now until the end of this Agreement The officer of the Customer responsible for preparation of Customer's annual budget shall request from it legislative body or funding authority fiords to be paid to CFS under this Agreement. If notwithstanding the making in good faith of such request in accordance with appropriate procedures and wilh the exercise of reasonable care and diligence, such legislative body or funding authority does not appropriate funds to be paid to CFS for the Equipment, Customer may, upon poor wriften notice to CFS, effective upon the exhaustion of the funding autherizedfor the then current appropriation period, return the Equipment to CFS, al Customers expense and in accordance with this Agreement, and thereupon, Customer shall be released of it obligation to make Payment to CFS due thereafter, provided: (1) to Equipment is returned to CFS as provided for in the Agreement; (2) the above described notice states the failure of the legislative body or funding authority to appropriate the necessary funds as the reason for cancellation; and (3) such notice is accompanied by payment of all amount then due to CFS under this Agreement In the event Customer returns the Equipment pursuant to the terms of this Agreement, CFS shall retain all sums paid by Customer. Customer's Payment obligations under this Agreement in any fiscal year shall constitute a current expense of Customer for such fiscal year, and shall not constitute indebtedness or a multiple fiscal year obligadon of Customer under Customer's state constitution, state law or home rule charter. Nothing intiisAgreementshalconstitute a pledge by Customer of any taxes or other monies, other than as appropriated for a specific fiscal year for the Agreement and to Equipment. 7. ACCEPTANCE; DELIVERY: Customer's execution of the Acceptance Certificate, or Customer's provision to CFS of otherwdten confirmation of it acceptance of the Equipment, shall conclusively establish that the Equipment has been delivered to and accepted by Customer for all purposes of this Agreement and Customer may not for any reason revoke that acceptance; however, if Customer has not, within ten (10) days after delivery of the Equipment, delivered to CFS written notice of any non-acceptance of the Equipment, specifying the reasons therefore and specifically referencing this Agreement, Customer shall be deemed to have irrevocably accepted the Equipment. CFS is the lessor and Customer is the lessee of the Equipment under this Agreement. As between CFS and Customer only, this Agreement shall supersede any Customer purchase order in its entirely. Customer agrees to waive any right of specific performance of this Agreement and to hold CFS harmless from damages Iffor any reason the Equipment is not delivered as ordered, t the Equipment is unsatisfactory or if CFS does not execute this Agreement. Customer agrees that any delay in delivery of the Equipment shall not affect the validity of this Agreement S. LOCATION; LIENS; NAMES; OFFICES: Customer shall not move the Equipment from the location specified herein except with the prior written consent of CFS. Customer agrees that it will keep the Equipment free and clear of all claims and liens other than those created as a result of this Agreement Customer's legal name (as setforlh in its constiluent documents filed with the appropriate governmental office or agency) is set forth herein. Uponrequest, Customer will deliver to CFS certified constituent documents. The chief executive office ofCustomer islocated atthe address setforthherein. Customer will not change it name or the location of its chief executive office unless CFS has been given at least 30 days prior written notice thereof and Customer has executed and delivered to CFS such financing statement and other instrument required or appropriate. 9. USE; FINANCING STATEMENTS: Customer shall comply with all laws or regulations relating to the use or maintenance of the Equipment Customer shall put the Equipment only to the use contemplated by the manufacturer of such Equipment. Customer authorizes CFS (and any third party filing service designated by CFS) to execute and file, (a) financing statements evidencing the interest of CFS in the Equipment, (b) continuation statement in respect thereof, and (c) amendments (including forms containing a broader description of the Equipment than the description setforth herein) and Customer irrevocably waives any right to notice thereof. CFS -1045 (02108) SEE REVERSE SIDEFOR ADDITIONAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS. INITIAL 10. INDEMNITY: Customer agrees to reimburse CFS for and to defend CFS against any claim for lasses or injury caused by the Equipment. This Section shall survive termination of this Agreement. 11. MAINTENANCE; ALTERATIONS: Customer will keep and maintain the Equipment in good working order and shall, at Customer's expense, supply and install all replacement parts and accessories when required to maintain the Equipment in good working condition. Customer shall not, without the prior written consent of CFS, make any changes or substitutions to the Equipment. Any and all replacement parts, accessories, authorized changes anNor substitutions for the Equipment shall become part of the Equipment and subject to the terms of this Agreement. 12. TAXES; OTHER FEES AND CHARGES: CUSTOMER SHALL PAY AND DISCHARGE WHEN DUE ALL LICENSE AND REGISTRATION FEES, ASSESSMENTS, SALES, USE, PROPERTY AND OTHER TAXES, AND OTHER EXPENSES AND CHARGES, together with any applicable penalties, interest, now or at any time imposed upon any item of the Equipment, the Payments payable under this Agreement, or Customer's performance or non-performance of its obligations hereunder, whether payable by or assessed to CFS or Customer. If Customer fails to pay any fees, assessments, taxes, expenses, or charges as required by the Agreement, CFS shall have the right but not the obligation to pay those fees, assessments, taxes, expenses, or charges. If such payments are made by CFS. Customer shall promptly reimburse CFS, upon demand, for all such payments made plus administration fees and costs, if any. Customer acknowledges thatwhere required by law, CFS will file any notices and pay personal properly taxes levied on the Equipment Customer shall reimburse CFS for the expense of personal property taxes as invoiced by CFS and pay CFS a processing fee not to exceed $50 per year per item of Equipment which is subject to such tax Customer agrees that CFS has not, and will not, render tax advice to Customer and that the payment of such taxes is an administrative act. ON THE DATE OF THE FIRST SCHEDULED PAYMENT AND THE DATE OF THE FIRST SCHEDULED PAYMENT AFTER THE ADDITION OF ANY EQUIPMENT, D RE£ARBINGBOB% 13. INSURANCE: Customer, at its sole costand expense, shall obtain, maintain and pay for (a) insurance against the loss, theft, or damage to the Equipment far the full replacement value thereof, and (b) comprehensive public liability and property damage insurance. Al such insurance shall provide for a deductible not exceeding $5,000 and be in form and amount and with companies satisfactory to CFS. Each insurer providing such insurance shall name CFS as additional insured and loss payee and provide CFS thirty (30) days written notice before the policy in question shall be materially altered or canceled. Customer shall pay the premiums for such insurance, shall be responsible for all deductible portions thereof, and shall deliver certificates or other evidence of insurance to CFS. The proceeds of such insurance, al the option of CFS, shall be applied to (a) replace or repair the Equipment, or (b) pay CFS the 'Remaining Lease Balance' For purposes of this Agreement, the 'Remaining Lease Balance' shall be the 'sum of. (1) all amounts then owed by Customer to CFS under this Agreement (it) the present value of all remaining Payments for the full term of this Agreement plus (iii) any applicable taxes, expenses, charges and fees. For purposes of determining present value under this Agreement, Payments shall be discounted at6%per year. Customer hereby appoints CFS as Customers atiomey-in-facllo make claim for, receive payment of, and execute and endorse all documents, checks, or drafts for any loss or damage under any such insurance policy. If within ten (10) days after CFS's request, Customer fails to deliver satisfaclory evidence of such insurance to CFS, then CFS shall have the right, butnot the duty, to obtain insurance with respect to the Equipment satisfactory to CFS, at the expense of the Customer. Customer hereby agrees that CFS shall be entitled to retain anyfees earned by it in connection with any insurance obtained under this Agreement. 14. LOSS DAMAGE: Customer assumes and shall bear the entire risk of loss, theft of, or damage to the Equipment from any cause whatsoever, effective upon delivery to Customer. No such loss, theft or damage shall relieve Customer of any obligation under this Agreement. In the event of damage to any item of Equipment, Customer shall immediately repair such damage at Customer's expense. If any item of Equipment is lost, stolen, or damaged beyond repair, Customer, at the option of CPS, will (a) replace the same with like equipment in a condition acceptable to CFS and convey clear title to such equipment to CFS (such equipment will become 'Equipment! subject to Me terms of this Agreement),or(b)pay CPS the Remaining Lease Balance. Upon CFS!s receipt of the Remaining Lease Balance, Customer shall be enfled to whatever interest CFS may have in such item of Equipment, in its then condition and location, without warranties of any kind. 15. DEFAULT: Any of the following events or conditions shall constitute an Event of Default under this Agreement: (a) if Customer defaults in the payment when due of any indebtedness of Customer to CFS, whether or not arising from this Agreement without notice or demand by CFS; (b) if Customer or any Guarantor ceases doing business as a going concern; (c) if Customer or any Guarantor becomes insolvent or makes an assignment for the benefit of creditors; (d) if a petition or proceeding is filed by or against Customer or any Guarantor under any bankruptcy or insolvency law; (e) if a receiver, trustee, conservator, or liquidator is appointed for Customer, any Guarantor, or any of Customer's property, (f) if any statement representation or warranty made by Customer or any Guarantor to CFS is incorrect in arty material respect; or (g) if Customer or any Guarantor defaults under any loan or credit agreement; or (h) if Customer or any Guarantor who is a natural person dies. 16. REMEDIES: Upon the happening of anyone or more Events of Default. CFS shall have the right to exercise any one or all of the following remedies (which shall be cumulative), simultaneously, or serially, and in any order: (a) to declare if unpaid Payments and other amounts due and payable under this Agreement with CFS retaining title to the Equipment (b) to terminale any and all agreements with Customer; (c) with or without notice, demand or legal process, to retake possession of any or all of the Equipment (and Customer authorizes and empowers CFS to enter upon the premises wherever the Equipment may be found) and (i) retain such Equipment and all Payments and other sums paid under this Agreement, (it) re -lease the Equipment and recover from Customer the amount by which the Remaining Lease Balance exceeds the value attributed to the Equipment by CFS for purposes of calculating the payments under the new agreement, or (iii) sell the Equipment and recover from Customer the amount by which the Remaining Lease Balance exceeds the rwl amount received by CFS from such sate; or (d) to pursue any other remedy permitted at law or in equity. CFS (i) may dispose of the Equipment in its then present condition or following such preparation and processing as CFS deems commercially reasonable; (it) shall have no duty to prepare or process the Equipment prior to sale; phi) may disclaim warranties of title, possession, quiet enjoyment and to like; and (iv) may comply with any applicable state or federal law requirements in connection with a disposition of the Equipment and none of the foregoing actions shall be deemed to adversely affect the commercial reasonableness of the disposition of theEquipmenl. In the event the Equipment is not available for sale, the Customer shall be liable for the Remaining Lease Balance and any other amounts due under this Agreement If the proceeds of the sale or re-leasing of the Equipment are not sulficient to pay the balance of any Payments owed by Customer during its then -current appropriation period, CFS may take any other remedy available at taw or in equity to require Customer to pay such Payments and perform any of its other obligations under this Agreement 17. LATE CHARGES; EXPENSES OF ENFORCEMENT. If Customer fails to pay any sum to be paid by Customer to CFS under this Agreement on or before the applicable due date, Customer shall pay CFS, upon demand, an amount equal to ten percent (10%)) of each such delayed Payment or ten dollars ($10.00) whichever is greater for each billing period or portion of a billing period such Payment is delayed to the extent permitted bylaw. The amounts specified above shall be paid as liquidated damages and as compensation for CFS's internal operating expenses incurred in connection with such late payment. In addition, Customer shall reimburse CFS for all of its out-of-pocket costs and expenses incurred in exercising any of its rights or remedies under this Agreement or in enforcing any of the terms or provisions of this Agreement, including, williout limitation, reasonable attomeys fees and expenses and fees and expenses of collection agencies, whether or not suit is brought If CFS should bring court action, Customer and CFS agree thatahomey's fees equal to twenty hre percent (25%) of the amount sought by CFS shall be deemed reasonable for purposes of this Agreement. 18. ASSIGNMENT: CUSTOMER SHALL NOT ASSIGN OR PLEDGE THIS AGREEMENT IN WHOLE OR IN PART, NOR SHALL CUSTOMER SUBLET OR LEND ANY ITEM OF EQUIPMENT WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT OF CFS. CFS may pledge or transfer this Agreement If CFS transfers this Agreement, CFS shall act as Customer's agent for purposes of keeping a written record of such transfer in accordance with Section 149(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and upon Customer request CFS shell deliver the new owner's name to Customer. Customer agrees that 9CFS transfers this Agreement, the new owner will have the same rights and benefits that CFS has now and will riot have to perform any of CFS's obligations. Customer agrees that the rights of the new owner will not be subject to any claims, defenses, or set -offs that Customer may have against CFS, including, without limitation, claims, defenses, or set -offs arising out of service obligations, if any, under this Agreement. If Customer is given notice of arty such transfer, Customer agrees, if so directed therein, to pay directly to (he new owner all or any part of the amounts payable hereunder. 19. RETURN: If Customer terminates the lease of any item of Equipment as described in the Fiscal Funding provision hereof, Customer shall return such Equipment at its sole cost and expense in good operating condition, ordinary wear and tear resulting from proper use excepted, to a location specified by CFS. If for any reason Customer shall fail to return the Equipment to CFS as provided in this Agreement, Customer shall pay to CFS upon demand one billing period's Payment for each billing period or portion thereof that such delivery is delayed. 20. OWNERSHIP OF EQUIPMENT: For any item of Equipment, upon payment in full of all Payments and other amounts due under this Agreement at the end of the scheduled term, CFV security interest shall be deemed released and Customer shall be entified to whatever interest CFS may have in such item of Equipment, including title to such Equipment, in its [hen condition and location, without warranties of any kind. 21. WARRANTY OF BUSINESS PURPOSE: Customer represents and warrants that the Equipment will not be used for personal, family, or household purposes. 22. PERSONAL PROPERTY: The Equipment shall remain personal property regardless of whether it becomes affixed to real properly or permanently rests upon any real property or any improvement to real property. 23. MAXIMUM INTEREST; RECHARACTERIZEDAGREEMENT: No Paymentis intended to exceed the maximum amountoftme price ififferenthal or interest, as applicable, permitted to be charged or collected by applicable laws, and any such excess Payment will be applied to payments due under this Agreement in inverse order of maturity, and thereafter shall be refunded, If this Agreement is recharaceraed as a conditional sale or loan, Customer hereby grants to CFS, its successors and assigns, a security interest in the Equipment to secure payment and performance of Customer's obligations under his Agreement. 24. UCC • ARTICLE 2A: CUSTOMER ACKNOWLEDGES AND AGREES THAT THIS AGREEMENT IS INTENDED AS A"FINANCE LEASE"AS THAT TERM IS DEFINED IN ARTICLE 2A OF THE UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE AND THAT CFS IS ENTITLED TO ALL BENEFITS, PRIVILEGES, AND PROTECTIONS OFA LESSOR UNDER A FINANCE LEASE. 25. WAIVER OF OFFSET. This Agreement is a net lease. If the Equipment is not property installed, does not operate as represented or warranted, or is unsatisfactory for any reason, Customer shall make such daim solely against the supplier, dealer, or manufacturer. Customer waives any and all eAsting and future claims and offsets against any Payments or other charges due under this Agreement, and unconditionally agrees to pay such Payments and other charges, regardless of any offset or claim which may be asserted by Customer or on its behalf. 26. NOTICES: All notices required or permitted under [his Agreement shall be sufficient If delivered personally, sent via facsirdle or other electronic transmission, or mailed to such party at the address set forth in his Agreement, or at such other address as such party may designate in writing from time to time. Any notice from CFS to Customer shall be effective three days after it has been deposited in the mal, duly addressed. All notices to CFS from Customer shall be effective after it has been received via U.S. Mail, express delivery, facsimile or other electronic transmission. 27. AUTHORITY AND AUTHORIZATION: Customer represents and agrees that (a) Customer is a state or a political subdivision or agency of a state; (b) that entedng into and performance of the Agreement is authorized under Customers state laws and Constitution and does not violate or contradict any judgment, law, order, or regulation, or cause any default under arty agreement to which Customer is party; and (c) Customer has complied with any bidding requirements and, where necessary, has properly presented this Agreement for approval and adoption as a valid obligation on Customers part. Upon request, Customer agrees to provide CFS with an opinion of counsel as to clauses (a) through (c) above, an incumbency certificate, and other documents that CFS may request, with all such documents being in a form satisfactory to CFS. 28. ELECTRONIC ACCEPTANCE: Customer agrees that CFS may accept a facsimile or other electronic transmission of this Agreement or any Acceptance Certificate as an original, and thatfacsimile or electronically transmitted copies of Customers signature will be treated as an original for all purposes. 29. NON -WAIVER: No waiver of any of Customers obligations, conditions or covenants shall be effective unless contained in a writing signed by CFS. Failure to exercise any remedywhich CFS may have shall not constitute a waiver of any obligation with respect to which Customer is in default. 30. MISCELLANEOUS: If there should be more than one party executing this Agreement as Customer, all obligations to be performed by Customer shall be the joint and several liability of all such parties. Customers representations, warranties, and covenants under this Agreement shall survive the delivery and return of time Equipment. Any provision of this Agreement which may be determined by competent autoi ty to be prohibited or unenforceable in any jurisdiction shall, as to such jurisdiction, be ineffective to the extent of such prohibition or imenforceabilily without invalidating the remaining provisions of this Agreement No such prohibition or unenforceability in anyjurisdiction shall invalidate or render unenforceable such provision in any other jurisdiction. Customer agrees that CFS may insert missing information or correct other information on this Agreement including the Equipment's description, serial number, and location, otherwise, this Agreement contains the entire arrangement between Customer and CFS and no modifications of this Agreement shall be effective unless in writing and signed by the parties. 31. GOVERNMENT USE: Customer agrees that (a) Customer will comply with all information reporting requirements of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, including but not limited to the execution and delivery to CFS of information reporting statements requested by CFS, (b) Customer will not do, cause to be done, or fail to do any act if such actwill cause the interest portion of the Payments N be or to become subject to Federal income taxation, and (c) the use of the Equipment is essential for Customers proper, efficient and economic operation, Customer will belheonly entity touse the Equipment during the term ofthis Agreement V and Customer will use the Equipment only for Customer's governmental purposes. Upon request, Customer agrees to provide CFS with an essential use letter in aform satisfactory to CFS as to clause (c) above. 32. GOVERNING LAW; VENUE; WAIVER OF JURY TRIAL: THIS AGREEMENT HAS BEEN EXECUTED BY CFS IN, AND SHALL FOR ALL PURPOSES BE DEEMED A CONTRACT ENTERED INTO IN, THE STATE (� OFNEWJERSEY. THE RIGHTS OF THE PARTIES UNDER THIS AGREEMENT SHALL BE GOVERNED BY THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY WITHOUT REFERENCE TO CONFLICT OF LAW PRINCIPLES, ANY ACTION BETWEEN CUSTOMER AND CFS SHALL BE BROUGHT IN ANY STATE OR FEDERAL COURT LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF AT CFS' SOLE OPTION, IN THE STATE WHERE THE CUSTOMER OR THE EQUIPMENT IS LOCATED. CUSTOMER, BY ITS EXECUTION AND DELIVERY HEREOF, IRREVOCABLY WAIVES OBJECTIONS TO THE JURISDICTION OF SUCH COURTS AND OBJECTIONS TO VENUE AND CONVENIENCE OF FORUM. CUSTOMER, BY ITS EXECUTION AND DELIVERY HEREOF, AND CFS BY ITS ACCEPTANCE HEREOF, HEREBY WAIVES ANY RIGHT TO A JURY TRIAL IN ANY SUCH PROCEEDINGS CFS -1045 (01108) INITIAL Item No. 10 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/Council Members FROM: Patrick Richardson, Planning and Redevelopment Director DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Amendment to Office Lease Agreement regarding the leasing of space in the Civic Center parking garage storefront to the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau. PREPARED BY: Luke Watson, Management Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council Members approve the Amendment to the Office Lease between the City of Temecula and the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau for the leasing of commercial space in the Old Town parking garage. BACKGROUND: City staff and representatives from the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau ("CONVIS) negotiated lease terms regarding the leasing of 1,770 square feet of commercial space in the storefront that is part of the Old Town parking structure adjacent to the Civic Center. The City Council approved the negotiated lease terms at the November 24, 2009 Council meeting. Initially, staff worked with Keyser Marston Associates and local brokers to determine fair market value for commercial office space and tenant improvements. Based upon the recommendations of Keyser Marston and local brokers it was determined that a lease rate of $1.60 per square foot and a tenant improvement allowance of $106,200 ($60 per square foot) was appropriate based on rates for similar office space within the City. Since the lease was approved by the City Council, City staff and CONVIS staff have worked with the architect of the office space (NMR) to design the tenant improvements that are the subject of the lease. The general contractor provided a bid based on the desired tenant improvements that put the total cost of the improvements between $150,000 and $175,000. In order to address the discrepancy between the negotiated tenant improvement rate of $106,200 and the actual bid range of $150,000 and $175,000, City staff and CONVIS staff have negotiated the following amended lease terms: City will spend "not to exceed" $175,000 for tenant improvements. The originally negotiated lease rate of $2,832 per month will remain in place starting with the first month of occupancy (estimated to be January 1, 2011) and will adjust, based on total amount of actual tenant improvement cost incurred, not to exceed $175,000 The adjusted lease rate, which is to begin March 1, 2011, will be based upon the actual tenant improvement cost and will be amortized at a rate of 5% over the remaining lease term. The maximum possible adjusted lease rate per month will be $3,120 ($1.76 per square foot). This is based on the maximum total amount allowed for tenant improvements of $175,000 amortized over the five (5) year lease term. All other terms of the original lease are to remain in place. FISCAL IMPACT: The $175,000 (maximum) tenant improvement allowance will be allocated from the CIP project: Old Town Infrastructure Projects — Parking Structure Office and Retail. Account Number 210.165.644. Over the first five years of the lease, the maximum gross rent received by the City will total $191,760. This figure is representative of a maximum tenant improvement cost of $175,000 and maximum increases of 5% in the lease rate in years four (4) and five (5) of the lease term. The actual lease rate will be amortized based on the actual tenant improvement cost. ATTACHMENTS: First Amendment to Lease Agreement Lease Agreement RECORDING REQUESTED BY: WHEN RECORDED RETURN TO: City of Temecula P.O. Box 9033 Temecula, California 92589-9033 Attention: City Clerk [Space Above For Recorder's Use Only] The undersigned declare that this "Memorandum of Lease; First Amendment of Lease" is exempt from Recording Fees pursuant to California Government Code Section 27383 and exempt from Documentary Transfer Tax pursuant to California Revenue and Taxation Code Section 11922. MEMORANDUM OF LEASE; FIRST AMENDMENT OF LEASE THIS MEMORANDUM OF LEASE; FIRST AMENDMENT OF LEASE (this "Memorandum") is dated as of 2010, and is entered into by and between the CITY OF TEMECULA ("City"), and the TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU, a California nonprofit corporation ("Tenant"). RECITALS A. City and Tenant have entered into that certain Office Lease dated November 24, 2009 (the "Lease"), pursuant to which City has leased and demises to Tenant, and Tenant has leased and accepted from City, a portion (the "Premises") of that certain building located in the City of Temecula, County of Los Angeles, State of California, commonly known as 28690 Mercedes Street as more particularly described in the Lease. B. Tenant and City now desire to enter into this Memorandum to comply with applicable law requiring that municipal lease be recorded, and to amend the Lease. AGREEMENT NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the foregoing and other good and valuable consideration, the receipt and sufficiency of which is hereby acknowledged, Tenant and City agree as follows: 1. Lease. City hereby leases and demises to Tenant, and Tenant hereby leases and accepts from City, the portion of the Property defined as the "Premises" for five (5) years, with an option in favor of Tenant to extend the term for an additional five (5) years, unless terminated earlier as more particularly described in the Lease. The commencement date, rental rate and other terms and conditions of the Lease are set forth in the Lease, which terms and conditions are incorporated herein by this reference. 11087-0001\1181622v1.doc 2. Amendments. Section 3B of the Lease is hereby amended by increasing the number "$106,200" to "$175,000" in both places where $106,200 appears. Section 4A of the Lease is hereby amended by deleting the first sentence thereof and substituting the following sentence in lieu thereof. "Tenant shall pay to City as monthly rent, without deduction, setoff, notice or demand, in advance, on or before the first business day of each calendar month: (i) the sum of $2,832.00 per month, through and including February 1, 2011, and (ii) thereafter, the sum of $3,120.00 per month, which shall be adjusted in accordance with Section 413; provided, however, that the City Manager of City shall have the authority to reduce such $3,120.00 sum by executing a written amendment to this Lease." 3. Counterparts. This Memorandum may be executed in any number of counterparts, each of which, when executed and delivered, shall be deemed to be an original, and all of which, taken together, shall be deemed to be one and the same instrument. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have executed this Memorandum of Lease as of the date first written above. CITY: CITY OF TEMECULA, a municipal corporation Jeff Comerchero, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMR, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: Peter Thorson, City Attorney 11087-0001\1181622v1.doc TENANT: TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU, a California nonprofit corporation Print Name: Print Name: State of California County of On personally appeared ACKNOWLEDGMENT before me, (insert name and title of the officer) who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged to me that he/she/they executed the same in his/her/their authorized capacity(ies), and that by his/her/their signature(s) on the instrument the person(s), or the entity upon behalf of which the person(s) acted, executed the instrument. I certify under PENALTY OF PERJURY under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing paragraph is true and correct. WITNESS my hand and official seal. Signature Signature of Notary Public State of California County of On personally appeared before me, (Seal) (insert name and title of the officer) who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged to me that he/she/they executed the same in his/her/their authorized capacity(ies), and that by his/her/their signature(s) on the instrument the person(s), or the entity upon behalf of which the person(s) acted, executed the instrument. I certify under PENALTY OF PERJURY under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing paragraph is true and correct. WITNESS my hand and official seal. Signature Signature of Notary Public 11087-0001\1181622v1.doc (Seal) 11087-0001\1181622v1.doc 09�tK OFFICE LEASE I . DATE; PARTIES. This Office Lease is dated as of November 24, 2009 and is entered into by and between the CITY OF TEMECULA, a municipal corporation ("City") as City and the TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU, a California nonprofit corporation ("Tenant"). 2. PREMISES; PARKING; MONTHLY CONFERENCE ROOM. City hereby leases to Tenant, and Tenant hereby leases from City, the premises ("Premises") outlined on Exhibit "A" attached hereto located in the building at 28690 Mercedes Street, Temecula, California (the "Building"). Upon fourteen (14) days' prior written notice to City given no more often than once a month, Tenant shall have the right to use the so-called "community room" in the Building or a comparable conference room in the Building (as determined by City) for a monthly meeting of Tenant's board of directors. Tenant's customers shall have the right to use the parking spaces on the ground floor of the parking facility in the Building, including the two reserved parking spaces outlined on Exhibit "B" attached hereto. Subject to Landlord's approval of the signs and the means of attaching the signs, Tenant may install two signs on the wall at the head of the two reserved parking spaces indicating that they are reserved for Tenant's customers. Tenant acknowledges that Landlord shall not be obligated to monitor the use of the two 'reserved spaces. Tenant's employees, contractors, officer and agents shall only park on levels 3 and 4 of the parking facility that is part of the Building. Tenant shall also have the non-exclusive right to use Common Areas (as hereinafter defined) for ingress and egress to and from the Premises. As used herein, the term "Common Areas" shall mean all areas within the exterior boundaries of the parcel of land on which the Building is located that is now or later made available for the general, nonexclusive use of City, other persons entitled to occupy the Building, and the public, and the term "Project" shall mean the Building together with the parcel of land on which the Building is located. Tenant understands and acknowledges that, although included within the definition of "Common Area" herein, the parking structure and related facilities for the Project may, at City's sole and absolute option and in accordance with applicable laws and governmental requirements, be available and open to the general public for parking. City shall have the right to (a) utilize from time to time any portion of the Common Area for promotional, entertainment and related matters; (b) place permanent or temporary kiosks, displays, carts and stands in the Common Area and to lease same to tenants; (c) restrain the use of the Common Area by unauthorized persons; (d) temporarily close any portion of the Common Area for repairs, improvements or alterations, to discourage non -customer use, to prevent dedication or an easement by prescription or for any other reason deemed sufficient in City's judgment; and (e) renovate, upgrade or change the shape and size of the Common Area or add, eliminate or change the location of improvements to the Common Area including, without limitation, buildings, parking areas, roadways and curb cuts, and to construct buildings on the Common Area. 11086-0156\1181606v4.doc City makes no warranties or representations, express or implied, regarding the condition of the Premises or Building and Tenant shall take possession of the Premises in "as is" condition, subject to City's obligation to complete the Tenant Improvements (as defined in Section3A below). 3. TERM; TENANT IMPROVEMENTS; EXTENSION OPTION. A. Term. The term of this Lease ("Term") shall be five (5) years, commencing on the date on which Landlord completes the Tenant Improvements (hereinafter defined) and notifies Tenant in writing that the Premises are ready for occupancy (the "Commencement Date"). B. Tenant Improvements. As used herein, the term "Tenant Improvements" shall mean the improvements described on Exhibit "C" attached hereto. If Landlord's estimate of the cost of completing the Tenant Improvements exceeds $106,200, then within ten (10) days after written demand from Landlord, Tenant shall deposit with Landlord, as additional rent, the amount by which Landlord's estimate exceeds $106,200, and Landlord shall use such deposit to pay for costs of completing the Tenant Improvements. If the deposit is not fully used, Landlord shall refund the unused amount to Tenant promptly after the Commencement Date. If the Tenant Improvements cost more than Landlord's estimate, as determined by Landlord after the Commencement Date, then Tenant shall pay to Landlord as additional rent the amount by which the cost of the Tenant Improvements exceeded Landlord's estimate within ten (10) days after written demand by Landlord. C. Tenant's Option to Extend the Term. Subject to the prior written approval of the Executive Director of the Agency, Tenant shall have the option to extend the Term for an additional consecutive period of five (5) years ("Extension Period") by giving Landlord irrevocable written notice of such exercise not less than six (6) months prior to the start of the Extension Period. 4. RENT; ADJUSTMENTS; SECURITY DEPOSIT. A. Monthly Rent. Tenant shall pay to City as monthly rent, without deduction, setoff, notice or demand, the sum of $2,832.00 per month, in advance, on the first day of each calendar year and continuing during the Term, as adjusted in accordance with Section 4B below. All rental payments hereunder shall be paid by Tenant to City of Temecula, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, CA 92589, or at such other address or to such other persons as the City may from time to time designate in writing. B. Rent Adjustments. On the third anniversary of the Commencement Date and each subsequent anniversary of the Commencement Date including during the Extension Period, if any (each, an "Adjustment Date"), the then -current monthly rent shall be increased by the lesser of: (i) the percentage increase in the Consumer Price Index published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the United States Department of Labor (`Bureau") for the Los Angeles -Anaheim -Riverside Metropolitan Area or successor thereto ("CPI") during the year ending on the applicable Adjustment Date, as determined by Landlord by dividing the CPT published 3 months prior to the applicable Adjustment Date by the CPI published 15 months prior to the applicable Adjustment Date; or (ii) five percent (5%). Landlord shall notify Tenant in writing of the adjusted monthly rent. C. Security Deposit. Tenant shall deposit with City upon execution hereof a security deposit in the amount of $2,832.00 (the "Security Deposit") as security for Tenant's faithful 11096-0156A1 IS1606v4.doc performance of its obligations under this Lease. If Tenant fails to pay rent, or otherwise defaults under this Lease, City may use, apply or retain all or any portion of said Security Deposit for the payment of any amount already due City for rent which will be due in the future, and/or to reimburse or compensate City for any liability, expense, loss or damage which Landlord may suffer or incur by reason thereof. If City uses or applies all or any portion of the Security Deposit, Tenant shall within ten (10) days after written request thereof for deposit monies with Landlord sufficient to restore said Security Deposit to the full amount required by this Lease. When the rent increases during the term of this Lease, Tenant shall, upon written request from City, deposit additional monies with City so that the total amount of the Security Deposit shall at all times bear the same proportion to the increased rent as the initial Security Deposit bore to the initial rent. Landlord shall not be required to keep the Security Deposit separate from its general accounts. Within ninety (90) days after the expiration or termination of this Lease (or such earlier date as required by law), City shall return that portion of the Security Deposit not used or applied. No part of the Security Deposit shall be considered to be held in trust, to bear interest or to be prepayment for any monies to be paid by Tenant under this Lease. 5. USE. Tenant shall use said Premises solely for office purposes. Tenant shall not use or permit the Premises to be used for any other purpose without the prior written consent of City, which may be withheld in the City's sole and absolute discretion. 6. ALTERATIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. Tenant must obtain City's written approval with respect to any changes, alterations or additions to the Premises. City's approval process will be in addition to any municipal code, regulatory and legal requirements. All alterations, additions, or changes to be made to the structure or improvements on the Premises shall be under the supervision of a competent architect or competent licensed structural engineer and made in accordance with the plans and specifications with respect thereto, and all work must be done in a good and workmanlike manner and diligently prosecuted to completion. 7. MAINTENANCE. City shall, at its sole cost and expense, maintain the Building (including plumbing, heating, HVAC and electrical systems) in operable, condition, and repair. City shall provide janitorial services for the common areas of the Building in accordance with the City's janitorial service contract for the Building, as amended from time to time. Tenant shall maintain the Premises in good condition and repair. 8. ASSIGNMENT AND SUBLETTING. Tenant shall not either voluntarily, or by operation of law, assign, transfer, mortgage, pledge, hypothecate or encumber this Lease or any interest herein, or any right or privilege appurtenant hereto, or allow any other person (the employees, agents, servants and invitees of Tenant excepted) to occupy or use the Premises, or any portion thereof, without first obtaining the written consent of City, which consent may be withheld in the City's sole and absolute discretion. A consent to one assignment, subletting, occupation or use by any other person shall not be deemed to be a consent to any subsequent assignment, subletting, occupation or use by another person. Consent to any such assignment or subletting shall in no way relieve Tenant of any liability under this Lease, whether or not the term of the Lease is extended by the assignee or sublessee. Any such assignment or subletting without such consent shall be void, and shall, at the option of the City, constitute a default under this Lease. 11086-0156A1181606v4.doc 3 9. INDEMNIFICATION. Tenant shall indemnify and hold harmless City, the City Council and each member thereof, and City's officers, employees and agents (all collectively referred to as "Indemnitee") against and from any and all claims, losses, damages, liabilities, costs and expenses (including attorneys' fees and costs) to the extent arising from Tenant's use of the Premises or from the conduct of its business or from any activity, work, or other things done, suffered by the Tenant in or about the Premises (excluding acts and omissions by Landlord or Landlord's contractors). If any action or proceeding be brought against any Indemnitee by reason of any such claim, Tenant, upon notice from any Indemnitee, shall defend the Indemnitees at Tenant's expense, by counsel reasonably satisfactory to Indemnitees. Tenant shall give prompt notice to City in case of casualty or accidents in the Premises. 10. INSURANCE. A. Tenant's Liability Insurance. Tenant shall, at Tenant's own cost and expense, during the entire Term and the Extension Period, if any, a broad form comprehensive coverage policy of public liability insurance issued by an insurance company acceptable to City and authorized to issue liability insurance in the State of California and having a rating of not less than "A-13" as set forth in the then current Best's Insurance Guide, insuring Tenant and City against loss or liability caused by or connected with Tenant's occupation, use, disuse, or condition of the Premises under this Lease in amounts not less that: 1) $1,000,000 for injury to or death of one person and, subject to such limitation for the injury or death of one person, of not less than $2,000,000 for injury or death to two or more persons as a result of any one accident or incident; and 2) $1,000,000 for damage to or destruction of any property of others. All public liability insurance and property damage insurance shall insure performance by Tenant of the indemnity provisions of this Lease. City shall be named as additional insured on each insurance policy required by this Section, and such policies shall contain cross liability endorsements. B. Increase in Insurance Coverage. If, in the good faith opinion of City, the amount of public liability and property insurance coverage at that time is not comparable to the insurance typically required by landlords of property similar to the Building, Tenant shall increase the insurance coverage as required by City. C. Insurance Certificate. Tenant shall deliver to City a certificate of insurance, and if requested by City complete and correct copy of each insurance policy, for all insurance required by this Section 10. All insurance policies required by express provisions of this Lease shall be nonassessable and shall contain language to the effect that (a) any loss shall be payable notwithstanding any act or negligence of City that might otherwise result in the forfeiture of the insurance, (b) that the insurer waives the right of subrogation against City, and (c) the policies are primary and non-contributing with any insurance that may be carried by Landlord. D. Notice of Cancellation of Insurance. Each insurance policy required by this Section 10 shall contain a provision that it cannot be cancelled or materially changed for any reason unless 30 days' prior written notice of such cancellation or change is given to Landlord in the manner required by this Lease for service of notices on City by Tenant. 1 1086-0156\ 1 181606A.doc 4 1 I. UTILITIES; HVAC. City shall provide and pay for water and trash pick-up. Tenant shall obtain and pay for all other utilities, including gas, electricity and phone service. Tenant shall pay Tenant's reasonable prorated share of utilities contracted for by City (including electricity and gas), as determined by Landlord, on a monthly basis within ten (10) days after City gives written notice to Tenant of the amount due. Tenant shall have the right to "after hours" HVAC provided it is scheduled in advance with the City, but Tenant shall reimburse City within ten (10) days after written notice from time to time for City's actual cost of providing such after-hours HVAC as additional rent. Tenant acknowledges that the Building hours are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., seven days a week (excluding national, state and, if elected by City, local holidays). 12. SIGNS. Tenant shall not, without City's prior written approval, install or affix any lighting or plumbing fixtures, shades, awnings, or decorations (including exterior painting), signs, lettering, placards, or the like on the exterior of Premises; display or sell merchandise on, or otherwise obstruct, any area outside the exterior walls of the Premises; or cause or permit to be used any advertising, loudspeakers, unusually bright or flashing lights, and similar devices which may be seen or heard outside the Premises. Tenant may install, at Tenant's cost, exterior signage at a location approved by City provided that such signage complies with the Old Town Specific Plan and all applicable laws and provided, further that City shall have approved the contractor installing the signage and the means of affixing or installing such sign. 13. COMPLIANCE WITH LAW. Tenant, at its expense, shall comply promptly with all applicable laws, ordinances, regulations, and orders of any governmental authority pertaining to the Premises or Tenant's use or occupancy of the Premises or improvement of the Premises (including laws, ordinances, regulations and orders pertaining to non-structural improvements required by law, the location and maintenance of trade fixtures, equipment, and other personal property; the conduct of Tenant's employees; preparation, storage, and service of food and drink, and the like, but excluding new laws or changes in laws that require improvements to the structural components of the Premises). 14. RIGHT OF ACCESS. The City and City's officers, employees, and agents shall at all reasonable times have the right to enter the Premises for the purpose of inspecting the same, posting notices of non -responsibility or any other notices required by law for the protection of the City, doing any work that City is permitted or required to perform under this Lease, and making any reasonable repairs which the City determines may be required. Tenant shall furnish City with a pass key to the Premises which the City shall use only in case of emergency to prevent or investigate a crime, or in such cases where access is necessary to prevent damage to the Building or to the Premises or to make repairs necessary to ensure continuous operation of the Building. City shall have the right to enter the Premises and post "For Lease" or "For Rent" signs in any windows of the Premises: (i) during any period while Tenant is in default, and (ii) after delivery of any notice of termination. In conducting its activities on the Premises as allowed in this section City shall use good faith efforts to attempt to minimize the inconvenience, annoyance, or disturbance to Tenant. 15. TAXES. Tenant shall pay or cause to be paid, before delinquency, any and all taxes levied and assessed which become payable during the term hereof against its interest in the Premises, upon improvements made by Tenant, or any equipment, furniture, fixtures, and any other 11086-0156A1181606v4.doc 5 personal property located in or on the Premises, or which become a lien against the Premises or Tenant's interest therein. TENANT RECOGNIZES AND UNDERSTANDS THAT THIS LEASE MAY CREATE A POSSESSORY INTEREST SUBJECT TO PROPERTY TAXES LEVIED UPON SUCH INTEREST, AND THAT IN SUCH EVENT TENANT SHALL BE OBLIGATED TO PAY SUCH TAX OR PURSUE AN EXEMPTION. 16. RULES AND REGULATIONS. Tenant shall faithfully observe and comply with the rules and regulations that City shall from time to time promulgate and/or modify. The rules and regulations shall be binding upon the Tenant upon delivery of a copy of them to Tenant. City shall not be responsible to Tenant for the nonperformance of any said rules and regulations by any other lessees or occupants of the Building. 17. TENANT'S DEFAULT. The occurrence of any one or more of the following events shall constitute a default and breach of this Lease by Tenant the failure by Tenant to observe or perform any of the covenants, conditions or provisions of this Lease to be observed or performed by the Tenant, other than described where such failure shall continue for a period of thirty (30) days after written notice thereof by City to Tenant; provided, however, that if the nature of Tenant's default is such that more than thirty (30) days are reasonably required for its cure, then Tenant shall not be deemed to be in default if Tenant commences such cure within said thirty (30) day period and thereafter diligently prosecutes such cure to completion. 18. REMEDIES UPON TENANT DEFAULT. In the event of any such default or breach by Tenant, City may at any time thereafter, in its sole discretion, with or without notice or demand and without limiting City in the exercise of a right or remedy which City may have by reason of such default or breach terminate Tenant's right to possession of the Premises by written notice to Tenant, in which case this Lease shall terminate and Tenant shall immediately surrender possession of the Premises to City. City may also pursue any other remedy now or hereafter available to City under the laws orjudicial decisions of the State of California. 19. DEFAULT BY CITY. City shall not be in default unless City fails to perform obligations required of City within thirty (30) days after written notice by Tenant to City specifying wherein City has failed to perform such obligation; provided, however, that if the nature of City's obligation is such that more than thirty (30) days are required for performance then City shall not be in default if City commences performance within such thirty (30) day period and thereafter diligently prosecutes the same to completion. 20. DAMAGE; RECONSTRUCTION. In the event the Premises or parking areas are damaged by fire or other perils, City may terminate this Lease by written notice to Tenant. 21. EMINENT DOMAIN. If any portion of the Building or the Premises shall be taken or appropriated by any authority under the power of eminent domain, City may terminate this Lease by written notice to Tenant. 22. SUCCESSORS. Each and every one of the terms, covenants, and conditions of this Lease shall inure to the benefit of and shall bind, as the case may be, not only the parties hereto but each and everyone of the heirs, executors, administrators, successors, assigns, and legal representatives of the parties hereto; provided, however, that any subletting or assignment by Tenant 11086-0156V1181606v4.doc 6 of the whole or any part of the Premises or any interest therein shall be subject to the provisions of Section 9 of this Lease. 23. HOLDING OVER. If Tenant, with City's prior written consent, remains in possession of the Premises after expiration or termination of the term, or after the date in any notice given by City to Tenant terminating this Lease, such possession by Tenant shall be deemed to be tenancy at will (or as otherwise expressly agreed by City in its written consent), terminable upon notice given at any time by either Party, at a monthly rental equal to the fair rental value of the Premises, as determined by City in its good faith discretion. All provisions of this Lease except those pertaining to rent and term shall apply to the tenancy. 24. SURRENDER. At the expiration or termination of the term of this Lease, Tenant shall surrender the Premises to the City in the same condition as received, reasonable wear and tear excepted; provided, however, that: (i) all of Tenant's machinery, equipment and other trade fixtures shall remain Tenant's property and Tenant may remove the Personal Property, provided Tenant removes such machinery, equipment, trade fixtures and Personal Property at Tenant's cost prior to the expiration of the Term or within thirty (30) days after any earlier termination of the Term; (ii) City may require Tenant to remove all fixtures, personal property and alterations installed by Tenant and/or the Personal Property by written notice given at least thirty (30) days prior to the expiration of the Term or concurrently with City's termination notice, as applicable; and (iii) Tenant shall remove Tenant's exterior sign and shall repair all damage caused by the removal. 25. GENERAL PROVISIONS. A. Waiver. The waiver by City of any term, covenant or condition herein contained shall not be deemed to be a waiver of such term, covenant or condition or any subsequent breach of the same or any other term, covenant or condition herein contained. The acceptance of rent hereunder by City shall not be deemed to be a waiver of any default by Tenant of any term, covenant or condition herein contained, regardless of City's knowledge of such default at the time of the acceptance of such rent. B. Time. Time is of the essence of this Lease and each and all of its provisions. C. Prior Agreements. This Lease contains all of the agreements of the parties hereto with respect to any matter covered or mentioned in this Lease, and no prior agreements or understanding pertaining to any such matters shall be effective for any purpose. D. Inability to Perform. This Lease and the obligations of the Tenant hereunder shall not be affected or impaired because the City is unable to fulfill any of its obligations hereunder or is delayed in doing so, if such inability or delay is caused by reason of strike, labor troubles, acts of nature, or any cause beyond the reasonable control of the City. E. Partial Invalidity. Any provision of this Lease which shall prove to be invalid, void, or illegal shall in no way affect, impair or invalidate any other provision hereof and such other provision shall remain in full force and effect. F. City's Approvals. Neither City's execution of this Lease nor any consent or approval given by City hereunder in its capacity as City shall waive, abridge, impair or otherwise 11086-0156A1181606v4.doc affect City's powers and duties as a governmental body. Any requirements under this Lease that Tenant obtain consents or approvals of City are in addition to and not in lieu of any requirements of law that Tenant obtain approvals or permits. G. Brokers. Tenant represents and warrants that it has not had any dealings with realtors, brokers or agents in connection with the negotiation of this Lease. H. Recorded Memorandum of Lease. Concurrently with its execution and delivery of this Lease, Tenant shall execute, acknowledge and deliver to City, for recordation, a Memorandum of Lease in a form prescribed by the City. I. Notices. All notices required or permitted by this Lease shall be in writing and may be delivered in person (by hand or by overnight courier) or may be sent by regular, certified or registered mail or reputable overnight delivery service, with postage prepaid, and shall be deemed sufficiently given if served in a manner specified in this Section. Until changed by a notice given in accordance with the provisions of this Section (in which case the address[es] in the notice of change shall apply), the respective addresses of City and Tenant for the purpose of receiving notices required or permitted by this Lease are as follows: City: City of Temecula P.O. Box 9033 Temecula, California 92589-9033 Attention: Luke Watson Tenant: Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau 26790 Ynez Ct., #B Temecula, California 92591 Attention: Chairman of the Board and Operations Director Any notice sent by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested, shall be deemed given on the date of delivery shown on the receipt card, or if no delivery date is shown, the postmark thereon. Notices delivered by overnight courier that guarantee next day delivery shall be deemed given on the next business day after delivery of the same to the courier. If notice is received on a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, it shall be deemed received on the next business day. 11086-0156A1 181606v4.doc Executed as of the date first written above. CITY: CITY OF TEMECULA, a municipal corporation By: Print Namc:uMarryann Edwards Title: Mayor ATTEST: —�w Susan W. Jones, ,MMC City Clerk.�►� Approved as to form: Peter Thorson, City Attorney 11086-0156\1181606v4.doc TENANT: TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS UREAU, a Californian np it corporation By: ' Print N Title: (SEAL) By - Print Name: Cr7i!,, n Title: Dra-tons- Pi)-er EXHIBIT "A" DESCRIPTION OF LEASED PREMISES [Attached.] A-1 11086-0156V1181606v4.doc I OEN rn ENLARGED PIAN yr -or yam mar¢au�mmm �ENLAF CED PLANCEO PLAN yv-ra lOT/aM at mna VNRONG BfPIICRIRE A42 EXHIBIT `B" DESCRIPTION OF TWO GROUND FLOOR "RESERVED" PARKING SPACES [Attached.] 11086-0156\1181606v4.doc �]1 ENLARGED PLAN yr - or Designated Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors 5ureau parking spaces (1 ENLARGED �PLAN ." v.. re. =_r NIC OLS ME RG RO( 'T TO EXHIBIT "C" TENANT IMPROVEMENT PLANILAYOUT [Attached.] C-1 11086-0156A1181606v4.doc t� N STAIR £ ELEVATOR Al STAIR AIA AND OFFICE SHELL GROUNC n ENLARGED PLAN 10-07-09:11:33AM: ACORD,N CERTIFICATE OF LIABILITY INSURANCE alifornia Southwestern Insurance Agency Acense Number 0443354 !1 Orchard .ake Forest, CA 92630 26790 Yenz Court Temecula, CA 92591 MAY HAVE BEEN REDUCED BY PAID INSURERS AFFORDING COVERAGE INSURERA Philadelphia Insurar INSURER C: INSURER E: z 7/ e DATE (MMmD/YYYY) u OFSUCH R R NSR TYPE OPINSURIINDE POLICY NUMDER P L6YEFFELTNE ORTE Y(IFF P %Pi DATE(MMJDDfYYYYI LIMBS OENERALUABIUTY PHPK388937 03/20/2009 03/20/2010 EACHOCCURRENCE S 1 000 X COMAERCIALOENERALUABILnY PREMISES Eaaccunanv s 100,0 CLAIMS MADE O OCCUR MED EJP (Any. m..) S 5,0( PERSONAL& ADV INJURY S 1,000,0( GENERAL AGGREGATE S 2,000, GENT.AGGREGATELIMITAPPLIESPER: PRODUCTS. COMPIOPAGO S 2,000,0( X POLICY PTO'LOC AtnOMOBILELUUNLITY ANYAUTO PHPK388937 03/20/2009 03/20/2010 COMBINEDSINCLE LIMB (EaawanD i 1,000,0( BODILY INJURY 6 (PeI Pawn) ALL OWNED AUTOS SCHEDULED AUTOS X X HIREDAVIGS NONOWNED AUTOS BODILY INJURY S (Pei arddonl) PROPERTYDAMAGE S B'd, amd"D ' GARAGE UABILITY AUTO ONLY•EAACCIDENT S OTHER I}V.N EAACC S AUTO ONLN AGO $ ANY AUTO EXCESS I UMBRELLA UASILITY EACH OCCURRENCE S OCCUR E] CLAIMSMADE AGGREGATE S f i OEDUCTBLE f RETENTION & WORKERS COMPENSATION AND EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY YIN ANY PROPRIETOR(PARTNEWEACCUTIVEQ TORYLIMITS ER E.L EACH ACCIDENT i OFFICERIMEMBER EXCLUDED? (Mandatory In NM El. DISEASE- EA EMPLOYE f E.L. DISEASE• POLICY LIMIT S IIyas da enw.ndur SPEZIAL PROVISIONS EalO OTHER SCRIPnON OF OPERATIONS I LOCATIONS I VEHICLES MPmhprshin Meetina (4 42051 I EKCSUSIONS ADDED BY UNDORiEMENTI Main Street. Temecula. SPECIAL PROVISIONS CA 92590 June 30th 2009 e Theater, The City of Temecula, and the Temecula Community Services District and their respective ected officials, officers, employees, agents, volunteers and representatives are named as additional sured. Except' 10 Day Notice of Cancellation for Non Payment of Premium ( 6HOULD ANY OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED POLICIES BE CANCELLED BEFORE THE E%PIRATII DATE THEREOF, THE ISSUING INSURERWILL ENDEAVORTO MAIL "30 DAYSWRITTEN NOTICE TO THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER NAMED TO THE IEFT, Our FAILURE TO DO SO SHAU IMPOSE NO OBLIGATION OR LIABILITY OF ANY KIND UPON THE INSURER, RB AGENTS OR The City Of Temecula REPRESENTATIVES. 43200 Business Park Drive AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE Te ecula, CA 92592 Sarah Mathis SCM CORD 25 (2009101) m 1988.2009 ACORD CORPORATION. All rights reserve( The ACORD name and loon are roalstarod marks of ACORD 10-07-09:11:33AM: < 9/ e POLICYHOLDER COPY SK STATE P.O. BOX 420807, SAN FRANCISCO,CA 94142-0807 COMPENSATION I N S U R A N C E FUND CERTIFICATE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION INSURANCE ISSUE DATE: 06-11-2009 CITY OF TEMECULA SK R.D.A. OF TEMECULA PO BOX 9033 TEMECULA CA 92689-9033 GROUP: POLICY NUMBER: 1920931-2009 CERTIFICATE ID: S CERTIFICATE EXPIRES: 08-01-2010 08-01-2009/08-01-2010 This is to certify that we have issued a valid Workers' Compensation Insurance policy in a form approved by the California Insurance Commissioner to the employer named below for the policy period Indicated. This policy is not subject to cancellation by the Fund excopt upon 30 days advance written notice to the employer. We will also give you 30 days advance notice should this policy be cancelled prior to Its normal expiration This certificate of insurance is not an insurance policy and does not amend, extend or sitar the coverage afforded by the policy listed herein Notwithstanding any requirement term or condition of any contract or other document with respect to which this certificate of insurance may be issued or to which it may pertain, the insurance afforded by the policy described herein is subject to all the terms. exclusions, and conditions, of such policy. tTH0%RI1ZCD REPRESENTATI PRESIDENT/) EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY LIMIT INCLUDING DEFENSE COSTS: $1,000,000 PER OCCURRENGE.V ENDORSEMENT 12065 ENTITLED CERTIFICATE HOLDERS' NOTICE EFFECTIVE 06-01-2009 IS ATTACHED TO AND FORMS A PART OF THIS POLICY. EMPLOYER TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION &VISTORS SURE DBA: TEMECULA VALLEY CONVNTN & VSTRS SR 26790 YNEZ CT STE 8 TEMECULA CA 92591 iREV.2-051 IMG2,CN] PRINTED : 06-11-2009 10-07-09:11:33AM: Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company One Bala Plaza, Suite 100, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania 19004 COMMON POLICY DECLARATIONS Policy Number: PHPK388937 Named Insured and Mailing Address: TEMECULA VALLEY CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU 26790 YNEZ CT TEMECULA, CA 92591-5607 Policy Period From: 03/20/2009 To: 03/20/2010 Business Description: Non Profit Organization . 2/ a Producer: 3741 California Southwestern Insurance Agency 21 ORCHARD LAKE FOREST, CA 92390 at 12:01 A.M. Slandard'rime at your mal0og address shown above. IN RETURN FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE PREMIUM, AND SUBJECT TO ALL THE TERMS OF THIS POLICY, WE AGREE WITH YOU TO PROVIDE THE INSURANCE AS STATED IN THIS POLICY. THIS POLICY CONSISTS OF THE FOLLOWING COVERAGE PARTS FOR WHICH A PREMIUM IS INDICATED. THIS PREMIUM MAY BE SUBJECT TO ADJUSTMENT. Commercial Properly Coverage Part Commercial General Liability Coverage Part Commercial Crime Coverage Part Commercial Inland Marine Coverage Part Commercial Auto Coverage Part Businessowners Workers Compensation Professional Liability Total Total Includes Federal Terrorism Risk Insurance Act Coverage 3,176.00 145.00 107.00 457.00 $ 3,885.00 FORM (S) AND ENDORSEMENT (S) MADE A PART OF THIS POLICY AT THE TIME OF ISSUE Refer To Forms Schedule CPD- PlIC (01107) Countersignature Dale 302.00 10-07-00:11:33<M: a 3/ a Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company Form Schedule — Policy Policy Number: PHPK388937 Forms and Endorsements applying to this Coverage Part and made a part of this policy at time of issue: Form Edition Description BIP -190-1 1298 Commercial Lines Policy Jacket CPD-PIIC 0107 Common Policy Declarations Location Schedule 0100 Location Schedule Loss Payee Schedule 0100 Loss Payee Schedule Additional Insured Schedule 0100 Additional Insured Schedule PP 0701 0701 Privacy Policy Notice PI -BELL -1 0907 Bell Endorsement IL0017 1198 Common Policy Conditions IL0021 0908 Nuclear Energy Liability Exclusion Endorsement IL0102 OSO5 California Changes - Actual Cash Value IL0104 0907 California Changes IL0270 0908 California Changes -Cancellation and NonRenewai IL0952 0308 Cap on Losses From Certified Acts of Terrorism IL0985 0108 Disclosure Pursuant to Terrorism Risk Insurance Act PI -CME -1 - 0807 Crisis Management Enhancement Endorsement PI -TER -DNI 0506 Disclosure Notice of Terrorism Ins Coverage Rejection Page 1 of 1 10-07-06:11:33AM; Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company Locations Schedule Policy Number: PHPK388937 Prems. Bldg. No. No. Address 001 001 26790 Ynez Ct Temecula, CA 92591-5607 Page 1 of 1 10-07-09:11:33AM: Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company Additional Insured Schedule Policy Number: PHPK3B8937 Additional Insured The City of Temecula and Redevelopment Association Its Officers, employees and volunteers 43200 Business Park Dr Temecula, CA 92592 CG2026 - General Liability Additional Insured US Express Leasing, Inc c/o Insurance Center a/c #40348501-1 PO Box 3996 Bellevue, WA 98009-3996 CG2028 - General Liability Page 1 of 1 n 5/ 0 10-07-0e:11:33AM: Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company a ei a COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY COVERAGE PART DECLARATIONS Policy Number: PHPK388937 Agent # 3741 ® See Supplemental Schedule LIMITS OF INSURANCE Premium Basis $ 2,000,000 General Aggregate Limit (Other Than Products — Completed Operations) $ 2,000,000 Products/Completed Operations Aggregate Limit (Any One Person Or Organization) $ 1,000,000 Personal and Advertising Injury Il $ 1, 000, 000 Each Occurrence Limit $ 100,000 Rented To You Limit $ 5,000 Medical Expense Limit (Any One Person) FORM OF BUSINESS: NON PROFIT ORGANIZATION Business Description: Non Profit Organization Location of All Premises You Own, Rent or Occupy: SEE SCHEDULE ATTACHED AUDIT PERIOD, ANNUAL, UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED: N/A ClasslRcations Code No. Premium Basis Rates Prem.r Prodd Dos. Como. Os Advance Premiums PremJ ProdJ Gas. Comp. Gs, SEE SCHEDULE ATTACHED TOTAL PREMIUM FOR THIS COVERAGE PART: $ 145.00 $ RETROACTIVE DATE (CO 00 02 ONLY) This insurance does not apply to *Bodily Injury", "Property Damage", or "Personal and Advertising Injury' which occurs before the retroactive date, if any, shown below. Retroactive Date: FORM (S) AND ENDORSEMENT (S) APPLICABLE TO THIS COVERAGE PART: Refer To Forms Schedule Countersignature Dale Authorized Representative Item No. I I ORDINANCE NO. 10-12 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AMENDING THE TEMECULA MUNICIPAL CODE BY ADDING A NEW CHAPTER 5.06, LAWFUL HIRING COMPLIANCE, AMENDING SECTIONS 5.04.270, 5.04.280 AND 5.04.300, ADDING SECTION 5.04.310 AND REPEALING SECTION 5.04.200 REQUIRING EMPLOYERS TO VERIFY THE WORK AUTHORIZATION STATUS OF NEWLY HIRED WORKERS UNDER FEDERAL LAW AS A CONDITION OF RECEIVING A BUSINESS LICENSE, PROVIDING FOR REMEDIES FOR VIOLATIONS AND PROVIDING FOR APPEALS OF ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS CONCERNING SUCH REQUIREMENTS THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Chapter 5.06, Lawful Hiring Compliance, is hereby added to the Temecula Municipal Code to read as follows: Chapter 5.06 Lawful Hiring Compliance Sections: 5.06.010 - Definitions. 5.06.020 - Knowingly employing undocumented workers. 5.06.030 - Verification of employment eligibility. 5.06.040 - Violations. 5.06.050 - Appeal. 5.06.060 - Severability. 5.06.010 - Definitions. Except as otherwise expressly set forth herein, the following words and terms as used in this chapter shall have the following meanings: A. "City clerk" means the city clerk of the city and his or her designee(s). B. "City manager" means the city manager of the city or his or her designee responsible for administering this chapter. R:/Ords 2010/Ords 10-12 C. "Employ" means hiring an employee after January 31, 2011. D. "Employee" means any person who provides services or labor within the city for an employer for wages or any other remuneration. An independent contractor is not an employee for the purpose of this chapter. E. "Employer" means any person that is (1) transacting business in the city, (2) employs one or more employees in the city and (3) is required to obtain a business license certificate under Title 5 of this code. F. "E -verify program" means the electronic verification of work authorization program of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigration Responsibility Act of 1996, as amended, and operated jointly by the United States Department of Homeland Security and the United States Social Security Administration, or a successor electronic verification of work authorization program designated by the United States Department of Homeland Security or other federal agency authorized to verify the work authorization status of newly hired employees pursuant to the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, Pub. L. No. 99-603. G. "Independent contractor" means any individual or entity that carries on an independent business, that contracts to do a piece of work according to the individual's or entity's own means and methods and that is subject to control only as to results. Whether an individual or entity is an independent contractor is determined on a case-by-case basis through various factors, including whether the individual or entity: 1. Supplies the tools or materials. 2. Makes services available to the general public. 3. Works or may work for a number of clients at the same time. 4. Has an opportunity for profit or loss as a result of labor or service provided. 5. Invests in the facilities for work. 6. Directs the order or sequence in which the work is completed. 7. Determines the hours when the work is completed. H. "Knowingly employ an undocumented worker" means the actions described in Section 1324a of Title 8 of the United States Code. This term shall be interpreted consistently with Section 1324a of Title 8 of the United States Code and any applicable federal rules and/or regulations. I. "Person" means all domestic and foreign corporations, associations, syndicates, joint stock corporations, partnerships of every kind, clubs, businesses, trusts, societies and individuals transacting and carrying on any business in the city other than as an employee. J. "Transacting business" means engaging in any activity for profit within the city, including, but not limited to providing goods or services, whether the business is physically located within the city or located outside the city with a R:/Ords 2010/Ords 10-12 2 substantial amount of business transacted within city limits. K. "Undocumented worker" means a worker who does not have the legal right or authorization under federal law to work in the United States as described in Section 1324a(h)(3) of Title 8 of the United States Code. 6.06.020 - Knowingly employing undocumented workers. An employer shall not knowingly employ an undocumented worker. If, in the case when an employer uses a contract, subcontract, or other independent contractor agreement to obtain labor of workers in the city, the employer knowingly contracts with an undocumented worker or with a person who employs an undocumented worker to perform the labor, the employer violates this Section 5.06.020. 6.06.030 - Verification of employment eligibility. A. After January 1, 2011, every employer, after hiring an employee, shall verify the employment eligibility of the employee through the e -verify program. B. An employer shall maintain records sufficient to establish that it has complied with the requirement set forth in subsection (A) of this Section 5.06.030 with respect to each employee and shall retain such records for the duration of such employee's employment; provided, however, that an employer shall retain and maintain such records for a longer period of time if required by an applicable state or federal law, regulation or rule. The records maintained pursuant to this Section 5.06.030 shall be immediately made available to the city for inspection and audit upon written notice to the employer by the City Manager. C. The City Manager may establish such regulations as necessary or convenient to implement the provisions of this chapter, including but not limited the certification of compliance with the requirements of this chapter as part of the application process for a business certificate or the renewal of a business certificate pursuant to Chapter 5.04 of this Code. 6.06.040 - Violations. A. On a finding of a first violation of this chapter, the city manager shall demand that the employer terminate the employment of all undocumented workers in the city hired in violation of this ordinance and demand that the employer sign a declaration under penalty of perjury within ten (10) business days stating that the employer has terminated the employment of all undocumented workers in the city and that the employer will comply with the requirements of this chapter. B. On a finding of a second violation of this chapter, the city manager may revoke any license or business certificate that has been issued R:/Ords 2010/Ords 10-12 3 to and that is held by an employer pursuant to Title 5 of this Code, including, without limitation, a business certificate issued pursuant to Chapter 5.04 of this Code. For the purpose of this Section 5.06.040, a second violation shall be a violation that occurs within twenty-four (24) months of a finding of a first violation. C. Notwithstanding any other provision of this code, the penalty for a violation of this Chapter 5.06 shall be limited to the penalties set forth in this Section 5.06.040. 5.06.050 - Appeal. If an employer is aggrieved by any decision of the City Manager regarding the finding of a violation or the revocation of a license issued pursuant to Title 5 of this code, the employer may appeal the decision pursuant to the provisions of Section 5.04.310. 5.06.060 - Severability. This Chapter and the various parts, sections and clauses thereof are declared severable. If any part, sentence, paragraph, section or clause is adjudged unconstitutional or invalid, the remainder of this chapter shall not be affected thereby. The City Council declares that it would have passed this Chapter and each part thereof, regardless of the fact that one or more parts thereof be declared unconstitutional or invalid. Section 2. Section 5.04.270 of the Temecula Municipal Code is herby amended to read as follows: 5.04.270 Right to revoke. Every certificate granted under this Chapter is granted and accepted by all parties with the express understanding that the city council may revoke the certificate if it is in the best interest of the health, welfare or safety of the public to do so and grounds for such revocation exist as noted in Section 5.04.280 of this Code. Section 3. Section 5.04.280 of the Temecula Municipal Code is hereby amended to read as follows: 5.04.280 Grounds for denial or revocation. A certificate required by this Chapter may be denied or revoked pursuant to this Chapter only upon one or more of the following grounds: A. Proper application as prescribed in this Chapter has not been made or information submitted is false: or B. The prescribed fee for such certificate has not been paid; or R:/Ords 2010/Ords 10-12 4 C. Delinquent certificate fees have not been paid; or D. The conduct of the business has been or is contrary to local, state or federal law; or E. The business has been or is in violation of the provisions of Chapter 5.06 of this Code. Section 4. Section 5.04.300 of the Temecula Municipal Code is herby amended to read as follows: 5.04.300 Violation—Penalties. A. Any person who fails to apply for and receive a certificate prior to the start of business, or has not applied for the renewal of an existing certificate prior to expiration of the certificate shall pay the applicable fee, plus a penalty fee not to exceed twice the normal registration fee. B. Any person who fails to file for a certificate as provided in this Chapter within thirty calendar days after being informed to do so, or fails to pay the applicable fee, or violates any of the other provisions of this Chapter, or knowingly or intentionally misrepresents any material fact to any officer or employee of the City in procuring the certificate provided in this Chapter, or continues to operate a business after the business registration certificate has been revoked, is guilty of a violation of this code that may be enforced pursuant to the enforcement provisions set forth in Title 1 of this code. C. Notwithstanding any other provision of this code, the penalty for a violation of Chapter 5.06 of this Code shall be limited to the penalties set forth in Section 5.06.040. Section 5. Section 5.04.310 is hereby added to the Temecula Municipal Code to read as follows: 5.04.310 Appeal of denial, revocation or other action relating to a business license. A. Any person aggrieved by the denial of an application for a business certificate, denial of an application for renewal of a business certificate, revocation or suspension of a business certificate, or any other decision of an administrative officer or agency with respect to the issuance or refusal to issue a certificate ("Administrative Decision"), may appeal the Administrative Decision by filing an appeal in the Office of the City Clerk within fifteen (15) calendar days from the date notice of the Administrative Decision was mailed to the applicant or licensee. If the fifteenth (15th) day falls on a Saturday, Sunday or City holiday, the appeal may be filed on the next day the City Hall is open. The appeal document must be actually received in the Office of the City Clerk within the applicable time period and not just mailed within R:/Ords 2010/Ords 10-12 5 such time. The person who files such an appeal shall be known as the "Appellant." The provisions of Chapter 2.44 shall not be applicable to an appeal of the Administrative Decision. 1. The written appeal shall be accompanied by an appeal fee in an amount as set by City Council resolution. The appeal shall set forth the Administrative Decision being appealed and the reasons why the decision should be reversed or modified. The City Clerk shall promptly forward a copy of the appeal to the City Manager. 2. In the event an appeal is timely filed, an Administrative Decision concerning the denial of renewal of a license or business certificate, or the suspension or revocation of a license or business certificate shall not be effective until a final decision by the Hearing Officer has been made pursuant to this Section. Failure of any person to file an appeal in accordance with the provisions of this Section shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to an appeal. If no timely appeal is filed, the Administrative Decision shall become effective upon expiration of the period for filing an appeal. 3. Upon receipt of a timely appeal, the City Clerk shall make arrangements for the selection of a Hearing Officer to conduct the Appeal Hearing. The Hearing Officer shall be a person knowledgeable in municipal affairs, including but not limited to, attorneys, retired judges, a reputable firm providing mediators and arbitrators, local government officials, or the State Office of Administrative Hearings (or its successor office). Not less than fifteen (15) days prior to the Appeal Hearing, the City Clerk shall notify the City Manager and the Appellant of the name of the Hearing Officer who has been selected to hear the appeal. Within ten (10) days of the date of mailing the notice of the Hearing Officer, the Appellant may request the City Clerk recuse a hearing officer for reasons of actual prejudice against the party's cause. The City Clerk shall then request a mediation and arbitration firm or the Office of Administrative Hearings as the designated Hearing Officer for the Appeal Hearing. The Hearing Officer shall be fair and impartial and shall have no bias for or against the City or the Appellant. 4. At the Appeal Hearing, the Hearing Officer shall receive oral and written evidence from the Director of Finance and the Appellant. a. The evidence presented need not comply with the strict rules of evidence set forth in the California Evidence Code but shall be the type of evidence upon which reasonable and prudent people rely upon in the conduct of serious affairs. b. The Hearing Officer shall have broad authority to control the proceedings and to provide for cross examination of witness in a fair and impartial manner. The Hearing Officer shall have authority to administer oaths to those persons who will provide oral testimony. R:/Ords 2010/Ords 10-12 6 C. The City Manager shall have the burden of proof to establish by clear and convincing evidence the facts upon which his or her decision is based. d. The Appeal Hearing shall be recorded by audio recording. Any party may, at its sole cost and expense, utilize the services of a certified court reporter to prepare the verbatim record of the hearing. If a court reporter is used, the transcript prepared shall be made available for purchase to both parties. e. The Hearing Officer may continue the Appeal Hearing from time to time, but only upon written motion of a party showing good cause for the continuance. The party requesting the continuance shall pay the costs of the Hearing Officer, if any, for the cancelled hearing. 1. The Hearing Officer may uphold, modify or reverse the Administrative Decision. 2. Within ten (10) days of the conclusion of the Appeal Hearing, the Hearing Officer shall render his or her decision and make written findings supporting the decision. The Hearing Officer shall send the decision to the City Clerk. Upon receipt of the Hearing Officer's Decision, the City Clerk shall notify the City Manager and the Appellant of the decision and provide them with a copy of the Hearing Officer Decision, along with a proof of mailing. 3. The Hearing Officer's decision shall be final and conclusive as to the City and the Appellant and no appeal to the City Council from the hearing Officer's Decision shall be available. Any legal action challenging the Hearing Officer's decision shall be filed within ninety (90) days of the date of the proof of service of mailing of the Hearing Officer's opinion, pursuant to § 1094.5, et seq. of the California Code of Civil Procedure. B. Any notices which either party may desire to give to the other party in connection with the Appeal under this Section must be in writing and may be given either by (i) personal service, (ii) delivery by a reputable document delivery service, such as but not limited to, Federal Express, that provides a receipt showing date and time of delivery, or (iii) mailing in the United States Mail, first class mail, postage prepaid, addressed to the address to the City at City Hall or to the Appellant at the address set forth in the notice of appeal. Notice shall be effective on the date of personal delivery or the date when the notice was deposited in the mail or reputable document delivery service. C. If the Hearing Officer overturns the Administrative Decision or substantially modifies it in favor of the Appellant, the appeal fee shall be refunded to the Appellant. D. The City Manager shall have the authority to establish all appropriate administrative regulations for the fair and efficient implementation of R:/Ords 2010/Ords 10-12 7 this section, conducting hearings and rendering decisions pursuant to this Section, 5.04.310. E. Notwithstanding the procedures set forth in this Section, the City Manager shall have the authority to enter into settlement agreements with an Appellant that that justice may require and that are consistent with the purposes of this Title. Section 6. Section 5.04.200 of the Temecula Municipal Code, Certificate Appeal of Denial, is hereby repealed. Section 7. This Ordinance and the various parts, sections and clauses thereof are declared severable. If any part, sentence, paragraph, section or clause is adjudged unconstitutional or invalid, the remainder of this Ordinance shall not be affected thereby. The city council declares that it would have passed this Ordinance and each part thereof, regardless of the fact that one or more parts thereof be declared unconstitutional or invalid. Section 8. The City Clerk shall certify to the adoption of this Ordinance and shall cause the same to be published in the manner prescribed by law. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 27th day of July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] R:/Ords 2010/Ords 10-12 8 STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Ordinance No. 10-12 was duly introduced and placed upon its first reading at a meeting of the City Council of the City of Temecula on the 13th day of July, 2010, and that thereafter, said Ordinance was duly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 27th day of July, 2010, the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: IG1:i..11FG11►�Ko1l1►[MIN dil:4dil:l:4:& 1 Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk R:/Ords 2010/Ords 10-12 9 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Item No. 12 ACTION MINUTES of JULY 13, 2010 City Council Chambers, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT MEETING The Temecula Community Services District Meeting convened at 8:09 PM. CALL TO ORDER: President Chuck Washington ROLL CALL: DIRECTORS: Comerchero, Edwards, Naggar, Roberts, Washington CSD PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no public comments. CSD CONSENT CALENDAR 16 Action Minutes - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Director Naggar made the motion; it was seconded by Director Edwards and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 16.1 Approve the action minutes of June 22, 2010. 17 Third Amendment to the Roof Preventive Maintenance Services Agreement with TremcoMleatherproofing Technologies, Inc. for Fiscal Year 2010-2011 - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Director Naggar made the motion; it was seconded by Director Edwards and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 17.1 Approve the Third Amendment with TremcoMleatherproofing Technologies, Inc. for $27,416 to provide preventive roof maintenance services at the various locations and extend the Agreement to June 30, 2011. CSD DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SERVICES REPORT CSD GENERAL MANAGERS REPORT CSD BOARD OF DIRECTORS REPORTS CSD ADJOURNMENT At 8:11 P.M., the Temecula Community Services District meeting was formally adjourned to Tuesday, July 27, 2010, at 5:30 PM., for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 P.M., in the City Council Chambers, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California. Chuck Washington, President ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/District Secretary [SEAL] TCSD DEPARTMENTAL REPORT Item No. 13 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT AGENDA REPORT TO: General Manager/Board of Directors FROM: Herman D. Parker, Director of Community Services DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Monthly Departmental Report PREPARED BY: Gail Zigler, Administrative Assistant Phase 1 of the Redhawk Park Improvement project is currently underway. Improvements to the park will include construction of a restroom, parking lot improvements, and a half -court basketball court at Redhawk Community Park, as well as a permanent dog park. Completion is anticipated in November 2010. The Escallier House and Barn have been relocated as part of the Temecula Community Center (TCC) expansion project. A bid opening was held on March 4, 2010. The project calls for refurbishment of the Escallier House and Barn which will be the future home of the Temecula Community Pantry. A construction contract was awarded in March of 2010. Construction has begun on this project. A conceptual design for the Old Town Gymnasium project was completed and approved by the Community Services Commission and City Council. The new gymnasium project will include the construction of a regulation size basketball court, restroom facilities, seating for spectators and an office. During the month of July, the Community Services Department coordinated and hosted the Annual 4th of July Parade and 4th of July Family Festival and Fireworks Spectacular. Both of these events were extremely successful with record crowds. An estimated 18,000 spectators were in attendance for the fireworks presentation. On July 9, 2010 the Community Services Department, in conjunction with Riverside County Parks Department, held the annual Concert and Aglow in the Park at Lake Skinner. The event encompassed an afternoon of food vendors, arts, crafts, face painting, a concert by Neil Diamond impersonator "Hot August Night" and a small balloon glow. The campground was sold out and approximately 300 cars entered Lake Skinner to attend the event resulting in an estimated 2,500 in attendance. The Community Services Department's annual Summer Sunsets Film and Concert Series are currently underway, as well as weekly F.A.M. events and Family Fun Night events. These events are well attended. Within the Cultural Arts Division the Old Town Temecula Community Theater released their 2010-2011 Season of Temecula Presents which includes their dance series, blues series, and orchestra series, as well as the regular Jazz, Country, Classics and Rock series at the Merc. The Temecula Public Library continues to have the highest circulation of book materials in the Riverside County system. In February 2010 Temecula Public Library had 44% of the total circulation of the 13 libraries in the mid -south zone for Riverside County. The combined circulation for the Temecula Public Library and the Grace Mellman Library had 54% of the total for the zone. The TCSD Maintenance Division plays an integral role in assisting with the many citywide special events held each month. In addition, the Maintenance Division continues to oversee the maintenance and rehabilitation of all City parks and facilities. REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY Item No. 14 ACTION MINUTES of JULY 13, 2010 City Council Chambers, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY MEETING The Temecula Redevelopment Agency Meeting convened at 8:12 PM. CALL TO ORDER: Chair Person Mike Naggar ROLL CALL: AGENCY MEMBERS: Comerchero, Edwards, Washington, Roberts, Naggar RDA PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no public comments. RDA CONSENT CALENDAR 18 Action Minutes - Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) Agency Member Edwards made the motion; it was seconded by Agency Member Comerchero and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 18.1 Approve the action minutes of June 22, 2010. 1 RDA EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS REPORT RDA AGENCY MEMBERS REPORTS RDA ADJOURNMENT At 8:12 P.M., the Temecula Redevelopment Agency meeting was formally adjourned to Tuesday, July 27, 2010, at 5:30 P.M., for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 P.M., in the City Council Chambers, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California. Michael S. Naggar, Chair Person ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Agency Secretary [SEAL] RDA DEPARTMENTAL REPORT Item No. 15 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY AGENDA REPORT TO: Executive Director/Agency Members FROM: Patrick Richardson, Director of Planning and Redevelopment DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Redevelopment Departmental Monthly Report RECOMMENDATION: Receive and file. REDEVELOPMENT Temecula Vallev Convention and Visitors Bureau Lease of Commercial Sgace in the Old Town Parking Garage - The Agency and the Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau have executed an Office Lease for commercial space in the Old Town Parking Garage. The Convention and Visitor's Bureau is currently in the process of working with the architect of the Civic Center project to design the tenant improvements. These improvements are estimated to be complete November 1, 2010 per the Civic Center project manager. Town Square Market Place - As part of the Civic Center Master Plan, the City has created a development opportunity for approximately 52,000 square feet of commercial and office space surrounding the Town Square along the reconfigured Main Street. The Agency issued a Request for Interest to select a preferred development partner. On August 26, 2008, the City Council entered into an Exclusive Negotiating Agreement (ENA) with Pelican Properties to develop the project. Pelican has participated in several meetings with Old Town stakeholders and adjacent property owners. They have worked closely with Staff on site planning issues. On January 22, 2009 the Executive Director granted a three-month extension to the Exclusive Negotiating Agreement which expires on May 26, 2009. Due to the state of the economy Staff recommended the Agency extend the ENA an additional six months. On May 26, 2009 Agency Board approved a six (6) month extension to the ENA. Agency Staff met with the Agency sub- committee in February 2010 and received direction to take an extension of one year with the possibility of an additional one year administrative extension which the Agency approved on March 9, 2010. Agency Staff and Pelican Properties have been in continuous contact as we make progress towards a first draft of the Development Agreement. Auto Mall Sign - The Agency and Auto Dealers Association have entered into a Loan Agreement for a loan from the Agency to the Auto Dealers Association in the amount of $875,000 for a state of the art high definition marquee sign. Part of the agreement stipulates that the City will have 10 percent of the time between sunrise and 11:00 p.m. daily to use the sign to promote City interests. The sign will be located on the currently vacant parcel south of Rancho Ford. The old sign will be removed. Per the Loan Agreement the Auto Mall sign shall be constructed on or before October 13, 2010. The Auto Dealers Association has applied for building permits and they are expected to be issued in early July. Construction is anticipated to start immediately followed the issuance of building permits. Facade Improvement Program - The Fagade Improvement Program provides funding assistance to Old Town business and property owners to provide exterior improvements to their buildings and property. Funding in the amount of $80,000 is available during FY 2010-2011. As of July 1, 2010 the Agency plans on accepting application for the program. The following Fagade improvements are in process or recently completed: • Emporium Center — Fagade Renovation (in process) • Temecula Stage Stop — Outdoor canopy renovation (complete) HOUSING R.C. Hobbs Exclusive Negotiating Agreement — The R.C. Hobbs Company approached the Agency regarding the possible development of mixed income affordable housing on vacant Agency owned property located at 28640 Pujol Street. Considering Hobbs' background and recent Staff experience working with the organization, Staff felt that Hobbs would be a quality partner on an affordable housing development at the aforementioned location. Hobbs requested that the Agency and Hobbs enter into an ENA with a one-year term with a potential six month extension by written approval of the Executive Director. The Agency approved the ENA at its February 9, 2010 meeting. An appraisal for the subject property was commissioned by the Agency and completed on June 24, 2010. Diaz Road Exclusive Negotiation Agreement - The Agency issued a Request for Interest to select a preferred development partner for the 30 -acre site located on Diaz Road. Seven firms responded. The Agency negotiated a Purchase and Sale Agreement and Escrow Instructions ("PSA") for the sale of approximately 20 acres to Clearwater Development for the development of a water park. The Agency Board approved the PSA on September 22, 2009. Major terms of the PSA are a purchase price of $6.7 million with a $1 million "holdback" to mitigate existing soils conditions. Since the Agency and Clearwater Development entered into the PSA Clearwater was granted an extension to the escrow of 6 months. At the October 27, 2009 Agency Board meeting the extension was approved. The Agency Board at its April 27, 2010 meeting approved an additional extension to the PSA which will extend the closing date to October 29, 2010. First Time Homebuyers Program - On July 22, 2008, the City Council approved an amendment to increase the loan amount for down payment assistance from $24,000 to $65,000. This down payment assistance allows qualifying households to purchase homes in the $250,000-$300,000 price range. The Agency will begin accepting application for FY 2010-2011 beginning July 1, 2010. There are no applications for this program outstanding at this time. Summerhouse - The Agency negotiated an Owner Participation Agreement ("OPK) with Summerhouse Housing Partners L.P for the purchase and development of the Summerhouse community. The Agency Board approved the OPA on September 22, 2009. The OPA terms require the development of 70 affordable units at very -low income, 20 units at moderate income, and 20 units at senior affordable income, for a total of 110 affordable units. The terms of this agreement place affordability restrictions on the property for 55 years. Immediately following the close of escrow, Summerhouse Housing Partners L.P. began clean- up and restoration of the site. A Development Plan has been approved by the City and construction of the partially completed units is underway. The 20 units in the first phase of the project will be complete by January 1, 2011. Residential Improvement Program - The program budget for FY 2010/2011 is $200,000. The Agency will begin taking applications for the program July 1, 2010. TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY Item No. 16 ACTION MINUTES of JULY 28, 2009 City Council Chambers, 43200 Business Park Drive, Temecula, California TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY The Temecula Public Financing Authority convened at 8:25 P.M. CALL TO ORDER: Chair Person Maryann Edwards ROLL CALL: DIRECTORS: Comerchero, Naggar, Roberts, Washington, Edwards TPFA PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no public comments. TPFA CONSENT CALENDAR 19 Minutes — Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Director Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Director Naggar; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 19.1 Approve the minutes of May 12, 2009. 20 Authorization of Special Tax Lew in Community Facilities District No. 03-1 (Crowne Hill) — Approved Staff Recommendation (4-0-1) — Director Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Director Naggar; and electronic vote reflected approval with Director Naggar abstaining. RECOMMENDATION: 20.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 09-02 A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-1 (CROWNE HILL) 21 Authorization of Special Tax Lew in Communitv Facilities District No. 01-02 (Harveston) — Approved Staff Recommendation (4-0-1) — Director Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Director Naggar; and electronic vote reflected approval with Director Comerchero abstaining. RECOMMENDATION: 21.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 09-03 A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 01-2 (HARVESTON) 22 Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-6 (Harveston II) — Approved Staff Recommendation (4-0-1) — Director Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Director Naggar; and electronic vote reflected approval with Director Comerchero abstaining. RECOMMENDATION: 22.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 09-04 A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-6 (HARVESTON II) 23 Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-2 (Roripaugh Ranch — Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Director Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Director Naggar; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 23.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 09-05 A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-2 (RORIPAUGH RANCH) 24 Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-3 (Wolf Creek) — Approved Staff Recommendation (5-0-0) — Director Washington made the motion; it was seconded by Director Naggar; and electronic vote reflected unanimous approval. RECOMMENDATION: 24.1 Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 09-06 A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-3 (WOLF CREEK) ADJOURNMENT At 8:28 P.M., the Temecula Public Financing Authority Meeting was formally adjourned. Item No. 17 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AGENDA REPORT TO: Executive Director/Authority Members FROM: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-1 (Crowne Hill) PREPARED BY: David Bilby, Senior Debt Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the Board of Directors: Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-1 (CROWNE HILL) BACKGROUND: The Temecula Public Financing Authority (the "Authority') was created pursuant to a joint exercise of powers agreement between the City of Temecula and the Temecula Redevelopment Agency. On January 28, 2003, the Authority adopted two resolutions of intention relative to a proposed community facilities district (the "District") and, thereafter, took the necessary actions to issue bonds on July 24, 2003, in the amount of $12,155,000, and on July 26, 2005, in the amount of $6,000,000. The proceeds of the bonds were used to eliminate a County special assessment lien on the land in the CFD and to finance various public improvements specified in the CFD proceedings. The bonds are special, limited obligations of the Authority secured solely by the special taxes levied in the District. The maximum special tax levy required for fiscal year 2010/11, as calculated by the City's special tax consultant, is $1,114,369.76, which includes both the original issue and the second issue. This levy of special tax will fund the debt service payments and administrative costs which are detailed in the attached schedule entitled "Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010/11." FISCAL IMPACT: The calculated maximum special tax levy required for the 2010/11 fiscal year is $1,114,369.76. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution No. TPFA 10 - Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010/11 RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-1 (CROWNE HILL) THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The Temecula Public Financing Authority is the legislative body for Community Facilities District No. 03-1 (Crowne Hill) (the "CFD"), created pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982, as amended (the "Act'). Section 2. The Board of Directors has enacted Ordinance No. TPFA 03-01 in accordance with Government Code Section 53340 authorizing the levy of a special tax assessment on the property located within the CFD. Section 3. The Board of Directors has completed all steps necessary to levy a special tax assessment in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Act. Section 4. Pursuant to the provisions of Resolution No. TPFA 03-05 and Ordinance No. TPFA 03-01, there is to be levied an aggregate special tax of $1,114,369.76 on the taxable parcels located in the CFD for Fiscal Year 2010-11 as set forth on a magnetic tape to be provided by NBS to the Auditor -Controller of the County. Section 5. The special tax levy set forth above does not exceed the amount previously authorized by Resolution No. TPFA 03-05 and Ordinance No. TPFA 03-01, and is not in excess of that previously approved by the qualified electorate of the CFD. Section 6. The proceeds of the special tax levy shall be used to pay, in whole or in part, the costs of the following items: A. Payment of principal and interest on the outstanding authorized bonded indebtedness. B. Replenishment of the required bond reserve funds, or other reserve funds, if necessary. C. Payment of the administrative costs and incidental expenses of the CFD, as provided in Resolution No. TPFA 03-05 the Indenture of Trust for the CFD and the Act. The proceeds of the special tax levy shall be used as set forth above, and shall not be used for any other purpose. Section 7. The Auditor -Controller of the County is hereby directed to enter the installment of the special tax for the exact rate and amount of the special tax levied in accordance with this resolution for each lot or parcel of land affected in a space marked "CFD No. 03-1 (Crowne Hill)" on the next County assessment roll on which taxes will become due. Section 8. The County Auditor -Controller shall, at the close of the tax collection period, promptly render to the CFD a detailed report showing the amounts of the special tax installments, penalties, interest and fees collected, and from which properties they have been collected. Any expenses to be paid to the Auditor -Controller for carrying out the foregoing responsibilities shall be in accordance with a contract entered into between the CFD and the Auditor, pursuant to Section 29304 of the Government Code. Section 9. The Authority Secretary shall certify adoption of the resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority this 27th day of July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Chairperson ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk/Board Secretary of the Temecula Public Financing Authority, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. TPFA 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority at a meeting thereof held on the 27th day of July, 2010, by the following vote: AYES: BOARD MEMBERS: NOES: BOARD MEMBERS: F-Al�►r�:Z.7aV.lddAdd:l4:951 ABSTAIN: BOARD MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary City of Temecula Community Facilities District No. 03-1A Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010111 Category/Item FY 2010/11 FY 2009/10 Increase / (Decrease) Principal and Interest Principal $285,000.00 $275,000.00 $10,000.00 Interest 797,205.02 809,045.02 (11,840.00) Subtotal: $1,082,205.02 $1,084,045.02 $(1,840.00) Admin. Expenses Agency administrative costs $18,000.00 $18,000.00 $0.00 Trustee/Paying Agent costs 5,300.00 5,400.00 (100.00) County collection fees 569.81 361.80 208.01 Arbitrage calculation costs 0.00 2,500.00 (2,500.00) Continuing disclosure costs 1,352.64 1,352.64 0.00 Administration costs 6,784.55 6,784.55 0.00 Administration expenses 160.00 160.00 0.00 Other costs 0.00 0.00 0.00 Subtotal: $32,167.00 $34,558.99 $(2,391.99) Miscellaneous DM charges - district -wide $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 DM Charges Changed Accounts 0.00 0.00 0.00 Reserve Fund credit 0.00 0.00 0.00 Special Tax Fund Credit 0.00 0.00 0.00 Installment rounding (2.26) (4.77) 2.51 Subtotal: $(2.26) $(4.77) $2.51 Grand Total: $1,114,369.76 $1,118,599.24 Total Accounts: 804 804 The Grand Total may be reduced by county collection fees shown above ifthe county retains such fees from the apportionment offunds. $(4,229.48) 0 Copyright ©1999-2008 N BS 7/12/2010 11:05:41AM Item No. 18 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AGENDA REPORT TO: Executive Director/Authority Members FROM: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 01-2 (Harveston) PREPARED BY: David Bilby, Senior Debt Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the Board of Directors 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 01-2 (HARVESTON) BACKGROUND: The Temecula Public Financing Authority (the "Authority') was created pursuant to a joint exercise of powers agreement between the City of Temecula and the Temecula Redevelopment Agency. On December 11, 2001, the Authority adopted two resolutions of intention relative to a proposed community facilities district (the "District") and, thereafter, approved the necessary actions to issue variable rate special tax bonds on August 28, 2002, in the amount of $17,310,000. Proceeds of the bonds in the amount of $11,025,000 were used to pay the redemption price of the 1998 Winchester Hills bonds and to establish an escrow fund to pay the sinking fund payments. Additional proceeds were used to finance various public improvements specified in the CFD proceedings. On July 11, 2006, the Authority adopted a resolution authorizing the issuance of special tax refunding bonds. These bonds were issued on September 1, 2006 in the amount of $17,545,000 and were used to refund the special variable rate tax bonds issued on August 28, 2002. The bonds are special, limited obligations of the Authority secured solely by the special taxes levied in the District. The special tax levy, as calculated by the City's special tax consultant, required for the 2010/11 fiscal year is $1,346,120.70, which is the sum of CFD 01-2 A & B (as noted in exhibits). This levy of special tax will fund the debt service payments and administrative costs which are detailed in the attached schedule entitled "Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010/11." FISCAL IMPACT: The calculated special tax levy required forthe 2010/11 fiscal year is $1,346,120.70. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution No. TPFA 10 - Final Budgets for Fiscal Year 2010/11 RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 01-2 (HARVESTON) THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The Temecula Public Financing Authority is the legislative body for Community Facilities District No. 01-2 (Harveston) (the "CFD"), created pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982, as amended (the "Act'). Section 2. The Board of Directors has enacted Ordinance No. TPFA 02-01 in accordance with Government Code Section 53340 authorizing the levy of a special tax assessment on the property located within the CFD. Section 3. The Board of Directors has completed all steps necessary to levy a special tax assessment in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Act. Section 4. Pursuant to the provisions of Resolution No. TPFA 02-03 and Ordinance No. TPFA 02-01, there is to be levied an aggregate special tax of $1,346,120.70 on the taxable parcels located in the CFD for Fiscal Year 2009-10 as set forth on a magnetic tape to be provided by NBS to the Auditor -Controller of the County. Section 5. The special tax levy set forth above does not exceed the amount previously authorized by Resolution No. TPFA 02-03 and Ordinance No. TPFA 02-01, and is not in excess of that previously approved by the qualified electorate of the CFD. Section 6. The proceeds of the special tax levy shall be used to pay, in whole or in part, the costs of the following items: A. Payment of principal and interest on the outstanding authorized bonded indebtedness. B. Replenishment of the required bond reserve funds, or other reserve funds, if necessary. C. Payment of the administrative costs and incidental expenses of the CFD, as provided in Resolution No. TPFA 02-03 and the indenture of trust for the CFD and the Act. The proceeds of the special tax levy shall be used as set forth above, and shall not be used for any other purpose. Section 7. The Auditor -Controller of the County is hereby directed to enter the installment of the special tax for the exact rate and amount of the special tax levied in accordance with this resolution for each lot or parcel of land affected in a space marked "CFD No. 01-2 (Harveston)" on the next County assessment roll on which taxes will become due. Section 8. The County Auditor -Controller shall, at the close of the tax collection period, promptly render to the CFD a detailed report showing the amounts of the special tax installments, penalties, interest and fees collected, and from which properties they have been collected. Any expenses to be paid to the Auditor -Controller for carrying out the foregoing responsibilities shall be in accordance with a contract entered into between the CFD and the Auditor, pursuant to Section 29304 of the Government Code. Section 9. The Authority Secretary shall certify adoption of the resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority this 27th day of July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Chairperson ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk/Board Secretary of the Temecula Public Financing Authority, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. TPFA 09- was duly and regularly adopted by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority at a meeting thereof held on the 27th day of July, 2010, by the following vote: AYES: BOARD MEMBERS: NOES: BOARD MEMBERS: F-Al�►r�:Z.7aV.lddAdd:l4:951 ABSTAIN: BOARD MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary City of Temecula Community Facilities District No. 01-2 A Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010111 Category/Item FY 2010/11 FY 2009/10 Increase / (Decrease) Principal and Interest DM charges - district -wide Principal $350,000.00 $0.00 $340,000.00 $10,000.00 Interest 727,011.26 Reserve for Delinquencies 740,693.76 (13,682.50) Subtotal: $1,077,011.26 (5.62) $1,080,693.76 $(3,682.50) Admin. Expenses $(5.62) $(11.87) $6.25 Administration costs $32,500.00 $32,500.00 $0.00 Trustee/Paying Agent costs 2,850.00 3,300.00 (450.00) County collection fees 956.67 630.90 325.77 Arbitrage calculation costs 0.00 0.00 0.00 Continuing disclosure costs 1,852.64 1,852.64 0.00 Agency administrative costs 7,408.99 7,408.99 0.00 Administration expenses 180.00 180.00 0.00 Other costs 0.00 0.00 0.00 Subtotal: $45,748.30 $45,872.53 $(12423) Miscellaneous DM charges - district -wide $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 Manual adjustments 0.00 0.00 0.00 Reserve for Delinquencies 0.00 0.00 0.00 Installment rounding (5.62) (11.87) 6.25 Subtotal: $(5.62) $(11.87) $6.25 Grand Total: $1,122,753.94 $1,126,554.42 $(3,800.48) Total Accounts: 1,471 1,402 69 The Grand Total may be reduced by county collection fees shown above if the county retains such fees from the apportionment of funds Copyright ©1999-2008 N BS 7/12/2010 11:08:43AM City of Temecula Community Facilities District No. 01-2 B Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010111 Category/Item FY 2010/11 FY 2009/10 Increase / (Decrease) Maintenance Park Maintenance $219,854.42 $217,971.28 $1,883.14 Subtotal: $219,854.42 $217,971.28 $1,883.14 Admin. Expenses Agency administrative costs $2,500.00 $2,500.00 $0.00 County collection fees 1,012.93 674.55 338.38 Subtotal: $3,512.93 $3,174.55 $338.38 Miscellaneous DM charges - district -wide $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 DM Charges - Changed Accounts 0.00 0.00 0.00 Manual adjustments 0.00 0.00 0.00 Installment rounding (0.59) (0.59) 0.00 Subtotal: $(0.59) $(0.59) $0.00 Grand Total: $223,366.76 $221,145.24 Total Accounts: 1,568 1,499 The Grand Total may be reduced by county collection fees shown above ifthe county retains such fees from the apportionment offunds. $2,221.52 69 Copyright ©1999-2008 N BS 7/12/2010 11:12:25AM Item No. 19 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AGENDA REPORT TO: Executive Director/Authority Members FROM: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-6 (Harveston II) PREPARED BY: David Bilby, Senior Debt Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the Board of Directors 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-6 (HARVESTON II) BACKGROUND: The Temecula Public Financing Authority (the "Authority') was created pursuant to a joint exercise of powers agreement between the City of Temecula and the Temecula Redevelopment Agency. On October 22, 2003, the Authority adopted two resolutions of intention relative to a proposed community facilities district (the "District") and, thereafter, approved the necessary actions to issue special tax bonds on August 26, 2004, in the amount of $4,845,000. The proceeds of the bonds were used to finance various public improvements specified in the CFD proceedings. The bonds are special, limited obligations of the Authority secured solely by the special taxes levied in the District. The special tax levy for fiscal year 2010/11, as calculated by the City's special tax consultant, is $363,593.04. This levy of special tax will fund the debt service payments and administrative costs which are detailed in the attached schedule entitled "Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010/11." FISCAL IMPACT: The calculated special tax levy required forthe 2010/11 fiscal year is $363,593.04. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution No. TPFA 10 - Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010/11 RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-6 (HARVESTON II) THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The Temecula Public Financing Authority is the legislative body for Community Facilities District No. 03-6 (Harveston II) (the "CFD"), created pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982, as amended (the "Act'). Section 2. The Board of Directors has enacted Ordinance No. TPFA 03-03 in accordance with Government Code Section 53340 authorizing the levy of a special tax assessment on the property located within the CFD. Section 3. The Board of Directors has completed all steps necessary to levy a special tax assessment in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Act. Section 4. Pursuant to the provisions of Resolution No. TPFA 03-27 and Ordinance No. TPFA 03-03, there is to be levied an aggregate special tax of $363,593.04 on the taxable parcels located in the CFD for Fiscal Year 2010/11 as set forth on a magnetic tape to be provided by NBS to the Auditor -Controller of the County. Section 5. The special tax levy set forth above does not exceed the amount previously authorized by Resolution No. TPFA 03-27 and Ordinance No. TPFA 03-03, and is not in excess of that previously approved by the qualified electorate of the CFD. Section 6. The proceeds of the special tax levy shall be used to pay, in whole or in part, the costs of the following items: A. Payment of principal and interest on the outstanding authorized bonded indebtedness. B. Replenishment of the required bond reserve funds, or other reserve funds, if necessary. C. Payment of the administrative costs and incidental expenses of the CFD, as provided in Resolution No. TPFA 03-27 and the indenture of trust for the CFD and the Act. The proceeds of the special tax levy shall be used as set forth above, and shall not be used for any other purpose. Section 7. The Auditor -Controller of the County is hereby directed to enter the installment of the special tax for the exact rate and amount of the special tax levied in accordance with this resolution for each lot or parcel of land affected in a space marked "CFD No. 03-6 (Harveston II)" on the next County assessment roll on which taxes will become due. Section 8. The County Auditor -Controller shall, at the close of the tax collection period, promptly render to the CFD a detailed report showing the amounts of the special tax installments, penalties, interest and fees collected, and from which properties they have been collected. Any expenses to be paid to the Auditor -Controller for carrying out the foregoing responsibilities shall be in accordance with a contract entered into between the CFD and the Auditor, pursuant to Section 29304 of the Government Code. Section 9. The Authority Secretary shall certify adoption of the resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority this 27th day of July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Chairperson ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk/Board Secretary of the Temecula Public Financing Authority, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. TPFA 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority at a meeting thereof held on the 27th day of July, 2010, by the following vote: AYES: BOARD MEMBERS: NOES: BOARD MEMBERS: F-Al�►r�:Z.7aV.lddAdd:l4:951 ABSTAIN: BOARD MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary City of Temecula Community Facilities District No. 03-06 Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010111 Category/Item FY 2010/11 FY 2009/10 Increase / (Decrease) Principal and Interest 0.00 0.00 0.00 Principal $100,000.00 $95,000.00 $5,000.00 Interest 236,747.50 240,262.50 (3,515.00) Subtotal: $336,747.50 $335,262.50 $1,485.00 Admin. Expenses Agency administrative costs $15,000.00 $15,000.00 $0.00 Trustee/Paying Agent costs 3,350.00 3,600.00 (250.00) County collection fees 781.51 495.00 286.51 Arbitrage calculation costs 0.00 2,500.00 (2,500.00) Continuing disclosure costs 1,352.64 1,352.64 0.00 Administration costs 6,222.33 6,222.33 0.00 Administration expenses 150.00 150.00 0.00 Other costs 0.00 0.00 0.00 Subtotal: Miscellaneous DM charges - district -wide DM Charges - Changed Accounts Reserve for Delinquencies Reserve Fund credit Special Tax Fund Credit Installment rounding Subtotal: Grand Total: $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (10.94) (11.23) 0.29 $(10.94) $(11.23) $0.29 $363,593.04 $364,571.24 Total Accounts: 1,169 1,100 The Grand Total may be reduced by county collection fees shown above if the county retains such fees from the apportionment of funds. $(978.20) 69 Copyright ©1999-2008 N BS 7/12/2010 11:26:39AM Item No. 20 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AGENDA REPORT TO: Executive Director/Authority Members FROM: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-2 (Roripaugh Ranch) PREPARED BY: David Bilby, Senior Debt Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the Board of Directors 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-2 (RORIPAUGH RANCH) BACKGROUND: The Temecula Public Financing Authority was created pursuant to a joint exercise of powers agreement between the City of Temecula and the Temecula Redevelopment Agency. On August 24, 2004, the Authority adopted a resolution of intention relative to a proposed community facilities district (the "District") and, thereafter, took the necessary actions to issue bonds on April 13, 2006, in the amount of $51,250,000. The proceeds of the bonds were used to eliminate a County special assessment lien on the land in the CFD and to finance various public improvements specified in the CFD proceedings. The bonds are special, limited obligations of the Authority, secured solely by the special taxes levied in the District and a letter of credit provided by the Developer. The maximum special tax levy required for fiscal year 2010/11, as calculated by the City's special tax consultant, is $3,576,798.22. This levy of special tax will fund the debt service payments and administrative costs which are detailed in the attached schedule entitled "Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010/11." FISCAL IMPACT: The calculated maximum special tax levy required for the 2010/11 fiscal year is $3,576,798.22. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution No. TPFA 10 - Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010/11 RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-2 (RORIPAUGH RANCH) THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The Temecula Public Financing Authority is the legislative body for Community Facilities District No. 03-2 (Roripaugh Ranch) (the "CFD"), created pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982, as amended (the "Act'). Section 2. The Board of Directors has enacted Ordinance No. TPFA 05-01 in accordance with Government Code Section 53340 authorizing the levy of a special tax assessment on the property located within the CFD. Section 3. The Board of Directors has completed all steps necessary to levy a special tax assessment in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Act. Section 4. Pursuant to the provisions of Resolution No. TPFA 05-01 and Ordinance No. TPFA 05-01, there is to be levied an aggregate special tax of $3,576,798.22 on the taxable parcels located in the CFD for Fiscal Year 2010/11 as set forth on a magnetic tape to be provided by NBS to the Auditor -Controller of the County. Section 5. The special tax levy set forth above does not exceed the amount previously authorized by Resolution No. TPFA 05-1 and Ordinance No. TPFA 05-01, and is not in excess of that previously approved by the qualified electorate of the CFD. Section 6. The proceeds of the special tax levy shall be used to pay, in whole or in part, the costs of the following items: A. Payment of principal and interest on the outstanding authorized bonded indebtedness. B. Replenishment of the required bond reserve funds, or other reserve funds, if necessary. C. Payment of the administrative costs and incidental expenses of the CFD, as provided in Resolution No. TPFA 05-01 and the indenture of trust for the CFD and the Act. The proceeds of the special tax levy shall be used as set forth above, and shall not be used for any other purpose. Section 7. The Auditor -Controller of the County is hereby directed to enter the installment of the special tax for the exact rate and amount of the special tax levied in accordance with this resolution for each lot or parcel of land affected in a space marked "CFD No. 03-2 (Roripaugh Ranch)" on the next County assessment roll on which taxes will become due. Section 8. The County Auditor -Controller shall, at the close of the tax collection period, promptly render to the CFD a detailed report showing the amounts of the special tax installments, penalties, interest and fees collected, and from which properties they have been collected. Any expenses to be paid to the Auditor -Controller for carrying out the foregoing responsibilities shall be in accordance with a contract entered into between the CFD and the Auditor, pursuant to Section 29304 of the Government Code. Section 9. The Authority Secretary shall certify adoption of the resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority this 27th day of July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Chairperson ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk/Board Secretary of the Temecula Public Financing Authority, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. TPFA 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority at a meeting thereof held on the 27th day of July, 2010, by the following vote: AYES: BOARD MEMBERS: NOES: BOARD MEMBERS: F-Al�►r�:Z.7aV.lddAdd:l4:951 ABSTAIN: BOARD MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary City of Temecula Community Facilities District No. 03-02 Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010111 Category/Item FY 2010/11 FY 2009/10 Increase / (Decrease) Principal and Interest 0.00 0.00 0.00 Principal $905,000.00 $865,000.00 $40,000.00 Interest 2,596,575.00 2,635,500.00 (38,925.00) Subtotal: $3,501,575.00 $3,500,500.00 $1,075.00 Admin. Expenses Agency administrative costs $60,000.00 $60,000.00 $0.00 Trustee/Paying Agent costs 1,850.00 1,850.00 0.00 County collection fees 287.93 143.10 144.83 Arbitrage calculation costs 2,500.00 0.00 2,500.00 Continuing disclosure costs 1,352.64 1,352.64 0.00 Administration costs 9,018.43 9,018.43 0.00 Administration expenses 215.00 215.00 0.00 Other costs 0.00 0.00 0.00 Subtotal: Miscellaneous DM charges - district -wide Reserve for Delinquencies Reserve Fund credit Special Tax Fund Credit Installment rounding Subtotal: Grand Total: ate, ».oma $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 (0.78) (2.01) 1.23 $(0.78) $(2.01) $1.23 $3,576,798.22 $3,573,077.16 Total Accounts: 318 318 The Grand Total may be reduced by county collection fees shown above ifthe county retains such fees from the apportionment offunds. $3,721.06 0 Copyright ©1999-2008 N BS 7/12/2010 11:34:39AM Item No. 21 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AGENDA REPORT TO: Executive Director/Authority Members FROM: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Authorization of Special Tax Levy in Community Facilities District No. 03-3 (Wolf Creek) PREPARED BY: David Bilby, Senior Debt Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the Board of Directors 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-3 (WOLF CREEK) BACKGROUND: The Temecula Public Financing Authority (the "Authority') was created pursuant to a joint exercise of powers agreement between the City of Temecula and the Temecula Redevelopment Agency. On July 22, 2003, the Authority adopted a resolution of intention relative to a proposed community facilities district (the "District) and, thereafter, approved the necessary actions to issue special tax bonds on December 18, 2003, in the amount of $30,990,000. Proceeds of the bonds in the amount of $4,409,530 were used to discharge the assessment liens on property in the District for the County's Assessment District No. 159. Additional proceeds are being used to finance various public improvements specified in the CFD proceedings. The bonds are special, limited obligations of the Authority secured solely by the special taxes levied in the District. The special tax levy, as calculated by the City's special tax consultant, required for the 2010/11 fiscal year is $2,210,689.40. This levy of special tax will fund the debt service payments and administrative costs which are detailed in the attached schedule entitled "Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010/11." FISCAL IMPACT: The calculated special tax levy required forthe 2010/11 fiscal year is $2,210,689.40. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution No. TPFA 10 - Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010/11 RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AUTHORIZING THE LEVY OF A SPECIAL TAX IN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT NO. 03-3 (WOLF CREEK) THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The Temecula Public Financing Authority is the legislative body for Community Facilities District No. 03-3 (Wolf Creek) (the "CFD"), created pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982, as amended (the "Act'). Section 2. The Board of Directors has enacted Ordinance No. TPFA 03-02 in accordance with Government Code Section 53340 authorizing the levy of a special tax assessment on the property located within the CFD. Section 3. The Board of Directors has completed all steps necessary to levy a special tax assessment in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Act. Section 4. Pursuant to the provisions of Resolution No. TPFA 03-22 and Ordinance No. TPFA 03-02, there is to be levied an aggregate special tax of $2,210,689.40 on the taxable parcels located in the CFD for Fiscal Year 2010-11 as set forth on a magnetic tape to be provided by NBS to the Auditor -Controller of the County. Section 5. The special tax levy set forth above does not exceed the amount previously authorized by Resolution No. TPFA 03-22 and Ordinance No. TPFA 03-2, and is not in excess of that previously approved by the qualified electorate of the CFD. Section 6. The proceeds of the special tax levy shall be used to pay, in whole or in part, the costs of the following items: A. Payment of principal and interest on the outstanding authorized bonded indebtedness. B. Replenishment of the required bond reserve funds, or other reserve funds, if necessary. C. Payment of the administrative costs and incidental expenses of the CFD, as provided in Resolution No. TPFA 03-22 and the indenture of trust for the CFD and the Act. The proceeds of the special tax levy shall be used as set forth above, and shall not be used for any other purpose. Section 7. The Auditor -Controller of the County is hereby directed to enter the installment of the special tax for the exact rate and amount of the special tax levied in accordance with this resolution for each lot or parcel of land affected in a space marked "CFD No. 03-3 (Wolf Creek)" on the next County assessment roll on which taxes will become due. Section 8. The County Auditor -Controller shall, at the close of the tax collection period, promptly render to the CFD a detailed report showing the amounts of the special tax installments, penalties, interest and fees collected, and from which properties they have been collected. Any expenses to be paid to the Auditor -Controller for carrying out the foregoing responsibilities shall be in accordance with a contract entered into between the CFD and the Auditor, pursuant to Section 29304 of the Government Code. Section 9. The Authority Secretary shall certify adoption of the resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority this 27th day of July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Chairperson ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk/Board Secretary of the Temecula Public Financing Authority, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. TPFA 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority at a meeting thereof held on the 27th day of July, 2010, by the following vote: AYES: BOARD MEMBERS: NOES: BOARD MEMBERS: F-Al�►r�:Z.7aV.lddAdd:l4:951 ABSTAIN: BOARD MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary City of Temecula Community Facilities District No. 03-03 Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2010111 Category/Item FY 2010/11 FY 2009/10 Increase / (Decrease) Principal and Interest Principal $600,000.00 $580,000.00 $20,000.00 Interest 1,567,875.00 1,590,495.00 (22,620.00) Subtotal: $2,167,875.00 $2,170,495.00 $(2,620.00) Admin. Expenses Agency administrative costs $30,000.00 $30,000.00 $0.00 Special Tax B 0.00 0.00 0.00 Trustee/Paying Agent costs 3,950.00 4,400.00 (450.00) County Tax Collection Fee 1,140.53 819.45 321.08 Arbitrage calculations costs 0.00 0.00 0.00 Continuing disclosure costs 1,352.64 1,352.64 0.00 Administration costs 6,222.33 6,222.33 0.00 Administration expenses 150.00 150.00 0.00 Other costs 0.00 0.00 0.00 Subtotal: $42,815.50 $42,944.42 $(12892) Miscellaneous Reserve Fund credit $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 Reserve Fund credit 0.00 0.00 0.00 Reserve for Delinquencies 0.00 0.00 0.00 DM charges - district -wide 0.00 0.00 0.00 Manual adjustments 0.00 0.00 0.00 Special Tax Fund Credit 0.00 0.00 0.00 Installment rounding (1.10) (1.92) 0.82 Subtotal: $(1.10) $(1.92) $0.82 Grand Total: $2,210,689.40 $2,213,437.50 Total Accounts: 1,788 1,788 The Grand Total may be reduced by county collection fees shown above ifthe county retains such fees from the apportionment offunds. $(2,748.10) 0 Copyright ©1999-2008 N BS 7/12/2010 11:38:07AM Item No. 22 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY AGENDA REPORT TO: Executive Director/Authority Members FROM: Genie Roberts, Director of Finance DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Community Facilities District No. 2003-02 (Roripaugh Ranch) Initiation of Action Necessary to Foreclose Delinquent Special Tax Liens PREPARED BY: David Bilby, Senior Debt Analyst RECOMMENDATION: That the Board of Directors 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DECLARING ITS INTENTION TO REMOVE DELINQUENT SPECIAL TAXES FROM THE COUNTY TAX ROLL AND ORDERING JUDICIAL FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST DELINQUENT PROPERTY WITHIN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT 03-02 (RORIPAUGH RANCH) BACKGROUND: On April 10, 2010, approximately $1,179,993.25 in special taxes levied on behalf of Community Facilities District No. 03-02 (Roripaugh Ranch) became delinquent by reason of non-payment. These properties are owned by Ashby USA, LLC. As a result, approximately $1,179,993.25 in special taxes, and $117,999.31 in penalties are presently owed. The District is additionally entitled to collect its administrative costs in seeking to resolve these delinquencies, including attorney's fees, roll removal fees, and costs of the litigation guarantees to be obtained from a title company. The attached resolution authorizes the Authority to remove from the county tax rolls the CFD taxes related to the Ashby owned parcels only. In addition, the City Attorney has ordered that litigation guarantees be prepared and has commenced to prepare complaints forjudicial foreclosure. Foreclosure actions will be filed following the adoption of a resolution directing the City Attorney to initiate such proceedings. Any such proceedings may be affected by the filing of bankruptcy actions. FISCAL IMPACT: The delinquencies on these parcels in the amount of $1,179,993.25 will be used to satisfy the debt service requirement on the outstanding bonds. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution No. TPFA 10 RESOLUTION NO. TPFA 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY DECLARING ITS INTENTION TO REMOVE CERTAIN DELINQUENT SPECIAL TAXES FROM THE COUNTY TAX ROLL AND ORDERING JUDCIAL FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST DELINQUENT PROPERTY WITHIN COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICT 03-02 (RORIPAUGH RANCH) THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TEMECULA PUBLIC FINANCING AUTHORITY (HEREAFTER REFERRED TO AS THE "AUTHORITY") DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The Authority has by previous Resolutions formed the Community Facilities District No. 03-02 (Roripaugh Ranch) (hereafter referred to as the "District'), and authorized the levy of a Special Tax in the District for Fiscal Year 2009/10, pursuant to the terms of the Mello Roos Community Facilities Disrtrict Act of 1982, as amended (hereafter referred to as the "Act') that provides for the levy and collection of special taxes by the County of Riverside for the City of Temecula to pay the maintenance and services of all improvements and facilities related thereto. Section 2. The Authority enacted Ordinance No. TPFA 05-01 in accordance with Government Code Section 53340 authorizing the levy of the Special Tax on property located within the District. Section 3. Pursuant to Section 53356.1 of the Act, in the event of any delinquency in the payment of the Special Tax, the District may order the institution of a Superior Court Action to foreclose the lien therefore within specified time limits. Section 4. There exists delinquent installments due by property owners of assessor parcel numbers 964-180-004-6, 964-180-005-7, 964-180-017-8, 964-180-018- 9, 964-180-019-0, 964-180-020-0, 964-180-022-2, 964-180-023-3, 964-180-024-4, 964- 180-025-5, 964-180-026-6, 964-180-027-7 located within the District. Section 5. The Authority hereby declares that it is its intention to order judicial foreclosure proceedings against assessor parcel numbers 964-180-004-6, 964-180- 005-7, 964-180-017-8, 964-180-018-9, 964-180-019-0, 964-180-020-0, 964-180-022-2, 964-180-023-3, 964-180-024-4, 964-180-025-5, 964-180-026-6, 964-180-027-7 within the District and cause Notice of Intent to remove delinquent Special Tax installments from the County Tax Roll pursuant to Section 53356.2 of the Act. Section 6. The Authority Secretary shall certify adoption of the Resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority this 27th day of July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Chairperson ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk/Board Secretary of the Temecula Public Financing Authority, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. TPFA 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the Board of Directors of the Temecula Public Financing Authority at a meeting thereof held on the 27th day of July, 2010, by the following vote: AYES: BOARD MEMBERS: NOES: BOARD MEMBERS: F-Al�►r�:Z.7aV.lddAdd:l4:951 ABSTAIN: BOARD MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk/Board Secretary PUBLIC HEARING Item No. 23 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Patrick Richardson, Director of Planning and Redevelopment DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Revisions to the adopted City of Temecula 2008-2014 Housing Element Update (Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017 PREPARED BY: Dana Schuma, Associate Planner RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council: 1. Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ADOPTING REVISIONS TO THE ADOPTED GENERAL PLAN 2008-2014 HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE (LR08-0017) BACKGROUND: State Housing Law requires local jurisdictions to update the Housing Element of their General Plan every six years. The purpose of a Housing Element is to address local and regional housing needs. The original City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element was approved in 1993 and updated in 2002 pursuant to the amendment cycle for local agencies under the jurisdiction of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG). Subsequently, a Comprehensive General Plan Update was adopted by the City Council on April 12, 2005. The current Housing Element Update cycle is for the period 2008 through 2014. On September 2, 2009, the Planning Commission recommended approval of the 2008-2014 Housing Element Update and on November 10, 2009, the City Council adopted the 2008-2014 Housing Element Update. The adopted document was then sent to the State of California Housing and Community Development Department (HCD) for a 90 -day certification review. On February 23, 2010, City staff received a comment letter from HCD requesting additional revisions to further address specific requirements of Housing Element Law before certifying the document. In order to comply with State Housing Law, staff revised the adopted 2008-2014 Housing Element Update to expand on the following areas: Analyze constraints and provide reasonable accommodations for housing for persons with disabilities (Government Code Section 65583(a)(5)): Currently, the City does not have a formalized reasonable accommodation process for individual homeowners requesting exceptions to zoning and development standards to accommodate a specific disability. In order to comply with statutory requirements, the Housing Element Update was revised to include procedures within Program 21 to analyze housing constraints on persons with disabilities and establish a reasonable accommodation ordinance to reduce those constraints. Facilitate the development of a variety of housing types, including supportive housing, transitional housing, and single -room occupancies (Government Code Section 65583(c)(1)): Both transitional and supportive housing must be treated as residential uses that are subject to the same permitting and processing requirements as other residential uses in the same zone. In order to comply, the Housing Element Update was revised to include provisions for amending the Municipal Code to allow transitional, supportive, and single -room occupancies (SROs) by right without a Conditional Use Permit or other discretionary action. Specify minimum densities of 20 units per acre for Urban Density Overlay areas, and ensure that 50 percent of the remaining housing need can be met on sites designated exclusively for residential uses (Government Code Section 65583.2(h)): The Total RHNA for Temecula 1,381 affordable units. At least 50 percent of the RHNA has to be accommodated on sites designated exclusively for residential uses. In order to comply, the Housing Element was revised to demonstrate that the City's RNHA obligation can be met by suitable vacant sites located within the proposed Urban Density Overlay, and that residential uses would be permitted by right at minimum densities of 20 units per acre on those identified vacant sites. The City currently has 806 acres of vacant residential land with the potential to develop 1,581 residential dwelling units based on the zoning densities. On July 7, 2010 the Planning Commission conducted a public hearing on the revised draft Housing Element and recommended City Council approval by a vote of 4-0 (Carey absent). Upon adoption of the proposed revisions, the 2008-2014 Housing Element Update will again be sent to HCD for certification. Staff has worked closely with HCD to ensure the revisions meet all State -mandated requirements for final certification. FISCAL IMPACT: None. ENVIRONMENTAL: Staff reviewed the project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and based on an initial study, the proposed project has been determined to be consistent with the previously adopted Negative Declaration and is exempt from further environmental review pursuant to Section 15162 of the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines. ATTACHMENTS: Redlined Revisions to the 2008-2014 Housing Element Update City Council Resolution Revised 2008-2014 Housing Element Update HCD Comment Letter Planning Commission July 7, 2010 Staff Report and Resolution �f I Provisions for a Variety of Housing Housing Element law specifies that jurisdictions must identify adequate sites to be made available through appropriate zoning and development standards to encourage the development of a variety of types of housing for all income levels, including multi -family rental housing, agricultural employee housing, manufactured homes, senior and affordable housing, congregate care facilities, emergency shelters/transitional housing, supportive housing, single -room occupancy, second dwelling units, and housing for persons with I disabilities. Table H-28 summarizes Temecula's permitted residential I t housing by zoning district and the following paragraphs describe the N City's provision for these types of housing. TABLE H-28 PERMITTED HOUSING BY ZONING DISTRICT ZONE HOUSING TYPE CC PO HR RR VL L-1 L-2 LM M H Affordable Housing C P P P P P P i i i 1 P P Senior Housing/Congregate Care' P P - P P P P Multifamily rental housing C - _ P P Permanent housing for agricultural employees5 -- Seasonal housing for agricultural employees5 -- Emergency shelterS2 3 C C C C C C C C P P Transitional Housing2 C C C C C C C C P P Single -Room Occupancy° P P - - - P P Supportive housing° P P - -- P P Factory -built housing/modular homes P P P P P P P P Mobile homes2 -- C C C C C C Second units P P P P P P P P Residential care facilities for the P P P P P P P elderly (six or fewer) — — — — — — — — — Residential care facilities for the C C C C C C P elderly (seven or more)— Residential care facilities for persons with disabilities (six or _ _ P P P P P P P fewer Notes: 1. Senior housing is also permitted in the Neighborhood Commercial, Service Commercial, and Highway/Tourist Commercial zoning districts. 2. These uses are not permitted within the Nicolas Valley Rural Preservation Area as identified in Table LU -5 of the Land Use Element of the General Plan. 3. Emergency shelters are also conditionally permitted in all commercial and industrial zoning districts within the City of Temecula. 4. This will require an amendment to the Temecula Municipal Code, which will be a program for the Housing Element planning period. Supportive housing andSROs are expected to be permitted by right in medium to high density residential zones and commercial and office zones. -Residential care facilities for persons with disabilities will be permitted by right in all residential zones. 5. Housing opportunities for agricultural employees is discussed on page H-17. \1 I- c u E\ C E N E R \ 1. E A N 1 143) Y I made available shall relate to the nutritional, social, recreational, house keeping, and personal needs of the residents and shall be provided or made available at a level necessary to assist the residents to function H independently." Second Units: The City of Temecula allows second units in all of O the residential districts where a detached single-family unit exists and l.,l the owner occupies either the primary or secondary unit. Second units c cannot be sold, but may be rented. The second unit must be J compatible with the design of the primary dwelling unit and meet the 1 size and parking requirements identified in the Development Code. An application for a second dwelling unit must be completed and submitted to the Planning Department. See the Housing Element section on housing resources for additional information on second a dwelling units. Emergency Shelters /Transitional Homeless Housing: The City facilitates the development of emergency shelters and transitional housing by permitting the development of such facilities in the Medium Density and High Density residential districts by right without a conditional use permit or other discretionary action. These uses are also permitted in other residential districts with a conditional use permit. Emergency shelters are also permitted with a conditional use permit in the Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Highway/Tourist Commercial, Service Commercial, PO, Business Park, and Light Industrial zoning districts. Currently, Temecula has two group homes for teenagers with a total capacity of 18 persons. In addition, two residential facilities in the City offer housing for up to approximately 14 developmentally disabled persons. The State Fire Marshal is the agency having jurisdiction for group homes with seven or more residents. The City of Temecula contracts with the State Fire Marshal through the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire) in conjunction with the Riverside County Fire Department. The Building and Safety Department has developed a positive working relationship with the County Fire Department that ensures that any improvements and/or maintenance for group homes are handled through the City's normal concurrent review process. It has been a departmental philosophy to provide complete direction for applicants, as well as looking for solutions when problems or barriers present themselves on a project. Because of this, in the past the City has had success finding reasonable solutions to non- compliant code issues with successful end results. for Persons with Disabilities: The Ci y provides h 11-7151 .01 H 0 u s affordable, barrier -free housing. The requirements for accessibility the California Building Code and the Temecula Municipal Code ensure reasonable accommodation and compliance with accessibility requirements and are provided in all projects within Temecula Residential care facilities (group homes) for six or fewer residents are pernutted in all residential zoning districts. The development of residential care facilities for seven or more residents are pernutted in the Medium Density and High Density residential zoning districts by right without a conditional permit or other discretionary action Facilities for seven or more residents are also permitted in all other residential zoning districts with a conditional use Permit The maximum densities for care facilities are not limited specifically Regulations and the Temecula Municipal Code. The City does not restrict occupancy of unrelated individuals in group homes and does not define family or enforce a definition in its zoning ordinance. The uses or the number of uses in any part of the Citi. The Citi allows project or other special needs. However, this flexibility is not explicit for housing for persons with disabilities and special needs. The element includes Program 21 to establish a formal and written procedure in the zoning code to reduce parking for housing for persons with disabilities. accessibility. The City's requirements for building permits and inspections are the same as for other residential projects and are straightforward and not burdensome. City officials are not aware of any instances in which an applicant experienced delays or rejection of a retrofittingproposal for accessibilityto persons with disabilities. Compliance with these development standards ensures reasonable accommodation is provided for all new projects. In addition, retrofit assistance for persons with disabilities is available through_ the City's Residential Improvement Program. The City will continue to implement the existing requirements as well as establish a fom-ialized reasonable accommodation process for individual homeowners L 11 1 0 I 1 L_ \L L C U L E N L R A L P L \ N 1-5? 4. Development and Planning Fees The cost of development is a constraint to the implementation of affordable housing projects. Typically, the cost of developing raw land is significantly increased by the various regulations and fees local governments impose on developers. The City of Temecula charges various fees and assessments to cover the cost of processing permits and providing certain services and utilities. Table H-29 summarizes that City's planning fee requirements for residential development, while Table H-30 depicts the City's development fees for residential development. Comparing the cost of one jurisdiction's development and planning fees to another is difficult since each jurisdiction calculates and applies its fee schedule in its own unique way. While no recent studies available to the general public have been completed in Riverside County to compare the fees charged by various jurisdictions, a recent trend used by other jurisdictions is to assess a deposit that varies per application type, and then charge an hourly "fully burdened" rate to recover costs. The City of Temecula assesses a fixed rate for each application type, based on the average hours of staff time required to process each application. The City of Temecula fee schedule is adjusted annually based on the consumer price index for the greater Los Angeles Metropolitan area. TABLE H-29 PLANNING FEE SCHEDULE* Development Agreement $49,496 Department of Project Type City of Environmental Development Agreement — Minor Modification' 2,3,4 Temecula Fee Health Fee Planning and Zoning $827 N/A Conditional Use Permit — No Site Changes' 2.3,4 $3,078 $234 Conditional Use Permit—with a Development $980 $234 Plan' 2,3,4 $12,092 $136 Development Agreement $49,496 N/A Development Agreement — Major Modification 1,2,3,4 $11,340 N/A Development Agreement — Minor Modification' 2,3,4 $3,240 N/A DIF Credit or Reduction $827 N/A Development Plan — Less than 10,000 sf'.2,3,4 $7,402 $136 Development Plan — 10,000 sf to 100,000 sf'•2,3,4 $10,051 $136 Development Plan — Over 100,000 sf' 2,3,4 $12,092 $136 Development Plan — Major Modification 1,2,3,4 $5,682 N/A Development Plan — Minor Modification 1•2.3.4 $2,461 N/A Development Plan — Minor Modification 1,2,3.4 $152 N/A (Planning Review Only) I is I 1' I I I-> H 0 U S N G affordable to lower income units (or 13% of the RHNA for lower income households). 2. Sites for Homeless and Emergency and Transitio Shelters Objectim: Provide adequate sites for emergency and--transkieflal shelters by adopting a Zoning Ordinance that permits transitional and emergency housing in Medium and High Residential Density zones, and conditionally permits shelters in the remaining Residential zones and Commercial and Industrial zones. Accomplishments: In 1998, Temecula updated the Development Code in which emergency shelters and transitional housing are permitted in the Medium Density and High Density Residential districts by fight without a conditional use permit or other discretionary action. 4he r- y requiredywe '.5 in the Ranehe Wes be r-esefved fer tmns tien,i heusing. These uses are also permitted in other residential districts with a conditional use permit. Emergency shelters are also permitted with a conditional use permit in the Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Highway/ Tourist Commercial, Service Commercial, PO, Business Park, and Light Industrial zoning districts. 3. Landbanking Objectiw: Acquire sites (or funds) for affordable/senior housing through the development of a Landbanking Program. Accomplishments: In 1996, the Temecula Redevelopment Agency purchased 3.42 acres of land on Pujol Street to be leased to Affirmed Housing for the Mission Village affordable housing project. A 0.19 acre parcel was also purchased by the Agency and will be granted to Habitat for Humanity for the construction of two single-family homes affordable to Very Low Income families. In addition, the Agency acquired two Medium Density Residential parcels totaling 0.67 acres. The Redevelopment Agency is working to acquire four additional parcels and two tax defaulted parcels for a total of 4.47 acres. Finally in 2004, the agency acquired a large parcel of land totaling 32.9 acres for a large mixed-use project. B. Assist in Development of Affordable Housing 1. Density Bonus Program Objectim: Encourage development of housing for low-income households by incorporating a Density Bonus Program into the I ',� 1 II I ( I v I I\ \ t I' I \ \ I!QI H 0 U S ;� • Mobile home parks are allowed in all of the residential zoning districts with a conditional use permit; HSenior and affordable housing are allowed in a variety of residential and non-residential zoning districts and are eligible for density bonuses and development concessions; S Congregate care facilities are allowed in a variety of residential and non-residential zoning districts and the facilities are not Ilimited specifically to the density requirements of the specific T zoning district; l Second units are allowed in all residential zoning districts where a detached single-family unit exists; and • Emergency shelters and transitional housing are permitted in the Medium and High Density Residential zoning districts right, and conditionally permitted in the remainder of the residential districts. Emergency shelters are also conditionally age permitted in several of the non-residential zoning districts. There are no additional development standards required by the City for emergency shelters unless the permit approval process through the Riverside County Department of Health and/or Fire Department requires improvements to be made for life safety issues. These improvements may include but are not limited to special "panic" hardware for gates and doors, pull alarms, fire sprinklers, and disabled persons access. As stated in Section IV, the City has a RHNA of 4,086 new units for the period of 2008 through 2014. The residential development capacity under the Temecula Land Use Plan provides sufficient land to meet the City's need for this new construction for the 2008-2014 period. Fiw- Year Objectives: The City will continue to implement and, as appropriate and necessary, augment the Land Use Element and Development Code. To address the Citys identified shortfall of 1.381 units to accommodate its RHNA for lower-income housing, the City will establish the Urban Density C►verlay to sites identified in Appendix D by June 2012. Progress-to-Daz The City has implemented amendments to the Development Code and the Land Use Element to ensure that affordable housing can be built in its residential areas by right. \I L- U L V !. I \ I I\ A I I' I \\ 11-106 Future• site. I N • 4 4ie City wig pr-evide fe an adequate ., be e f residential sites to-aeee edge -any, reg regkmal-share of th uui re if ,,pp ,t,io The City will monitor the availability of sites zoned for residential uses to ensure sufficient capacity exists to accommodate the City's remaining need for lower- income households and rezone additional sites for exclusively residential uses as needed to accommodate 50 percent of the remaining need for exclusively residential development. The City will identify specific sites, at least 35 acres, for exclusively residential development as part of the establishment of the Urban Density Overlay from the sites identified in Appendix D-2 which meet the criteria detailed in Govemment Code 65583.2(h)(i1. PrWr5s to Date: The City 44 provide rer its Shan- Pf ;:6o Fd=P�accommodates low and moderate income housing on sites designated exclusively for residential uses. Future The City will continue to identify and provide an adequate number of exclusively residential sites 35 acres to accommodate at least 50 percent (690 units at 20 du/ac) of its remaining need for lower-income households._ _ the R T"TA appheable. • The City will maintain an inventory of sites suitable for residential development (including underutilized commercial sites) and provide that information to interested developers. Progress -to -Date• The City has established and maintains an inventory of developable sites. (; I . 1 R \ L (' L\ \ 1110> M The City will continue to augment the Land`' Use Element and Development Code to incorporate changes required by law, and to H ensure the development of afrere all arrvr ��_ owner -occupied and rental multifamily 0 housing will have minimum densities of 20 units per acre and be allowed by right in all U overlay areas pursuant to Government Code 65583.21. Sites rezoned to accommodate the identified shortfall will be appropriately I sized_ to accommodate at least 16 units tier site. I N • 4 4ie City wig pr-evide fe an adequate ., be e f residential sites to-aeee edge -any, reg regkmal-share of th uui re if ,,pp ,t,io The City will monitor the availability of sites zoned for residential uses to ensure sufficient capacity exists to accommodate the City's remaining need for lower- income households and rezone additional sites for exclusively residential uses as needed to accommodate 50 percent of the remaining need for exclusively residential development. The City will identify specific sites, at least 35 acres, for exclusively residential development as part of the establishment of the Urban Density Overlay from the sites identified in Appendix D-2 which meet the criteria detailed in Govemment Code 65583.2(h)(i1. PrWr5s to Date: The City 44 provide rer its Shan- Pf ;:6o Fd=P�accommodates low and moderate income housing on sites designated exclusively for residential uses. Future The City will continue to identify and provide an adequate number of exclusively residential sites 35 acres to accommodate at least 50 percent (690 units at 20 du/ac) of its remaining need for lower-income households._ _ the R T"TA appheable. • The City will maintain an inventory of sites suitable for residential development (including underutilized commercial sites) and provide that information to interested developers. Progress -to -Date• The City has established and maintains an inventory of developable sites. (; I . 1 R \ L (' L\ \ 1110> M .Y� T Mixed -Use Overlay will be adopted by jute`- 2012. The City will then establish the development standards in the Zoning LI Ordinance by December 2012. 1 1 The City will encourage higher density residential development within the Mixed -Use Overlay Areas by II U providing appropriate, flexible development standards through the Zoning Ordinance. Upon completion of the Gene 'lanMixed-use Overlay Area by June 2012, the City I will revise the Zoning Ordinance to establish specific use, height, bulk, parking, landscaping, and other guidelines N appropriate for mixed-use development by December 2012. Progress -to -Date• The updated General Plan was adopted by the City in 2005 and includes a Mixed -Use Overlay. Development standards have been created appropriate for mixed-use development. Future• The City will continue to use the Mixed -Use Overlay Zone to encourage the development of multi -family housing. In addition, by 2012, the City will establish and implement a new "Urban Density Overlay Zone" that will allow 30 dwelling units per acre by right or higher with density bonus provisions. Development must meet the following criteria: (1) the parcel is vacant or underutilized; (2) residential uses are permitted or conditionally permitted with the underlying zoning for the site; (3) A minimum of 20% of the units will be affordable to Extremely Low -Income, Very Low -Income, Low -Income, or Low - Moderate Income households; (4) the breakdown of these units is equivalent to the ratio in the Temecula Regional Housing Needs Assessment for 2006-2014; and (5) the units maintain their affordable status for at least 55 years. 2. Sites for Emergency and Transitional Housing According to the 2000 Census and the 2006 Census estimates, there were no homeless persons reported living in the City, and all of Temecula's population was accounted for in either households or group homes. However, the 2007 Riverside County Homeless Survey, I \1 I , tl l \ (, I \ i I\" \ L P I_ A \ 11101) conducted on January 24, 2007, identified 105 homeless persons living in Temecula, which accounts for approximately 2.3 percent of Hthe County's homeless population. The City has adopted a program to find housing for Temecula's homeless population. In addition, a number of facilities and service agencies serve the homeless needs of Temecula. S The Temecula Development Code provides for the provision of emergency shelters and transitional housing within the City. The City Ifacilitates the development of emergency shelters and transitional housing by permitting such facilities in the Medium Density and High Density Residential districts by right. These uses are also permitted in other residential districts with a conditional use permit. Emergency shelters are also permitted with a conditional use permit in the Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Highway/Tourist Commercial, Service Commercial, PO, Business Park, and Light Industrial zoning districts. Fiw- Year Objectiws: • The City will continue to permit emergency shelters and transitional housing as identified in the Development Code. Progress -to -Date• The City Council has formed a Homeless Shelter Ad Hoc Subcommittee to address the issue of transitional and/or emergency housing for the homeless living in Temecula. Futures The City will continue to work with public agencies and private entities to provide adequate resources for its homeless population. The City will also, to the extent feasible, participate in efforts to unite organizations and entities that provide services to the homeless. • The City will continue to require affordable housing projects receiving assistance from the City to reserve units for transitional housing. Pr%ms-to-Dato The City Council has formed a Homeless Shelter Ad Hoc Subcommittee to address the issue of transitional and/or emergency housing for the homeless living in Temecula. Futures The City will continue its efforts to require affordable housing projects that receive L_ I T) 0 F 1 E \1 L -- H L \ G i \ L R A I I' I \\ I+110 assistance from the City to reserve units far transitional housing. Fiw- Year Objectiws : • The City will recommend an amendment to the Temecula Municipal Code to define supportive and transitional housing as residential uses subiect only to the same hermit and nrocessine reauirements of similar uses in the same zone b3� Tune 2012. Piss -to -Date• The City has reviewed the state law and understands the legal requirement and the moral need to provide this type of housing. I ! ) i I I \< < �_ a I. \ ( , t ,\ 1,_ o I P i \ \. H Assist in Development of Affordable Housing O New construction is a major source of housing for prospective homeowners and renters. However, the cost of new construction is l_,1 substantially greater than other program options. Incentive programs, such as density bonus, offer a cost-effective means of providing affordable housing. Other programs, such as the First Time Home i Buyers Program, increase the affordability of new and existing l housing. 1 V 3. Sites for Transitional/ Supportive Housing and Single Room Occupancies The City has a legal obligation to respond to new legislation passed since the last update of the Housing Element to amend the Temecula Municipal Code to allow for supportive housing and single room occupancy residential uses by right within residential zones. The City currently prints Transitional Housing in Medium and High Density residential districts by and in other residential districts with the approval of a conditional use permit. However, under new state law, supportive and transitional housing must be treated as residential uses subject only to the same permit processing procedures as other housing in the same zone. In addition, the City will amend the zoning code to designate zoning districts appropriate for Single Room Occupancies (SROs). Under- the new Mate sive housingand single mem Fiw- Year Objectiws : • The City will recommend an amendment to the Temecula Municipal Code to define supportive and transitional housing as residential uses subiect only to the same hermit and nrocessine reauirements of similar uses in the same zone b3� Tune 2012. Piss -to -Date• The City has reviewed the state law and understands the legal requirement and the moral need to provide this type of housing. I ! ) i I I \< < �_ a I. \ ( , t ,\ 1,_ o I P i \ \. C i r) 0 1 21. Housing for Persons with Disabilities Consistent with SB 520 enacted January 1, 2002 the City annually analyzes and determines whether there are constraints on the development, maintenance, and improvement of housing for persons with disabilities, including review of eensistent vi; cu 520 enaetea january > 92. g4ie anal'sis will include —land use controls, permit procedures, and building codes for the development of housing for persons with disabilities. In addition, the City will establish a written reasonable accommodation ordinance to provide exception in zoning and land use for housing for persons with disabilities. This procedure will be a ministerial process, with minimal or no processing fee, subject to approval by the Community Development Director aimlvine the following decision-making criteria: • The request for reasonable accommodation will be used by an individual with a disabiliW protected under fair housing laws. • The requested accommodation is necessary to make housing available to an individual with a disability protected under fair housing laws. • The requested accommodation would not require a fundamental alteration in the nature of the City's land -use and zoning program. Fim- Year Objectives: • Consistent with Health & Safety Code Sections 1267.8 1566.3, and 1568, the City will amend the Development Code to treat licensed residential care facilities and group homes serving six or fewer no differently than other by right single family housing uses by June 2011. • The City will adopt a formalized reasonable accommodation process for individual homeowners requesting exceptions to zoning and development standards to accommodate a disability by June 2011. T L y1 I u 1_ \ (; t \ I I v L f 1, \ 'y 11-1 )3 11 0 U S •• T L y1 I u 1_ \ (; t \ I I v L f 1, \ 'y 11-1 )3 11 0 U S Progress -to -Date The City has updated its General Plan and Zoning Code to provide more opportunities for the development of housing for persons with disabilities. I i Future The City will continue to monitor its U General Plan and Zoning Code for increased opportunities €erthe -to develop housing for persons with disabilities and to conform to IState law. The City will amend the Development Code and adopt a formalized Nreasonable accommodation Ordinance by June 2011. 22. Housing Element Monitoring and Reporting To ensure that the housing programs identified in this Housing Element are implemented and achieve their goals, an accurate monitoring and reporting system is required. Service agencies receiving CDBG funding from the City are required to report on their program accomplishments at least annually. Records from service agencies help the City assess the extent of housing and supportive service needs, particularly regarding the special needs populations. The City is also required to submit annual reports to the state addressing its success in implementing the General Plan and Housing Element. These reports provide decision makers with useful information regarding how successful the housing programs are with meeting the needs of the community. Fim- Year Objectims: • The City will continue to require that service agencies report their accomplishments annually. This information will be used by the City to assess the community's housing needs and how well these needs are being met by the existing programs. • The City will continue to submit annual reports to the state assessing the implementation of the General Plan and Housing Element. C. Summary of Quantified Objectives The following Table H-40 summarizes the City's quantified five-year objectives with regard to housing production, conservation, RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ADOPTING REVISIONS TO THE ADOPTED GENERAL PLAN 2008-2014 HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE (LR08-0017) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Procedural Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. State Housing Law requires that local jurisdictions periodically update their Housing Element pursuant to the update cycle of its Council of Governments. B. The City of Temecula adopted its first Housing Element on November 9, 1F'xxl C. The City of Temecula first amended its Housing Element on October 8, 2002. D. The City of Temecula adopted a Comprehensive Update of its General Plan on April 12, 2005. E. The Southern California Association of Governments completed the Regional Housing Needs Assessment for this Housing Element cycle on July 12, 2007. F. On September 2, 2009, the Planning Commission recommended that the City Council approve Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017, a statutory update of the City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element. G. On November 10, 2009, the City Council adopted the 2008-2014 General Plan Housing Element Update, Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017. H. This Housing Element Update was processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law. I. The Planning Commission, at a regular meeting, considered the revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update and environmental review on July 7, 2010, at a duly noticed public hearing as prescribed by law, at which time the City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. J. At the conclusion of the Planning Commission hearing and after due consideration of the testimony, the Planning Commission recommended that the City Council approve the proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update, Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017. K. The City Council, at a regular meeting, considered the revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update and environmental review on July 27, 2010, at a duly noticed public hearing as prescribed by law, at which time the City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. L. At the conclusion of the City Council hearing and after due consideration of the testimony, the City Council approved the revisions to Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017subject to and based upon the findings set forth hereunder. M. All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Resolution have occurred. Section 2. Further Findings. The City Council, in approving the revisions to the adopted General Plan 2008-2014 Housing Element Update hereby finds, determines and declares that: A. The proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update are in conformance with the General Plan for Temecula and with all applicable requirements of State law and other Ordinances of the City; The revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update have been designed to be consistent with State Housing Law, the Regional Housing Needs Assessment for local agencies under jurisdiction of the Southern California Association of Governments, and to be internally consistent with the other elements of the Temecula General Plan. B. The proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update will not have a significant impact on the character of the built environment; The Housing Element Update is compatible with the nature, condition and development of existing uses, buildings and structures and the proposed revisions will not adversely affect the existing or planned uses, buildings, or structures. The proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update clarify specific programs that provide opportunity for affordable housing through the identification of appropriate sites and density, provisions for transitional and supportive housing, as well as establish reasonable accommodation to improve constraints on housing for persons with disabilities. Furthermore, these proposed revisions are consistent with the previously adopted environmental analysis indicating that impacts related to the built environment will be less than significant as result of this project. C. The nature of the proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update is not detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of the community; The proposed revisions will not expose people to an increased risk of negative health or public safety impacts and are consistent with the previously adopted environmental analysis indicating that impacts related to the health, safety and general welfare of the community will be less than significant as a result of this project. Section 3. Environmental Findings. The City Council hereby makes the following environmental findings and determinations in connection with the approval of the proposed revisions to the adopted General Plan 2008-2014 Housing Element Update: A. Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act ("CEQA"), the City Council has considered the proposed revisions to the adopted 2008-2014 Housing Element Update. The City Council has also reviewed the adopted Negative Declaration for the Housing Element Update, including the impacts and mitigation measures identified therein, and the subsequent environmental reviews required as mitigation measures identified therein. Based on that review, the City Council finds that the proposed project does not require the preparation of a subsequent Negative Declaration as none of the conditions described in Section 15162 of the CEQA Guidelines (14 Cal. Code Regs. 15162) exist. B. The City Council also finds that the proposed revisions do not involve significant new effects, does not change the baseline environmental conditions, and does not represent new information of substantial importance which shows that the Housing Element Update will have one or more significant effects not previously discussed in the Negative Declaration. The Negative Declaration previously analyzed the potential environmental impacts for the Housing Element Update. The revisions are consistent with what was previously approved and analyzed in the Negative Declaration. All potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed revisions are adequately addressed by the adopted Negative Declaration. A Notice of Determination pursuant to Section 15162 of the CEQA Guidelines is therefore the appropriate type of CEQA documentation for the revisions to the Housing Element Update, and no additional environmental documentation is required. Section 4. The City Council hereby amends the Housing Element of the City of Temecula General Plan to incorporate the revisions to updated Housing Element described and depicted on Exhibit A attached to this Resolution and incorporated herein as though set forth in full. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 27th day July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 27th day of July, 2010, by the following vote: F-Ayd:.�Ko1l1►NllNdiIAdi1:l4:63 NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk Old Town Temecula circa 1890 circa 1880 - TABLE OF CONTENTS City of Temecula Housing Element Page I. Introduction H-1 A. Community Context H 1 B. State Policy and Authorization H-3 C. Organization of the Housing Element H-3 D. Relationship to Other General Plan Elements H-4 E. Public Participation H-5 F. Data Sources and Glossary H6 II. Housing Needs Assessment H-6 A. Population Characteristics H-7 B. Employment Characteristics H-9 C. Household Characteristics H-11 D. Special Needs Populations H16 E. Housing Stock Characteristics H-23 III. Constraints on Housing Production H-34 A. Market Constraints H-34 B. Governmental Constraints H-36 Cl State Tax Policies and Regulations H-61 D. Infrastructure Constraints H-61 E. Environmental Constraints H-62 IV. Housing Resources H-66 A. Sites for Housing Development H-66 B. Financial Resources H-83 C. Housing Developers H-86 D. Infrastructure and Facilities H-87 E. Energy Conservation H-87 V. Accomplishments Under Adopted Housing Element H-88 A. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites H-88 B. Assist in Development of Affordable Housing 14-89 C. Govemment Constraints H-93 D. Conserve and Improve Existing Affordable Housing H-93 E. Equal Housing Opportunity H-97 F. Housing Element Monitoring and Reporting H-98 Gryof Temecula Genal Plan Homing Element - November 10, 2009 i TABLE OF CONTENTS City of Temecula Housing Element VI. Housing Plan A. Goal and Policies B. Housing Programs C. Summary of Quantified Objectives Appendices A. Housing Element Glossary B. Vacant Land Inventory and Residential Capacity Analysis G Underatilized Residential Parcels D. Urban Density Overlay List of Figures Page H-99 H-99 1104 H-123 H i City of Temecula's Multi Family Development H-2 H-2 2005 Age Distribution H-8 H-3 Temecula Housing Stock Composition H-24 H-4 Vacant Developable Parcels in the City of Temecula H-70 H-5 Underutilized Residential Properties and Potential Second Unit Sites H-72 H-6 Urban Density Overlay Area H-77 List of Tables I -L 1 Population Growth Trends H-7 112 2005 Race and Ethnicity H-9 H-3 Categories of Jobs in Temecula (2005) H 10 H-4 Employment by Industry: 2005 FI 10 H-5 Household Growth Trends H-12 H-6 Average Number of Persons Per Household 2000 & 2005 H 13 14-7 Household Income by Tenure H 14 H 8.2000 Temecula Households Overpaying for Housing H 15 H-9 2000 Temecula Vacancy Rates by Tenure 116 1-10 Female Headed Households H 17 H 112000 Senior Households by Age &Tenure H 18 H 12 Households Size by Tenure H-20 H 13 Household Size by Income H21 H 14 Number of Bedrooms by Tenure H-21 H 15 Total Housing Units H-24 H 16 2006 Estimated Housing Tenure H-25 H 17 2000 Estimated 'Housing Tenure by Housing Type (%) H-25 H-18 Age of Housing Stock 1126 City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element - November 10, 2009 ll TABLE OF CONTENTS City of Temecula Housing Element List of Tables (continued) H 19 Median Home Prices H-20 Housing Sales July 2006 through December 2007 H-21 Affordable Housing Costs by Income Category Riverside County H-22 Assisted Housing Inventory and at Risk Status H-23 Rent Subsidies Required H-24 Disposition of Conventional Loan Applications: 2006 H-25 Disposition of Government Backed Loan Applications: 2006 H-26 Residential Development Standards H-27 Parking Space Requirements H-28 Pemutted Housing by Zoning District H-29 Planning Fee Schedule H-30 Development Impact Fees for the City of Temecula H-31 Potential Residential Development Potential of Vacant Land Outside Specific Plan Areas H-32 Remaining Approved Residential Development for Existing Specific Plans H-33 Potential Residential Development on Vacant Commercial Land H-34 Potential Residential Development within the Urban Density Overlay Zone (Vacant Parcels) H-35 Potential Residential Development within the Urban Density Overlay Zone (Underutilized Parcels) H-36 Share of the Riverside CountyRHNA H-37 Temecula RHNA Adjusted for Completed Projects H-3 8 Summary of Residential Development Potential H-39 Remaining RHNA Adjusted for Projects in Pipeline H-40 Summary of Quantified Objectives H-41 Housing Program Summary H-27 H-28 H-29 H-30 H-33 H-35 H-36 H-40 H-41 H-43 H-53 H-55 H-67 H-68 H-73 H-78 H-78 H-79 H 81 H-82 H-84 H-123 H-124 Cary of Temecula General Plan I -lowing Element November 10, 2009 iu I. INTRODUCTION A. Community Context HOUSING ELEMENT Irhe City of Temecula (City is a growing community located along Interstate 15 (I-15) in southwestern Riverside County (County, just north of the San Diego County line. Located in Temecula Valley, the City is surrounded by gentle rolling hills. Surrounded by this attractive natural setting and located with access to both Orange and Los Angeles Counties to the north and San Diego County to the south, the City population has nearly quadrupled since its incorporation in 1989. Since that time, the population has increased from 27,099 persons to an estimated 97,935 persons in 2007. With its European history beginning in the 1800s, Temecula has played an important role locally for over a century. Old Town Temecula is the historic core of the City and is located in its western portion. Change from a small agricultural community to an urbanized city began in 1964 when Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical purchased the 87,500 -acre Vail Ranch. Development of the ranch occurred under the design of a master plan that continues to influence the land use pattern and circulation system of Temecula today. Much of the remaining vacant land within the City will be developed under the control of approved specific plans. The majority (80%) of the existing housing in Temecula consists of single-family detached houses, with the remainder consisting of single-family attached and multi -family units. A map that identifies the location of the City's multifamily housing complexes is included as Figure H-1. The high number of single-family homes is reflective of the City's young family-oriented population and desire to maintain its rural traditions. In comparison to the surrounding communities, the cost of purchasing a new home in Temecula is high, with an October 2007 median price of $418,000. In the neighboring communities of Hemet, Lake Elsinore, Murrieta, and Perris, the October 2007 median home prices ranged from $265,000 to $395,000, while the median home price in Riverside County was $350,000. C: i "( Y 0 F 1 E ;M E <: U L A GENEIZAL P L :1 N 0 Na N me 3 ga wo 2 Cree a 49 3 $pmWrwl 116 9 iasWms Rib s Nesi$yWl i6 6 AWgmIh SLmrtl f46 fr tmre 64 8 MNMMY&jE ib 9 Kgliug k49B 2M 1G Paunvalley. 9x f1 aax Tree u f2 Pmb4n 39c +a nsRr w f6 fa�rrea'ImmW 3s f3 gan[fpC�ttk 30 f6 Ne„anvez +w 19 $pWafilge 312 16 SWuroGMcexo 126 S><emneT 225 4 21 lartawWGazEpna G 21 %. TmrtmgVAe9 96 T! Tw4nYPtl9s 230 23 VsfapeNex IIO 26 Y.ntltl Sol 48 25 WOom9NW RO Tt Vpal� 2R m wrclnuaamw.. ssz 23 WSJaIAgt 1W 31 MWpN4191WA=s fib 31 Tmtt'WaGeek Nbge 4'6 92 Rarcm9anares 2s :J CeM FNY 6.W 6i WAGeeA 19ti 3 ixrelCrcek H6 "3 9yt I1 i6 3i C� III 1R 39 Co�nYy GWn 12 39 ,w6arrc Pfm 1e6 w swamunelx�azore i6R + mmewareM9u na Multi -Family Development D6c .W I, 200] 2ti�ati i� i S W O Pms's .. wrs.rree;Nurc. 0 cryer«raaRaa Figure H-1 City of Temecula's Multi -Family Development C: [ .E Y O E 1 E M E i: I I, A G I. `v E, R. A L P L A N H-2 In recent years, the housing market in Temecula has very much be - influenced by growth pressure in San Diego County. As housing prices in San Diego County began catching up with prices in south Orange County, many people who work in San Diego have chosen to live in Temecula, placing significant pressure on the Temecula , housing market. Employment opportunities exist within the City, allowing residents to work and live within the City. In 1990, the estimated jobs -to -housing ratio was about 1.15 jobs per household. Although regional estimates predicted that the ratio would decrease to 1.06 jobs per household by 2005, as the construction of new housing outpaces employment growth, this has not been the case and there is now a larger job surplus in the City. B. State Policy and Authorization The California State Legislature has identified the attainment of a decent home and suitable living environment for every Californian as the State's major housing goal. Recognizing the important role of local planning programs in the pursuit of this goal, the Legislature has mandated that all cities and counties prepare a housing element as part of their comprehensive General Plans. State Housing Element Law requires all cities and counties to update their Housing Elements at least every six years to reflect a community's changing needs. The prior element cycle was extended to cover a ten-year period due to the lack of state budget for the Regional Councils of Governments (such as the Southern California Association of Governments) to generate the regional housing growth allocations. Temecurla's last Housing Element was prepared in 2002 and was recently updated to cover the period of July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2014. C. Organization of the Housing Element The City is facing important housing issues such as preserving the historic traditions of the community, ensuring that new development is compatible with the existing character, providing a range of housing that meets the needs of all residents, ensuring that affordable housing is available to all segments of the community, and balancing employment with housing opportunities. This Housing Element evaluates housing needs in Temecula based on its demographic and housing characteristics. The Housing Element also compiles an inventory of resources available to address identified housing needs, assesses the effectiveness and appropriateness of existing housing programs being implemented by the City, and crafts C [ .I. Y J F 1 1, M L C: U L A G L N E [2. A L, P L A N H-3 a housing strategy that would effectively address the housing issues relating to availability, adequacy, and affordability within the limitations of the City. This Housing Element represents a policy statement indicating that Temecula will continue to strive toward maintaining and enhancing its housing quality and its desirability as a place to work and live. The Temecula Housing Element is comprised of the following major components: • An analysis of the City's population, household and employment base, and the characteristics of the City's housing stock (Section II); • Review of potential constraints to meeting the City's identified housing needs (Section III); • An evaluation of opportunities and resources that will further the development of new housing (Section IV); • An evaluation of accomplishments under the adopted Housing Element (Section V); and • A statement of the Housing Plan to address the City's identified housing needs, including housing goals, policies and programs (Section VI). D. Relationship to Other General Plan Elements The Temecula General Plan is comprised of the following 10 elements: 1) Land Use; 2) Circulation; 3) Housing; 4) Open Space/Conservation; 5) Growth Management/Public Facilities; 6) Public Safety; 7) Noise; 8) Air Quality; 9) Community Design; and 10) Economic Development. Background information and policy direction presented in one element is also reflected in other General Plan elements. For example, residential development capacities established in the Land Use Element are incorporated within the Housing Element. The General Plan goals and policies were reviewed for consistency with proposals recommended in this Housing Element update. This Housing Element builds upon other General Plan elements and is consistent with the goals and policies set forth by the General Plan. City staff maintains a conscious effort to entre that revisions to any element of the General Plan achieve internal consistency among all General Plan elements. The City undertook a comprehensive General Plan update that was completed in 2005. As L M F. C U L A C, E\ E R. A 1., P t, A N F(-4 part of that update, all General Plan goals, policies, and were reviewed for internal consistency. E. Public Participation Prog Residents of Temecula have had and will continue to have several opportunities to provide input during the development of the Housing Element. On December 19, 2007, the City conducted a publicly noticed workshop to discuss housing needs in the City and to provide policy directions for the drafting of the Housing Element. On June 19, 2008, the City sponsored a regional -wide Homeless Summit that brought together representatives from the Temecula City Council, Riverside County, local community churches, and 19 non- profit agencies to discuss ways to work collectively to address homeless issues. A key goal of this meeting was to discuss and enhance awareness of the "Housing First" movement,' a nationwide effort to create a ten-year plan to eliminate homelessness. The meeting was well attended with more than 30 people representing agencies such as SAFE, People Helping People, Temecula Valley Unified School District, Circle of Care, and Project Touch. Attendees were able to share infonnation on services that each agency provides and to learn from County staff how the County is addressing this issue. Prior to adoption of the Housing Element the City held another public workshop on August 18, 2009. A notice for the public workshop was published in the local newspaper ten days in advance of the workshop. The notice was also published on the Citys website. This workshop was attended by approximately 150 citizens concerned about affordable housing being placed in or near their neighborhood. The purpose of the workshop was to explain to the general public the requirements under State Housing Law, proposed amendments to the General Plan Housing Element and the proposed new programs developed to address new areas of concern. The feedback and concerns expressed by the public at workshops indicate that the public is generally in support of providing affordable housing but would prefer that it be placed away from established single-family residential neighborhoods when possible. The mixed-use, high- density concept for the Urban Density Overlay will alleviate this concern and has been incorporated into the Housing Element adopted by the City Council (tentatively scheduled for September 22, 2009). ' Housing First is an approach that considers social services and intervention services for at -risk homeless families after homeless families are in their own housing, and not while they are in transitional or temporary facilities. C. I 'I Y O I l L ,Yl E C U L, A G E N E R A L: P L A H-5 -�f Also prior to adoption the Draft Housing Element was available for review by interested individuals and organizations during the public review and comment period for a proposed Negative Declaration pursuant to the noticing requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act. A Notice of public Hearing and a Notice of Availability of the Draft Housing Element was published in the local newspaper and a direct mailing sent to the following organizations representing the interests of low and moderate income households and persons with special needs: • Coachella Valley Housing Coalition; • Rancho -Temecula Valley Senior Center; • Fair Housing Council of Riverside; • Riverside Center for Independent Living; • Catholic Charities; and • Housing Authority of the County of Riverside. F. Data Sources and Glossary The data used for the completion of this Housing Element comes from a variety of sources, including the 2000 Census, the 2006 Census estimates, American Community Survey, various studies produced by the City of Temecula, Southern California Association of Governments (SLAG), Western Regional Council of Governments (WRCOG), the California Department of Finance, the California Department of Employment Development, local newspapers, local real estate agents, local economists, professional associations, and DataQuick Information Systems. These data sources represent the best data available at the time this Housing Element was prepared. This Housing Element, along with the state -mandated requirements, includes a Glossary of terms used in the Element. This Glossary has been included to allow readers to better understand the terminology used in the Housing Element discussion, and can be found in Appendix A of this Element. II. HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT This section of the Housing Element describes the supply and demand for housing in Temecula, and is broken into five subsections addressing the characteristics of population, employment, households, special needs populations, and housing stock This analysis provides C I "E Y 0 1 T L 1.1 L C U L A G L N L it. A L P L A N H-6 the basis for developing a successful housing program that meets th needs of the community. A. Population Characteristics 1. Population Growth Trends Temecula is the fourth largest city among the 24 cities in the county of Riverside. According to the California Department of Finance, Temecula had a population of 97,935 as of January 1, 2007. During the period from 2002 to 2007, the California Department of Finance estimates that the City population grew by nearly 34%. As depicted in Table H-1, Temecula experienced its largest growth periods during the last 17 years, at almost nine times the growth that the County as a whole experienced. Temecula is ranked 31st out of 478 California cities, when ranked by the numeric change -in population for the year 2006-2007. TABLE H-1 POPULATION GROWTH TRENDS Jurisdiction 1990 2000 2001 Projected 2015 Projected % Change 2007.2015 Temecula 27,099 53,791 93,935 103,150 9.8% Hemet 36,094 62,751 71,705 100,832 40.6% Lake Elsinore 18,285 30,370 47,634 61,045 28.2% Murrieta 24,264 43,989 97,257 109,715 12.8% Perris 21,460 32,369 50,663 64,221 26.8% Riverside 1,170,413 1,522,855 1,493,337 2,509,300 64.8% SOURCE: U.S. Census, 2000; California Department Or Finance, WRCOG Riverside County Protection, November 2006. SLAG estimates that Temecula will continue to experience growth during the next five years. The level of growth however, is anticipated to be less than that experienced during the last 17 years, with a projected growth of 9.8% to about 103,150 persons by 2015. For Riverside County, an overall 68%n growth is expected for the next seven years. The neighboring cities of Lake Elsinore and Perris are expected to experience greater growth in comparison to Temecula in the coming years. Temecula's share of the total population in Riverside County was projected to remain at slightly above 4% in 2015. 2. Age Characteristics The age structure of a population is an important factor in evaluating housing needs and projecting the distribution of future housing development. Traditionally, both the young adult population (20-34) C i r Y 0 t 1. E ;M Lc t[ I_ A G E N L K A L P i. ` N 11-7 C: 1 I Y and the elderly population (65+) tend to prefer low to moderate cost, smaller units. Persons between 35 to 54 years old usually reside in higher cost, larger units because they typically have higher incomes and a larger household size. As shown in Figure H-2, the 2005 population of Temecula contains a younger population than the County as a whole. The median age of Temecula residents was 28.8, while the County median age was 32.5. While the City population has grown significantly since 2005, the City has remained a family-oriented community and mostly likely has maintained a similar age structure as in 2005. This age structure indicates that the City may require larger single-family homes to meet the needs of families with their school age children, as well as smaller, moderately priced houses and multi -family units for those younger individuals who do not have children, or are just beginning their families. FIGURE H-2 2005 AGE DISTRIBUTION 49°b�-.-----...-----...... --------- --.....—..----- - 3545 firy at ;o-:mecula M eiside Counh n 254 a 5% 7 <5 577 t829 21- - --.....>-::.. ......_ 24 25-44 4554 55-54 60-64 55 74 X5-84 85+ Age Groups SOURCE: 2005 Census. I Race/Ethnicity Characteristics The racial and ethnic composition of a population affects housing needs because of the unique household characteristics of different racial/ethnic groups. These characteristics tend to correlate with other factors such as family size, housing location choices, and mobility. As shown in Table H-2, the large majority (57.5%) of the 2005 population in Temecula was White, with Hispanics malting up the next largest group (29.8%). In comparison, Riverside County contains a much more diverse population. Only 44.9% of the County's 2005 O F 1 E ;t4 E C: Lf L A 11-8 {.; L N E K A L P I Y N Since 1990, the racial and ethnic composition of Temecula's population has also changed. This is reflected in the school enrollment data obtained from the State Department of Education. Enrollment data for the 2006-2007 school year in the Temecula Valley Unified School District showed that 54.1% of the students were White, 21.4% were Hispanic (could be any race), 19.9% were Asian and others, and 4.7% were Black B. Employment Characteristics 1. Employment Growth According to the 2000 Census, 39,474 Temecula residents were in the labor force, representing a labor participation rate of 68.7%. ('The labor force includes employed and unemployed persons aged 16 years and above.) In 2000, the unemployment rate was 3.2%, much lower than the countywide rate of 4.7%. The 2006 Census estimates that in 2006, approximately 42,762 persons were in the labor force. By the end of 2006, the unemployment rate had risen very slightly to 3.3%. A Gty study of employment opportunities indicated that there were 51,502 jobs in Temecula in 2005. As shown in Table H-3, most of the jobs in Temecula fell within two categories: managerial and professional specialty (34.8%) and sales, technical, and administrative support (27.8%). Employment by industry is tabulated in Table H-4. As shown, manufacturing and retail trade were the primary industries in Temecula. C: 11 t o f l E M E: C EI L A C1 E N E R A is P L .1 N H-9 --M population was White. The neat largest group was the Idispan population at 41.2%. TABLE H-2 2005 RACE AND ETHNICITY Numberof %of Numberof %of Riverside Race/ Temecula Temecula's Riverside County County's Ethnicity Residents Population Residents Population White 50,493 57.5% 857,769 44.9% l! Black 2,750 3.1% 105,465 5.5% Asian/Other 8463 9.3% 56,975 8.4% Hispanic* 26,172 29.8% 787,148 41.2% Total 87,878 100.0% 1,911,281 100.0% Note: Racial categories do not include Hispanics. SOURCE: Housing Report, Temecula: Demographic, Economic and Quality of Life Data, January 18, Since 1990, the racial and ethnic composition of Temecula's population has also changed. This is reflected in the school enrollment data obtained from the State Department of Education. Enrollment data for the 2006-2007 school year in the Temecula Valley Unified School District showed that 54.1% of the students were White, 21.4% were Hispanic (could be any race), 19.9% were Asian and others, and 4.7% were Black B. Employment Characteristics 1. Employment Growth According to the 2000 Census, 39,474 Temecula residents were in the labor force, representing a labor participation rate of 68.7%. ('The labor force includes employed and unemployed persons aged 16 years and above.) In 2000, the unemployment rate was 3.2%, much lower than the countywide rate of 4.7%. The 2006 Census estimates that in 2006, approximately 42,762 persons were in the labor force. By the end of 2006, the unemployment rate had risen very slightly to 3.3%. A Gty study of employment opportunities indicated that there were 51,502 jobs in Temecula in 2005. As shown in Table H-3, most of the jobs in Temecula fell within two categories: managerial and professional specialty (34.8%) and sales, technical, and administrative support (27.8%). Employment by industry is tabulated in Table H-4. As shown, manufacturing and retail trade were the primary industries in Temecula. C: 11 t o f l E M E: C EI L A C1 E N E R A is P L .1 N H-9 According to SLAG, the City's 2000 employment base of 24,354 jobs, which was projected to increase by 56% to 38,040 by the year 2010, reflects an average annual growth of 5.6%. However, these projections have already been surpassed as described in Table H-4. TABLE H-4 EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY: 2005 Industry NumberofJobs { Manufacturing 7,728 15.0% Retail Trade 12,787 24.8% Government, Education, Utilities 3,993 TABLE H-3 Distribution & Transportation 2,802 5.4% CATEGORIES OF JOBS IN TEMECULA (2005) 1,239 2.4% Occupation Number of Jobs %of Total Construction 4,415 8.6% Hotel & Amusement 5,945 Managerial/Professional/Technology 17,923 34.8% 3.3% Sales/Technical/Administrative (Support) 14,317 27.8% Health Services Service Occupation 8,446 16.4% 1,047 Construction Total 51,502 y SOURCE: City of Temecula Community Profile, 2005. 5,614 10.9% Production/Transportation 4,944 9.6% Agriculture/ Other 258 0.5% Total 51,502 100.0% SOURCE: City of Temecula Community Profile, 2005. According to SLAG, the City's 2000 employment base of 24,354 jobs, which was projected to increase by 56% to 38,040 by the year 2010, reflects an average annual growth of 5.6%. However, these projections have already been surpassed as described in Table H-4. TABLE H-4 EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY: 2005 Industry NumberofJobs %of Total Manufacturing 7,728 15.0% Retail Trade 12,787 24.8% Government, Education, Utilities 3,993 7.8% Distribution & Transportation 2,802 5.4% Agriculture & Mining 1,239 2.4% Support Services/ Other 6,177 12% Construction 4,415 8.6% Hotel & Amusement 5,945 11.5% Business Services 1,698 3.3% Finance & Real Estate 2,453 4.8% Health Services 1,219 2.4% Engineering & Management 1,047 2.0% Total 51,502 100.0% SOURCE: City of Temecula Community Profile, 2005. SCAG employment estimates over the last 18 years have proven to be consistently below actual in -City employment levels, 0 t l I- .1-t L C 1.1 L A {; t. N L R : t L P f. A H-10 2. Jobs -Housing Ratio A general measure of the balance between a communitys employment opportunities and the housing needs of its residents is through a "jobs -housing ratio' test. According to the 1990 Census, Temecula had an average of 1.62 wage-earners in a family while a City study estimated that the City had 1.66 jobs per household in 1990. These figures generally indicated that adequate employment opportunities existed in the City, potentially allowing a portion of its residents to work there. In comparison, Riverside County had 1.50 wage-earners per family, but offered only 0.89 jobs per household in 1990. Overall, more residents in other parts of the County worked outside of their place of residence than in Temecula. The 2006 Census estimates indicate that there are approximately 2.11 wage eamers per family and 1.72- jobs per household in Temecula. The jobs -housing ratio in Temecula was projected to decrease substantially to 1.06 by 2005. However, the current jobs - housing ratio is approximately 1.5, indicating that employment growth in the City continues to exceed household growth. If SCAG employment estimates decrease, Temecula residents will commute to other places in the region for employment. The majority of Temecula residents commute to places of employment outside of the City to work in San Diego and Orange Counties. As a result, the Temecula housing market is directly tied to the San Diego and Orange County markets. C. Household Characteristics 1. Household Growth Trends Parallel to the population growth trends shown in Table H-1, household growth in Temecula exceeded that of the surrounding communities and the County as a whole. Between 2000 and 2007, the number of households in Temecula increased by 98.4% while that in the County only increased by 87.4%. Comparing the City population growth (74.6%) with its household growth (98.4%) indicates that the City has become more family-oriented with increasing household size. Table H-5 shows that Temecula is expected to grow at a faster pace than the County, although the rate of growth is expected to slow. C, I[ r 0 1 T r .m 1: t: U 1, A G, E\ F R A 1. P 1, AN, 0 G TABLE H-5 HOUSEHOLD GROWTH TRENDS Jurisdiction 1990* 2000 % Change 1990.2000 Projected 2007 Pro Change 2000.2007 Temecula 9,130 15,875 74% 31,501 98.4% Hemet 17,397 27,241 57% 35,342 29.8% Lake Elsinore 6,066 8,844 46% 15,587 76.2% Murrieta' 6,849 10,296 50% 33,298 223.4 Perris 6,726 8,850 32% 14,567 65% Riverside 402,067 483,580 20% 753,797 87.4% County SOURCE: U.S. Census, 1990; California Department of Finance, January 1, 1992 and January 1, 2000 and SCAG Baseline Growth Projection, adopted April 16, 1998; California Department of Finance, 2007. 2. Household Composition and Size The characteristics of the households in a city are important indicators of the type of housing needed in that community. The Census defines a household as all persons who occupy a housing unit, which may include families related through marriage or blood, unrelated individuals living together, or individuals living alone. People living in retirement or convalescent homes, dormitories, or other group living situations are not considered households. According to the 2000 Census, 82.9% of the 18,293 households in Temecula were considered families. Among the 3,128 non -family households, 394 (12.6%) were single people living alone, including 109 (3.5%) elderly persons living alone. In 2000, only 22 of Temecula's residents lived in group quarters. Household size is an important indicator for identifying sources of population growth as well as overcrowding in individual housing units. A citys average household size may decline in communities where the population is aging. As depicted in Table H-6, the average persons per household decreased by 3.18% in Temecula during the period of 2000-2005. This is consistent with the higher cost of housing during that period, which would affect larger families, although a large number of families with school age children still live in Temecula. Average household sizes in Hemet, Lake Elsinore, and Perris continued to grow, while Murrieta experienced a much more dramatic decline in average household sizes than Temecula, reflecting a slightly different household trend. C i .j Y 0 r F r M E. c t[ L A Ci E N F K A L P L A F(-32 C I [ Y 0 1 - TABLE H-6 AVERAGE NUMBER OF PERSONS PER HOUSEHOLD 2000 & 2005 Jurisdiction Average Persons/Household % Change 2000 2005 2000 -2105 Temecula 3.39 3.282 -3.18% Hemet 2.27 2.335 2.86% Lake Elsinore 3.41 3.374 1.051. Murrieta 4.27 3.091 -27.61% Perris 3.63 3.846 5.95% Riverside County 3.09 3.093 0% SOURCE: California Department of Finance, January 1, 2005. 3. Household Income The income earned by a household is an important indicator of the household's ability to acquire adequate housing. While Upper Income households have more discretionary income to spend on housing, Low and Moderate Income households are more limited in the range of housing that they can afford. Typically, as the income of households decreases, the incidence of overpayment and overcrowding increases. The HCD has developed the following income categories: • Extremely Low Income Households earn between 0 and 30% of the Median Family Income (MTI), adjusted for household size; • Very Low Income Households cam between 31% and 50% of the MFI, adjusted for household size; • Low Income Households earn between 51 and 80% of the MFI, adjusted for household size; • Moderate Income Households earn between 81 and 120% of the MFI, adjusted for household size; and • Above Moderate/Upper Income Households earn over 120% of the MFI, adjusted for household size. As part of the Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RI INA), SCAG has developed estimates on income distribution for all jurisdictions within the SLAG region in 2006. The income distributions for Temecula and Riverside County are presented in Table H-7. Overall, household incomes in Temecula are higher than Countywide, with about 24% of households in the City eaming Very Low and Low incomes, while more than 41% of the households in the County were lower incomes. Median household income in Temecula was estimated at $71,754 in 2006, which continued to be higher than the countywide median income of $42,887. One reason for the higher median income 1 E M L is Ll L A G E N 1 K A L. P L A N 1-1-13 -'r f 0 S I G in Temecula is that many of Temecula's residents work in San Diego and Orange Counties where the median income and associated wages are higher. TABLE H-7 HOUSEHOLD INCOME BY TENURE Income Group Owner- Households City of Temecula Renter- Households Total Households Riverside County Extremely Low Income 2.25% 11.35% 5.4% 12.40% Very Low Income 2.25% 11.35% 5.4% 12.4% Low Income 8.10% 23.40% 13.40% 17.00% Moderate Income 29.10% 26.30% 19.20% 18.50% Upper Income 71.90% 27.50% 56.50% 39.70% Total 100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 100.0% SOURCE: Regional Housing Need Allocation Plan, SCAG, January 1, 2006 -June 30, 2014. 4. Overcrowding An overcrowded household is typically defined as one with more than one person per room, excluding bathrooms, kitchens, hallways, and porches. A severely overcrowded household is defined as one with more than 1.5 persons per room. Overcrowding is the result of either a lack of affordable housing and/or a lack of available housing units of adequate size. According to the 2006 Census estimates, 778 households in Temecula (2.99%) were deemed to be overcrowded. Of these households, 190 owner occupied units and 369 renter occupied units had few than 1.5 occupants per room; and 219 (0.8%) households were severely overcrowded. Of the severely overcrowded units, 77 were owner occupied and 142 were renter occupied. This marks an improvement of the overcrowding conditions reported in the 2000 Census, where 1,333 households were considered to be overcrowded. Of those, 871 were owner occupied and 372 were renter occupied. In comparison, overcrowding was a more prevalent issue Countywide, with 12,055 (1.87%) households living in severely overcrowded conditions. 5. Overpayment State and Federal standards consider a family to be overpaying for housing if it spends more than 30% of its gross income on housing. A household that spends more than it can afford for housing has less money available for other necessities and emergency expenditures. Very Low Income households overpaying for housing are more likely to be at risk of becoming homeless than other households. Renter - households overpay for their housing costs more often than owner - C_ T E t4 E C (.I L A i� E\ E K, A L P L i1 I H-14 households because of their typically lower incomes. Compared taY 1� renters, overpayment by owners is less of a concern because homeowners have the option to refinance the mortgage, or to sell the house and move into rentals or buy a less expensive home. In 2000, 78.4% of total renters and 62.5% of total owners were overpaying for housing in the City. The majority of the Moderate and Upper Income households with housing overpayments were homeowners. Overall, Moderate and Upper Income households were more affected by housing overpayment than other groups. 6. Housing Vacancy Rates for Owner/Renter Staff reviewed the most recent State of California City/County Population and Housing Estimate Report (E-5). This document indicates the housing vacancy rate for the City of Temecula is 4.06% as of January 1, 2007. In 2000, of the vacant houses in Temecula, approximately 47% were for rent, and approximately 24% were for sale only. (The remaining 29% were sold, but unoccupied, seasonally or occasionally occupied, or were vacant for some other unidentified reason) Under the current General Plan, a vacancy rate of 5% generally signals an adequate supply of housing. Table H-9 provides detailed vacancy rates by -tenure taken from the 2000 Census. C. t[ Y 1 E :tt L. t. H L A t3 t N is R A t.. P L A N 11-15 As shown in Table H-8 below, among the City's overpaying households, 27% were Extremely Low, Very Low, and Low Income households and 73% were Moderate and Upper Income households. TABLE H-8 2000 TEMECULA HOUSEHOLDS OVERPAYING FOR HOUSING Income Group Total Households Renter -Households Owner -Households Overpaying Overpaying Overpaying _ Extremely Low 772 12.0% 564 _ 29.3% 208 4.6% Income Very Low Income 957 14.9% 557 28.9% 400 8.9% Low Income 1,295 20.2% 560 29.1% 735 16.3% Moderate/Upper 3,400 52.9% 246 12.8% 3,154 70.1% Income Total Overpaying 6,424 100.0% 1,927 100.0% 4,497 100.0% Households Note: Sums slightly over or less than 100% are due to rounding error. SOURCE: CHAS Databook, HUD, 2000. The majority of the Moderate and Upper Income households with housing overpayments were homeowners. Overall, Moderate and Upper Income households were more affected by housing overpayment than other groups. 6. Housing Vacancy Rates for Owner/Renter Staff reviewed the most recent State of California City/County Population and Housing Estimate Report (E-5). This document indicates the housing vacancy rate for the City of Temecula is 4.06% as of January 1, 2007. In 2000, of the vacant houses in Temecula, approximately 47% were for rent, and approximately 24% were for sale only. (The remaining 29% were sold, but unoccupied, seasonally or occasionally occupied, or were vacant for some other unidentified reason) Under the current General Plan, a vacancy rate of 5% generally signals an adequate supply of housing. Table H-9 provides detailed vacancy rates by -tenure taken from the 2000 Census. C. t[ Y 1 E :tt L. t. H L A t3 t N is R A t.. P L A N 11-15 D. Special Needs Populations Certain segments of the population may have a more difficult time finding decent, affordable housing due to their special circumstances or needs. These "special needs" population include elderly persons, persons with disabilities, large households, single -parent households, farm workers, and the homeless. 1. Agricultural Workers Agriculture is a predominant industry in Riverside County, which is divided into four distinct agricultural districts. The City of Temecula is located within the San Jacinto/Temecula agricultural district. However, the amount of land devoted to agricultural use in Temecula is miniscule (see Figure LU -II of the General Plan Land Use Element and Figure OS -3 of the General Plan Open Space/Conservation Element). According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's 2002 Census, between 1997 and 2002, the number of farms in Riverside County decreased, while the number of acres used for fanning increased from an average size of 136 acres to an average size of 180 acres. The 2006 Census estimated that 434 Temecula residents were employed in fanning, forestry, and fishing occupations. While there are no agricultural operations in the City, nearby wineries represent an employment base for permanent, seasonal, and/or migrant farm workers. (A City study indicates that 1,239 agriculture - related jobs were located in Temecula in 2005. These jobs include management, workers, and agriculture -related business workers) Farm workers face various housing issues due to their typically lower incomes and the seasonal nature of their work. These issues include overcrowding and substandard housing conditions, and homelessness. C) r r o} T f. M r_ C t( L A (� t_ N F [z A L P L A N s" x TABLE H-9 2000 TEMECULA VACANCY RATES BY TENURE No. of Units (2000 Census) Percentage of Housing Units Total: 19.022 units 100% Occupied 18,219 units 96% Vacant 803 units 4% For Rent 372 units 2.00%' For Sale Only 246 units 1.30% Rented or Sold, Not 72 units 0.38% a. For Seasonal, Recreational 99 units 0.52% or Occasional use For Migrant Workers 0 units 0.00% Other Vacant 14 units 0,07% ' Totals more than 4.0% due to rounding errors. SOURCE: US Census, 2000. D. Special Needs Populations Certain segments of the population may have a more difficult time finding decent, affordable housing due to their special circumstances or needs. These "special needs" population include elderly persons, persons with disabilities, large households, single -parent households, farm workers, and the homeless. 1. Agricultural Workers Agriculture is a predominant industry in Riverside County, which is divided into four distinct agricultural districts. The City of Temecula is located within the San Jacinto/Temecula agricultural district. However, the amount of land devoted to agricultural use in Temecula is miniscule (see Figure LU -II of the General Plan Land Use Element and Figure OS -3 of the General Plan Open Space/Conservation Element). According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's 2002 Census, between 1997 and 2002, the number of farms in Riverside County decreased, while the number of acres used for fanning increased from an average size of 136 acres to an average size of 180 acres. The 2006 Census estimated that 434 Temecula residents were employed in fanning, forestry, and fishing occupations. While there are no agricultural operations in the City, nearby wineries represent an employment base for permanent, seasonal, and/or migrant farm workers. (A City study indicates that 1,239 agriculture - related jobs were located in Temecula in 2005. These jobs include management, workers, and agriculture -related business workers) Farm workers face various housing issues due to their typically lower incomes and the seasonal nature of their work. These issues include overcrowding and substandard housing conditions, and homelessness. C) r r o} T f. M r_ C t( L A (� t_ N F [z A L P L A N The City is unable to require wineries outside of its jurisdiction provide worker housing. Under its current zoning, the City does not allow for farm labor camps or farm -related group care facilities. However, to assist agricultural workers with their housing needs, the City of Temecula Municipal Code permits by right manufactured homes in all residential zones, permits by right apartments in Medium and High Density residential zones, conditionally permits boarding houses in the Medium and High Density residential zones, and a Program identified in this Housing Element Update will permit by right single -room occupancies in the Medium and High Density residential zones, and in the Community Commercial and Professional Office zones. Presently, agricultural workers can also qualify for existing affordable housing units in Temecula. 2. Female Headed Households Single -parent families often require special attention due to their needs for affordable childcare, health care, and housing assistance. Female -headed families with children particularly tend to have lower incomes, thus limiting housing availability for this group. According to 2000 Census data, approximately 846 households (approximately 4.6% of all households) were found to be under the poverty level in the City in 2000. Of those households under the poverty level, approximately 346 (1.9% of total households) were female -headed households. Thus, female -headed households living under the poverty level comprise approximately 40.9% of all female -headed households. This relatively high poverty rate among female -headed, single -parent households, suggests that the City will continue to face a need for additional, affordable family housing with access to additional support services. Table H-10 provides the number of female -headed households, as well as the percentage of female households living under the poverty level. TABLE H-10 FEMALE HEADED HOUSEHOLDS City of Temecula Householder Type Number Percent Total Households 18,249 100.0% Total Female Headed Householders 1,686 9.2% Female Heads with Children Under 18 1,143 6.6% Female Heads without Children Under 18 543 3.0% Total Families Under the Poverty Level 846 4.6% Female Headed Households Under the Poverty Level 346 1.9% SOURCE: U.S. Census, 2000; SF 3: H77. According to the 2006 Census estimates, 4,175 (16.1%) households in Temecula were headed by single -parents, of which 1,746 (6.70%) were C\ [ T Y O F 1 #' rl.( 1_, C CI 1., A Cs 1\ F: R A 1--P 11-11 headed by females with children under the age of 18. These estimates indicate that there are fewer single -parent households and fewer households headed by females with children thanwere reported in the 2000 Census. Among the female -headed households reported in the 2000 Census, 323, or approximately 26%, were living below the poverty level. Although the 2006 Census estimates do not report the number of female -headed households with children living below the poverty level, approximately 56 percent of all households are headed by female. It is unlikely that that the percentage of these households living below the poverty he has decreased. Instead, given the high cost of housing in Temecula and current economic conditions, it has likely increased. 3. Seniors/Elderly The special needs of seniors are a function of their often lower or fixed income. In addition, housing for seniors often requires special attention in design to allow greater access and mobility. Housing located within the vicinity of community facilities and public transportation also facilitates mobility of the elderly in the community. Seniors that own homes may, because of fixed incomes, fall behind in property maintenance and may not be able to afford mcreases mproperty taxes. In 2000, approximately 4,095 residents (approximately 7% of the population), age 65 and older, lived in Temecula. Senior heads of households numbered approximately 2,226 or approximately 12 percent of all households. Table H-11 provides the number of senior households and percentage of the general population that are owners and renters. TABLE H-11 2000 SENIOR HOUSEHOLDS BY AGE AND TENURE Householder Age Owner- Households Renter- Households % Owners I % Renters (All Temecula Households) 65-74 years 1,088 172 6.0%/1.0% 75-84 years 701 121 3.8%/0.7% 85 years and older 106 38 0.6%/0.2% Total 1,895 331 10.4%/1.8% SOURCE: U.S. Census, 2000. These numbers indicate that most seniors in Temecula have either come to Temecula to retire or they are long-time homeowners that want to stay in the area. Senior householders that rent constituted less than 2% of all renters. An estimated 115 senior households were extremely low-income, while an estimated 110 senior households C; I T Y O F I E ;4t E C t l L: A G F.. \ E It A 1., P L 1 1-1-1S were very low-income, and 54 were low-income, of 279 senior households, or approximately householders, that were low-income and below. which reflects a tota 5 15% of all senior According to 2006 Census data, Temecula had approximately 5,059 residents age 65 or older, representing slightly more than 6% of the total population and an overall decline as a percentage of the population since 2000. According to the 2006 Census data, approximately 43% of the elderly residents were reported to have self- care and mobility limitations and/or work disabilities. 4. Persons with Disabilities In 2005, about 9% of the Temecula residents age 16 or over were recorded by the Census as experiencing self-care and mobility limitations and/or work disabilities. Physical and mental disabilities can hinder a person's access to traditionally designed housing units (and other facilities) as well as potentially limit the ability to earn income. Housing to satisfy design and location requirements for disabled persons is limited in supply and often costly to provide. Housing opportunities for disabled persons can be addressed through the provision of affordable, barrier --free housing. The requirements for accessibility in the California. Building Code and the Temecula Municipal Code will ensure that reasonable accommodation and compliance with accessibility requirements are provided in all projects within Temecula. Reasonable accommodation is required for all new non-residential development and within multi -family housing projects to enable retrofit for persons with disabilities. All development plans are reviewed by the Building and Safety Department prior to approval to ensure that all requirements have been satisfied. In addition to the development of new units, rehabilitation assistance can also be provided to disabled residents to make necessary improvements to remove architectural barriers of existing units. The City's Residential Improvement Program is available to disabled residents to make repairs and/or retrofits to their homes to accommodate special needs. The program provides up to $7,500 for repairs as a forgivable loan, provided the homeowner remains in the home for at least five years. 5. Large Households Large households are defined as those with five or more persons. The 2000 Census reported 3,266 households in Temecula had five or more members; of those approximately 80% were owner -households and 20% were renters. Typically, the availability of adequately sized and affordable housing units is a major obstacle facing large households. In 2000, Temecula had 6,663 three-bedroom housing units and another 6,527 housing units with four or more bedrooms. C i "E Y O F T F 1.1 L C: U L A G E\ E [Z A 1. P I. A\ H-19 0 S I G C 1 T Y Thus, the City has an adequate supply of large -size housing units (approximately 72.4 % of all households). The issue for large households is related to affordability, particularly among renters. Accordingly, in the City of Temecula, only 13.5% of renter -occupied units contained five or more people. Subsequently, according to the 2000 Census, 48% of the renter -occupied large households were overpaying for housing. Table H-12 demonstrates the number of large families residing in each household type by tenure. TABLE H-12 HOUSEHOLDS SIZE BY TENURE Source: U.S. Census, 2000, SF 3: H17. Often large households with Extremely Low or Very Low incomes have to resort to smaller units in order to save on housing costs, which typically results in overcrowding; In the City of Temecula, approximately 297 households (approximately 9.1% of total households) earning below 50% of the WI were living in large households. In addition, the 2000 Census identified 669 renter households with five or more persons, but only 331 rental units with four or more bedrooms. This would suggest a lack of adequate large household rental units in the City. However, as is evident in Table H-13, approximately 79.3% of all large households were occupied by families with an income level above 80% of the NM. This would suggest that although Temecula is in need of more rental units for large families, the majority of large households in the City are earning well above the MEL Table H-14 compares the number of housing units by tenure and number of bedrooms in 2000. r 1 L M L C t L A 1-1-20 G L N L Ii. A L P t. A N City of Temecula 1-4 persons 5+ persons Total Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Owner 10,679 80.4% 2,597 - 19.6% 13,276 100% Renter 4,274 86.5% 669 13.5% 4,943 100% Total 14,953 N/A 3,266 N/A 18,219 N/A Households Source: U.S. Census, 2000, SF 3: H17. Often large households with Extremely Low or Very Low incomes have to resort to smaller units in order to save on housing costs, which typically results in overcrowding; In the City of Temecula, approximately 297 households (approximately 9.1% of total households) earning below 50% of the WI were living in large households. In addition, the 2000 Census identified 669 renter households with five or more persons, but only 331 rental units with four or more bedrooms. This would suggest a lack of adequate large household rental units in the City. However, as is evident in Table H-13, approximately 79.3% of all large households were occupied by families with an income level above 80% of the NM. This would suggest that although Temecula is in need of more rental units for large families, the majority of large households in the City are earning well above the MEL Table H-14 compares the number of housing units by tenure and number of bedrooms in 2000. r 1 L M L C t L A 1-1-20 G L N L Ii. A L P t. A N 6. Homeless The homeless population refers to persons lacking consistent and adequate shelter. This includes persons living in emergency or transitional housing for homeless persons, as well as persons living in cats, parks, abandoned buildings, and other places not meant for permanent habitation. According to the 2000 Census and the 2006 Census estimates, no homeless persons were reported and Temecula's population was accounted for in either households or group homes. However, the 2007 Riverside County Homeless Survey, conducted on January 24, 2007, identified 105 homeless persons living in Temecula. This homeless population accounts for approximately 2.3 percent of the County's homeless population. The City has adopted a program to find housing for Temecula's homeless population. C I 1 Y O F l E AI E C U L A GE -NI -RAL P L H-21 TABLE H-13x� HOUSEHOLD SIZE BY INCOME City of Temecula City of Temecula 1-4 persons 5+ persons* Total Income Level Bedroom Type Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Below 30% of MFI 653 5.2% 399 7.1% 1,052 5.8% 340 30% to 50% of MFI 723 5.7% 352 6.2% 1,075 5.9% ' 7.6% 2 1,177 8.9% 2,130 43.1% 3,307 51%to 80% 1,273 10.1% 660 11.7% 1,933 10.6% 6,663 81%+ 9,930 78.9% 4,235 75.0% 14,165 77.7% 5,238 Totals 12,579 100.0% 5,646 100.0% 18,225 100.0% _... 7.1% Totals 13,276 100% 4943 100% 18,219 Note: Includes other households. SOURCE: Census Bureau 2000 Census, SF 3: H17. SOURCE: Approximations based on CHAS Data, 2000. 6. Homeless The homeless population refers to persons lacking consistent and adequate shelter. This includes persons living in emergency or transitional housing for homeless persons, as well as persons living in cats, parks, abandoned buildings, and other places not meant for permanent habitation. According to the 2000 Census and the 2006 Census estimates, no homeless persons were reported and Temecula's population was accounted for in either households or group homes. However, the 2007 Riverside County Homeless Survey, conducted on January 24, 2007, identified 105 homeless persons living in Temecula. This homeless population accounts for approximately 2.3 percent of the County's homeless population. The City has adopted a program to find housing for Temecula's homeless population. C I 1 Y O F l E AI E C U L A GE -NI -RAL P L H-21 TABLE H-14 NUMBER OF BEDROOMS BY TENURE City of Temecula Owner Households Renter Households All Households Bedroom Type Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent 0 54 0.41% 286 5.8% 340 1.9% 1 137 1.0% 1,248 25.2% 1,382 7.6% 2 1,177 8.9% 2,130 43.1% 3,307 18.1% 3 5,738 43.2% 925 18.7% 6,663 36.6% 4 4,907 37.0% 331 6.7% 5,238 28.7% 5+ 1,263 9.5% 26 0.5% 1,289 7.1% Totals 13,276 100% 4943 100% 18,219 100% SOURCE: Census Bureau 2000 Census, SF 3: H17. 6. Homeless The homeless population refers to persons lacking consistent and adequate shelter. This includes persons living in emergency or transitional housing for homeless persons, as well as persons living in cats, parks, abandoned buildings, and other places not meant for permanent habitation. According to the 2000 Census and the 2006 Census estimates, no homeless persons were reported and Temecula's population was accounted for in either households or group homes. However, the 2007 Riverside County Homeless Survey, conducted on January 24, 2007, identified 105 homeless persons living in Temecula. This homeless population accounts for approximately 2.3 percent of the County's homeless population. The City has adopted a program to find housing for Temecula's homeless population. C I 1 Y O F l E AI E C U L A GE -NI -RAL P L H-21 f, "` ... >3� 1-11 0 U S A number of facilities and service agencies serve the homeless in the Temecula Valley area, and they include: • Temecula Murrieta Rescue Mission (Temecula) — Located off Temecula Parkway, provides transitional housing referrals, health services, meals, telephone services, counseling, job information, and referrals to other public and private resources and services. This shelter is funded by a partnership of organizations including Rancho Community Church and the Orange County Rescue Mission. • Project T.O.U.C.H. — Project T.O.U.C.H. creates a forum that utilizes faith based organizations, non -profits, businesses and government agencies to provide services to homeless and people in crisis in the Temecula Valley area. These services include shelter through motel vouchers, meals through restaurant vouchers, safe house placement, counseling, transportation assistance and gasoline vouchers, as well as referrals to other resources and services. This organization is funded by a variety of local private and public sponsors. • Jericho House — Jericho House is a street ministry that offers referrals to transitional housing facilities, food programs and meal assistance, substance abuse counseling, health services, and other private and public resources and services within the Temecula Valley. The non-profit organization is funded through a variety of local private and public sponsors. In addition, the Riverside County Department of Public Social Services, with offices located in the City of Temecula, offers a variety of programs for the City's homeless population through its Homeless Programs Unit. These services include outreach, intake, and assessment to identify housing and other social service needs such as emergency shelter, transitional housing with supportive services, and permanent housing. The Department of Public Social Services also offers a hotline to assist those in need by dialing 2-1- 1. C, i T Y O F T E AA E C 11 1. A C [ N L R A 1, P I A N H-22 E. Housing Stock Characteristics A housing unit is defined as a house, apartment, or single room, occupied as a separate living quarter or, if vacant, intended for occupancy as a separate living quarter. Separate living quarters are those in which the occupants live and eat separately from any other persons in the building and that have direct access from the outside of a building or through a common hall. 1. Housing Growth Trends As shown in Table H-15, the housing stock in Temecula increased by almost 74% during the period of 1990 to 2000 and another 40% from 2000 to 2005. Temecula had the greatest increase in its housing stock compared to the surrounding communities. However, over the next few years, Temecula is expected to experience only moderate housing growth, while a substantial housing increase is anticipated for Lake Elsinore and Perris. 2. Housing Type The majority (80%) of the existing housing stock in Temecula consists of single-family detached and attached homes (see Figure H-3). Single-family housing units are dispersed throughout the City. Multi -family developments of five or more units represent the next largest segment (151/o) of the housing stock, and the greatest concentration of apartment complexes is located along Margarita Road. Currently consisting of 197 units, Heritage Mobile Home Park located in the northeastern corner of the City is the only mobile home park in Temecula. The City recently approved an addition of 13 spaces in this park. -I Y O P 1. F :M F C l] 1. ;\ (.i E N E R ;\ L P i.: A N 11-23 01 S N Figure H-3 Temecula Housing Stock Composition Multi Family (2-4 Units) (3%) Multi Family (5+ Units) (15%1 Single Family (Attached) 12%) SOURCE: California Department of Finance, January 1, 2005. 3. Tenure Mobile Home and Other (I%) Single Family (Detached) (80%) Table H-16 illustrates the tenure distribution of occupied housing in Temecula and in the surrounding communities. Compared to surrounding communities, Temecula has an average rate of homeownership. With approximately 25,935 dwelling units in 2006, approximately 68.7% (or 17,822 dwelling units) are owner -occupied. (The City of Murrieta has approximately 24,084 housing units and 82.8% are owner -occupied) The high percentage of single-family homes that exist in Temecula (20,748 units or 80% of the housing stocW and the average proportion of renters (31.3 % or 8,113 units) in the City indicates that many single-family homes are used as rentals. C I T Y J F Z 1: 14 L C L[ L A C.r E N E K A L P L A H-24 TABLE H-15 TOTAL HOUSING UNITS Jurisdiction 1990 2000 % Change 2005 % Change 1990.2000 2000-2005 Temecula 10,659 18,534 74% 26,007 40.0% Hemet 19,692 30,802 56% 32,452 5.4% Lake Elsinore 6,981 10,150 45% 12,190 20.0% Murrieta 9,664 14,528 50% 28,788 98.0% Perris 7,761 10,444 35% 12,673 21.3% Riverside County 483,847 582,419 20% 689,866 18.4% SOURCE: California Department of Finance, January 1, 2005. Figure H-3 Temecula Housing Stock Composition Multi Family (2-4 Units) (3%) Multi Family (5+ Units) (15%1 Single Family (Attached) 12%) SOURCE: California Department of Finance, January 1, 2005. 3. Tenure Mobile Home and Other (I%) Single Family (Detached) (80%) Table H-16 illustrates the tenure distribution of occupied housing in Temecula and in the surrounding communities. Compared to surrounding communities, Temecula has an average rate of homeownership. With approximately 25,935 dwelling units in 2006, approximately 68.7% (or 17,822 dwelling units) are owner -occupied. (The City of Murrieta has approximately 24,084 housing units and 82.8% are owner -occupied) The high percentage of single-family homes that exist in Temecula (20,748 units or 80% of the housing stocW and the average proportion of renters (31.3 % or 8,113 units) in the City indicates that many single-family homes are used as rentals. C I T Y J F Z 1: 14 L C L[ L A C.r E N E K A L P L A H-24 Jurisdiction Temecula Hemet TABLE H-16 2006 ESTIMATED HOUSING TENURE Occupied Dwelling Units Owner of Total Renter Occupied Occupied Occupied Murrieta Units unit 17,822 68.7% 8,113 15,618 59.4% 10,659 % of Total Occupied Units 31.3% 40.6% Exs � „n r„y r+1ERS Total Occupied Units 25,935 26,277. Lake Elsinore 21775 58.8% 1,015 41.2% 6,066 1 attached 2.4 units in Multifamily Mobile Home Murrieta 24,084 82.8% 4,992 17.2% 29,076 unit Perris 3,040 73.0% 1,110 26.7% 41163 and other Riverside County 444,836 69.2% 198,403 30.8% 643,239 SOURCE: 2006 Census and 2006 American Community Survey; SCAG, Draft Regional Housing Need 1.4% 0.1% Allocation Plan - January 1, 2006 June30, 2014; SCAG, Final Regional Housing Need 1.2% (72.9%) Allocation Plan - January 1, 2006 - June 30, 2014). _ The vacancy rate is a measure of housing availabilityin a community. A vacancy rate of 5% generally indicates an adequate supply of housing with room for mobility. According to 2000 Department of Finance data, the overall vacancy rate in Temecula was 4.06%, while that in the County was recorded at 13.25%. The relatively low vacancy rate in Temecula and the high vacancy rate in the County are attributed to the increase in population over the last few years, with many housing units continually coming on the market. Table H-17 provides an overview of housing types by tenure: TABLE H-17 2000 ESTIMATED HOUSING TENURE BY HOUSING TYPES (%) Occupied Dwelling Units ' Totals subject to rounding error. SOURCE: U.S. Census, 2000. (n=18,219) 4. Age and Housing Stock Conditions The age of housing is commonly used as a measure of when housing may begin to require major repairs. In general, housing units over 30 years old are likely to exhibit signs of rehabilitation needs, such as new roofing, foundation work, and new plumbing. .M E C LI I., A Ci E 'v E it. A L P 1. H-2.5 1 detached 1 attached 2.4 units in Multifamily Mobile Home unit unit structure 5+ units and other Owner - Occupied 70.0% 1.4% 0.1% 0.3% 1.2% (72.9%) Renter - Occupied 7.4% 0.7% 3.2% 11.9% 0.4% (27.1%)' ' Totals subject to rounding error. SOURCE: U.S. Census, 2000. (n=18,219) 4. Age and Housing Stock Conditions The age of housing is commonly used as a measure of when housing may begin to require major repairs. In general, housing units over 30 years old are likely to exhibit signs of rehabilitation needs, such as new roofing, foundation work, and new plumbing. .M E C LI I., A Ci E 'v E it. A L P 1. H-2.5 0 U S N G C. I "I Y As depicted in Table H-18, the majority of housing units in Temecula were built between 1980 through 2000 (76%) and most likely are in excellent condition. Only about 6% of the existing housing stock is over 30 years old. While approximately 22% of the units were built in the 1980s and will be approaching 30 years old during this Housing Element cycle, these units were built in compliance with modern building standards and are not likely to deteriorate rapidly. TABLE H-18 AGE OF HOUSING STOCK Year Built Number of Units %of Total 2000+ 6,543 23.8% 1990 to 1999 12,714 46.3% 1980 to 1989 6,176 22.5% 1960 to 1979 _ 1,7156.2% 1940 to 1959 298 1.1% 1939 or earlier 0 0.0% SOURCES: 2006 Census and 2006 Population and Housing Estimates, Department of Finance Building and Safety Inspection staff utilized the emergency services city map, divided into six separate areas to perform a methodical canvassing of the City's housing stock. The staff of 11 inspectors conducted windshield and sidewalk surveys and did not find any areas of housing that required abatement or demolition. As Building and Safety and Code Enforcement are under the same department supervision, the exchange of information between the Building and Code staff members is excellent. Enforcement items are a regularly reoccurring weekly meeting topic during Building and Safety weekly staff meetings. According to City staff, no housing units will need to be demolished or replaced due to dilapidated conditions. (However, the City has a few units that may be removed in order to facilitate intensification of the sites. The City will ensure that any applicable replacement/relocation requirement is met) Also, based on the housing age and condition in the City, only a small portion of the City's 3,013 older housing units would require rehabilitation (not more than 20% or approximately 603 units) and only some households would require assistance in making the needed repairs or improvements (for purposes of this Housing Element update, the term "older housing" refers to homes constructed prior to 1978). The City estimates a need for rehabilitation assistance for 150 households over the next five years. O 1 L ib4 1. C U L, A 1-1-26 5. Housing Costs Ozrmership Housing Temecula is one of the fastest growing and most prosperous communities in the Inland Empire. With its setting amidst the wine country and location along I-15 mid -way between San Diego and Orange Counties, Temecula experiences growth from both directions. As a result, Temecula was one of the fust communities to see its residential real estate market recover from Southern California's steep recession in the late 1990s. However, as evidenced in Table H-19, median home prices in Temecula decreased between 2006 and 2007, while median prices in surrounding communities declined even more substantially. According to the California Association of Realtors, housing prices in Temecula are higher than in some surrounding communities, but the overall percentage change in price is lower than in Hemet, Lake Elsinore, Murrieta, and Penis as of November 2007. While Temecula is one of the highest priced housing markets in Riverside County, when compared to San Diego and Orange Counties where the majority of the City's residents work, Temecula's housing costs are substantially lower. For example, in 2007 new homes in Temecula sold for an average of $402,000, while new homes in San Diego County sold for an average of $442,500. TABLE H-19 MEDIAN HOME PRICES Jurisdiction November2007 November 2006 % Change Temecula $402,000 $487,500 -17.54% Hemet $253,500 $353,000 -28.19% Lake Elsinore $320,000 $421,000 -23.99% Murrieta $348,750 $484,750 -28.06% Perris $310,000 $400,000 -22.5% Riverside County $359,000 $126,000 -16.51% SOURCE: California Association of Realtors, Median Home Prices, November 2007. Reflective of the housing stock, most housing sales in Temecula are for three- and four-bedroom single-family homes. During the 18 -month period between July 2006 and December 2007, 2,869 housing sales were executed, of which 78% were three- and four-bedroom single-family homes. Housing units in Temecula are sold for a wide range of prices. As shown in Table H-20, four- bedroom homes are sold from $62,500 to $2.5 million, indicating that some older housing units are sold for much lower prices while newer and custom homes are priced much higher. Condominium sales in Temecula exhibited less of a range in prices. C I F 1 J E 1 L M E C Lt L, A G F \i E R A L P L A\ H-2.7 0 N G C_ I I Y J 1 TABLE H-20 HOUSING SALES JULY 2006 THROUGH DECEMBER 2007 Single -Family Median Price Low Hi Sales No. % of Total 2 -bedroom $390,000 $260,000 $869,000 66 2.3% 3 -bedroom $414,750 $50,000 $1,825,000 1,060 37.6% 4 -bedroom $480,000 $62,500 $2,525,000 1,170 41.5% 5 -bedroom $590,000 $265,000 $3,100,000 371 13.1% 6 -bedroom $630,000 $354,000 $1,609,500 82 2.9% Condominiums Median Price Price Range Units Sold % of Total 2 -bedroom $278,500 $174,000 $321,000 22 17.5% 3 -bedroom $351,750 $140,500 $450,000 89 70.6% 4 -bedroom $379,000 $315,000 $45,000 9 7.1% SOURCE: Los Angeles Times, Dataquick Service, 2008. Housing affordability is dependent upon income and housing costs. According to U.S. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) guidelines for 2007, the MFT for a family of four in Riverside County is $59,200. Based on this median income, the following maximum income limits for a four -person family can be established: • Very Low Income households (0 to 50% of MFT) earn a maximum of $29,600; • Low Income households (51 to 80% of WI) cam a maximum of $47,350; • Moderate Income households (81 to 120% of MFI) earn a maximum of $71,000; • Median Income households earn $47,400. Assuming that the potential homebuyer within each income group has sufficient credit, down payment (50/o), and maintains affordable housing expenses (i.e., spends no more than 30% of their gross income on the mortgage, taxes, and insurance), the maximum affordable home price can be determined for each income group. Table H-21 shows the maximum housing prices affordable to the various income groups. Based on the median home prices shown in Table H-19, housing ownership opportunities are available in Temecula for some older Very Low and Low Income and most Moderate Income households, although Very Low Income households would not be able to afford median housing prices in the City. In addition, most two- and three-bedroom condominiums, and some older three- and four-bedroom houses are affordable to Moderate Income households. T E ;M E C Ll L A G E t E R, A L: P L A N H-24 TABLE H-21 AFFORDABLE HOUSING COSTS BY INCOME CATEGORY RIVERSIDE COUNTY Income Category Maximum Income Monthly Affordable Housing Cost Utilities Affordable Rent Taxes Maintenance Affordable Home Price Very Low $29,600 $740 $123 $617 $244 $83,000 Low $43,350 $888 $123 $765 $298 $148,000 Moderate $71,000 $1,628 $123 $1,505 $370 $234,000 Median $59,200 $1,480 $123 $1,357 $334 $191,000 Maximum affordable home price based on a 30 -year loan at 6.5% interest, assuming that the homebuyer can afford to pay a 10% down payment and closing costs. Rental Housing Current rental information on multi -family rental units in Temecula was obtained through the City's Geographical Information System (GIS) data reports. The data identified 41 multi -family complexes in the city. The multi -family housing stock has more than doubled since 1998, increasing from 3,120 to 6,247 units. According to the 2007 John Husing Report, the average monthly rent in Temecula was $1,144 in 2006. This data indicated that the monthly average rent in Temecula has increased by over 40% since 2002. Based on the household income limits identified in Table H-21, a Low Income household can afford to pay monthly housing costs in the amount of $888 per month, while a Moderate Income household can afford to pay up to $1,628 per month. Based on these limits, Low and Moderate Income households can afford to live in Temecula even if rents have increased significantly by 40% since the last update to the Housing Element. As Very Low Income households can only afford to pay $740 a month in housing costs, they will not be able to afford market rate rents without paying in excess of 30% of their gross income under most circumstances. Often large households with Very Low Incomes have to resort to smaller units in order to save on housing costs, which typically results in overcrowding. 6. Assisted Housing at Risk of Conversion Inwntory of Assisted Housing State Housing Element law requires cities to prepare an inventory that includes all assisted multi -family rental units which are eligible to convert to non -low income housing uses due to termination of subsidy contract, mortgage prepayment, or expiring use restrictions. Under Housing Element law, this inventory is required to cover an evaluation period following the statutory due date of the Housing C I r y o f 1 r. :M L c: U L A C l t, NiI R A L [' i A '\ 11-2,9 0 C I .t Y O F ( E ;14 I_ c LI L A {; }\ F It, A L. 1' L 1 1-1-3C) 11 4'_r'�� Element (July 1, 2008). Thus, this at -risk housing analysis covets the period from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2014. Table H-22 provides an inventory of the City's assisted multi -family housing stock by various government assistance programs. This inventory includes all multi -family rental units assisted under Federal, State, and/or local programs, including HUD programs, state and local bond programs, redevelopment programs, and local density bonus direct or assistance programs. TABLE H-22 ASSISTED HOUSING INVENTORY AND AT RISK STATUS Total # of Project Project Program Earliest Conversion Date Units at Units Risk _ Temecula Villas 96 Section 8 New 6/1999 48 (28837 Pujol St.) Construction (expired) Woodcreek Apts. 344 Mortgage Revenue 3/31/2003 71 (4220 Moraga Rd.) Bond (expired) Rancho California Apts. 55 Section 8 New 3/16/2011 55 (29210 Stonewood Rd.) Construction (City to renegotiate Section 221(d)4 before expiration) Rancho West Apts. 150 RDA Revenue Bond 4/8/2026 150 (4220 Main St.) HOME Rancho Creek Apts. 30 RDA Loan 9/30/2026 30 (28464 Felix Valdez Rd.) Mission Village Apts. 76 RDA Revenue Bond 7/16/2028 76 (28497 Pujol St.) Oaktree Apts. 40 FmHA New Construction 8/8/2004 40 (42176 Lyndie Lane) Section 515/Section 8 (Owner has requested a TEFRA Hearing) Creekside Apts. 48 Fm HA New Construction 8/22/2036 43 (28955 Pujol St.) Section 515 Dalton II 24 Agency Loan 2062 24 (419455'St.) Dalton III 22 Agency Loan 2062 22 (41955 5� St.) Cottages of Old Town 17 Agency Loan 2047 17 6'" St. & Felix Valdez) Riverbank Apts. 66 Agency Loan 2058 66 (28500 Pujol St.) Temecula Lane 11 Builder Financed 2065 11 (Loma Linda Rd & Pechanga Pkwy) Habitat 1 2 Land/Cash Contribution 2047 2 (6' St. & Felix Valdez) Habitat 11 7 Land/Cash Contribution 2047 7 SOURCE: City of Temecula, December 2007. C I .t Y O F ( E ;14 I_ c LI L A {; }\ F It, A L. 1' L 1 1-1-3C) At -Risk Housing Conwrsion Potential � .LG 5 The Woodcreek Apartments (now Sage Canyon Apartments) have been converted. The City's Redevelopment Agency is currently working with an affordable housing partner who is in the process of acquiring the Oaktree Apartments. They will be using several affordable housing funding sources that will require a 55 -year affordability covenant. The City's Redevelopment Agency will work to support a similar scenario to extend the affordability covenants of the Rancho California Apartments prior to the contract expiring in 2011. Rancho California: This 55 -unit project was developed with a HUD -insured Section 221(d)4 mortgage loan. This mortgage loan maintains a market rate interest and places no deed restriction on the project to maintain the units as affordable housing. To ensure affordability of these units, HUD provided a 20 -year Section 8 contract for the 55 units, thereby subsidizing the rent payments by tenants. This Section 8 contract was due to expire in March 2004. Currently, the project is contracted by HUD through 2011 and will be re-evaluated every five years thereafter. Through conversations with the property's corporate spokesperson, it has been made clear that the land owner has no intention, and cannot currently foresee a situation whereby this development would be converted to market rate upon its valuation in 2011. Oaktree Apartments: The 40 -unit Oaktree project was financed through FmHA-New Construction Section 515 loans. This project was due to expire in 2004 with prepayment of the loan; the City is currently in negotiations to extend the term of its affordable units. At present, the property owner has not converted these to market rate units. In March, 2008 the California Statewide Communities Development Authority requested the City conduct a TEFRA hearing to issue purchase and rehabilitation bonds to a third party buyer for the project. That rehabilitation effort did not transpire. However, on June 9, 2009 a developer applied to the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee for assistance to purchase and renovate the Oaktree Apartments. A decision on that application is pending and the City will continue to work with interested parties to rehabilitate and extend the affordability covenants for the Oaktree Apartments. Preservation and Replacement of At -Risk Housing Cost Analysis Preservation of the at -risk projects can be achieved in four ways: 1) facilitate transfer of ownership of the at -risk properties to non- profit organizations; 2) purchase of affordability covenants; 3) provide rental assistance to tenants using funding sources other CC [ i Y O F T it M L C U L A G E N E It A L P F. 1 N 11-31 0 C I r l To purchase the affordability covenant on the at -risk projects, an incentive package should include interest assistance at or below what the property owners can obtain in the open market. To enhance the attractiveness of the incentive package, the interest assistance may need to be combined with additional rent assistance. Rent Subsidy: A total of 55 units in the Rancho California project currently maintain Section 8 contracts that are due to expire within the time frame of this Housing Element. Should annual renewal of project -based Section 8 contracts become unavailable in the future, tenant -based rent subsidies such as Section 8 vouchers and certificates may be used to preserve the affordability of housing. Table H-23 describes the rental subsidies that would be required for these two projects. Under the HUD Section 8 program, assistance is only available to Very Low Income households (up to 50% of the County Median Family Income). Thus the discrepancy between the Fair Market Rent for a unit and the housing cost affordable to a Very Low Income household is used to estimate the amount of rent subsidy required for that unit. J F }_: h1 1- C L} L, A 1-1;32 C}\ E R A L P 1. \\ than Section 8; and/or 4) construct or purchase replacement affordable units. Transfer of Ownership: By transferring ownership of at -risk projects to non-profit housing organizations, long-term, low income use of those projects can be secured, and the project will be eligible for a greater range of government assistance programs. Purchase of Affordability Covenant: Another option to preserve it the affordability of at -risk projects is to provide an incentive package t to the owners to maintain the projects as low income housing. Incentives could include writing down the interest rate on the remaining loan balance, and/or supplementing the tenant's rent payment or Section 8 subsidy amount from HUD to market levels. C I r l To purchase the affordability covenant on the at -risk projects, an incentive package should include interest assistance at or below what the property owners can obtain in the open market. To enhance the attractiveness of the incentive package, the interest assistance may need to be combined with additional rent assistance. Rent Subsidy: A total of 55 units in the Rancho California project currently maintain Section 8 contracts that are due to expire within the time frame of this Housing Element. Should annual renewal of project -based Section 8 contracts become unavailable in the future, tenant -based rent subsidies such as Section 8 vouchers and certificates may be used to preserve the affordability of housing. Table H-23 describes the rental subsidies that would be required for these two projects. Under the HUD Section 8 program, assistance is only available to Very Low Income households (up to 50% of the County Median Family Income). Thus the discrepancy between the Fair Market Rent for a unit and the housing cost affordable to a Very Low Income household is used to estimate the amount of rent subsidy required for that unit. J F }_: h1 1- C L} L, A 1-1;32 C}\ E R A L P 1. \\ TABLE H-23 RENT SUBSIDIES REQUIRED Section 81Subsidized At -risk Units -Rancho California 2 -Bedroom 22 3 -Bedroom 22 4 -Bedroom 11 Total 55 Total Monthly Rent Income Supported by Affordable $26,180 Housing Cost of Very Low Income Households Total Month Rent Allows by Fair Market Rents $42,152 Total Annual Subsidies Required $191,664 Notes: A two-bedroom unit is assumed to be occupied by a three-person household, a three-bedroom unit by a four -person household, and a four-bedroom unit by a five -person household. Based on 2007 Median Family Income in Riverside County, affordable monthly housing cost for a three-person Very Low Income household is $666, for a four -person household is $740, and a five -person household is $799. 2005 Fair Market Rents in Riverside County are $752 for a two-bedroom unit, $1,058 for a three- bedroom unit, and $1,234 for a four-bedroom unit. Replacement Cost Analysis/Purchase of Similar Units: The cost of developing new housing depends on a variety of factors such as density, size of units, location and related land costs, and type of construction. Based on discussions with a local developer with recent experience building multi -family housing within Temecula, it would be nearly impossible to develop multi -family rental housing for less than approximately $130,000 - $150,000 per unit. This cost estimate includes all costs associated with development. To replace the 95 affordable units in the Rancho California and Oaktree apartments with new construction would therefore require at least $12,350,000 to $14,250,000, provided that vacant or underutilized multi -family residential sites would be available for construction of replacement housing. Cost Comparison The cost to build new housing to replace the 95 at -risk units within the Rancho California and Oakree projects is high, with an estimated total cost of between $12.35 million and $14.25 million. The new construction cost estimate to replace the potential loss of these affordable units is considerably higher than the cost to preserve them. The most cost effective means of preserving the affordability of the at -risk units would be to transfer ownership to a non-profit group or purchasing 95 similar existing units, which is estimated at more than $6.9 million. Use of other forms of rent assistance, such as Section 8, does not ensure long-term unit affordability. The cost associated with rent C 1 'I Y o r l L .°til E C U I-, A C E Ni L [t A L r' L A H-33 0 I I G C I T Y subsidies is lower, requiring a total of approximately $359,910 annually for both Rancho California and Woodcreek Overall, transferring project ownership to non-profit organizations combined with financing techniques to lower the mortgage payment the purchase of affordability covenants, is probably the most cost- effective means of preserving the at -risk housing projects in Temecula. III. CONSTRAINTS ON HOUSING PRODUCTION Market, governmental, and infrastructure factors pose constraints to the provision of adequate and affordable housing. These constraints may result in housing that is not affordable to Very Low, Low, and Moderate Income households, or may render residential construction economically infeasible for developers. A. Market Constraints 1. Land and Construction Costs A major cost associated with developing new housing is the cost of land. Most vacant residential parcels in Temecula have been subdivided, while others are contained within planned communities. In 2000, in the Meadow View area, where parcels begin at one-half acre and increase in size, the price of a vacant parcel ranged from $60,000 to over $100,000. Larger tracts of raw land are available in the surrounding sphere of influence at a lower cost per acre. However, the potential development of this raw land is constrained by the City's desire to preserve rural lands, as evident in the General Plan. In general, vacant parcels in Temecula range from $95,000 per acre (residential) to nearly $24,000 per acre (vineyard). Most vacant residential parcels in Temecula are within a range of $180,000 to $330,000. Another major cost associated with building a new house is the cost of building materials, which can comprise up to 50% of the sales price of a home. Construction costs have continued to escalate throughout California for wood frame, single-family construction of average to good quality range from $50 to $70 per square foot, while custom homes and units with extra amenities may run higher. Costs for wood frame, multi -family construction average about $50 per square foot excluding parking. Both the costs of land and construction of a new house are passed on to the homebuyer. As a result, an increase in the cost of land or 0 F l h M E C: II L A 11-34 G E N L It. A L P L. A N construction materials will result in a higher housing price for tbe3_ purchaser. 2. Availability of Mortgage and Rehabilitation Financing Under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA), lending institutions are required to disclose information on the disposition of loan applications. Overall, in 2006, financing tightened for homebuyers and homeowners in Temecula and throughout the entire Riverside -San Bemardino-Ontario region. In 1997, a total of 1,031 applications were submitted for conventional home purchase loans in Temecula alone, and approximately 73% were approved. In 2006 a total of 255,754 applications were submitted throughout the Riverside -San Bemardino-Ontario area, of which only 52.6% were approved, as depicted in Table H-24. In 1997, in Temecula, only 12% were denied, with the remaining 14% of the applications were withdrawn or closed for incompleteness. However, in 2006, throughout the Riverside -San Bemardino-Ontario area, nearly 22% were denied and the remaining 26% were withdrawn or closed for incompleteness. Lower income applicants throughout the area continued to have a lower rate of approval in comparison to the higher income applicants, but in the current economy, the approval rate has fallen to 40.7%. TABLE H-24 DISPOSITION OF CONVENTIONAL LOAN APPLICATIONS: 2006 RIVERSIDE -SAN BERNARDINO-ONTARIO METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA Applicant Income Total Applications Home Purchase Loans %Originated/ Approved* % Denied % Other Low Income (<80%MFI) 6,146 40.7% 29.0% 30.3% Moderate Income (80-119% MR) 21,167 50.5% 23.3% 26.2% Upper Income (>+120%MFI) 228,441 53.1% 21.2% 25.7% Total 255,754 52.6% 21.6% 25.8% Originated Loan is a loan that has been approved and accepted by the applicant. SOURCE: Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (NMDA) data for 2006. The disparity between income groups with the availability of funding is also apparent in the approval rate for conventional home improvement loans. Table H-25 illustrates the disposition of government -backed home purchase and home improvement loans. Government -backed loans I I E. 14 F C (.t L A C. 1_; N E It. A 1., 11-35 0 a 1— } n include those insured by the FHA FmI3A and VA but do not include those provided through the Temecula Redevelopment Agency. Comparing Table H-25 with Table H-24 indicates that more Low and Moderate Income households throughout the area have a higher approval rate for government-backed loans than for conventional loans to achieve homeownership. This further substantiates the continued need for home buying assistance in order to facilitate homeownership among Low and Moderate Income households. TABLE H-25 DISPOSITION OF GOVERNMENT BACKED LOAN APPLICATIONS: 2006 RIVERSIDE-SAN BERNARDINO-ONTARIO METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA Home Purchase Loans _ - Applicant Income Total Applications %Originated/ ° Approved /°Denied %Other Lowinome (<80% MFI) 387 63.5% 15.5% 21.0% 80%I) Moderate Income 710 65.8% 13.2% 21.0% (80-119% MR) Upper income (>+120% MR) 862 68.0% 11.5% 20.5% Total 1,959 66.0% 12.9% 21.1% Originated Loan is a loan that has been approved and accepted by the applicant. SOURCE: Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (NMDA) data for 2006. Few households applied for home improvement loans under either conventional or government -backed lending. This is reflective of the overall sound conditions of the City's housing stock Locally assisted home improvement loans and grants are important to assisting the Low and Moderate Income households in making the necessary repairs. B. Governmental Constraints 1. Land Use Controls The Land Use Element of the Temecula General Plan and corresponding Development Code provide for a range of residential types and densities dispersed throughout the City. The current Land Use Element has designated 10,295 acres (63%) of the City's total land inventory for residential uses, including: single-family homes, multi -family units, and mobile homes. Residential densities in Temecula cover a wide spectrum, including the following categories: • Hillside Residential (HR) (0-0.1 unit/net acre) r 0 r T ):: m L c I.i /, A GENFKAL P L A X H-36 These residential categories provide for a range of housing types to be developed in Temecula. The City has set target levels for density for Hillside (0.1 unit/acre); Very Low (0.3 units/acre); Low (1.5 units/acre); Low Medium (4.5 units/acre) Density Residential designations. Only projects that provide amenities or public benefits will be allowed to exceed the target level The types of amenities or public benefits may include providing road connections, parks, or a fire station. These amenities typically apply to large-scale planned development projects. The City has not set density target levels for the Medium and High Density Residential categories in order to facilitate the development of affordable housing. In addition, the Land Use Element includes a Mixed -Use Overlay that adds residential uses to permitted uses, and increases the maximum and target floor -to -area ratio (FAR). As stated in the General Plan Land Use Element, for each area, a daily trip cap is defined, based on the maximum number of daily trips permitted. Within the daily trip cap for each area, flexible, high-quality design and creative mixes of adjacent uses are encouraged. Development project proposals that exceed the specified trip caps will not be approved. Residential densities would average approximately 28 units per net acre. According to the Land Use Element, the total number of units possible in Mixed -Use Overlay Areas ranges from approximately 1,173 to 2,348 units. The trip caps for each Mined Use Overlay area are as follows: Area 1 — 15,000 trips; Area 2 — 30,000 trips; Area 3 — 6,000 trips. The total number of trips, 51,000, is equivalent to 8,500 residential dwelling units (at 6 trips per unit for high density residential development); or 102 acres of commercial development (at 500 trips per acre); or a combination of the two. This intensity of development within the Mixed Use Overlays, while previously evaluated, is not expected to occur. Further discussion regarding anticipated development can be found on pages H-71 through H-75. In addition, in the first year after adoption of the Housing Element C I "I Y O F T F tit L C: U f A G Ei N1 E ft. A L P L A N 11-37 • Rural (RR) (0.1-0.2 unit/net acre) • Very Low Density Residential (VL) (0.2-0.4 unit/net acre) • Low Density Residential -1 (L-1) (0.5-1 unit/net acre) • Low Density Residential -2 (L-2) (1.0-2.9 units/net acre) • Low Medium Density Residential (LM) (3.0-6.9 units/net acre) • Medium Density Residential (NI) (7.0-12.9 units/net acre) • Nigh Density Residential (I) (13-20 units/net acre) These residential categories provide for a range of housing types to be developed in Temecula. The City has set target levels for density for Hillside (0.1 unit/acre); Very Low (0.3 units/acre); Low (1.5 units/acre); Low Medium (4.5 units/acre) Density Residential designations. Only projects that provide amenities or public benefits will be allowed to exceed the target level The types of amenities or public benefits may include providing road connections, parks, or a fire station. These amenities typically apply to large-scale planned development projects. The City has not set density target levels for the Medium and High Density Residential categories in order to facilitate the development of affordable housing. In addition, the Land Use Element includes a Mixed -Use Overlay that adds residential uses to permitted uses, and increases the maximum and target floor -to -area ratio (FAR). As stated in the General Plan Land Use Element, for each area, a daily trip cap is defined, based on the maximum number of daily trips permitted. Within the daily trip cap for each area, flexible, high-quality design and creative mixes of adjacent uses are encouraged. Development project proposals that exceed the specified trip caps will not be approved. Residential densities would average approximately 28 units per net acre. According to the Land Use Element, the total number of units possible in Mixed -Use Overlay Areas ranges from approximately 1,173 to 2,348 units. The trip caps for each Mined Use Overlay area are as follows: Area 1 — 15,000 trips; Area 2 — 30,000 trips; Area 3 — 6,000 trips. The total number of trips, 51,000, is equivalent to 8,500 residential dwelling units (at 6 trips per unit for high density residential development); or 102 acres of commercial development (at 500 trips per acre); or a combination of the two. This intensity of development within the Mixed Use Overlays, while previously evaluated, is not expected to occur. Further discussion regarding anticipated development can be found on pages H-71 through H-75. In addition, in the first year after adoption of the Housing Element C I "I Y O F T F tit L C: U f A G Ei N1 E ft. A L P L A N 11-37 Tp r� k Update, the City of Temecula intends to complete a comprehensive traffic study for the Jefferson Avenue Corridor. This study will evaluate the existing conditions and will also evaluate the benefits of proposed Circulation Element roads yet to be constructed. These roads include the French Valley Parkway, the Western Bypass, the extension of Overland Drive across Murrieta Creek, and a north/south connection into the City of Murrieta. The study will evaluate the completion of these improvements and their impact on providing relief to the existing road network. In 2009, the City will establish an "Urban Density Overlay' zone that will apply to sites located within an existing Mixed -Use Overlay Zone or within the Redevelopment Agency boundary. This new overlay will by permit right 30 dwelling units per acre (and higher with density bonuses) when: (1) the parcel is vacant or underutilized; (2) residential uses are permitted or conditionally permitted with the underlying zoning for the site; (3) a minimum of 20% of the units are available to Extremely Low -Income, Very Low -Income, Low Income, and/or Low -Moderate income families; (4) the breakdown of these units is equivalent to the ratio in the Temecula Regional Housing Needs Assessment for 2006-2014; and (5) the units maintain their affordable status for at least 55 years. During the RH[NA planning period, the City of Temecula intends to complete a new Specific Plan for the Jefferson Avenue Corridor, which makes up a significant portion of the Urban Density Overlay Area. A significant component of the Specific Plan will be a comprehensive traffic study that will evaluate the potential increase in vehicle trips within the Specific Plan Area and, in particular, along the Jefferson Avenue Corridor under existing conditions and after all General Plan Circulation Element improvements have been completed. It is anticipated that the completion of the French Valley Parkway, the Western Bypass, the Overland Bridge Extension over Murrieta Creek, and the Rancho Way Bridge over Murrieta Creek will lessen the traffic impacts on Jefferson Avenue. Such findings will enable higher density projects within this project area. 2. Residential Development Standards Temecula's residential development and parking standards are summarized in Tables H-26 and H-27. Residential standards have been adopted by the City to protect the safety and welfare of its residents. The Development Code and General Plan allow for modification and flexibility in the development standards through the provision of a Mixed -Use Overlay (see description above), Village Center Overlay, Planned Development Overlay, and the new Urban Density Overlay C, I T Y O 1 T F. ;tl E C: t L. A (_, E N E 12, A L P 1, A N 1-38 h ^ems_ Zone to be established by 2009. Flexibility in planning for over i• ti areas is allowed to promote a greater range of housing opportunities within the City. Diversity of housing, including affordable housing is one of the performance standards for the Village Center Overlay. The Planned Development Overlay Zoning District also encourages the provision of additional housing opportunities for the community. C 1-1 Y O 1: 1 E ;M Y C: L1 L A <, } N E K A L P L A N H-39 TABLE H-26 RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS HR VL L-1 L-2 LM M H Minimum Net Lot -- — — — 7,200 7,200 7,200 Area (square feet) Minimum Average 10 acres 2.5 acres 1.0 acre 0.5 acre — — — Net Lot Area per Dwelling Unit Maximum Dwelling _ — — — — 12.0 20.0 Units Per Acrel Lot Dimensions Minimum Lot 50 ft. 40 ft. 40 ft. 30 ft 30 ft. 30 fL 30 ft. Frontage at Front Property Line Minimum Lot 40 ft. 30 It. 30 ft. 25 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. 20 It Frontage for a Flag Lot at Front Property Line Minimum Width at 100 ft. 100 fl. 70 ft. 50 ft. 50 ft. 40 ft. 30 ft. Required Front Setback Area Minimum Average 100 ft. 80 ft. 70 ft. 60 ft. 50 ft. 50 ft. 50 ft. Width Minimum Lot Depth 150 ft. 120 ft. 100 ft. 90 ft 80 ft. 80 ft. 100 ft. Setbacks Minimum Front 40 ft. 25 ft. 25 ft. 15 ft.2 10 ft.2 10 ft.2 20IL2 Yard2 Minimum Comer 40 ft. 15 ft. 15 ft. 15 ft. 15 ft. 15 ft. 15 ft. Side Yard Minimum Interior 25 ft. 10 ft. 10 ft. 10 ft. VariabW Variable3 Vadable3 Side Yard3 Minimum Rear Yard 20 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. Maximum Height 35 ft 35 ft. 35 ft. 35 ft. 35 ft. 40 ft. 50 ft. Maximum % of Lot 10% 20% 25% 25% 35% 35% 30% Coverage Open Space 90% 70% 60% 40% 25% 25% 30% Required Private Open NA NA NA NA NA 200 150 Space/Per Unit Notes: 1. Affordable housing and congregate care facilities may exceed the stated densities pursuant to the provisions of Section 17.10.020M. 2. In the H residential zoning district, dwelling units with entrances that have direct access to the street, such that the predominate features of the home fronting the street are the windows and the front door, may have a minimum setback of fifteen feet. 3. In order to allow for more flexible site planning, variable interior yard setback for both sides must equal at least LM zoning district: The combined interior side yard setback for both sides must equal at least fifteen feet One side shall have at least five feet and the other side shall have at least ten feet and shall be located on the same side as the driveway to provide for potential vehicular access to the rear of the property. M and H zoning districts: The combined interior side yard setbacks shall not be less than ten feet. This is intended to permit a zero lot line arrangement with a zero setback on one side yard and ten feet on the opposite side yard. SOURCE: The City of Temecula Development Code, January 2008. o f I. r ;M L C it L A Cr L 'v F R A L P L A Fl -40 TABLE H-27 PARKING SPACE REQUIREMENTS Land Use Required Parking Spaces Single -Family Unit 2 enclosed spaces Duplex, Triplex 2 covered spaces/units, plus 1 guest space/4 units Multi -Family Units (12 units or 2-5 units: 2 covered spaces/units, plus 2 guest less)— 3 or fewer bedrooms spaces 6-12 units: 2 covered spaces/unit, plus 3 guest spaces Multi -Family Units (13 or more 1 covered space and % uncovered space for each units)— 3 or fewer bedrooms 1 -bedroom unit 1 covered and 1 uncovered space for each 2 -bedroom unit 2 covered spaces and % uncovered space for each 3 -bedroom (or more) unit plus 1 guest space/6 units, with a minimum of 4 guest spaces Mobile Home Park 1 covered space/trailer site, plus 1 guest space/2 trailer sites Second Unit 1 covered space for each 2 -bedroom (or smaller) unit 2 covered spaces for each 3 -bedroom (or larger) unit Senior Citizens Housing % covered space/unit, plus 1 uncovered guest Complex/Congregate Care space per 5 units SOURCE: City of Temecula Development Code, 2008. Additional flexibility in development standards is also provided in the Development Code through the use of variable setbacks. This flexibility allows for creative site planning, especially for irregular sites. For example, the City adopted a Planned Development Overlay district for the Temecula Creek Village project to provide for mixed- use commercial/residential development. Temecula Creek Village consists of 32.6 vacant acres within the PO zone with 20 acres of residential and 12 acres of commercial uses. Residential uses for the Planned Development Overlay district include medium and high density multi -family uses. To provide additional opportunities for affordable housing, the Development Code and General Plan also allow senior housing, congregate care facilities, and affordable housing in some non- residential zoning districts upon approval of a Conditional Use Permit in most cases. Senior housing is also permitted in the Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Service Commercial, Highway/Tourist Commercial, and Professional Office (PO) zoning districts. Congregate care facilities are allowed in the Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Highway/Tourist C I t Y 0 1 'l 1.. 'vi 1. % u L ;1 GLNEKAL 1' LA H-41 0 a 0 l G Commercial, Service Commercial, and PO zoning districts. Affordable housing projects are allowed in the PO zoning district. Affordable housing and affordable senior housing projects are entitled to receive various incentives provided the project meets the requirements of Section 65915 of the California Government Code. Affordable housing projects are entitled to receive qualifying density incentives from section 17.10.020(4 (3) (a) of the Temecula Municipal Code and may also receive qualifying concessions from section 17.10.020(4(3)(b) of the Temecula Municipal Code. The project incentives and concessions pursuant to the Temecula Municipal Code are as follows: a. Density Incentives. Affordable housing projects are entitled to receive an increase in the allowable density for the following zoning districts. The maximum densities for affordable housing projects are as follows: i. In the high density residential and the professional office zoning districts, the maximum density shall be thirty units per acre. ii. In the medium density residential zoning district, the maximum density shall be eighteen units per acre; however, for affordable senior housing, the maximum density shall be twenty units per acre. iii. In the low medium density residential zoning district, the maximum density shall be nine units per acre. iv. In all approved specific plans, the maximum density bonus shall not exceed fifty percent of the target density in the planning area. To achieve such densities, it may be necessary for the City to offer development standard concessions. Such concessions are already available to projects which provide an affordable component, as it applies to a density bonus. For those projects which develop within the Urban Density Overlay zone, it is likely that similar concessions will need to be made to accommodate the increase in density. The types of concessions that may be offered for affordable housing projects are discussed in detail in the Density Bonus and Incentive Law of this Housing Element. C. I "L Y O F 1 L. NI E C U L A 1-1-42 G E N E ft. A L: P L A 3. Provisions for a Variety of Housing., Housing Element law specifies that jurisdictions must identify adequate sites to be made available through appropriate zoning and development standards to encourage the development of a variety of types of housing for all income levels, including multi -family rental housing, agricultural employee housing, manufactured homes, senior and affordable housing, congregate care facilities, emergency shelters/transitional housing, supportive housing, single -room occupancy, second dwelling units, and housing for persons with disabilities. Table H-28 summarizes Temecula's permitted residential housing by zoning district and the following paragraphs describe the City's provision for these types of housing. TABLE H-28 - PERMITTED HOUSING BY ZONING DISTRICT ZONE HOUSING TYPE CC PO HR RR VL L-1 L-2 LM M H Affordable Housing -- C P P P P P P P P Senior Housing/Congregate Care' P P -- — __ __ P P P P Multifamily rental housing C -- -- -- — -- -- __ P P Permanent housing for agricultural employees' -- — -- "" Seasonal housing for agricultural employees' Emergency shelters,' C C C C C C C C P P Transitional Housing C C C C C C C C P P Single -Room Occupancy" P P -- — -_ __ __ -_ P p Supportive housing' P P -- -- -- -- -- __ P P Factory -built housing/modular homes -- P P P P P P P P Mobile homes — -- -- -- C C C C C C Second units -- p P P p P P P P Residential care facilities for the P P P P P P P P elderly (six or fewer) Residential rare facilities for the C C C C C C P P elderly (seven or more) Residential care facilities for persons with disabilities (six or -- -- P P P p P P P P fewer) Notes: 1. Senior housing is also permitted in the Neighborhood Commercial, Service Commercial, and Highway/Tourist Commercial zoning districts. 2. These uses are not permitted within the Nicolas Valley Rural Preservation Area as identified in Table LU -5 of the Land Use Element of the General Plan. 3. Emergency shelters are also conditionally permitted in all commercial and industrial zoning districts within the City of Temecula. 4. This will require an amendment to the Temecula Municipal Code, which will be a program for the Housing Element planning period. Supportive housing andSROs are expected to be permitted by right in medium to high density residential zones and commercial and office zones. Residential care facilities for persons with disabilities will be permitted by right in all residential zones. 5. Housing opportunities for agricultural employees is discussed on page H-17. C_ I I Y O 1- T L hl L C: ii L A is E N L K, A l.. 1' LA H-43 2@ Current rental information on multi -family rental units in Temecula was obtained through the City's GIS data reports. The data identified 41 multi -family complexes in the city. The multi -family housing stock has more than doubled since 1998, increasing from 3,120 to approximately 6,247 units. According to the 2007 John Husing Report, the average monthly rent in Temecula was $1,144 in 2006. S This data indicated that the monthly average rent in Temecula has risen over 40% since 2002. The City of Temecula allows for multi -family rental housing in its High and Medium Density Residential zoning districts. These zoning districts are intended to provide for the development of attached residential housing. Typically, housing types may include townhouses and stacked apartments with a density range of 7-12 units per acre in the Medium Density Residential zones, and 13-20 dwelling units per acre in the High Density Residential zones. Permanent and Seasonal Housing for Agricultural Employees: Agriculture is a predominant industry in Riverside County, but there is very little prime farmland, unique farmland, or farmland of local importance within the City of Temecula's limits (General Plan, Figure OS -3). While there are no agricultural operations in the City of Temecula, nearby wineries represent an employee base for agricultural workers. Agricultural workers face various housing issues due to their typically lower incomes and the seasonal nature of their work However, since there is an insignificant amount of existing agricultural land, the City does not provide agricultural employee housing nor does the City anticipate a need for permanent and seasonal agricultural employee housing. However, other opportunities for agricultural worker housing are discussed on page H-17 of this Housing Element. Factory Built Housing/Modular and Mobile Homes: Temecula allows for the provision of manufactured housing in all of its residential zoning districts, but requires a permanent foundation. Mobile home parks are allowed with a conditional use permit in all of the residential zoning districts, except Hillside Residential (HR) and Rural Residential (RR). Manufactured housing must be certified according to the National Mobile Home Construction and Safety Standards Act of 1974 and must conform to all other development and use requirements applicable to the primary units in the zoning district. The units must stand on a permanent foundation and the materials used for the siding must be approved by the Planning Director. Additionally, the City recognizes the potential for additional affordable factory -built housing as second dwelling units. —! t Y O F 1 L ;b1 L C U L A CF E N L It A L P L 1 H-44 Senior and affordable housing are permitted in the High, Medium, and Low Medium Density Residential zoning districts, with approval of a development plan. The maximum density allowed for senior housing that complies with the City's affordable housing provisions, including the density bonus, is 30 units per acre for Fliigh Density Residential, 20 units per acre for Medium Density Residential, and 8 units per acre for Low Medium Density Residential. For an approved specific plan, the maximum density bonus cannot exceed 50% of the target density in the planning area. Senior housing is also allowed in the Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Service Commercial, Highway/Tourist Commercial, and PO zoning districts. Senior housing constructed in the Neighborhood Commercial zone will be developed to be consistent with the development and performance standards allowed in the Medium Density Residential zoning district. For the Community Commercial, Service Commercial, Highway/Tourist Commercial, and PO zoning districts, senior housing will be developed consistent with the development and performance standards allowed for the High Density Residential zoning district. Affordable Housing There are various types of income levels when defining affordable housing: Low or Moderate Income Household: Persons or families whose income does not exceed 120 percent of AMI, adjusted annually for family size. Lower Income Household: Persons or families whose income does not exceed 80 percent of area median income (AMI), which is adjusted annually for family size. C- I f r 0 r TEMECULA C E N E R A L P 1, A N H-45 Senior Housing/Affordable Housing: There are a total 14 affordable housing developments throughout the City of Temecula. Affordable housing is pennitted in High, Medium, and Low Density residential zoning districts and is conditionally permitted in PO zones. In addition to development on vacant land within the permitted zones, the City recognizes the potential for additional affordable housing in future mixed-use areas, including the Jefferson/Ynez Corridor, the Education Center site, and the adjacent Professional Hospital Supply (PHS) expansion site. Affordable housing can also be achieved in the form of second dwelling units. The Code allows for second units in all residential zoning districts if the development standards can be met. For additional information on affordable housing within the City please reference the Housing Element sections on housing stock and housing resources. Senior and affordable housing are permitted in the High, Medium, and Low Medium Density Residential zoning districts, with approval of a development plan. The maximum density allowed for senior housing that complies with the City's affordable housing provisions, including the density bonus, is 30 units per acre for Fliigh Density Residential, 20 units per acre for Medium Density Residential, and 8 units per acre for Low Medium Density Residential. For an approved specific plan, the maximum density bonus cannot exceed 50% of the target density in the planning area. Senior housing is also allowed in the Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Service Commercial, Highway/Tourist Commercial, and PO zoning districts. Senior housing constructed in the Neighborhood Commercial zone will be developed to be consistent with the development and performance standards allowed in the Medium Density Residential zoning district. For the Community Commercial, Service Commercial, Highway/Tourist Commercial, and PO zoning districts, senior housing will be developed consistent with the development and performance standards allowed for the High Density Residential zoning district. Affordable Housing There are various types of income levels when defining affordable housing: Low or Moderate Income Household: Persons or families whose income does not exceed 120 percent of AMI, adjusted annually for family size. Lower Income Household: Persons or families whose income does not exceed 80 percent of area median income (AMI), which is adjusted annually for family size. C- I f r 0 r TEMECULA C E N E R A L P 1, A N H-45 0 S I N G Very Low Income Household: Persons or families whose income does not exceed 50 percent of AMI adjusted annually for family size. Extremely Low Income Household: Persons or families whose income does not exceed 30 percent of AMI, adjusted annually for familysize. There are three basic sources of law governing affordable housing project incentives within the City: (1) the 20% low and moderate income housing set-aside provisions of the California Community Redevelopment Act; (2) the "density bonus" law; and (3) Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.08.030, relating to "affordable housing" as a conditionally permitted use in the PO zone. Not less than 20% of all tax increment revenues that are allocated to an agency pursuant to Health & Safety Code Section 33670 must be used by the Redevelopment Agency for purposes of increasing, improving, and preserving the City's supply of low and moderate - income housing available at affordable housing cost to people and families of Lower Moderate income, Lower income households, Very Low income households and Extremely Low income households. An agency must deposit the 20% set aside in a separate Housing Fund until used. The Temecula Redevelopment Agency has established a Redevelopment Housing Fund by setting aside 20% of its tax increment revenue. The Agency anticipates an annual deposit of between $3.0 and $3.3 million in tax increment funds over a five-year period. Based on the required 20% set-aside, approximately $16.5 million will be available during the five-year period for housing activities. Since set-aside funds are a function of property tax revenues, the amount of future deposits will depend on factors such as market conditions and the timing of new taxable development. Community Redevelopment Law sets forth a variety of options for localities to expend their housing funds, including: • Land disposition and write-downs; • Site improvements; • Loans; • Issuance of bonds; • Land and building acquisition by Agency; • Direct housing construction; C 1 r t o r T t: R1 F C u 1 A C_� E\1 t. R A 1. P 1. A ]-1-46 • Housing rehabilitation; • Rent subsidies; • Predevelopment funds; and • Administrative costs for non-profit housing corporations. The specific uses of the set-aside funds are described in the Housing Plan section of this Housing Element. California Redevelopment Law requires the City to ensure housing developments with Housing Fund moneys remain affordable and occupied by persons or families of low or moderate income, very low income and extremely low income. An agency must maintain the affordability of all new substantially rehabilitated housing units developed or otherwise assisted with Housing Fund moneys for no less than 45 years for owner -occupied units or 55 years for rental units. No -Density Bow andlnoitizeLaw The State density bonus statutes require the City to grant a density bonus and incentives or concessions to a developer who agrees to construct or donate land for affordable housing. Below lists the thresholds in which the State decides if a project can be deemed all or partly"affordable housing." Type of Qualifying Housing Required Percentage of Unit Lower Income 10% of proposed units Very Low Income 5% of proposed units Senior Citizen Housing Development Any senior housing development Moderate Income- Condominium or Planned 10% of proposed units Development Once a project has been deemed a partly or fully complete "affordable housing" project, the applicant maybe allowed to develop additional density. The City must calculate the extra density to which an applicant is entitled. The density bonus law not only uses a base percentage of the project (listed below), but there is also a sliding scale that allows for greater density bonuses when an applicant includes more than the minimum qualifying percentage of affordable units. To qualify for a density bonus through donation of land, the applicant must propose a Tentative Tract Map, Parcel N1ap, or other residential development project. The donor of land meeting the specified criteria is entitled to a base 15% density bonus, with a sliding scale increase of 1% and an additional increase of 1% for each unit in the total number of affordable units entitled on the donated land in C I "I Y O F 1 E: ;it 1 C: Ii L: A CS E N E it A L. P L :L 1v H-47 0 S G excess of the 10% qualifying percentage. Below lists the Base and Sliding Scale bonuses: Type of Qualifying Base Density Bonus Sliding Scale Density Bonus Housing Lower Income 20% increase in the number of units, unless a lesser % is requested by the applicant Very Low Income 20% increase in the number of units, unless a lesser % is requested by the applicant Senior Citizen 20% increase in the number Housing of units, unless a less % is Development requested by the applicant Moderate -Income 5% increase in the number of Condominium or units, unless a lesser % is Planned requested by the applicant Development Percentage of Affordable Units 1.5% increase in density bonus for each 1% increase in lower income affordable units to a maximum density bonus of 35% of proposed units 2.5% increase in density bonus for each 1% increase in very low income affordable units up to a maximum density bonus of 35% of proposed units No sliding scale increase 1% increase in density bonus for each 1% increase in moderate income affordable units up to a maximum density bonus of 35% of proposed units. Number of Incentives or Concessions 10% Lower Income or 5% Very Low Income or 10% Moderate 1 Income (condo/planned development) 20% Lower Income or 10% Very Low Income or 20% Moderate 2 Income (condo/planned development) 30% Lower Income or 15% Very Low Income or 30% Moderate 3 Income (condo/planned development) In addition to the density bonuses described above, the applicant may request specific incentives or concessions. Provided that the agency cannot make findings sufficient to deny requested incentives or concessions, as provided by the Government Code Section 65914 (d), incentives or concessions must be granted if requested by the applicant. The potential concessions include: • An increase in the amount of required lot coverage; • A modification to the setback or required yard provisions; • An increase in the maximum allowable building height; C. I "I Y O 1' 1 L M L C U L A C.; E N 6 R, A L P L A N 11-48 Il A reduction in the amount of required on-site parking;4- , Q; reduction in the amount of on-site landscaping, except that no reduction in on-site recreational amenities may be approved unless the affordable housing is in close proximity with easy access to a public park with recreational amenities; • A reduction in the minimum lot area; or • Approval of an affordable housing project in the PO zone with the approval of a conditional use permit. An applicant who receives a density bonus and/or other concessions/incentives must agree to ensure the continued affordability of all low and very low income density bonus units for at least 30 years, unless a longer period of time is required. The minimum length of the affordability covenant will depend upon whether the City grants any additional concession or incentives on top of the density bonus as well as if any City Housing Fund moneys were also used for the project. sr r rr Fr i�' or � I: I I r� iri' � • r � Affordable housing is permitted within the PO zone with the approval of a Conditional Use Permit. These units should be spread throughout the site and include various types of housing sizes. Since this Municipal Code Amendment was enacted, one such project has been approved. The Temecula Lane project secured 11 multi -family for rent units, under covenant for 55 years to accommodate low income households. Supportive Housing/Single Room Occupancy (SRO) Supportive housing is provided to socially support individuals and provide basic life skills and is coupled with social services such as job training, alcohol and drug abuse programs, and case management. This type of housing is often targeted for low-income workers and populations in need of assistance such as the homeless, those suffering from mental illness, those suffering from substance abuse problems, the elderly, the medicallyfrail, and persons with disabilities. Supportive housing can also be defined as transitional shelters, alcohol and drug treatment facilities, safe houses, and nursing homes. Persons unable to live in traditional households face specific challenges that may affect their ability to secure decent, affordable housing. For instance, persons with disabilities may require special modified amenities in their homes and/or services such as proximity to transit and wheelchair access to building entrances and exits. Homeless individuals may be without housing for any number of C i T Y O i- T L ;m E t: t.[ 1., A G E\ E R. A L P 1, 1 N H-49 S I G complex and diverse reasons. Single -room occupancy (SRO) housing offers one opportunity for low-cost housing that is specifically designed to meet some of the varying needs of several special needs groups. Supportive housing and SROs provide viable housing alternatives for individuals in these special needs groups. To encourage the development of supportive and SRO residences, an update to the zoning ordinance is required to facilitate permitting for these housing types. Supportive housing and SROs will be appropriately permitted in the medium density and high density residential zones, and in commercial and office zones when adjacent to or part of a multi- family residential use. Proximity to higher density locations will likely be closer to job centers, services, and transit. Sites for Supportive Housing/SROs _ The Temecula Municipal Code does not currently provide for supportive housing and SROs within the City. The City has a legal obligation to address the housing needs of these groups as pan of its Housing Element update. Proposed changes to the zoning ordinance will define the parameters for facilitating the development of supportive housing and SROs. The proposed zoning amendment will include changes designed to clarify the definition of supportive housing and SROs as well as define development standards for such housing types. Once the Municipal Code Amendment is adopted, the appropriate location for Supportive Housing/SROs would be in the Medium Demay Residemtal, High Density Resident Comnvaty Qnsrvmi4 and 1-7tfffsimn Offix zones. (See Section III.B.1, above, for more details concerning zoning in the City of Temecula). The amendment is expected to occur during the second year of the Planning Period, after adoption of the Housing Element Update. Congregate Care: Congregate care facilities are not limited specifically to density requirements as long as all of the development standards for the zoning district are met. Congregate care facilities are allowed in the Low -2 Density Residential, Low Medium Density Residential, Medium Density Residential, High Density Residential, Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Highway/ Tourist Commercial, Service Commercial, and PO zoning districts. In Temecula, congregate care facilities include facilities for seniors and the disabled in accordance with Health and Safety Code Section 50062.5, which requires facilities that are "planned, designed, and managed to include facilities and common space that allow for direct services and support services that maximize the residents' potential for independent living and which is occupied by elderly or handicapped persons or households, as defined in Sections 50067 and 50072. Direct services and support services which are provided or C [ T Y O 1 l E M E C U L A C E\ E [Z A L P L A N J - f made available shall relate to the nutritional, social, recreational, house. k keeping, and personal needs of the residents and shall be provided or made available at a level necessary to assist the residents to function independently." Second Units: The City of Temecula allows second units in all of the residential districts where a detached single-family unit exists and the owner occupies either the primary or secondary unit. Second units cannot be sold, but may be rented. The second unit must be compatible with the design of the primary dwelling unit and meet the size and parking requirements identified in the Development Code. An application for a second dwelling unit must be completed and submitted to the Planning Department. See the Housing Element section on housing resources for additional information on second G dwelling units. Emergency Shelters/ Homeless Housing: The City facilitates the development of emergency shelters and transitional housing by permitting the development of such facilities in the Medium Density and High Density residential districts by right without a conditional use permit or other discretionary action. These uses are also permitted in other residential districts with a conditional use permit. Emergency shelters are also permitted with a conditional use permit in the Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Highway/Tourist Commercial, Service Commercial, PO, Business Park, and Light Industrial zoning districts. Currently, Temecula has two group homes for teenagers with a total capacity of 18 persons. In addition, two residential facilities in the City offer housing for up to approximately 14 developmentally disabled persons. The State Fire Marshal is the agency having jurisdiction for group homes with seven or more residents. The City of Temecula contracts with the State Fire Marshal through the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire) in conjunction with the Riverside County Fire Department. The Building and Safety Department has developed a positive working relationship with the County Fire Department that ensures that any improvements and/or maintenance for group homes are handled through the Citys normal concurrent review process. It has been a departmental philosophy to provide complete direction for applicants, as well as looking for solutions when problems or barriers present themselves on a project. Because of this, in the past the City has had success finding reasonable solutions to non- compliant code issues with successful end results. Housing for Persons with Disabilities: The City provides housing opportunities for disabled persons through the provision of C[ T Y O F l E: tl E C: U L. A GINURAL P L. i I 14.51 55 �� affordable, barrier -free housing. The requirements for accessibility in the California Building Code and the Temecula Municipal Code ensure reasonable accommodation and compliance with accessibility requirements and are provided in all projects within Temecula. Residential care facilities (group homes) for six or fewer residents are permitted in all residential zoning districts. The development of facilities for residential care seven or more residents are permitted in the Medium Density and High Density residential zoning districts by right without a conditional permit or other discretionary action. ' Facilities for seven or more residents are also permitted in all other residential zoning districts with a conditional use permit The maximum densities for care facilities are not limited specifically density to requirements so long as the project complies with all development standards of Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations and the Temecula Municipal Code. The City does not restrict occupancy of unrelated individuals in group homes and does not define family or enforce a definition in its zoning ordinance. The City permits housing for special needs groups, including for individuals with disabilities, without regard to distances between such uses or the number of uses in any part of the City. The City allows some variation from the application of its parking standards. Section 17.24.040 of the Zoning Ordinance would allow for example, the reduction of parking spaces for a unique use such as a senior housing project or other special needs. However, this flexibility is not explicit for housing for persons with disabilities and special needs. The element includes Program 21 to establish a forrnal and written procedure in the zoning code to reduce parking for housing for persons with disabilities. The City's site planning requirements and assistance programs reduce housing constraints for persons with disabilities by providing necessary regulations for a variety of disabilities and housing conditions. The City does not impose special permit procedures or requirements that could impede the retrofitting of homes for accessibility. The City's requirements for building permits and inspections are the same as for other residential projects and are straightforward and not burdensome. City officials are not aware of any instances in which an applicant experienced delays or rejection of a retrofitting proposal for accessibility to persons with disabilities. Compliance with these development standards ensures reasonable accommodation is provided for all new projects. In addition, retrofit assistance for persons with disabilities is available through the City's Residential Improvement Program. The City will continue to implement the existing requirements as well as establish a formalized reasonable accommodation process for individual homeowners C [ "C Y O F TEMLCULA G E N E R A L P L ;1 11-52 <., I .L Y J F requesting exceptions to development standards to accommodate..�'",���_ specific disability. 4. Development and Planning Fees The cost of development is a constraint to the implementation of affordable housing projects. Typically, the cost of developing raw land is significantly increased by the various regulations and fees local governments impose on developers. The City of Temecula charges various fees and assessments to cover If the cost of processing permits and providing certain services and utilities. Table H-29 summarizes that City's planning fee requirements for residential development, while Table H-30 depicts the City's development fees for residential development. Comparing the cost of one jurisdiction's development and planning fees to another is difficult since each jurisdiction calculates and applies its fee schedule in its own unique way. While no recent studies available to the general public have been completed in Riverside County to compare the fees charged by various jurisdictions, a recent trend used by other jurisdictions is to assess a deposit that varies per application type, and then charge an hourly "fully burdened" rate to recover costs. The City of Temecula assesses a fixed rate for each application type, based on the average hours of staff time required to process each application. The City of Temecula fee schedule is adjusted annually based on the consumer price index for the greater Los Angeles Metropolitan area. TABLE H-29 PLANNING FEE SCHEDULE* Development Agreement Development Agreement — Major Modification' 2,3,4 Development Agreement — Minor Modification 1.2,3,4 DIF Credit or Reduction Development Plan — Less than 10,000 sf 1•2,3,4 Development Plan — 10,000 sf to 100,000 sf 1,2,3,4 Development Plan — Over 100,000 sf 1.2,9,4 Development Plan — Major Modification' 2,3,4 $49,496 $11,340 $3,240 $827 $7,402 $10,051 $12,092 $5,682 Development Plan — Minor Modification 1,2.9,4 $2,461 Development Plan — Minor Modification 1.2,9q $152 (Planning Review Only) T E M E C, U t., A G E 'Ni L R. A L. H-53 N/A N/A N/A N/A $136 $136 $136 N/A N/A N/A P I. ,1 \ Department of Project Type City of Environmental Temecula Fee Health Fee Planning and Zoning Conditional Use Permit— No Site Changes 1,2'3'4 $3,078 $234 Conditional Use Permit —with a Development $980 $234 Plan 1,2.3,4 Development Agreement Development Agreement — Major Modification' 2,3,4 Development Agreement — Minor Modification 1.2,3,4 DIF Credit or Reduction Development Plan — Less than 10,000 sf 1•2,3,4 Development Plan — 10,000 sf to 100,000 sf 1,2,3,4 Development Plan — Over 100,000 sf 1.2,9,4 Development Plan — Major Modification' 2,3,4 $49,496 $11,340 $3,240 $827 $7,402 $10,051 $12,092 $5,682 Development Plan — Minor Modification 1,2.9,4 $2,461 Development Plan — Minor Modification 1.2,9q $152 (Planning Review Only) T E M E C, U t., A G E 'Ni L R. A L. H-53 N/A N/A N/A N/A $136 $136 $136 N/A N/A N/A P I. ,1 \ E < Y'3 TABLE H-29 PLANNING FEE SCHEDULE* Project Type City of Temecula Fee Department of Environmental Health Fee General Plan Amendment/Zoning Map $6,984 $59 Amendment - Text or Exhibit 1.2• •4 $477 N/A General Plan Amendment/Zoning Map $5,473 $59 Amendment - Official Zoning Map and Land Map $78,424 $197 1,2,3,4 $31,126 $61 General Plan Amendment/Zoning Map $3,770 $59 Amendment - Official Zoning Map or Land Map $28,852 N/A 1,2,3,4 Second Dwelling Unit Permit $702 N/A Variance'•2.3.4 $3,559 $120 Minor Exception' • 2,3.4 $477 N/A Minor Exception (individual homeowner) - $118 N/A Specific Plan - New 12.3,4 $78,424 $197 Specific Plan Amendment - Major $31,126 $61 Specific Plan Amendment - Minor $10,861 $61 Planned Development Overlay'•2,3.4 $28,852 N/A Subdivisions Certificate of Land Division Compliance (fee per $1,201 $138 parcel)' 2,3,4 Common Interest Development Conversion' 2,3,4 $4,156 N/A Lot Line Adjustment $1,213 N/A Merger of Contiguous Parcels $1,819 N/A Minor Change (to approved Tentative Map) $1,902 N/A Parcel Map, - Tentative (Residential) wMaiver of $2,956 $389 Final Map ,2,3 Parcel Map -Tentative (Residential) Standard 1.23 $3,686 $675 Parcel Map -Tentative (Vesting)' 2,3 $3,234 $424 Parcel Map -Tentative (Revised)1,2,3 $3,214 $203 Condominium Map1,2,3 $10,775 $538 Tract Map -Standard 5-34 lots/units1,2,3 $9,683 $203 Tract Map -Standard 35-75 lots/units1,2,3 $10,951 $203 Tract Map -Standard 76-165 lots/units1,2,3 $12,548 $203 Tract Map- Standard 166 lots/units1,2,3 $14,034 $203 Tract Map - Standard - Revised Map1,2,3 $5,482 $203 Tract Map - Vesting 5-34 lots/units1,2,3 $12,424 $424 Tract Map- Vesting 35-75 lots/units1,2,3 $13,797 $424 Tract Map- Vesting 76-165 lots/units1,2,3 $15,421 $424. Tract Map - Vesting 166 lots/units1,2,3 $16,787 $424 Tract Map - Vesting - Revised Map1,2,3 $7,719 $424 Phasing Plan for Tentative Map-Sewered $3,283 $57 j E M E C Lt L A {_, F N L R. A L P L A N I -I-54 C TABLE H-29 PLANNING FEE SCHEDULE* Project Type Phasing Plan for Tentative Map -Subsurface Disposal Residential Tract Product Reviewl,4 Reversion to Acreage Miscellaneous Charges Certificate of Historic Appropriateness1,2,3,4 Substantial Conformance Extension of Time with Public Hearingl,2,3,4 Extension of Time without Public Hearingl,2,3,4 Extension of Time — Subdivision Ordinancel,2,3,4 Department of City of Environmental Temecula Fee Health Fee $3,283 $138 $9,499 N/A $698 $72 $423 $5,794 $2,578 $1,307 .$3,234 N/A $61 $63 $63 $63 Add CEQA Fee of $245 for environmental determination. If environmental determination is not exempt from CEQA, add $4,175 for Negative Declaration withow Mitigation, or $5,707 for Negative Declaration with Mitigation. If EIR is required, add $44,980 for city managed EIR or $66,321 for applicant managed EIR. Add UC Regents Fee of $60 (if required) — not applicable to duplicate applications Add Traffic Study Fee (if required) of $2,261 (major) or $565 (minor) Add DRC Landscape Fee of $250 (if new/modified landscaping is proposed) and DRC Architectural Review Fee of $.05 per building square foot (if new/modified architecture is proposed) $528 to Environmental Health if Sewered; $424 to Environmental Health if Subsurface Disposal 'SOURCE: Temecula User Fee Schedule (2007-08); updated annually each July 1. TABLE H-30 DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES FOR THE CITY OF TEMECULA Development Fee Land Use (Fee/Unit) Residential Attached Residential Detached Street System Improvements $1,171.69 $1,673.85 Traffic Signals and Traffic Control Systems $165.86 $236.94 Corporate Facilities $243.50 $454.13 Police Facilities $427.96 $241.90 Fire Protection Facilities $266.59 .$574.49 Parks and Recreational Improvements $1,979.17 $2,762.58 Open Space & Trails Development $576.88 $805.22 Libraries $527.15 $735.81 Total $5,358.80 $7,484.92 Single -Family Multi -Family Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee $10,046.00 $7,054.00 SOURCE: City of Temecula, 2008. TENIECULA Cs I \' F. R A L P L. A\ H-55 wr�r- 5. Building Codes and Enforcement Staffing and Process As Building and Safety and Code Enforcement are under the same department supervisions, the exchange of information between building and code staff members is excellent. Enforcement items are a regularly reoccurring weekly meeting topic during Building and Safety weekly staff meetings. The Code Enforcement Division consists of four permanent officers. Each officer has an assigned geographic area of the City and is very familiar with problematic properties. Each officer regularly patrols their area to ensure that any prior complaints have been resolved and to ensure that they have responded to any new complaints. The Department is complaint -driven, which means that officers respond to complaints as they come into the City. In addition, the officers make every effort to be proactive with their assigned geographic areas. Several of the code enforcement officers have received training in dealing with housing issues and are able to respond with Building Inspectors to calls of substandard housing. Building Codes The City of Temecula has adopted the 2007 California Building, Plumbing, Mechanical, Energy, and Electrical Codes. These codes are based upon the International Code Council 2006 International Building, Plumbing, Mechanical and the 2004 National Electrical Codes as modified by the California Building Standards Commission. Upon adoption of the 2007 California Building Codes, the Building and Safety Department made minor modifications to some code sections based upon unique topographical, geographical, or climatic reasons as is allowed by the California Building Standards Commission and Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations. The majority of the 25 amendments were to the administrative areas of the codes. Other codes modified are as follows: A. Clarification for sanitation facilities in the Temecula Old Town area for existing buildings where providing additional toilet facilities would be a hardship to small restaurants or coffee shops. B. Establishment of size requirements for commercial and residential building address numbers. C I[ Y 0 F_I L ;NA L C U 1, A G E N E R. A L P L A' H-56 C. Clarification to require a minimum Class C roofing material 4 the Temecula Old Town District. This Code is considered to be the minimum necessary to protect the public health, safety, and welfare. The City is responsible for enforcement of all the model codes. The requirements for accessibility in the California Building Code will ensure that reasonable accommodation and compliance with accessibility requirements are provided in all projects within Temecula. As the housing stock in Temecula is relatively new, there have not been many opportunities for increased energy conservation. However, by adopting the most current version of the Energy Codes, existing housing stock will be brought up in efficiency as replacement of existing equipment takes place. There are opportunities through utility providers for property owners to defer some of the associated costs of equipment upgrades. Only 6% of the housing stock in Temecula is older than 30 years. Overall, the housing stock is in excellent condition. The City's Code Enforcement program is complaint -based, and will not constrain the development or preservation of housing. When housing code violations are cited for units occupied by low and moderate income households, the Code Enforcement staff routinely offers information regarding the City's rehabilitation programs. 6. Local Processing and Permit Procedures The evaluation and review process required by City procedures contributes to the cost of housing in that the holding costs incurred I- E N1 F C U L A i.., }\ E it A L P 1. it N 11-57 D. Increase in the size of swimming pool barriers to a minimum of 60 inches. E. Prohibition of the use of horizontal flex ducting in rooms that produce steam. z F. Prohibition of aluminum conductors smaller than # 6 A.W.G. G. Requirement of electrical conductors to be placed at a minimum of 6" below slab within commercial buildings. H. Prohibition of non-metallic sheathed cable (romex) in commercial applications. I. Requirement of a twenty-four hour graph test for gas systems with 2" or larger piping. This Code is considered to be the minimum necessary to protect the public health, safety, and welfare. The City is responsible for enforcement of all the model codes. The requirements for accessibility in the California Building Code will ensure that reasonable accommodation and compliance with accessibility requirements are provided in all projects within Temecula. As the housing stock in Temecula is relatively new, there have not been many opportunities for increased energy conservation. However, by adopting the most current version of the Energy Codes, existing housing stock will be brought up in efficiency as replacement of existing equipment takes place. There are opportunities through utility providers for property owners to defer some of the associated costs of equipment upgrades. Only 6% of the housing stock in Temecula is older than 30 years. Overall, the housing stock is in excellent condition. The City's Code Enforcement program is complaint -based, and will not constrain the development or preservation of housing. When housing code violations are cited for units occupied by low and moderate income households, the Code Enforcement staff routinely offers information regarding the City's rehabilitation programs. 6. Local Processing and Permit Procedures The evaluation and review process required by City procedures contributes to the cost of housing in that the holding costs incurred I- E N1 F C U L A i.., }\ E it A L P 1. it N 11-57 by developers during the review period are ultimately manifested in the unit's selling price. All discretionary development projects that involve new construction but are less than 10,000 square feet are subject to a Planning Director's Hearing. The Director's Hearing is a publicly noticed hearing that permits the Planning Director to be the decision maker on relatively minor applications. The Temecula Municipal Code contains findings that must be made for project approval. If the project meets the required findings, the project cannot be denied by the Planning Director. The Planning Commission Hearing is a publicly noticed hearing for development applications that are larger than 10,000 square feet in size. The Planning Commission may be the decision maker for such applications provided there is no legislative action associated with the development application such as a Zone Change or a General Plan Amendment, and also may serve as an appeal board for Director Hearing decisions. The Temecula Municipal Code contains findings that must be made for project approval. If the project meets the required findings, the project cannot be denied by the Planning Commission. The City Council Hearing is a noticed public hearing for development applications that require a legislative action, and the City Council may also serve as an appeal board for decisions made by the Planning Commission. The Temecula Municipal Code contains findings that must be made for project approval. If the project meets the required findings, the project cannot be denied. The City Council is the final decision maker on all appeal actions. Mixed-use projects maybe subject to any of the above types of public hearings, but are unlikely to appear at the Director Hearing because of the size of the project. The processing and permit procedures for mixed-use projects are no different than the processing of any other development application. The General Plan Land Use Element and Housing Element discuss concessions that can be made to accommodate the scale, density or intensity of such projects. As a result, findings can be made to support consistency with the General Plan. Some minor development applications, such as a Minor Modification of an approved Development Plan may be approved at the staff level. The average time for such administrative approvals is five weeks. The average time for projects to get to a Planning Director's Hearing is eight to ten weeks. Once approval is given, the property owner must submit a grading plan to the Public Works Department and a building plan to the Building and Safety Department. Once approval is given, the property owner must submit the approved plans to the C S T Y O F f E M F.. C U L. A G E N E R, A L C" i T Y f Community Development and Public Works Departments to the required permits. obtairtn The average period for a project to get to the Planning Commission is four to six months. If the project needs to be heard by the City Council, the average time to get to this hearing is six to eight months. This processing time frame is significantly shorter than other jurisdictions. The City has not adopted any special design or environmental review processes that would add additional time to the processing period. However, the City must comply with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and Riverside County regulations. CEQA applies to all projects that require discretionary approval unless the project is determined to be exempt. A discretionary project is one that requires the exercise of judgment or deliberation by a public agency in determining whether the project will be approved, or if a permit will be issued. For example, if a property owner wants to construct a new building or subdivide a property, it would be considered a discretionary project because the City must review the proposal before issuing an approval or permit. CEQA also applies to decisions that could lead to indirect impacts, such as making changes to local codes, policies, and general and specific plans. Usually CEQA does not apply to projects that are only subject to ministerial approval. A ministerial project is one that requires a public official to determine only that the project conforms to applicable zoning and building code requirements and that applicable fees have been paid. Sonic examples of projects that are generally ministerial include sign permits, roof replacements, interior alterations to residences, and landscaping changes. In addition to the CEQA process, Riverside County has completed a comprehensive planning effort called the Riverside County Integrated Project (RCIP). RCIP integrates three regional planning efforts; the County General Plan, a Community and Environmental Transportation Acceptability Process to determine present and future road -way infrastructure and a Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) to conserve listed and sensitive species and their habitats. The final MSHCP was approved by the County Board of Supervisors on June 17, 2003. The MSHCP is a comprehensive, multi -jurisdictional effort that includes the County and fourteen cities. Rather than deal with endangered species on a one -by -one basis, this Plan focuses on the conservation of 146 species. The MSHCP consists of a reserve system of approximately 500,000 acres of which approximately 347,000 acres T E M E C: U I., A GENEKAL P L, i1 1 11-59 are currently within public ownership and 153,000 acres are currently in private ownership. The approved M3HCP contributes to the economic viability of the region by providing landowners, developers, and those who build public infrastructure with more certainty, a streamlined regulatory process, and identified project mitigation. 7. On and Off -Site Improvements The City of Temecula requires full -frontage improvements for all approved development projects. The City makes no exceptions for frontage improvements because of the need to make connections for existing bike lanes and trails, and to correctly align roadways to avoid bottlenecks at narrower sections. The City may permit the possibility of deferring some improvements on a project -by -project basis. The deferral of improvements may be permitted when the costs of the improvements greatly outweighs the contractor's ability to enter into a reimbursement agreement, or when timing of the needed improvements is beyond the control of the applicant, such as improvements to be made by Caltrans. The Circulation Element of the Temecula General Plan identifies eight different roadway classifications (Table G2) and cross-sections (Figure G1) that include minimum dimensions for right-of-way accounting for lane width, center median, bike lane and/or multi- purpose trails, curb, gutter, landscaping and sidewalks. Figure G2 of the Circulation Element identifies the locations and alignments of each road in the City of Temecula by classification. Applicants for new development applications should consult the Circulation Element to determine the roadway classification fronting the project site and to determine the type of improvements that maybe required for the proposed project. The City makes available standard drawings for on and off-site improvements which establish infrastructure or site requirements that support new residential development. These improvements include streets, sidewalks, water and sewer, drainage, curbs and gutters, bike lanes and parkway dedications, utility easements and landscaping. While these improvements are necessary to ensure that new housing meets the City's development goals, the cost of these requirements can represent a significant share of the cost of producing new housing. The City of Temecula recognizes that such requirements can potentially be considered regulatory barriers to affordable housing if the jurisdiction determined requirements are greater (and hence, more costly) than those necessary to achieve health and safety requirements in the community. However, the cost to design such improvements is dramatically decreased when utilizing the City's standard drawings. O E T E t4 L C U L A 11-60 G E N E [Z. A L P L iA i1 C. State Tax Policies and Regulations 1. Article 34 of the California Constitution Article 34 was enacted in 1950. It requires that low rent housing projects developed, constructed, or acquired in any manner by any State or public agency, including cities, receive voter approval through the referendum process. The residents of Temecula have not passed a referendum to allow the City to develop, construct, or acquire affordable housing. While California Health and Safety Code further clarifies the scope and applicability of Article 34 to exclude housing projects that have deed -restrictions on less than 49% of the units or rehabilitation/ reconstruction of housing projects that are currently deed -restricted or occupied by lower income persons, Article 34 still constitutes an obstacle for local governments to be directly involved in the production of long-term affordable housing. 2. Environmental Protection State regulations require environmental review of proposed discretionary projects (e.g., subdivision maps, use permits, etc). Costs resulting from fees charged by local government and private consultants needed to complete the environmental analysis, and from delays caused by the mandated public review periods, are also added to the cost of housing and passed on to the consumer. However, the presence of these regulations helps preserve the environment and ensure environmental safety to Temecula's residents. In addition, much of the remaining vacant residential land is located within approved specific plan areas for which the required environmental review has already been completed. D. Infrastructure Constraints Another factor adding to the cost of new construction is the cost of providing adequate infrastructure (major and local streets; curbs, gutters, and sidewalks; water and sewer lines; and street lighting), which is required to be built or installed in new development. In most cases, these improvements are dedicated to the City, which is then responsible for their maintenance. The cost of these facilities is borne by developers and is added to the cost of new housing units, which is eventually passed on to the homebuyer or property owner. In addition, two areas of the City, designated for residential uses, are partially developed and do not have sewer service. Development of this land is limited to Very Low Density Residential uses. The majority of the remainder of future residential development within C I ..I.. Y O} l L YI E C U L A G, E N L R. A L P L A N H-61 0 U S I G C I I Y the City will occur in master planned communities, or on sites adjacent to existing infrastructure. As a result, future residential development will not be constrained by the lack of sufficient infrastructure in the remainder of the City. The Rancho California Water District (RCWD) is the retail supplier of potable water to the City. According to the Growth Management/ Public Facilities Element of the General Plan, RCWD has adequate water supply to meet current demand and is investigating a number of sources to meet long-range demands. Upgrading existing wells, adding new wells, implementing a water recharge program, and increasing the use of reclaimed water are among the major strategies devised by the RCWD. Wastewater facilities in Temecula are provided by the Eastem Municipal Water District (EMWD). EMWD has adequate capacity to meet current treatment demand. By closely working with the RCWD and EMWD in developing supply options; conservation techniques, including the use of reclaimed water, and development monitoring systems, the City can ensure that development does not outpace the long-term availability of water and adequacy of wastewater treatment capacity. E. Environmental Constraints The City is impacted by various environmental hazards that include active fault traces, liquefaction and subsidence, steep slopes, and flooding. These natural hazards form environmental constraints to residential development by threatening the public safety. To protect the health, safety, and welfare of residents in Temecula, the City has adopted regulations that limit development within areas of high risk, and/or require design standards that can withstand natural hazards. Other environmental constraints include infrastructure constraints. Vacant developable parcels and underutilized parcels with hazard - related constraints are noted by parcel in Appendix B. In some instances, the parcel inventory indicates "multiple" on-site constraints. This designation was chosen for display purposes to make the table in the appendix easier to read. A complete listing of the environmental constraints would have required use of fonts that may have been too small to be clearly legible. However, parties interested in obtaining more information for specific parcel listings in Appendix B may do so by contacting the City of Temecula Planning Department, or by visiting the Gtys website at www.cityoftemecula.oxg. The City's Information Systems department maintains an online GIS parcel search which can be used to identify any parcel within the City of Temecula, including known environmental and other on-site constraints. () E JEMECULA G t E\ E IZ A E P L A N 13-62 t!i r 4 Flood Plain (FP) Overlay District: The City has applied a Flo Plain Overlay District to portions of the City that are threatened by flooding hazards. The overlay district includes design requirements that must be met for new construction and substantial improvement of structures within the district. These design standards have been adopted to reduce the flood hazards threatening people and structures within the overlay district. Development on this property must comply with specific structural design standards that raise the cost of construction. However, this property represents only a fraction of the Citys vacant Medium Density Residential land. The environmental constraints and the associated cost factor impacting this property will not compromise the Citys ability to provide adequate sites to accommodate its RHNA Pursuant to the default density assigned to City Temecula the of through Section 65583.2, affordable housing is expected to be accommodated within areas where density is 30 units per acre by right or more through density bonus provisions. The City's Medium Density zone allows a density of up to 12 units per acre by right, and up to 18 units per acre with a density bonus. Medium Density Residential zoned property, therefore, is not considered suitable for affordable housing. In addition, the residential capacity analysis conducted for parcels located within the proposed Urban Density Overlay Zone, Appendix D, excluded parcels owned by the City of Temecula and the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District. As a result of these facts and findings, it is unlikely that proximity to a flood zone will create additional costs or land use controls that could impede the future development of affordable housing opportunities. Alquist Priolo: Temecula is located within a highly active seismic region. Three Alquist-Priolo Special Studies Zones are located in Temecula — Wildomar, Willard, and Wolf Valley. These zones have been delineated by the State Geologist and encompass the area on either side of potentially or recently active fault traces where the potential for surface -rupture exists. The Wildomar Fault is the predominant fault in the City This fault trends in a northwest direction and transects the length of the City. The Willard fault is located southwest of the Wildomar fault zone. South of the Willard fault is the Wolf Valley fault zone. Within an Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault zone, habitable structures must maintain a minimum 50 -foot setback distance from the fault trace per State law. The existence of Alquist-Priolo zones in the city of Temecula effectively limits the amount of land and intensityfor the development of residential uses adjacent to these zones. However, only a few vacant residential sites designated for Very Low Density Residential use are impacted by these Alquist-Priolo zones. H-63 x _ Dam Inundation: Portions of Temecula face inundation if any of the three dams located in areas surrounding Temecula should fail. Lake Skinner Dam is an earthen dam at Skinner Reservoir (also known as Lake Skinner and located approximately 45 miles northeast of Temecula). Failure of the Lake Skinner Dam would result in flooding along Tucalota Creek and Benton Road, which is located near the south side of the reservoir, as well as flooding along parts of the Santa Gertrudis Creek and Warm Springs Creek Vail Lake is located over 60 miles southeast of Temecula; dam failure would inundate portions of the Pauba and Temecula Valleys, including I-15 and an adjacent three-mile area. Diamond Valley Lake is the largest reservoir in Southern California, and is located north of Skinner Reservoir, nearly 60 miles northeast of Temecula. Its water is detained by two earthen dams. Failure of the western dam would result in flooding in the northern parrs of the City. Several vacant developable parcels located near the western and southern perimeters of the City are at risk of inundation if dams north of the project site were breached. Far fewer vacant underutilized residential properties would be at risk of inundation. 100 -Year and 500 -Year Flood Plains: A 100 -year flood has an annual 1% probability of occurring, and a 500 -year flood has an annual 0.2% probability of occurring. The 100 -year flood plain in the City of Temecula forms a "u" along the alignment of the northern, western (west of and adjacent to I-15), and southern perimeters of the City; the 500 -year flood plain is non-contiguous and is generally located in the western and southern areas of the City, adjacent to 100 - year flood plains. The 100 -year floodplain includes several vacant developable parcels near the northern and western perimeters of the City; and the 500 -year flood plain is generally outside or adjacent to vacant developable parcels in the same area. In general, no underutilized residential parcels are located in the 100 -year flood plain, or within the 500 -year flood plain. Faults and Fault Zones: The Elsinore Faults and the fault zones associated with this fault extend through the western side of the City on a northwest -southeast alignment across I-15. Although the Elsinore fault zone is one of the largest in Southern California, it has been one of the quietest. The southeastern extension of the Elsinore fault zone, the Laguna Salada fault, ruptured in 1892 in a magnitude 7.0 earthquake, but, as noted in the City's General Plan Public Safety Element, the main trace of the Elsinore fault zone has only seen one historical event greater than magnitude 5.2. In 1920 a magnitude 6.0 earthquake near Temescal Valley produced no known surface rupture. Other faults that surround Temecula include the San Andreas, San Jacinto, San Gabriel, Newport -Inglewood, and the San Clemente Island faults. C I "I Y 0 F 1 L NA E C U C, A G E N E. It A L P I A N 1-1-64 C l r r The Elsinore Faults and fault zones extend through several vacant w developable land parcels, as well as through a large underutilized residential parcel. Liquefaction: Liquefaction can occur as a secondary effect of seismic shaking in areas of saturated, loose, fine -to -medium grained soils where the water table is 50 feet or less below the ground surface. Seismic shaking temporarily eliminates the grain -to -grain support nominally provided by the sediment grains. The waters between the grains assume the weight of the overlying material and the sudden increase in poor water pressure results in the soil losing its friction properties. The saturated material (with the frictionless properties of a liquid) will fail to support overlying structures. Liquefaction -related effects include loss of bearing strength, ground oscillations, lateral spreading and slumping. In Temecula, liquefaction zones generally align with areas in the City subject to 100 -year and 500 -year floods, and the areas subject to inundation if a nearby dam is breached. The liquefaction zones are, however, more far-reaching. Although a few underutilized residential properties are located in areas subject to liquefaction, many vacant developable properties are located within or immediately adjacent to areas subject to liquefaction. High Fire Area: High Fire Zones encroach at the City's western and southern boundaries, encompassing or partially encompassing several large vacant developable parcels, a maximum of two small underutilized residential parcels. Hazardous Waste Sites: Small hazardous waste sites are located along and near the west side of I-15. These sites encompass small portions of vacant developable land and are near several vacant developable parcels. None of underutilized residential properties are located on or near hazardous waste sites. Western Riverside County Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP): Encompassing the western one-third of Riverside County and approximately 1.26 million acres, the Western Riverside County Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (NBHCP) is a comprehensive, multi -jurisdictional Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) designed to conserve species and their habitats. The goal is to maintain biological and ecological diversity within an increasingly urbanized area. In Temecula, the MSHCP includes areas in northern, western, and southern Temecula. Nearly all of the vacant developable parcels located west of I-15 in western Temecula are within the MSHCP, as well as all parcels located in the southwestern comer of Temecula. Additional vacant developable parcels in the northeast corner of the City are also located in the H-65 0 S N G MSHCP. Few underutilized residential properties are located within the MSHCP. Riparian Areas: Riparian areas are locales that relate to the bank of a stream, river, or lake. In Temecula, riparian areas encompass southern cottonwood -willow riparian, and riparian scrub communities. These communities are limited to an area west of 1-15 and an area in the southeast comer of the City. No vacant developable land or underutilized parcels are located in riparian areas. Although a few vacant developable parcels are located immediately adjacent to a riparian area, no underutilized parcels are located in or near a riparian area. N. HOUSING RESOURCES A. Sites for Housing Development 1. Vacant Residential Sites An important component of the Temecula Housing Element is the identification of sites for future housing development, and evaluation of the adequacy of this site inventory in accommodating the City's share of regional housing growth as determined by WRCC)G. As part of this Housing Element update, the City conducted a parcel - by -parcel analysis of vacant residential sites for land outside of approved specific plans, based on data obtained from the City's geographic information system (GIS). The vacant land inventory for the City of Temecula, including an estimated development capacity for the vacant parcels, can be found in Appendix B of the Housing Element. Table H-31 quantifies the number and type of housing units that could be accommodated on the City's vacant residential sites located outside of approved specific plan areas. Residential capacity for each vacant parcel is based on the current zoning for each parcel and does not consider increases discussed in the Housing Element Programs. Each parcel is assumed to develop at seventy-five percent of its maximum capacity which allows for setbacks, landscaping, right-of-way dedications and other non-residential uses. M L C U L A H-66 C E 1 L R- A L P L A N C i T 1 O F TABLE H-31 POTENTIAL RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON VACANT RESIDENTIAL LAND OUTSIDE SPECIFIC PLAN AREAS General Plan Vacant Designations Density Range Acreage Gross Dwelling Units* Hillside 0-0.1 DU/AC 0 0 Very Low 0.2-0.4 DU/AC 553 206 Low 0.5-2.9 DU/AC 91 129 Low Medium 3.0-6.9 DU/AC 67 303 Medium 7.0-12.9 DU/AC 79 710 High 13.0-20.0 DU/AC 16 233 Total 806 1,581 * Gross Dwelling Unit calculation is based on assumptions contained in Appendix B SOURCE: City of Temecula, February 2009. ine k-xW also conauctea a recoms searen ana visual survey using aerial photos and site visits to estimate the remaining residential development capacity by number and type of housing within the approved specific plans. Table development potential remaining Appendix B-1). H-32 summarizes the housing in the specific plan areas (see Six specific plans have remaining potential for Very High Density residential development — Paloma Del Sol, Rancho Highlands, Wolf Creek, the future Villages of Old Town, Red Hawk, and Harveston. Paloma Del Sol is under active construction. The City Council is considering removing certain conditions for approval to facilitate the development of high density housing in this specific plan area. Harveston is approximately 88% built out with a remaining capacity to develop approximately 221 units at Very High Density. Rancho Highlands is approaching buildout with the exception of the Very High Density area. Infrastructure is already in place within the Rancho Highlands Specific Plan area. The Temecula Development Code allows for an increase in density in the High, Medium, and Low Medium residential designations if the development is senior housing, affordable housing or a congregate care facility. Densities for senior housing may be increased in High Density to 30 units per acre, in Medium Density to 20 units per acre, and in Low Medium Density to 8 units per acre. Currently, under the Development Code, density bonuses of at least 25% may also be granted for affordable housing projects, potentially increasing the maximum density, including density bonus, to 30 units per acre in High Density, 18 units per acre in Medium Density, and 8 units per acre in Low Medium Density. The density bonuses offered by the City exceed the State density bonus requirements. Density bonuses TLMECULA G F. N L K; A L P L A H-67 0 may also be granted to specific plan areas, as long as the maximum density bonus does not exceed 50% of the target density in such areas. For example, in the Paloma del Sol Specific Plan area, the target density for Very High density is 16.2 units per acre, with a maximum range of 20 runts per acre. An affordable housing project can potentially receive a maximum density bonus of 8.1 units per acre, resulting in a maximum density of 28.1 units per acre. In addition, the City offers flexibility on standards for front and rear yard setbacks, building height, lot coverage, open space requirements, parking requirements, and lot size. The State currently requires that approval authority for an affordable housing project also include from one to three concessions to the extent needed to facilitate the development of affordable housing. Overall, the vacant site inventory yields an estimated development capacity of 7,935 units (3,629 outside of Specific Plan areas and 4,306 within Specific Plan areas) as of December, 2007, without density bonuses. In addition, this number does not include implementation of the new "Urban Density Overlay Zone," which will be implemented in 2009 and will allow 30 dwelling units (and more with density bonuses) in Mixed -Use Overlay Areas and Redevelopment Plan areas under certain criteria. Figure H-4 identifies vacant developable parcels throughout the City of Temecula. Using developable vacant sites alone, the City would be able to meet its RHNA of 4,086 dwelling units. J F T L 11 L: C. li L A H -6S i..., E \ E ft. A L P 1. TABLE H-32 REMAINING APPROVED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT FOR EXISTING SPECIFIC PLANS Low Medium/ Medium Low Medium High High Very High Specific Plan/ Density Density Density Density2 Density2 Land Use (.4.2 (2.5 (5.8 (8.14 (14.20 Total Designations' DUTAC) DUTAC) DUTAC) DUTAC) DUTAC) Units Campos Verdes 0 0 0 0 0 0 Margarita Village 0 0 0 0 0 0 Paloma Del Sol 0 378 0 268 240 886 Rancho Highlands 0 0 0 0 404 404 Harveston3 0 20 0 104 0 124 Crown Hall 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 Wolf Creek 0 0 0 216 163 369 Roripaugh Estates 0 0 0 0 0 0 Roripaugh Ranch 108 939 122 846 0 2,015 Vail 0 0 0 0 0 0 Villages of Old 0 0 64 128 128 320 Town Red Hawks 0 0 91 0 97 188 Total 108 1,337 277 1,562 1,032 4,306 1 Land use categories for specific plans vary from those used in the Development Code. 2 The anticipated density in adopted specific plans, except for the Westside Specific Plan, is 11.6 units/acre for High Density Residential and 15.8-16.2 units/acre for Very High Density Residential. The anticipated density in a specific plan area refers only to an overall average density across the specific plan when a range of housing types is provided within a residential category. It does not prevent individual projects from achieving the maximum density permitted. 3 Entitlements issued for all remaining units in the Harveston Specific Plan area. 4 Villages of Old Town Specific Plan is an anticipated future Specific Plan. The number of dwelling units is estimated. This project is a concept and no formal application has been submitted for its development. 5 Entitlements issued for all remaining units in Red Hawk. SOURCE: City of Temecula, February 2008. i. I T Y O F T E. M L C L1 L A G L t ii R- A L P L\ ti F( -fig Figure H-4 Vacant Developable Parcels in the City of Temecula 0 F IYNIECULA C, 1 N L R. A L P L k N H-70 2. Underutilized Residential Properties/Second Units As part of the Housing Element Update, the City conducted a parcel - by -parcel analysis of sites with potential to support a second dwelling unit and/or be subdivided to accommodate additional residences. Underutilized residential property having the potential to subdivide, or construct a second dwelling unit, are shown on Figure H-5. (See Appendix C for more information on underutilized parcels within the City and potential constraints) These properties were selected because the lot is at least two times the minimum lot size for its current zone and the lot configuration could permit a lot split. In addition to development on vacant land, the City recognizes the potential for additional new development of affordable housing in the form of second units. The City has incorporated development standards for second units into its Development Code. The Code allows for second units in all residential zoning districts where there is an existing owner -occupied single-family detached dwelling unit if the following conditions are met: • The unit maybe rented, but not sold; • An attached second unit's floor area is no more than 400 square feet, and does not exceed 30% of the floor area of the primary residential unit; • A detached second unit has a floor area of between 400 and 1,200 square feet; • The application for the second unit is signed by the owner of the parcel and primary residential dwelling unit; • The design of the second unit is compatible with the primary dwelling unit and the surrounding neighborhood; and There is one covered parking space for each two-bedroom (or smaller) second unit or two covered parking spaces for each three- bedroom (or larger) second unit. C[ "t Y O F T L ;M L C t[ L A 11-71 G L: N L K A L. P L. iti1 0 Figure H-5 Underutilized Residential Properties and Potential Second Unit Sites -i y o F T E M E C Lf L A C�ENER-Al. P L A N 11-72 3. Targeted Sites Within the Old Town Specific Plan area, the Temecula Redevelopment Agency has identified several sites with the potential for residential redevelopment. Currently, the Redevelopment Agency has secured site control of three parcels and is securing site control of six additional sites through acquisition and tax default, totaling 5.33 acres. While the scope of housing development to occur on all of these sites has not been detemuned, given the Agency involvement, some form of affordable housing development can be expected. Based on the allowable density, an estimated 89 houses affordable to t lower income households have been constructed. 4. Vacant Commercial Sites Several commercial zoning districts throughout the City of Temecula permit by right or conditionally permit residential uses. The City's vacant land use survey, included as Appendix B of the Housing Element, identifies all such vacant parcels and the realistic residential development capacity for each parcel if developed with residential uses. Table H-33 summarizes the residential development potential within currently vacant commercial parcels. The data in this Table assumes a density of 20 units per acre, although parcels located within the Urban Density Overlay will be permitted do develop at 30 units per acre as discussed on page H-71. TABLE H-33 POTENTIAL RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON VACANT COMMERCIAL LAND Maximum Vacant General Plan Designations Density Acreage Gross Dwelling Units* Community Commercial 20 DU/AC 54.57 818 Highway Tourist Commercial 20 DU/AC 23.32 343 Professional Office 20 DU/AC 174.11 2585 Service Commercial 20 DU/AC 207.31 3082 Total 459.31 6828 * Gross Dwelling Unit calculation is based on information contained in Appendix B, multiplied by a factor of 75 SOURCE: City of Temecula, February 2009. 5. Mixed -Use Development As discussed in the Constraints section of this Housing Element, the Temecula Development Code and General Plan also allow housing in some non-residential zoning districts. As an example, the City adopted a C I r i o f T E ti, E. C U E A G Y� P R A i_ P 1, A H-73 The General Plan Community Design Element already recognizes three Mixed -Use Overlay Areas that can be used for mixed-use development. These areas include a failing commercial center on Jefferson Avenue, two struggling commercial centers, and another near Old Town (see below). The Target Center currently has a Vons supermarket, Target store, a 24 -Hour Fitness Center, and many smaller shops and restaurants. Some of the buildings, including 24 - Hour Fitness, are currently vacant. The Tower Plaza has a large office complex, some restaurants, a bank, a Big Lots, Armstrong Nursery, and many smaller Shops and restaurants. Recently the Orchards food market closed. The Stater Brothers Center is the oldest of the three mixed-use overlay centers and it currently includes a Salvation Army store, some restaurants, and an automotive use. The Stater Brothers supermarket, which anchored this center, has been closed for more than two years. To the extent that some of these uses remain quite viable (i.e., Target, 24 -Hour Fitness, the office building in the Tower Plaza), there will likely be no redevelopment of these uses in the short-term As buildings become vacant, such as the Orchards market and the Stater Brothers market, the potential for reuse does exist and the City has had discussions with developers about these sites. Given current market conditions, it is difficult to say when, or even if these sites will be redeveloped. The City's Redevelopment Agency is in the process of retaining an economic/fiscal consultant to assess the redevelopment potential and economic viability for the Jefferson Corridor area, which encompasses the Stater Brothers Center. In addition, the City has a C I T Y o} T t. M L C U i.. A G E N E R, A L P L A N H-74 U� Planned Development Overlay (PDO) district for the Temecula Creek Village (PDO,4) project to provide for a mixed-use commercial/residential project. Temecula Creek Village was built on a 32.6 -acre site within the PO zone with 20 acres of residential and 12 acres of commercial uses. A key component of this project was the provision of high density residential apartments with integrated commercial development in the PO zone. In 2005, the City updated its General Plan. As a part of the update, the City identified three additional areas with mixed-use opportunities. These areas are located within the City boundary and generally surrounding the I-15 corridor, total 448 acres and are characterized either by aging commercial centers, traditional development, commercial or vacant/under-utilized land. Specifically, in the area south of Old Town, many lots are currently vacant and present great opportunities for mixed -use -development. Such reuse has become popular among developers and residents alike in recent years. The General Plan Community Design Element already recognizes three Mixed -Use Overlay Areas that can be used for mixed-use development. These areas include a failing commercial center on Jefferson Avenue, two struggling commercial centers, and another near Old Town (see below). The Target Center currently has a Vons supermarket, Target store, a 24 -Hour Fitness Center, and many smaller shops and restaurants. Some of the buildings, including 24 - Hour Fitness, are currently vacant. The Tower Plaza has a large office complex, some restaurants, a bank, a Big Lots, Armstrong Nursery, and many smaller Shops and restaurants. Recently the Orchards food market closed. The Stater Brothers Center is the oldest of the three mixed-use overlay centers and it currently includes a Salvation Army store, some restaurants, and an automotive use. The Stater Brothers supermarket, which anchored this center, has been closed for more than two years. To the extent that some of these uses remain quite viable (i.e., Target, 24 -Hour Fitness, the office building in the Tower Plaza), there will likely be no redevelopment of these uses in the short-term As buildings become vacant, such as the Orchards market and the Stater Brothers market, the potential for reuse does exist and the City has had discussions with developers about these sites. Given current market conditions, it is difficult to say when, or even if these sites will be redeveloped. The City's Redevelopment Agency is in the process of retaining an economic/fiscal consultant to assess the redevelopment potential and economic viability for the Jefferson Corridor area, which encompasses the Stater Brothers Center. In addition, the City has a C I T Y o} T t. M L C U i.. A G E N E R, A L P L A N H-74 "Fast -Trach' process that can expedite processing of development in these three areas. g propose`; w Currently, a conceptual mixed-use project is proposed in the Village of Old Town, immediately outside one of the identified Mixed -Use Overlay Areas. The conceptual project proposes a total of 320 dwelling units at various densities, up to 20 units per acre. Building heights proposed range from three to four stories. The City is in the process of negotiating with the project developer the percentage of affordable units (60% lower income and 40% moderate income) in the proposal. The types of mixed-use envisioned for the Mixed -Use Overlay Areas are consistent with the village center concept. In some cases, residential units would be added within existing shopping centers and districts. In other cases, existing developments would be replaced with new mixed-use projects. Both multi -family rental apartments and condominiums/town homes are envisioned. While mixed-use will be permitted by right in the 448 acres identified with mixed-use potential, 40% of the properties are assumed to be developed with residential uses. The maximum residential density for mixed-use development is up to 30 units per acre (or higher with density bonus), with the potential to accommodate between 2,100 and 3,500 units depending on the areas to be included and the can*g capacity of infrastructure. To facilitate mixed-use development, the City will provide flexible development standards such as an increased height limit and shared parking opportunities. The City has revised the Zoning Ordinance to establish specific use, height, bulk, parking, landscaping, and other guidelines for these areas that would be appropriate for mixed-use development. 6. zoning to Encourage Lower Income Housing Under current zoning, the maximum residential density permitted by right in any zone in Temecula is twenty (20) dwelling units per acre. Density bonuses may be permitted on a project by project basis to increase the number of units designated for lower income households. However, legislation passed since the adoption of the last Housing Element, codified as Section 65583.2 of the California Government Code, requires that cities the size of Temecula permit residential density of up to thirty (30) units per acre. This density designation is also known as the default density. Permitting by right up to thirty units per acre for all zones where residential development is allowed would foreseeably have significant adverse impacts on the City of Temecula and its resident's quality of C i.E Y Cir- TE;N1LC: t[LA 11-705 G E\ E IZ A L P L A 0 S I life. The Citys master plan originally envisioned high density at 20 units per acre and increasing this to 30 units would represent a 50% across the board increase for high density residential projects. Such an increase would likely result in a diminished ability to provide services such as police and fire protection, utilities, water service, and adequate level of service on City streets. Throughout the development of this Housing Element Update, City staff expressed these concerns to the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) and worked with HCD to develop an appropriate concept to address the default density issue. As part of the adoption of the Housing Element Update, the City will establish and implement a new "Urban Density Overlay" zone that will permit by right 30 dwelling units per acre (and higher with density bonuses) within existing Mixed -Use Overlay Areas and in sites located within the Redevelopment Agency boundary. Figure H-6 identifies the boundaries of the Urban Density Overlay Zone. To achieve 30 units per acre, or more with density bonus provisions, sites located within the new overlay zone will be subject to the following criteria: (1) the parcel is vacant or underutilized (a new Program for identifying underutilized parcels suitable for reuse or redevelopment is included in section VI. B.); (2) residential uses are permitted or conditionally permitted with the underlying zoning for the site; (3) a minimum of 20% of the units are available to Extremely Low -Income, Very Low -Income, Low Income, and/or Low- Moderate owModerate income families; (4) the breakdown of these units is equivalent to the ratio in the Temecula Regional Housing Needs Assessment for 2006-2014; and (5) the units maintain their affordable status for at least 55 years. All residential projects located outside of the Urban Density Overlay zone will continue to be held at a maximum of 20 units per acre by right. Density bonuses will continue to be available for all residential projects having an affordable component. City staff conducted an analysis of the vacant and underutilized parcels located within the Urban Density Overlay Zone to determine the potential number of residential units that could be accommodated in this area. Detailed information for these parcels can be found in Appendix D. Table H-34 summarizes the potential residential capacity of vacant commercial parcels within the Urban Density Overlay Zone. J E T L N4 E C U L A 11-76 G E N E R. A L P L A Y H 0 U City of Temecula Urban Density Overlay � Parcels Wcaut PDpwtin with Land Use High (13-3! DWAr Mu) Pmftqsa� Cffi� Msammc�l U41 Undff tJfifLzedPmperfl�withLmdI.Jse Mw.h 31, ZD09 F//;� C�rAyc�tw —mm M �/j Hiway TM fist connW.W Figure H-6 Urban Density Overlay Vacant and Underutilized Sites C I I Y 0 r: T E M E C LI L A GENER,A1, P L, A N H-77 TABLE H-34 POTENTIAL RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE URBAN DENSITY OVERLAY ZONE (VACANT PARCELS) Gross Dwelling Unit calculation is based on assumptions contained in Appendix D SOURCE: City of Temecula, February 2009 The potential number of dwelling units that could be constructed on currently vacant parcels located within the Urban Density Overlay, exceeds the City of Temecula RHNA for extremely low-income, very low-income, and low-income households by 641 dwelling units. Therefore, upon certification by HCD, the City of Temecula Housing Element meets the requirements for appropriate density and adequate capacity for affordable housing. The City of Temecula also desires to spur economic development by creating mixed-use developments in underutilized commercial areas. The potential for residential units within the Urban Density Overlay zone can also include underutilized or underperforming commercial projects. The general locations of such commercial project sites are identified with detailed parcel information in Appendix D. Table H- 35 summarizes assumptions used by City staff to evaluate the potential for residential capacity in underutilized commercial parcels within the Urban Density Overlay Zone. TABLE H-35 POTENTIAL RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE URBAN DENSITY OVERLAY ZONE (UNDERUTILIZED PARCELS) Commercial Center Maximum Total Gross Dwelling Use Restrictions Density Acreage Units* None 30 DU/AC 41.99 945 Senior Housing Only 30 DU/AC 63.09 1419 Total 30 DU/AC 105.08 2364 Gross Dwelling Unit calculation is based on assumptions contained in Appendix D SOURCE: City of Temecula, February 2009 The potential number of dwelling units that could be constructed on currently vacant parcels located within the Urban Density Overlay, exceeds the City of Temecula RHNA for extremely low-income, very low-income, and low-income households by 641 dwelling units. Therefore, upon certification by HCD, the City of Temecula Housing Element meets the requirements for appropriate density and adequate capacity for affordable housing. The City of Temecula also desires to spur economic development by creating mixed-use developments in underutilized commercial areas. The potential for residential units within the Urban Density Overlay zone can also include underutilized or underperforming commercial projects. The general locations of such commercial project sites are identified with detailed parcel information in Appendix D. Table H- 35 summarizes assumptions used by City staff to evaluate the potential for residential capacity in underutilized commercial parcels within the Urban Density Overlay Zone. TABLE H-35 POTENTIAL RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE URBAN DENSITY OVERLAY ZONE (UNDERUTILIZED PARCELS) Commercial Center Maximum Density Total Acreage Gross Dwelling Units* Bel ViIlaggio 30 DU/AC 17.77 53 Jefferson Avenue (east side) 30 DU/AC 37.26 112 Jefferson Avenue (west side) 30 DU/AC 53.46 160 Target Center 30 DU/AC 50.30 151 Tower Plaza 30 DU/AC 23.42 70 Total 105.08 546 Gross Dwelling Unit calculation is based on assumptions contained in Appendix D SOURCE: City of Temecula, February 2009. C I T Y O F T 1_ A-1 F c U L A C.r E N, L R- A L P L A N— H-78 To meet the City's RHNA obligations for the planning period, additional sites and capacity from underutilized parcels is not necessary at this time. However, this is a program the City wishes to pursue and, therefore, general locations have been detemuned. During the planning period, the City of Temecula intends to complete a parcel specific inventory of all underutilized commercial parcels identified in Appendix D for future consideration of mixed-use development. All of the underutilized parcels are zoned Community Commercial and, therefore, there would not necessarily be any age restrictions on residential units constructed in these centers. 7. Residential Development Potential Compared with Temecula's Regional Housing Needs WRCOG has adopted a RHNA for its member cities. For Temecula, WRCOG has established the City's share of regional housing needs as 4,086 additional units for the period of January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2014, as of December 2008. Table H-36 shows the breakdown of these 4,086 dwelling units into income categories. TABLE H-36 SHARE OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY RHNA Housing Units Constructed: Housing units constructed and issued final building permits between January 1, 2006 and the adoption of the Housing Element can also be counted toward fulfilling the RHNA for this Housing Element cycle. According to City records, a total of 188 new single-family dwelling units (including tract homes) and 27 multi -family dwelling units have been approved, issued building permits, or constructed since November 1, 2007, as of June 2008. C.: I Z Y a F l_ 1., :N4 E C U L, A C., } N 1 R A L P 1, .A N F1-79 Income Level Extremely Very Low Low Moderate Above Municipality Low Income Income Income Moderate Total Temecula 507 507 693 757 1,622 4,086 Murrieta 784 784 1,067 1,171 2,497 6,303 Hemet 1,242 1,242 1,781 2,080 4,898 11,243 Riverside 1,344 1,344 1,866 2,099 4,728 11,281 Total 3,877 3,877 5,407 6,107 13,745 32,912 SOURCE: City of Temecula, 2008. Housing Units Constructed: Housing units constructed and issued final building permits between January 1, 2006 and the adoption of the Housing Element can also be counted toward fulfilling the RHNA for this Housing Element cycle. According to City records, a total of 188 new single-family dwelling units (including tract homes) and 27 multi -family dwelling units have been approved, issued building permits, or constructed since November 1, 2007, as of June 2008. C.: I Z Y a F l_ 1., :N4 E C U L, A C., } N 1 R A L P 1, .A N F1-79 According to the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) data for the region, in 2006 increasing numbers of Low and Moderate income households decided not to complete their mortgage loan applications. Although the reasons are not clear, some of these could include higher interest rates, and/or requirements for higher down payments. Government -backed loans resulted in higher approval rates, but fewer applicants than conventional loans, which provide reduced interest rates and down payment requirements than conventional loans. The City's First -Time Homebuyer Program offers down payment assistance to households with incomes not exceeding the area median income. The Mortgage Credit Certificate and Employee Relocation programs also provide down payment assistance to households with incomes not exceeding 120% of the area median income. RHNA: Table H-36, above, presents the City's portion of the RHNA as determined by WRCOG for each affordability level of housing units to be constructed between January 1, 2006 and June 30, 2014. Table H-37 shows the City's remaining RHNA requirement after crediting the recently completed projects. C I "I Y O F I L R4 F.. C U L A C Ii N E: R A L P 1, 1 N 11-80 The following affordable development projects were completed after January 1, 2006 and, therefore, can be credited toward meeting the City of Temecula RHNA for the 2006-2014 Planning Period: • Dalton II — approved and constructed 24 units (multi -family for -rent) / all moderate income under covenant for 55 years pursuant to regulatory agreement • Dalton III — approved and constructed 22 units (multi -family T for -rent) / 12 low income and 10 moderate income under 9 covenant for 55 years pursuant to regulatory agreement • Temecula Lane — approved and partially built 11 units (multi- family for -rent) / all very low income under covenant for 55 years • Riverbank— 66 senior units (multi -family for -rent)/ 13 very low income — 53 low income under covenant for 55 years pursuant to regulatory agreement. • Cottages —17 units (single-family for -sale) / all low or moderate income under covenant for 45 years pursuant to regulatory agreement. • Habitat II — 5 units (Single-family for -sale) / all very low income under covenant for 40 years pursuant to regulatory agreement. According to the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) data for the region, in 2006 increasing numbers of Low and Moderate income households decided not to complete their mortgage loan applications. Although the reasons are not clear, some of these could include higher interest rates, and/or requirements for higher down payments. Government -backed loans resulted in higher approval rates, but fewer applicants than conventional loans, which provide reduced interest rates and down payment requirements than conventional loans. The City's First -Time Homebuyer Program offers down payment assistance to households with incomes not exceeding the area median income. The Mortgage Credit Certificate and Employee Relocation programs also provide down payment assistance to households with incomes not exceeding 120% of the area median income. RHNA: Table H-36, above, presents the City's portion of the RHNA as determined by WRCOG for each affordability level of housing units to be constructed between January 1, 2006 and June 30, 2014. Table H-37 shows the City's remaining RHNA requirement after crediting the recently completed projects. C I "I Y O F I L R4 F.. C U L A C Ii N E: R A L P 1, 1 N 11-80 r 3"'.... eV7 TABLE H-37 TEMECULA RHNA ADJUSTED FOR COMPLETED PROJECTS Extremely Very Low Municipality Low Income Income Level Low Moderate Above Income Income Moderate Total Temecula 507 478 611 723 - 1,622 3,941 SOURCE: City of Temecula, 2009. Summary of Residential Development Potential: The City's site inventory demonstrates the availability of adequate sites to address the projected housing growth needs (see Appendix B). Table H-38 summarizes the City's residential development potential. However, the difficulty of providing affordable housing is generally acknowledged due to the tight housing market in Southern California. The site inventory indicates a capacity of 3,629 units on vacant properties outside of a specific plan area and 4,306 units within specific plan areas. Additional capacity is also available through target sites and mixed-use development and the potential to use underutilized parcels. Existing and proposed new zoning designations will facilitate the development of affordable housing, particularly with the use of public assistance, such as redevelopment housing set-aside funds, low income housing tax credits, and Section 8 rental assistance. The Redevelopment Agency is actively pursuing affordable housing development with redevelopment housing set-aside funds as mandated by state law. One recent Redevelopment Agency project, Mission Village, was developed at a density of approximately 20 units to the acre and the units are affordable to Very Low and Low Income households. The City has set target densities for the various residential designations: Hillside Residential (0.1 unit/acre); Very Low Density Residential (0.3 units/acre); Low Density Residential (1.3 units/acre); and Low Medium Density Residential (4.5 units/acre). Only projects that provide amenities or public benefits will be allowed to exceed the target level. However, to facilitate affordable housing development, the City has not set target density levels for the Medium and High Density Residential categories. C. I "i Y O F T L .N-1 E C L1 L: A N-81 G E N E K, A L P L A N 0 G As indicated in Table H-38 above, development in the Citys High Density Residential zone is permitted to occur at densities of 20 units per acre, which can be increased to 30 units per acre with a density bonus, potentially creating housing affordable to Low and Very Low Income households. For Very Nigh Density development within specific plan areas, the anticipated density is 15.8 to 16.2 units per acre (Table H-32). However, the anticipated density refers only to an overall average density across the specific plan when a range of housing types is provided within a residential category. It does not prevent individual projects from achieving the maximum density permitted. Density bonuses for senior and affordable housing may also be permitted within approved specific plan areas as long as the C: l I r O F T r .tri E. c [.I L A G E X F K, A (, P I A H-82 TABLE H-38 SUMMARY OF RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL Income Opportunity GP Desig- Maximum Acres Maximum Areas nation Density Unit Potential Lower Income Outside Specific Plan High 20 du/ac 48 1,029 Areas Within Specific Very High 20 du/ac -- 1,273 Plan Areas gg Target Sites High 20 du/ac 5.33 89 Mixed-Use MU 35-40 du/ac -- 16 (Village of Old Town) Total 2,407 Moderate Outside Medium 12 du/ac 171 2,004 - Income Specific Plan - Areas Within Specific High 14 du/ac --- 175 Plan Areas Mixed-Use MU 35-40 du/ac -- 11 (Village of Old Town) Total 2,190 Upper Outside Hillside 0.1 -4.5 du/ac 1,893 3,041 Income Specific Plan through Areas Low Medium Within Specific Low 0.4 - 8.0 du/ac --- 3,234 Plan Area through Medium High Mixed-Use MU various --- 293 (Village of Old Town) Total 6,568 Note: Development potential in this table does not include the mixed-use areas to be considered in the General Plan update. As indicated in Table H-38 above, development in the Citys High Density Residential zone is permitted to occur at densities of 20 units per acre, which can be increased to 30 units per acre with a density bonus, potentially creating housing affordable to Low and Very Low Income households. For Very Nigh Density development within specific plan areas, the anticipated density is 15.8 to 16.2 units per acre (Table H-32). However, the anticipated density refers only to an overall average density across the specific plan when a range of housing types is provided within a residential category. It does not prevent individual projects from achieving the maximum density permitted. Density bonuses for senior and affordable housing may also be permitted within approved specific plan areas as long as the C: l I r O F T r .tri E. c [.I L A G E X F K, A (, P I A H-82 maximum density bonus does not exceed 50% of the target density rrik such areas. Past multi -family developments in the City have realized a range of densities, averaging up to about 16 units per acre with some projects exceeding 20 units per acre. According to a major residential developer in the Inland Empire, development of housing affordable to lower income households in most communities in California requires some form of assistance, such as land write downs, constriction financing, fee waiver/reimbursement, and/or provision of off-site improvements. The issue is whether the assistance required would be so high that it would render affordable housing development financially infeasible. Based on past projects, the Temecula Redevelopment Agency estimates an average assistance of about $130,000 to $150,000 per unit to develop housing affordable for lower income households. This level of gap financing required in Temecula is consistent with, or less than, that needed in other communities based on a review of affordability gap analyses contained in several inclusionary in -lieu fee studies. Therefore, the $130,000 to $150,000 per unit subsidy to develop affordable housing for lower income households is considered financially feasible. As part of this Housing Element update, the City has included several programs/actions to facilitate affordable housing development. Program 4 (Land Assemblage and Affordable Housing Development) acquires land, which is then provided to affordable housing developers for the development of housing affordable to lower income households. Program 9 (Development Fee Reimbursement) offers reimbursement of development fees paid by the developers of affordable and senior housing. Program 11 (Redevelopment Set -Aside) identifies the development of multi -family affordable housing and acquisition of land for the development of low and moderate income housing as Priority I projects for the use of set- aside funds. Affordable Housing Projects in the Pipeline: The agency has, within the last 12 to 18 months, added an additional 121 affordable units to the housing stock and a total 268 over the previous plam-ring period. Currently, the agency is analyzing selected properties for possible acquisition and seeking land Owners as partners in Owner Participation Agreements. The following projects are under construction or are anticipated to be built during the planning period: Warehouse at Creekside — 32 units (multi -family for -rent) approved and under construction / 19 low income and 13 moderate income under covenant for 55 years pursuant to regulatory agreement. C[ "C 7 J F T E R-1 E. C C[ 1, A < s E., \ E R- A L P 1. A H-83 0 • Habitat III — 2 to 4 units (single-family for sale)/ all very low income. The Redevelopment Agency is in the process of obtaining neighboring property to allow for the construction of 4 units. • Creekside Apartments Rehabilitation — A TEFRA hearing was held on May 27, 2008. The City is awaiting confirmation of the issuance of revenue bonds which will result in the renewal of a 55 year covenant on 33 very low income and 15 low income multi- family for rent units. • Oak Tree Apartments Rehabilitation — The City has received a request for a TEFRA hearing to initiate the issuance of revenue bonds which will result in the renewal of a 55 year covenant on 4 extremely low income, 11 very low income and 24 low income multi -family for rent age restricted units. • Summerhouse — 110 units (multi -family foment) approved and partially constructed / 38 extremely low income, 70 very low income and 2 moderate income under covenant for 55 years pursuant to regulatory agreement. Table H-39 identifies the total remaining City of Temecula RHNA for the planning period 2008-2014 after adjustments have been made for projects completed after January 1, 2006 including projects in the pipeline. TABLE H-39 REMAINING RHNA ADJUSTED FOR PROJECTS IN PIPELINE Income Level Extremely Very Low Low Moderate Above Low Income Income Income Moderate Total Temecula 465 363 553 708 1,622 3,711 SOURCE: City of Temecula, 2009. Correspondence received from HCD during the development of the Draft Housing Element Update indicates that the default density of 30 units per acre only need apply to enough acreage to meet the need for housing units affordable to extremely low, very low, and low- income owincome households. The data from Table H-39 shows that the current combined need for such housing is 1,381 units. The City's analysis of the residential capacity within the Urban Density Overlay Zone, Tables H-34 and H-35, yielded a resulting capacity of 2,910 units. Moreover, the vacant land inventory analysis, Appendix B, yields a total capacity of 13,583 units without the benefit of increased density in the Urban Density Overlay Zone. In light of these facts C.: f T Y O 1 TYMECULA GENEKAL P 1, A H-84 07, and figures, it is apparent that the City of Temecula, indeed, has= sufficient available land, appropriate zoning, and capacity to meet the affordable housing goals for the current RHNA cycle. B. Financial Resources 1. Redevelopment Set -Aside Fund California Redevelopment Law provides the mechanism whereby cities and counties within the state can, through adoption of an ordinance, establish a redevelopment agency. The Agency's primary purpose is to provide the legal and financial mechanism necessary to address blight and the causes of blight, in the community through the formation of a redevelopment project area(s). Of the various means pemritted under California Redevelopment Law for financing the implementation of redevelopment plans, the most useful of these provisions is tax increment financing. This technique allows the assessed property valuation within the redevelopment project area to be frozen at its current assessed level when the redevelopment plan is adopted. As the property in the project area is improved or resold, the tax increment revenue generated from valuation increases above the frozen value is redistributed to the redevelopment agency to finance other redevelopment projects. California Redevelopment Law also requires the redevelopment agency to address housing issues for Low and Moderate Income residents in the following ways: Expend 20% of tax increment revenue to increase and improve the supply of Low and Moderate Income housing; • Replace Low and Moderate Income housing which is destroyed as a result of a redevelopment project (replacement housing obligation); and • Ensure that a portion of all housing constructed or substantially rehabilitated in a redevelopment project area be affordable to Low and Moderate Income households (inclusionary obligation). Prior to Temecula's incorporation, the County of Riverside established a Redevelopment Project on July 12, 1988 with the adoption of Redevelopment Plan No. 1-1988. The Project area extends from Interstate 15/State Route 79 Interchange north to the City limits. Old Town is included within the Project area. After incorporation, the City of Temecula assumed responsibility for administering the Project area. C: I T Y J F 1 E RR E C U L A G I N E ft A L P L A N N-85 C I T Y Pursuant to State law, the Temecula Redevelopment Agency has established a Redevelopment Housing Fund by setting aside 20% of the tax increment revenue. The Agency anticipates an annual deposit of between $1.4 million and $1.6 million in tax increment funds over a five-year period, for a total deposit of approximately $8.4 million to $9.0 million. Based on the required 20% set-aside, approximately $1.5 million will be available during the five-year period for housing activities. Since set-aside funds are a function of property tax revenues, the amount of future deposits will depend on factors such as market conditions and the timing of new taxable development. California Redevelopment Law sets forth a variety of options for localities to expend their housing funds, including: • Land disposition and write-downs; • Site improvements; • Loans; • Issuance of bonds; • Land and building acquisition by Agency; • Direct housing construction; • Housing rehabilitation; • Rent subsidies; • Predevelopment funds; and • Administrative costs for non-profit housing corporations. The specific uses of the set-aside funds are described in the Howirq Plan section of this Housing Element. 2. Section 8 The Section 8 rental assistance program extends rental subsidies to Very Low Income families and elderly who spend more than 30% of their income on rent. The subsidy represents the difference between the excess of 30% of the monthly income and the actual rent. Most Section 8 assistance is issued to the recipients as vouchers, which permit tenants to locate their own housing and rent units beyond the federally determined fair market rent in an area, provided the tenants paythe extra rent increment. The Housing Authority of Riverside administers the Section 8 Certificate/Voucher Program for Temecula. As of December 2007, 105 households were leasing in Temecula with the assistance of Section 8 programs. Of these households, 26 were elderly, 30 were disabled, and 31 were both disabled and elderly. An additional 531 households living in Temecula were on the waiting list to receive 0 r 1L A4 E C. I[ L A H-86 Ci E N I: R A t., P t.. A ti Section 8 rental assistance, 33 of which were disabled and 33 that are elderly and disabled. elderly 88 which w 3. Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) The City receives its CDBG funding through the County of Riverside. During Fiscal Year 2007, the County received a CDBG grant award of approximately $10.6 million. Based on a formula that considers population, poverty, and substandard housing, the City is eligible to receive approximately $300,000 annually from the County. These funds must be used to fund public improvements and service activities that aid Low and Moderately Low Income persons. The City has, in the past, used approximately 85% of the CDBG funds for capital projects, such as the Senior Citizen Center Expansion project, and the remaining 15% of the funding is awarded to various public service organizations. No CDBG funds have been used for housing at this time. 4. Analysis of Non -Vacant and Underutilized Lands Staff reviewed a list produced by GIS of underutilized single and multi -family projects within city limits. The following represents staff's findings: Multi -Family Underutilized multi -family properties are characterized as having been built with less than 50% of total allowable units per the Land Use Policy Map of the General Plan. Using this criteria, staff determined that seven multi -family housing developments are currently underutilized. These properties are identified in Figure H-5. Six of the developments were constructed before incorporation. Staff was unable to produce any meaningful data on these six developments since records appear to be missing. Laurel Greek (PA98-0171) was the only underutilized multi -family development constructed after incorporation. After reviewing the staff report for this project, staff discovered the site was developed with seven units per acre instead of the maximum permitted density of twelve units per acre. The staff report indicated that the lower density would serve as a good transitional development between the existing detached single family tract developments to the north and east. The staff report also mentioned that the adjacent HOA to the east of the project was opposed to the originally proposed fourplex product. C. i I 70 F I E ;it L C l( L A 1-1-8! G, }_ N' E IZ A L P L A N C [ [- Y Single -Family Underutilized single family properties are characterized as having the potential to be subdivided into three or more parcels. Using this criteria, staff determined that 172 single family residential properties are currently underutilized. The primary reasons for the underutilization are that these parcels may accommodate a secondary dwelling unit in the future. In addition, the properties may also become subdivided as previously stated. Underutilized properties are identified in Figure H-5. C. Housing Developers The following are housing providers interested in developing and/or preserving affordable housing in the City: • Coachella Valley Housing Coalition - 45 -701 Monroe Street, Suite G Indio, CA 92201 Telephone: (760) 347-3157 • Habitat for Humanity 41964 Main Street Temecula, CA 92591 Telephone: (909) 693-0460 • Jamboree Housing Corporation 2081 Business Center Drive, Suite 216 Irvine, CA 92612 Telephone: (949) 263-8676 • Affirmed Housing 13520 Evening Creek Drive North, Suite 360 San Diego, CA 92128 Telephone: (858)679-2828 • The Olson Company 30200 Old Ranch Pkwy, # 250 Seal Beach, CA 90740 Telephone: (562) 596-4770 • San Diego Community Housing Corporation 8799 Balboa Avenue, Suite 220 San Diego, CA 92123 Telephone: (858) 571-0444 • D'Alto Partners 41911 5thStreet Temecula, CA 92590 Telephone: (951)3040633 J F 1 ;1.1 E C Lf L A C E t L R A L: P L A N D. Infrastructure and Facilities The majority of the land available for residential development is located adjacent to existing infrastructure facilities, or within a specific plan area where infrastructure will be provided as part of the development process. As a result, infrastructure facilities will be able to serve most of the future residential development. E. Energy Conservation and Climate Change As residential energy costs rise, increasing utility costs reduce the affordability of housing. The City has many opportunities to directly affect energy use within its jurisdiction. Title 24 of the California Administrative Code sets forth mandatory energy standards for new development, and requires adoption of an "energy budget." The home building industry must comply with these standards while localities are responsible for enforcing the energy conservation regulations. Although the City has not adopted any programs yet to address Climate Change, the City is currently in the process of adopting the Green Builder Program, which includes energy efficiency standards, diversion of solid waste streams, reducing water demand, and other standards. In 2009, the City of Temecula proposes to adopt the California Green Builder Program as a voluntary program for all new single family production homes. In 2010, the City intends to make this a mandatory program In the summer of 2008, the City adopted a new Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance that meets or exceeds all standards contained in the revised State of California Model Ordinance. In addition, the City will adopt the stricter standards under the proposed State of California Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance or an equally C( T Y J fT L :11 E C U L A C E E K A 1., P L A H-89 , jr-,T • DR Horton 2280 Warlow Circle Suite 100 Corona, CA 92880 Telephone: (951)272-9000 • Bridge Housing Corporation 9191 Towne Center Drive, Suite L101 San Diego, CA 92122 Telephone: (858) 535-0552 • Highland Partnerships 285 Bay Blvd Chula Vista, CA 91910 Telephone: (619) 498-2900 D. Infrastructure and Facilities The majority of the land available for residential development is located adjacent to existing infrastructure facilities, or within a specific plan area where infrastructure will be provided as part of the development process. As a result, infrastructure facilities will be able to serve most of the future residential development. E. Energy Conservation and Climate Change As residential energy costs rise, increasing utility costs reduce the affordability of housing. The City has many opportunities to directly affect energy use within its jurisdiction. Title 24 of the California Administrative Code sets forth mandatory energy standards for new development, and requires adoption of an "energy budget." The home building industry must comply with these standards while localities are responsible for enforcing the energy conservation regulations. Although the City has not adopted any programs yet to address Climate Change, the City is currently in the process of adopting the Green Builder Program, which includes energy efficiency standards, diversion of solid waste streams, reducing water demand, and other standards. In 2009, the City of Temecula proposes to adopt the California Green Builder Program as a voluntary program for all new single family production homes. In 2010, the City intends to make this a mandatory program In the summer of 2008, the City adopted a new Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance that meets or exceeds all standards contained in the revised State of California Model Ordinance. In addition, the City will adopt the stricter standards under the proposed State of California Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance or an equally C( T Y J fT L :11 E C U L A C E E K A 1., P L A H-89 effective ordinance by July 1, 2010. Furthermore, the City is working on a sustainability program that would include an amendment to the General Plan and is anticipated to be enacted between 2010 and 2011. Some of the proposed targets for this program include reducing kilowatt hours for residential, commercial and industrial uses by 10% by 2015, and reducing kilowatt hours for City owned and operated facilities by25% by2015. V. ACCOMPLISHMENTS UNDER ADOPTED HOUSING ELEMENT In order to develop an effective housing plan for the 2008-2014 period, the City must assess the effectiveness of its existing housing programs and determine the continued appropriateness of such programs in addressing housing adequacy, affordability, and availability issues. This section evaluates the accomplishments of each program against the objectives established in the 2002 Housing Element, explains any discrepancy in program achievements, and recommends programmatic changes to the 2008-2014 Housing Element. A. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites 1. Land Use Element/Zoning Ordinance Objectiw: Provide a range of residential development opportunities through appropriate land use and zoning designations to fulfill the City's share of regional housing needs. The new 2008-2014 RHNA for the City has been set at 4,085 units (507 Extremely Low, 507 Very Low; 693 Low; 757 Moderate; and 1,622 Above Moderate Income households) for the period of 2008-2014. Accomplishments: During the last planning period, the City provided adequate sites to accommodate its share of regional growth through specific plan and zoning provisions. A total of 7,473 housing units were constructed between January 2000 and December 2005, representing 182.9% of the City's allocated RHNA. Based on the affordability analysis contained in Section II and Section IV, Part 4, one-quarter of the new 5,962 single-family houses constructed are affordable to Moderate Income households, while one-half of the 23 apartments and seven mobile homes constructed during this period are affordable to Moderate Income, with the other half affordable to lower income households. Based on this analysis, the City provided 1,509 units affordable to moderate income households (880% of the RHNA for moderate income households) and 18 units 1+90 affordable to lower income units (or 13% of the RHNA for income households). 2. Sites for Homeless and Emergency Shelters low Objective: Provide adequate sites for emergency shelters by adopting a Zoning Ordinance that permits transitional and emergency housing in Medium and High Residential Density zones, and conditionally permits shelters in the remaining Residential zones and Commercial and Industrial zones. Accomplishments: In 1998, Temecula updated the Development Code in which emergency shelters and transitional housing are permitted in the Medium Density and High Density Residential districts by right without a conditional use permit or other discretionary action.. These uses are also permitted in other residential districts with a conditional use permit. Emergency shelters are also permitted with a conditional use permit in the Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Highway/ Tourist Commercial, Service Commercial, PO, Business Park, and Light Industrial zoning districts. 3. Landbanking Objective: Acquire sites (or funds) for affordable/senior housing through the development of a Landbanking Program. Accomplishments: In 1996, the Temecula Redevelopment Agency purchased 3.42 acres of land on Pujol Street to be leased to Affirmed Housing for the Mission Village affordable housing project. A 0.19 acre parcel was also purchased by the Agency and will be granted to Habitat for Humanity for the construction of two single-family homes affordable to Very Low Income families. In addition, the Agency acquired two Medium Density Residential parcels totaling 0.67 acres. The Redevelopment Agency is working to acquire four additional parcels and two tax defaulted parcels for a total of 4.47 acres. Finally in 2004, the agency acquired a large parcel of land totaling 32.9 acres for a large mixed-use project. B. Assist in Development of Affordable Housing 1. Density Bonus Program Objective: Encourage development of housing for low-income households by incorporating a Density Bonus Program into the Zoning Ordinance. Include provisions to ensure the continued affordability of units. {.. I I Y O F T E M1 E C t( L A G F\ E R. it I.. P L A N 0 C I I Y Accomplishments: The City updated the Development Code in 1998. As described in Section III and IV, the new Development Code contains density bonus provisions for affordable and senior housing developments in the Hgh, Medium, and Low Medium residential designations. Density bonuses may also be granted to specific plan areas, as long as the maximum density, including the bonus, does not exceed 50% of the target density in the planning area. 2. Mortgage Revenue Bond Financing Objective: Increase the supply of rental and ownership units affordable to Low and Moderate Income households by working with Riverside County in securing tax exempt Mortgage Revenue Bond financing. Assistance will be provided to 20 first-time homebuyers annually through the single-family program and the City will establish a program to make use of multi -family Mortgage Revenue Bond financing. Accomplishments: Use of Mortgage Revenue Bond financing for residential construction in Riverside County has been limited in recent years. Instead, the City has relied heavily on redevelopment set-aside funds for affordable housing development. 3. Section 202 Elderly or Handicapped Housing Objective: Provide housing and related facilities for the elderly and handicapped by supporting all viable non-profit entities seeking Section 202 funding. Accomplishments: Due to federal budgetary constraints, the application and allocation of Section 202 funding has become an increasingly competitive process. No non-profit organization pursued Section 202 allotment for the development of senior housing in Temecula. 4. Second Units Objective: Provide increased affordable housing opportunities to low-income households by adopting a Second Unit Ordinance as part of the Development Code. The Second Unit Ordinance shall permit second units on residential lots zoned for single- and multi -family residential use. Accomplishments: The City has incorporated development standards for second units into its Development Code. The Code allows for second units in all residential zoning districts where there is an existing owner -occupied single-family detached dwelling unit if the conditions described in Section III are met. Since adoption of the second unit ordinance, 18 second units have been achieved. O 3 T l ,1I E C II L A 1-1-92 C E. '\' E [t A 1.: P L A N C. Government Constraints =' 1. Priority Processing for Affordable Housing Objectiw: Facilitate production of affordable housing through the development of a schedule for priority processing of affordable housing projects. A contact person shall be designated to coordinate processing of all of the necessary permits. Accomplishments: The Cityhas not adopted a schedule for priority processing of affordable housing projects. The number of housing projects processed during the last ten years did not warrant any special processing procedure for affordable housing projects. 2. Modify Development Fees Objectim: Provide incentives to developers of affordable/senior housing by reviewing existing development fee schedule and consider fee reductions, or the addition of fee waiver provisions for the production of low-income and senior citizen housing. Accomplishments: To provide assistance to developers of affordable/senior housing, the Redevelopment Agency may reimburse developers for the development fees paid. On a project -by - project basis, a developer of affordable/senior housing may enter into a development agreement with the Redevelopment Agency that stipulates that the developer will pay the City's development fees and the Agency will reimburse the developer. 3. Ensure Adequate Infrastructure Objective: Facilitate adequate infrastructure, particularly in areas lacking sufficient infrastructure, including sewer connections. Accomplishments. To ensure adequate infrastructure, the City will immediately consult with developers interested in developing areas that currently do not have adequate infrastructure to ensure that all new development is adequately served by sewer lines, and other infrastructure. D. Conserve and Improve Existing Affordable Housing 1. Preservation Program Objectiw: Conserve affordable housing in the City by encouraging Section 8 project property owners to renew their contracts. Identify non-profit organizations capable of purchasing these units. Consider {, i T Y J F l£ 41 E C L( L A 1-1-n3 G I. N E R A L P L A N �i the use of City -based incentives for assisted units that are not subject to HUD -sponsored incentives. Explore the possibility of providing tenant -based subsidies to assisted units that convert to market rate. Accomplishments: During the previous planning period, two at -risk affordable developments due to lose their affordable status were successful in extending the term of their affordable units. Rancho California and Oak tree maintained their affordable status and allowed for the preservation of 95 affordable units, all of which are under Section 8 contracts. Additionally, the Redevelopment Agency has worked with developers to construct 224 new affordable units over the previous planning period. Those units include very low, low and moderate units consisting of multi -family for -rent, and detached single-family for -sale. The 2008-2014 Housing Element includes programs to preserve and expand affordable housing opportunities in the City. - 2. Redevelopment Set-aside Fund Objectim: Provide a source of funding for housing programs by developing an expenditure plan for redevelopment set-aside monies. Programs that focus on the rehabilitation of units occupied by Low and Moderate Income households, preservation of assisted units, and construction of affordable housing will receive priority in the expenditure plan. Accomplishments: Pursuant to State law, the Temecula Redevelopment Agency has established a Redevelopment Housing Set -Aside Fund using 20% of the tax increment revenue. The Agency received a total deposit of approximately $15.8 million in set-aside funds for the period of Fiscal Year 1991/2 through Fiscal Year 1999/2000. These funds were utilized to implement the Fust Time Homebuyer and Residential Improvement Programs. The City now anticipates an annual deposit of about $3.0 million to $3.3 million in tax increment funds over the next five-year period. Based on the required 20% set-aside, approximately $16.5 million will be available during the planning period for housing activities. Since set-aside funds are a function of property tax revenues, the amount of future deposits will depend on factors such as market conditions and the timing of new taxable development. The City will continue to fund its previously funded housing programs. 3. Code Enforcement Objective: Preserve the housing stock by developing a Housing Inspection Program for all multi -family complexes. C f I. Y O F T L NA E C U L, A 11-94 GENLKAL P 1. A N Accomplishments: Temecula has not adopted a Housing InspectioN { Program targeting multi -family complexes. Implementation of such a " program is infeasible at this time due to the high cost and staffing requirements. Furthermore, housing in the City is generally in good condition; a citywide inspection program is not warranted. However, the City continues to enforce the Development Code and the Uniform Building Code (UBC). 4. Tool Lending Objectiw: Maintain the integrity of the housing stock by establishing a Tool Lending Program and advertise the availability of home repair information and tool lending. Accomplishments: The City has not adopted a Tool Lending Program as the administration of such a program can be cumbersome and time-consuming. However, to assist households with housing rehabilitation needs, the City offers a range of loan and grant rehabilitation programs, as described below. 5. Low -Interest Residential Rehabilitation Loans Objectiw: Preserve existing housing stock by establishing a low- interest owinterest residential rehabilitation program Provide program referrals through code enforcement activities. Accomplishments: Since 1996, the City has been offering the following low-interest or grant rehabilitation programs for residential units: • Senior Home Repair Grant Program: This program was available to seniors 55 or older with a household income that does not exceed 120% or the area median income adjusted for household size. Eligible households receive grants of up to $3,000 for be used for needed repairs to their homes. Home Improvement Program: This program is available to owners of single-family detached homes, and manufactured homes on a permanent foundation that are located within the City limits. The household income of the homeowner must not exceed the area median income adjusted for family size. Grants are available for up to $2,500 to correct confirmed health and safety and/or building code violations. Loans up to $5,000 per household are available for exterior painting, roofing, fence repair/replacement, and other exterior improvements. C I L Y o f T i_ :m E C U L A N-953 i� E\ E [Z A L. P L. A Since August 1999, there have been 379 projects funded by these two programs and a total of 772 projects funded since their inception. 6. Section 8 Housing Certificates/Vouchers Objective: Provide housing subsidies for Low Income households by supporting efforts to increase the amount of funding allocated to HUD programs. Provide referrals to apartment complex owners for information on the various Section 8 programs. Accomplishments: The Housing Authority of Riverside administers the Section 8 Certificate/Voucher Program for Temecula. Currently there are 105 households leasing in Temecula with the assistance of Section 8 programs. CSF these 105, 26 households are elderly, and 30 are disabled. An additional 531 households living in Temecula are on the waiting list to receive Section 8 rental assistance, 33 of which are elderly, 88 disabled and 33 both elderly and disabled. 7. Home Sharing Objective. Assist seniors and other with limited income in obtaining housing by supporting SHARE and home sharing activities of the Senior Citizens Service Center. The objective is 40 matches a year. 15 Very Low Income households; 15 Lower Income households; and 10 Moderate Income households. Accomplishments: The Cityhas not adopted its own Home Sharing Program, but continues to support the home sharing activities of the Senior Citizens Service Center. 8. Mobile Home Park Assistance Objective: Preserve low-cost housing options for City residents by providing technical assistance to mobile home park residents in pursuing Mobile Home Park Assistance Program WAP) funds. Accomplishments: Heritage Mobile Home Park is the only mobile home park in the City. Residents of this mobile home park did not pursue MPAP funds; no technical assistance was needed. 9. Mortgage Credit Certificate Objective: Assist at least 50 first-time homebuyers by providing tax credits, 10 of which are lower income households. Accomplishments: The City participates in the Mortgage Credit Certificates program administered by the County. As of July 1999, 72 households have been assisted under this program. In addition, the City has implemented a First Time Buyer Program to assist lower C I .t Y 0 F 1 E ;11 E. C U L A G. E N E K A 1.., 1' 1., A i1 H-96 income households with the purchase of their first home. This to ro d f f th d p gram provr es ass>stance or a portron o e own payment and/or closing costs of up to 20% of the purchase price of a home. To qualify, the homebuyer must not have owned a home during the previous three years, the buyer's household income must not exceed the area median income adjusted for household size, and the house must be located within the City. Since August 1999, six households have received funding through this program The City has also adopted an Employee Relocation Program to assist employees of participating employers with the down payment for a house located within Temecula. To qualify for this program, the household income of the homebuyer cannot exceed 120% of the area median income adjusted for household size. Down payment assistance is provided in the form of a loan of up to 10% of the purchase price, up to $15,000, with payments deferred for five years. Because of the cost of housing in recent years, this program has been used infrequently. 10. Low Income Home Energy Act Program Objectize: Support the County of Riverside Department of Community Action (DCA) and Temecula Senior Citizen Services Center in providing utilities assistance and weatherization to 30 Very Low Income households and allocate CDBG funding to the DCA for continued administration of the Low Income Home Energy Act Program (LIHEAP). Accomplishments: The City has not participated in the LIHEAP and did not allocate CDBG funding to the DCA for continued administration of the LIHEAP. E. Equal Housing Opportunity 1. Equal Housing Opportunity Objective: Support the activities of the Fair Housing Program to be in compliance with the National Fair Housing Law. Accomplishments: The City participates in the CDBG program as part of the Riverside Urban County program CDBG regulations mandate the provision of programs and services to further fair housing choice. Fair housing services are provided by Fair Housing Program of Riverside County. C, i 'I Y O F TEMECULA 11-97 G E N E R. A L P L ;\ ti 0 2. Housing Referral Directory Objectim: Dispense information on local, state and federal housing programs by developing a directory of services and resources for Low and Moderate Income households and special needs groups. Provide information and referrals to persons on an as needed basis. Accomplishments: The City created a Housing Referral Directory. Generally, information provided to persons requesting information through the Directory includes: the name, location, unit sizes, and a phone number of the projects providing the required housing. F. Housing Element Monitoring and Reporting 1. Annual Reporting Objectizr: Ensure that the Housing Element retains its viability and usefulness by developing a monitoring program and report annually to the City Council on implementation progress. Forward the monitoring report to HCD. Accomplishments: While a formal, annual report addressing the implementation of the Housing Element has not been developed, the Planning Department periodically updates the City Council on the progress of implementation of the General Plan, including the Housing Element. However, new state law now mandates the annual reporting to HCD and Office of Planning and Research (OPR). The City will comply with the annual reporting requirements. 2. Housing Needs Data Base Objectizr: Accurately assess housing needs in the community by requiring social service agencies/non-profit organizations receiving CDBG funding from the City to record information on the residences of clients served using a reporting form to be developed by the City. Accomplishments: Service agencies receiving CDBG funding from the City are required to report on their program accomplishments at least annually. Records from service agencies help the City assess the extent of housing and supportive service needs, particularly regarding the special needs population. The City also participated in the preparation of the 2000-2005 consolidated Plan for the Riverside Urban Gounty consortium The Consolidated Plan includes an updated housing and community development needs assessment. C[ T 7 J F 1 L A4 L.. C C[ L A H-98 C., L\ F R A L 1' L A N N p VI. HOUSIlVG PLAN "' x�;y The five-year Plan is the centerpiece of the 2008-2014 Housing Element for Temecula. The Housing Plan sets forth the City's goals, policies, and programs to address the identified housing needs. Housing programs included in this Plan define the specific actions the City will take to achieve specific goals and policies. The City's overall strategy for addressing its housing needs has been defined according to the following areas: • Providing adequate housing sites; • Assisting in development of affordable housing; • Removing governmental constraints; • Conserving and improving existing affordable housing; and • Promoting equal housing opportunity. A. Goals and Policies Provide Adequate Housing Sites Goal Provide a diversity of housing opportunities that satisfy the physical, social, and economic needs of existing and future residents of Temecula. Discussion The City provides for a mix of new housing opportunities by designating a range of residential densities and promoting creative design and development of vacant land. By providing for the construction of a range of housing, the needs of all sectors of the community can be met. Policy 1.1 Provide an inventory of land at varying densities sufficient to accommodate the existing and projected housing needs in the City. Policy 1.2 Encourage residential development that provides a range of housing types in terms of cost, density, and type, and provides the opportunity for local residents to live and work in the same community by balancing jobs and housing types. Policy 1.3 Require a mixture of diverse housing types and densities in new developments around the village centers to enhance their people -orientation and diversity. C I "I Y O 1 T L 1h E is C[ 1.., A Ei \ F: IZ, A L 1 1, A FFA9 4 r C I "E Y Policy 1.4 Support the use of innovative site plannir g and architectural design in residential development. Policy 1.5 Encourage the use of clustered development to preserve and enhance important environmental resources and open space, consistent with sustainabilityptinciples. Policy 1.6 Encourage the development of compatible mixed-use projects that promote and enhance the village concept, facilitate the efficient use of public facilities, support alternative transit options, and provide affordable housing alternatives by establishing a program of incentives for mixed-use projects. Policy 1.7 Where feasible, use City -owned or Citycontrolled land for affordable housing projects. _ Policy 1.8 To the extent feasible, make use of the tools available to the City under California Redevelopment Law to assemble land or sell land at a write-down for affordable housing. Assist in Development of Affordable Housing Goal 2 Provide affordable housing for all economic segments of Temecula. Discussion Temecula works to provide a variety of affordable housing opportunities for all economic segments of the community. By coordinating with other government agencies and non-profit organizations to access funding sources for affordable housing and to partner in the creative provision of affordable housing, the City helps provide safe and affordable housing for all residents in the community. During the second year (2009) of the planning period (2008-2014), the 40 units contained in the Oak Tree apartments will be purchased by a non-profit that will rehabilitate the units and renew a 55 -year covenant for 20 low-income units and 20 very low-income units. During the second year (2009) of the planning period (2008-2014), the Temecula Redevelopment Agency expects to construct "The Warehouse" project, which will add 32 low and moderate -income units to the City's inventory of affordable housing. 11-100 { T „ During the third (20 10) or fourth (2011) Year of the planning Pere (2008-2014), Habitat for Humanity' will add two additional units to the existing Habitat 2 project for very low-income families. Policy2.5 Require that all new affordable housing developments incorporate energy- and water -efficient appliances, amenities, and building materials in affordable housing developments to reduce overall housing -related costs for future Low and Moderate Income households and families. Policy 2.6 Establish and maintain a city database to monitor trends in the economy and the City's demographics to be able to anticipate shifts in trends, while continuing to provide relevant affordable housing. Policy 2.7 Develop and coordinate multi -agency, regional, and cross - jurisdictional approaches to homelessness, and special needs housing, including transitional housing. Remove Governmental Constraints Goal 3 Remove governmental constraints in the maintenance, improvement, and development of housing, where appropriate and legally possible. 2 Habitat for Humanity is a non-profit organization that builds and rehabilitates homes with the help of the homeowner families. Through the use of volunteer labor and donations of money and materials, the homes are sold at no profit and financed with affordable loans. C, 1 1 Y O 1 1 }, :bt E C U L. A E, E. \ E it A L P L A N 11 -!UI Policy 2.1 Promote a variety of housing opportunities that accommodate the needs of all income levels of the population, and provide opportunities to meet the City's fair share of Extremely Low, very Low, Low and Moderate Income housing by promoting the City's program of density bonuses and incentives. Policy 2.2 Support innovative public, private, and non-profit efforts in the development of affordable housing, particularly for needs groups. Gspecial Policy 2.3 Encourage the use of non-traditional housing models, including single -room occupancy structures (SRO) and manufactured housing, to meet the needs of special groups for affordable housing, temporary shelter, and/or transitional housing. Policy 2.4 Pursue all available fomes of private, local, state, and federal assistance to support development and implementation of the City's housing programs. Policy2.5 Require that all new affordable housing developments incorporate energy- and water -efficient appliances, amenities, and building materials in affordable housing developments to reduce overall housing -related costs for future Low and Moderate Income households and families. Policy 2.6 Establish and maintain a city database to monitor trends in the economy and the City's demographics to be able to anticipate shifts in trends, while continuing to provide relevant affordable housing. Policy 2.7 Develop and coordinate multi -agency, regional, and cross - jurisdictional approaches to homelessness, and special needs housing, including transitional housing. Remove Governmental Constraints Goal 3 Remove governmental constraints in the maintenance, improvement, and development of housing, where appropriate and legally possible. 2 Habitat for Humanity is a non-profit organization that builds and rehabilitates homes with the help of the homeowner families. Through the use of volunteer labor and donations of money and materials, the homes are sold at no profit and financed with affordable loans. C, 1 1 Y O 1 1 }, :bt E C U L. A E, E. \ E it A L P L A N 11 -!UI 0 C [ I Y Discussion The City's goal is to remove or mitigate constraints to the maintenance, improvement, and development of housing to ensure that housing affordable to all members of the community is provided. Governmental requirements for the development and rehabilitation of housing often add to the cost of the provision of affordable housing and may result in fewer opportunities for housing affordable to lower income households. Reducing development fees and ensuring that City regulations provide for the safety and welfare of the population without imposing unreasonable costs will help in the provision of affordable housing. Policy 3.1 Expedite processing procedures and fees for new construction or rehabilitation of housing. Policy 3.2 Consider mitigating development fees for projects that provide affordable and senior housing. Policy 3.3 Periodically review City development standards to ensure consistency with the General Plan and to ensure high- quality affordable housing. Conserve and Improve Existing Affordable Housing Goal 4 Conserve the existing affordable housing stock. Discussion Along with providing for new affordable housing opportunities, the City also has a goal to preserve existing affordable housing opportunities for residents. By providing incentives and programs to maintain existing units, both the affordability and the structural integrity of the units, the City ensures that affordable housing opportunities are preserved, as the housing stock ages. Policy 4.1 Monitor the number of affordable units eligible for conversion to market -rate units and continue the means to minimize the loss of these units. Policy 4.2 Develop programs directed at rehabilitating and preserving the integrity of existing housing stock for all income levels. Policy 4.3 Support the efforts of private and public entities in maintaining the affordability of units through implementation of energy conservation and weatherization programs. E I 1: NA E C U L A H-102 C.� 1 N E R A L P L A N C [ 'I r 0 r Promote Equal Housing Opportunities �i"G Goal Provide equal housing opportunity for all residents in Temecula. Discussion In order to make provisions for the housing needs of all segments of the community, the City must ensure that equal and fair housing opportunities are available to all residents. Policy 5.1 Encourage and support the enforcement of laws and regulations prohibiting the discrimination in lending practices and insurance practices to purchase, sell, rent, and lease property. Policy 5.2 Support efforts to ensure that all income segments of the community have unrestricted access to appropriate housing for. Policy 5.3 Encourage housing design standards that promote the accessibility of housing for persons with special needs, such as the elderly, persons with disabilities, large families, single - parent households, and the homeless. Policy 5.4 Encourage and consider supporting local private non-profit groups that address the housing needs of the homeless and other disadvantaged groups. Policy 5.5 Prohibit discrimination in the sale or rental of housing based on age, familial status, race, ethnicity, gender, or sexual orientation for all housing projects approved by the City and/or its Redevelopment Agency. Policy 5.6 Encourage the equitable distribution of affordable housing throughout the City. Policy 5.7 Educate the public on lower income and special needs housing through existing annual reports or other forms of media. Promote Public Participation Goal Encourage collaboration between housing developers and neighborhood organizations on affordable housing projects and addressing neighborhood concerns. Policy 6.1 Use the public participation process to educate the public on lower income and special needs housing through existing annual reports or other forms of media. 1 E: M F C U L A G L N E it. A L P L A N 11-103 Policy 6.2 Strengthen opportunities for participation in the approval process for affordable housing projects and all housing projects. B. Housing Programs The goals and policies contained in the Housing Element address Temecula's identified housing needs and are implemented through a series of housing programs. Housing programs include both programs currently in operation in the City and new programs that have been introduced to address the unmet housing needs. This section provides a description of each housing program, and future program goals. The Housing Program Summary (Table H-35) located at the end of this section summarizes the future five-year goals of each housing program, along with identifying the program funding sources, responsible agency, - and time frame for implementation. Summary reports are provided for some of the goals and policies listed below, particularly those that were, in the past Housing Element, linked to a date or perfonmance standards, or for which a goal or policy was specifically met. Provide Adequate Housing Sites A key element in satisfying the housing needs of all segments of the community is the provision of adequate sites for housing of all types, sizes, and prices. This is an important function in both zoning and General Plan designations. 1. Land Use Element and Development Code The Land Use Element of the Temecula General Plan designates land within the City for a range of residential densities ranging from 0.1 to 20 units per acre. A new "Urban Density Overlay' zone that will be implemented by 2012 will ensure that residential densities can reach 30 units per acre by right or higher (with density bonuses) for vacant or underutilized sites located within the Redevelopment Area or within a Mixed -Use Overlay zone under certain criteria. The following aspects of the Development Code help to ensure that the City to can provide adequate sites for affordable development: No density targets have been set for the Medium and High Density Residential categories so these districts can be developed at their maximum allowable density; The Village Center Overlay and Planned Development Overlay allow for the modifications and flexibility in development standards; C 1 5 J 1 T L NA L is LI L A G E N L ft. A L. P L A N H-104 V ,.. • Mobile home parks are allowed in all of the residential zonr districts with a conditional use permit; • Senior and affordable housing are allowed in a variety of residential and non-residential zoning districts and are eligible for density bonuses and development concessions; • Congregate care facilities are allowed in a variety of residential and non-residential zoning districts and the facilities are not limited specifically to the density requirements of the specific zoning district; • Second units are allowed in all residential zoning districts where a detached single-family unit exists; and • Emergency shelters and transitional housing are permitted in the Medium and High Density Residential zoning districts by right, and conditionally permitted in the remainder of the residential districts. Emergency shelters are also conditionally permitted in several of the non-residential zoning districts. There are no additional development standards required by the City for emergency shelters unless the permit approval process through the Riverside County Department of Health and/or Fire Department requires improvements to be made for life safety issues. These improvements may include but are not limited to special "panic" hardware for gates and doors, pull alarms, fire sprinklers, and disabled persons access. As stated in Section IV, the City has a RHNA of 4,086 new units for the period of 2008 through 2014. The residential development capacity under the Temecula Land Use Plan provides sufficient land to meet the City's need for this new construction for the 2008-2014 period. Fizz -Year Objectims: The City will continue to implement and, as appropriate and necessary, augment the Land Use Element and Development Code. To address the City's identified shortfall of 1,381 units to accommodate its RHNA for lower-income housing, the City will establish the Urban Density Overlay to sites identified in Appendix D by June 2012. PrWus-to-Date! The City has implemented amendments to the Development Code and the Land Use Element to ensure that affordable housing can be built in its residential areas by right. C\ [ I Y 0 F T E 1.1 E C U I, A 11-105 G E: \ E R, A L P L A N rr G Future: The City will continue to identify and provide an adequate number of exclusively residential sites (35 acres) to accommodate at least 50 percent (690 units at 20 du/ac) of its remaining need for lower-income households.. The City will maintain an inventory of sites suitable for residential development (including underutilized commercial sites) and provide that information to interested developers. Prrrgrras-to-Date• The City has established and maintains an inventory of developable sites. Future• The City will continue to maintain and update its inventory of developable sites and provide that information to interested developers, and will prepare an inventory of underutilized commercial sites suitable for C, f I Y F 1 E ;14 E C l[ 1: :1 G }.? N 1: ft A L P L \ .\ — 1-1-106 Future The City will continue to augment the Land Use Element and Development Code to incorporate changes required by law, and to ensure the development of all owner - housing occupied and rental multifamily will have minimum densities of 20 units per acre and be allowed by right in all overlay areas pursuant to Government Code 65583.2(x). Sites rezoned to accommodate the identified shortfall will be appropriately sized to accommodate at least 16 units per site. The City will monitor the availability of sites zoned for residential uses to ensure sufficient capacity exists to accommodate the City's remaining need for lower-income households and rezone additional sites for exclusively residential uses as needed to accommodate 50 percent of the remaining need for exclusively residential development. The City will identify specific sites, at least 35 acres, for exclusively residential development as part of the establishment of the Urban Density Overlay from the sites identified in Appendix D-2 which meet the criteria detailed in Government Code 65583.2(h)(i). Prtgress to Date. The City accommodates low and moderate income housing on sites designated exclusively for residential uses. Future: The City will continue to identify and provide an adequate number of exclusively residential sites (35 acres) to accommodate at least 50 percent (690 units at 20 du/ac) of its remaining need for lower-income households.. The City will maintain an inventory of sites suitable for residential development (including underutilized commercial sites) and provide that information to interested developers. Prrrgrras-to-Date• The City has established and maintains an inventory of developable sites. Future• The City will continue to maintain and update its inventory of developable sites and provide that information to interested developers, and will prepare an inventory of underutilized commercial sites suitable for C, f I Y F 1 E ;14 E C l[ 1: :1 G }.? N 1: ft A L P L \ .\ — 1-1-106 } lJ/ µ reuse or redevelopment for mixed-use and/or residential uses. The City will encourage the reservation of land that is currently designated for multiple -family development for the development of multiple -family housing by providing the multi -family sites inventory to multi -family housing developers to solicit development interest. The City will update the multi -family sites inventory at least once a year. A�s-to-Date• The City has established and maintains a multi -family sites inventory that is provided to developers. An update is provided on an annual basis. Future• The City will continue to maintain the multi- family sites inventory and to provide copies to multi -family housing developers to solicit development interest. As part of the General Plan update, the City has identified additional areas with mixed-use potential. The City will work to create a Mixed -Use Overlay in the Land Use Policy Map to be applied to approximately 448 acres of land along the I-15 corridor. Residential mixed-use will be permitted at a density of 30 units per acre. To ensure mixed-use development, the City will establish appropriate flexible development standards such as increased building height and shared parking opportunities for developments with minimum densities of 20 dwelling units per acre in the Zoning Ordinance. Within six months of adoption of the Land Use Policy Map including the Mixed -Use Overlay, the City will establish development standards appropriate for implementing mixed-use standards. Pmgrrss-to-Date! The City has established a mixed-use overlay in the Land Use Policy Map and has established development standards in the Zoning Ordnance. Future• The Citywill continue to use the mixed-use overlay zone to encourage the construction of multi -family housing by right. The Land Use Policy Map including the expanded Mixed -Use Overlay will be adopted by June 2012. The City will then establish the development standards in the Zoning Ordinance by December 2012. C' 1 -E Y 0} 1 1: ;m E., c l[ L A G E N E [Z A L P L A H-107 �n The City will encourage higher density residential development within the Mixed -Use Overlay Areas by providing appropriate, flexible development standards through the Zoning Ordinance. Upon completion of the Mixed-use Overlay Area by June 2012, the City will revise the Zoning Ordinance to establish specific use, height, bulk, parking, landscaping, and other guidelines appropriate for mixed-use development by December 2012. Progress -to -Date• The updated General Plan was adopted by the City in 2005 and includes a Mixed -Use Overlay. Development standards have been created appropriate for mixed-use development. Future• The City will continue to use the Mixed -Use Overlay Zone to encourage the development of multi -family housing. In addition, by 2012, the City will establish and implement a new "Urban Density Overlay Zone" that will allow 30 dwelling units per acre by right or higher with density bonus provisions. Development must meet the following criteria: (1) the parcel is vacant or underutilized; (2) residential uses are permitted or conditionally permitted with the underlying zoning for the site; (3) A minimum of 20% of the units will be affordable to Extremely Low-income, Very Low -Income, Low -Income, or Low- Moderate owModerate Income households; (4) the breakdown of these units is equivalent to the ratio in the Temecula Regional Housing Needs Assessment for 2006-2014; and (5) the units maintain their affordable status for at least 55 years. 2. Sites for Emergency and Transitional Housing According to the 2000 Census and the 2006 Census estimates, there were no homeless persons reported living in the City, and all of Temecula's population was accounted for in either households or group homes. However, the 2007 Riverside County Homeless Survey, conducted on January 24, 2007, identified 105 homeless persons living in Temecula, which accounts for approximately 2.3 percent of the County's homeless population. The City has adopted a program to find housing for Temecula's homeless population. In addition, a C I T Y 0 1: T L .'4 is C t L A i., E N L R. A L P L A 1 1-1-108 number of facilities and service agencies Temecula. serve the homeless needs The Temecula Development Code provides for the provision of emergency shelters and transitional housing within the City. The City facilitates the development of emergency shelters and transitional housing by permitting such facilities in the Medium Density and High Density Residential districts by right. These uses are also permitted in other residential districts with a conditional use permit. Emergency shelters are also permitted with a conditional use permit in the Neighborhood Commercial, Community Commercial, Highway/Tourist Commercial, Service Commercial, PO, Business Park, and Light Industrial zoning districts. Fieu-Year Objectizrs: • The Ciry will continue to permit emergency shelters and transitional housing as identified in the Development Code. Pmgnss-to-Date The City Council has formed a Homeless Shelter Ad Hoc Subcommittee to address the issue of transitional and/or emergency housing for the homeless living in Temecula. Future• The City will continue to work with public agencies and private entities to provide adequate resources for its homeless population. The City will also, to the extent feasible, participate in efforts to unite organizations and entities that provide services to the homeless. • The aty will continue to require affordable housing projects receiving assistance from the Gty to reserve units for transitional housing. Progress-to-Datc• The City Council has formed a Homeless Shelter Ad Hoc Subcommittee to address the issue of transitional and/or emergency housing for the homeless living in Temecula. Future• The City will continue its efforts to require affordable housing projects that receive assistance from the City to reserve units for transitional housing. C 1 'C Y i7 E T L M F C U L. A i. E N E R- A L P L A 11-109 Assist in Development of Affordable Housing New construction is a major source of housing for prospective homeowners and renters. However, the cost of new construction is substantially greater than other program options. Incentive programs, such as density bonus, offer a cost-effective means of providing affordable housing. Other programs, such as the Fust Time Home Buyers Program, increase the affordability of new and existing housing. 3. Sites for Transitional/Supportive Housing and Single Room Occupancies The City has a legal obligation to respond to new legislation passed since the last update of the Housing Element to amend the Temecula Municipal Code to allow for supportive housing and single room occupancy residential uses by right within residential zones. The City currently permits Transitional Housing in Medium and High Density residential districts by right and in other residential districts with the approval of a conditional use permit. However, under new state law, supportive and transitional housing must be treated as residential uses subject onlyto the same permit processing procedures as other housing in the same zone. In addition, the City will amend the zoning code to designate zoning districts appropriate for Single Room Occupancies (SROs). Five -Year Objectiws: The City will recommend an amendment to the Temecula Municipal Code to define supportive and transitional housing as residential uses subject only to the same permit and processing requirements of similar uses in the same zone by June 2012.. Progress-to-Dato The City has reviewed the state law and understands the legal requirement and the moral need to provide this type of housing. Ftatm The City will continue to work with state and public agencies and private entities to provide adequate housing resources for its diverse population. The City will also work to amend the Temecula Municipal Code to allow for these uses within zoning districts deemed appropriate by the City Council within two years of the Housing Element being certified. C [ 1 Y O F f F :14 E: C tI L A C', E N E R A L P L A N N-110 4. Density Bonus Ordinance ry The City has adopted its own Density Bonus Ordinance that complies with State requirements. The allowable density bonus for qualifying senior and affordable housing projects increases the total allowable density for High Density Residential, Medium Density Residential, and Low Medium Density Residential zones. For the approved specific plans, the maximum density, including the density bonus, is not allowed to exceed 50% of the target density in the planning area. Under new state law, affordable housing projects must also be granted at least one development concession by the City as an incentive for the provision of affordable housing. The potential concessions include: • An increase in the maximum lot coverage; • A modification to the setback or required yard provisions; • An increase in the maximum allowable building height; • A reduction in the required on-site parking; • A reduction in the amount of on-site landscaping, except that no reduction in on-site recreational amenities may be approved unless the affordable housing is in close proximity with easy access to a public park with recreational amenities; • A reduction in the minimum lot area; or • Approval of an affordable housing project in the PO zone with the approval of a conditional use permit. Five -Year Objective: • The City will inform residential development applicants through the Pre -application process and/or through the Development Review committee Meeting of opportunities for density increases. 5. Land Assemblage and Affordable Housing Development The City can utilize CDBG and redevelopment monies to purchase land for the development of Lower and Moderate Income housing. Through its Redevelopment Agency, the City has acquired three properties totaling approximately 36 acres. The Redevelopment Agency typically provides the land it acquires to affordable housing developers for the development of housing units affordable to Low C I "I Y 0 F T L Al F.. C I1 1, A C E. N L R- A t.. 13 i, .t N 11-111 C I T 1 J P and Very Low income households. The agency is involved in a developer selection process for the 32 acre site located on Diaz Road. Fite -Year Objectizes: • The City will continue to acquire land for use in the provision of affordable housing. • The Citywill facilitate the development of housing units affordable to lower income households by publicizing its density bonus program (including the new "Urban Density Overlay Zone" to be implemented in 2009 for properties located in a Redevelopment Plan area and/or in a Mined -Use Overlay Zone) and its incentives, and by making this information available to developers and non- profit housing agencies through the development application process. 6. Second Unit Ordinance The City has adopted a Second Unit Ordinance to facilitate the construction of affordable second units within developed areas of the City. The Second Unit Ordinance allows for second units in all residential zoning districts where there is an existing owner -occupied single-family detached dwelling unit if certain conditions are met, as described in Section IV. Five -Year Objectims: • The City will continue to allow and promote the construction of affordable second units to result in the construction of ten new second units by 2014. Progress -to -Date! Since adoption of the Second Unit Ordinance, 18 second units in residential zoning districts have been constructed. Fri• The City will continue to allow the construction of affordable second units and promote the program by publicizing the program and notifying owners of underutilized residential property. 7. Mortgage Credit Certificate Program The Mortgage Credit Certificate (MCC) program is administered countywide by the County of Riverside Economic and Development Agency (EDA), and is a way for the City to further leverage homeownership assistance. MCQ are certificates issued to income- -1 L ;1.1 E C Ll L A { t L N F.. [Z A I, H -R2 qualified first-time homebuyers authorizing the household to take at R credit against federal income taxes of up to 20% of the annual mortgage interest paid. This tax credit allows the buyer to qualify more easily for home loans as it increases the effective income of the buyer. Fite -Year Objectizes: • The City will continue to promote the regional Mortgage Credit Certificate program to assist an average of 10 households annually by publicizing the program and making the program known to developers and non-profit housing agencies. Progress -to -Data• The City continues to promote the regional MCC program to assist eligible households. Future• The City will continue to promote the regional MCC program to assist an average of 10 households annually. 8. First Time Home Buyer Program The City's First Time Home Buyer Program (FTHB) provides loan assistance to first time home buyers whose income does not exceed the area median income. The home being purchased must be located within City limits, be attached to a permanent foundation, have a minimum of two -bedrooms, and be occupied by the seller. The maximum assistance available under this program is 20% of the purchase price plus closing costs, up to a total payout of $65,000. The home buyer also must maintain the house in good condition during the term of the assistance. Fize- Year Objectims: The City completed the process of amending the FTFM program in July 2008 to considerably increase assistance by the City to a maximum of $65,000 per unit. For the first year of this program, funds are in place to assist with the purchase of 25 homes. The City has and will continue to reach out to the lending community and advertise the program through the City's website and community publications. 9. Employee Relocation Program The Employee Relocation Program is designed to provide assistance to families moving to the City due to relocation of their employer. This program provides a second trust deed of up to 10% of the C I 'I Y O F l E` I FC: U L A H-113 Cf E N E tt. A L P L A N Y7`r� x 4f '-=F R purchase price of the house, up to $15,000, to be used for the down payment. During the fust five years of the 30 -year loan, no payment on the loan is required. For the remaining 25 years, the loan is fully amortized for 300 months at Prime Rate of simple interest. To be eligible, the applicant must be employed with a City approved company participating in this program and the household income must not exceed 120% of the area median income. The home must be located within the City limits, be attached to a permanent foundation, and be occupied by the seller or vacant. Five -Year Objectizrs: • Despite current market conditions, the $15,000 maximum assistance available is not sufficient in reaching 10% of the purchase price plus closing costs. Therefore, the City will work to amend the program to allow for greater assistance in an attempt to make the program economically feasible. Remove Governmental Constraints Under State law, the Temecula Housing Element must address, and where appropriate and legally possible remove, governmental constraints to the maintenance, improvement, and development of housing. The following programs are designed to lessen governmental constraints to housing development. 10. Development Fees Reimbursement Developers of affordable/senior housing may qualify to receive a reimbursement by the Redevelopment Agency for development fees paid by the developer. Typically, developers of affordable/senior housing pay the City the required development fees. If the development qualifies for reimbursement of development fees through the Redevelopment Agency, the developer enters into a contract with the Agency, which then reimburses the developer for the fees paid. Fier -Year Objectives: • The Redevelopment Agency will continue to enter into development agreements with qualifying senior/ affordable housing projects on a case-by-case basis to provide development fee reimbursement. 11. Expedite Processing of Affordable Housing Projects —------------ -- — --- 1 114 V Under state housing law, residential projects with an affordable.; R& component have priority processing when it comes to provision of water service from water purveyors. Similarly, the City of Temecula should consider adopting a program to expedite processing of affordable housing projects. 0- Fim- Year Objectives: • The City will investigate the feasibility of committing to shorter processing times for affordable housing projects. • The City will need to develop objective criteria to evaluate affordable housing projects to qualify them for expedited processing. 12. Periodic Consistency Review of General Plan, Municipal Code and State Law To prevent unforeseen processing delays due to inconsistencies between the City's General Plan, Municipal Code, California Codes, state law or regulatory requirements, the City should conduct a biannual review of the Municipal Code and General Plan to ensure internal consistency and to ensure consistency with legislative and regulatory amendments, adoption of new state laws, and policy changes resulting from case law. Fier -Year Objectiws: City staff will track and stay abreast of changes in state housing law and work with the City Attomey to incorporate changes into the General Plan and Municipal Code. • The City Attorney will advise staff on significant case law interpretations which may cause the need to amend the General Plan or Municipal Code. Conserve and Improve Existing Affordable Housing A community's existing affordable housing stock is a valuable resource that should be conserved, and if necessary, improved to meet habitability requirements. 13. Preserve At -Risk Housing Units Between July 1, 2008 and June 30, 2016 there is one project in Temecula at -risk of conversion from affordable to market. The 55 unit Rancho California development will be re-evaluated in 2011 to C. ! T Y O F r E 1.1 L: C U L A G E N E [Z A L P 1, A N 11-115 b. Work with Potential Purchasers: Establish contact with public and non-profit agencies interested in purchasing and/or managing units at -risk to inform them of the status of the Rancho California Apartments. Tenant Education: The California Legislature passed AB 1701 in 1998, requiring that property owners give a nine- month notice of their intent to opt out of low income restrictions. The City will work with tenants of at -risk units and provide them with information regarding tenant rights and conversion procedures. The City will also provide tenants with information regarding Section 8 rent subsidies through the Riverside County Housing Authority, and other affordable housing opportunities. d. Assist Tenants of Existing Rent Restricted Units to Obtain Priotity Status on Section 8 Waiting List. Work with the Riverside Housing Authority to place tenants displaced from at -risk units on a priority list for Section 8 rental assistance. Five -Year Objectives: C I "I Y U E T 1: 14 E: C L( t.. A G E\ E R. A L. 1' 1. A N 11-116 determine whether its Section 8 contract will be extended. From conversations with the properly owner it was expressed that there is no interest in converting this property to market rate in 2011. The affordable status and Section 8 contracts will be re-evaluated every five years beginning in 2011. The City of Temecula will implement the following programs on an on-going basis to conserve its affordable housing stock a. Monitor Units At -Risk: Monitor the status of Rancho California and Oaktree, since the affordable restrictions are due to expire during the planning period. Pnrzss-to-Data The California Statewide Communities Development Authority has submitted a request for a TEFRA hearing for the Oaktree Apartments. Future• The City will continue to monitor the status of Rancho California since the affordable restrictions are due to expire during the planning period, and will work with interested parties to renew the covenants on Oaktree. b. Work with Potential Purchasers: Establish contact with public and non-profit agencies interested in purchasing and/or managing units at -risk to inform them of the status of the Rancho California Apartments. Tenant Education: The California Legislature passed AB 1701 in 1998, requiring that property owners give a nine- month notice of their intent to opt out of low income restrictions. The City will work with tenants of at -risk units and provide them with information regarding tenant rights and conversion procedures. The City will also provide tenants with information regarding Section 8 rent subsidies through the Riverside County Housing Authority, and other affordable housing opportunities. d. Assist Tenants of Existing Rent Restricted Units to Obtain Priotity Status on Section 8 Waiting List. Work with the Riverside Housing Authority to place tenants displaced from at -risk units on a priority list for Section 8 rental assistance. Five -Year Objectives: C I "I Y U E T 1: 14 E: C L( t.. A G E\ E R. A L. 1' 1. A N 11-116 • The City will monitor the status of Rancho Califoxnr�, and Oaktree. Progress -to -Date• The Oal¢ree affordable restrictions have been extended. Fta wu The City will continue to monitor the status of Rancho California since the affordable restrictions are due to expire during the planning period. • The City will identify non-profit organizations as potential purchasers/managers of at -risk housing units. • The City will explore funding sources available to preserve the affordability of Rancho Califomia, and Gree or to provide replacement units. Progress -to D=7 The Oalnree affordable restrictions have been extended. Ftdwe• The City will continue to monitor the status of Rancho California since the affordable restrictions are due to expire during the planning period. • The City will assist qualified tenants to apply for priority status on the Section 8 voucher/certificate program immediately should the owners of the at -risk project choose not to enter into additional restrictions. 14. Redevelopment Set -Aside Prior to Temecula's incorporation, the County of Riverside established a Redevelopment Project on July 12, 1988 with the adoption of Redevelopment Plan No. 1-1988. The Project area extends from I-15/State Route 79 interchange north to the City limits. The Old Town is included within the Project area. After incorporation, the City assumed responsibility for administering the Project area. Pursuant to State law, the Temecula Redevelopment Agency established a Redevelopment Housing Set -Aside Fund using 20% of the tax increment revenue. The Agency anticipates an annual deposit of about $3.0 million to $3.3 million in tax increment over a five-year C. I T Y O F 1 E M F C: U L A t, F N I_ R, A L 11-117 i dr. period. Based on the required 20% set-aside, approximately $16.5 million will be available during the five-year period for housing activities. Since set-aside funds are a function of property tax revenues, the amount of future deposits will depend on factors such as market conditions and the timing of new taxable development. The housing programs identified for expenditure of Housing Set - Aside Funds include funding for the development and preservation of multi -family affordable housing, acquisition of land for the development of Low and Moderate Income housing, and assistance in the rehabilitation of existing housing units. All of these programs are considered Priority I projects for the use of set aside funds. Fiw- Year Objectizrs: The City will continue to utilize its Housing Set -Aside Fund to implement the identified housing programs, pursuant to State law. 15. Code Enforcement While the majority of the existing housing stock in Temecula is less than 30 years old, there is a need to enforce housing maintenance for some of the older housing units. The City implements a code enforcement program to correct housing and building code violations. The City has adopted and enforces the UBC. Fiw- Year Objectizrs: The Citywill continue to seek voluntary compliance for Code - related issues and violations to enforce the UBC and offer information regarding the Citys housing rehabilitation programs to low and moderate -income households cited for code violations. 16. Residential Improvement Program The City provides the following grant and low-interest loan programs under its Residential Improvement Program to assist in rehabilitating existing residential units. Since 1999, 379 households have been assisted under this program. Senior Home Repair Grant — This program is available to seniors 55 or older with household incomes not exceeding 120% of the area median income. The one time grant of up to $3,000 can be used for repairing owner -occupied homes on a pennanent foundation located throughout the City. C 1 C Y O F 1 L N1 } C: U t A C. E N E [Z A 11' 1. k N H-113 x;{ter Single -Family Emergency Grant — This program provide' up to $2,500 grants to correct confirmed health and safety and/or building code violations in owner -occupied homes on a permanent foundation located throughout the City. The household's income must not exceed the area median income. Single -Family Paint & Fence Repair Loan — This loan program is available to households whose income does not exceed the area median income. Eligible housing units include owner -occupied homes on a permanent foundation located throughout the City. The maximum loan is $7,500 to be used for exterior improvements to the house. The interest rate for the loan is five percent, but the payments are deferred and forgiven five after years if the owner still owns and occupies the unit. If the house is sold within_ the five-year period, the loan will be due and payable. 17. Section 8 Rental Assistance Program The Section 8 rental assistance program extends rental subsidies to Very Low Income families and elderly that spend more than 30% of their income on rent. The Section 8 certificate subsidy represents the difference between the excess of 30% of the monthly income and the actual rent (up to the federally determined Fair Market Rent (FMR)). Most Section 8 assistance is issues to the recipients as vouchers, which permit tenants to locate their own housing and rent units beyond the FMR, provided the tenants pay the extra rent increment. The City contracts with the Riverside County Housing Authority to administer the Section 8 Certificate/Voucher Program. Five -Year Objectizes: • The City will continue to contract with the County of Riverside to administer the Section 8 Rental Assistance Program and provide rental assistance to at least 105 Very Low Income Temecula households. • The City will support the County of Riverside's applications for additional Section 8 allocation. The City will promote the Section 8 program to second unit owners by publicizing this program and making this information known to city and county agencies, and housing non -profits. i T Y J 1 1 L ;\t L L[ L A G, Ei E R. A L P L A N 11-119 18. Mobile Home Assistance Program (MPAP) To preserve affordable housing opportunities found within mobile home parks, the HCD provides financial and technical assistance to Low Income mobile home park residents through the Mobile Home Assistance Program (WAP). The MPAP provides loans of up to 50% of the purchase price plus the conversion costs of the mobile home park so that Low Income residents, or organizations formed by Low Income residents can own and/or operate the mobile home park a r Heritage Mobile Home Park is the only mobile home park in Temecula. The owners have indicated that they intend to operate the park indefinitely. In the event that the owners decide to close the park, the City will work with the tenants to acquire funding through the APAP program. _ Five -Year Objectives: The City will provide technical assistance to Heritage Mobile Home Park residents in pursuing MPAP funds in the event that the owners propose to close the mobile home park Promote Equal Housing Opportunities In order to make adequate provision for the housing needs of all economic segments of the community, the housing program must include actions that promote housing opportunities for all persons regardless of race, religion, sex, family size, martial status, ancestry, national origin, color, age, or physical disability. 19. Equal Housing Opportunity The Riverside County Consortium, of which the City is a member, has adopted an Analysis of Impediments (AI) to Fair Housing Choice and has conducted fair housing planning to implement the recommendations identified in the AL The Fair Housing Program of Riverside County maintains a comprehensive approach to affirmatively further and ensure equal access to housing for all persons. The three major components of this approach are: education, training/technical/ consultant assistance, and fair housing rights assistance. The Fair Housing Program of Riverside County is also an advocate for affordable housing, legislative reform, local compliance, and research projects relative to fair housing and human rights issues. The agency works with the State Department of Fair Employment and C f T 7 .1 F T 1:: \-1 L. C U L A C E ' E R A L P L j\ N 11-120 • The City will undertake ongoing efforts to educate the public about affordable housing. 20. Housing Referral Directory The City provides housing referral services through its Housing Referral Directory. People contacting the City are provided information on housing projects offering housing specific to a person's needs. Five -Year Objectives: • The City will continue to offer housing referral services through its Housing Referral Directory. 21. Housing for Persons with Disabilities Consistent with SB 520 enacted January 1, 2002, the City annually analyzes and determines whether there are constraints on the development, maintenance, and improvement of housing for persons with disabilities, including review of . land use controls, permit procedures, and building codes for the development of housing for persons with disabilities. C, i "E Y O F 1 E M £ C U L A G E N E It, A 1, 1' L A N 11-121 J y�M1 h Housing and HUD in the referral, enforcement, and resolution y5, housing discrimination cases. Fite -Year Objectives: • Temecula will continue to participate in the Riverside County Consortium in implementing the fair housing plan. • The City will place fair housing brochures at City counters, public libraries, Temecula Community Center, and Temecula Community Recreation Center. • The City will continue to post information regarding fair housing services on the City web site. Future fair housing workshops can also be advertised on the City web site. • The City will continue to provide referral services to the Fair Housing Program of Riverside County for residents inquiring about fair housing issues. • The City will continue to update its fair housing brochures to conform to state law. • The City will undertake ongoing efforts to educate the public about affordable housing. 20. Housing Referral Directory The City provides housing referral services through its Housing Referral Directory. People contacting the City are provided information on housing projects offering housing specific to a person's needs. Five -Year Objectives: • The City will continue to offer housing referral services through its Housing Referral Directory. 21. Housing for Persons with Disabilities Consistent with SB 520 enacted January 1, 2002, the City annually analyzes and determines whether there are constraints on the development, maintenance, and improvement of housing for persons with disabilities, including review of . land use controls, permit procedures, and building codes for the development of housing for persons with disabilities. C, i "E Y O F 1 E M £ C U L A G E N E It, A 1, 1' L A N 11-121 µµ� 4 In addition, the City will establish a written reasonable accommodation ordinance to provide exception in zoning and land use for housing for persons with disabilities. This procedure will be a ministerial process, with minimal or no processing fee, subject to approval by the Community Development Director applying the following decision-making criteria: • The request for reasonable accommodation will be used by an individual with a disability protected under fair housing laws. • The requested accommodation is necessary to snake housing available to an individual with a disability protected under fair housing laws. • The requested accommodation would not impose an undue financial or administrative burden on the City. • The requested accommodation would not require a fundamental alteration in the nature of the City's land -use and zoning program. Fiee-Year Objectives: Consistent with Health & Safety Code Sections 1267.8, 1566.3, and 1568, the City will amend the Development Code to treat licensed residential care facilities and group homes serving six or fewer no differently than other by right single family housing uses by -June 2011. The City will adopt a formalized reasonable accommodation process for individual homeowners requesting exceptions to zoning and development standards to accommodate a disability by -June 2011. Progress -to- Date• The City has updated its General Plan and Zoning Code to provide more opportunities for the development of housing for persons with disabilities. Fuwu The City will continue to monitor its General Plan and Zoning Code for increased opportunities to develop housing for persons with disabilities and to conform to State law. The City will amend the Development Code and adopt a formalized reasonable accommodation Ordinance by June 2011. C 1 -1 Y O F l i:; ;b1 F C: t.i L A G L\ L K A L P L A N H-122 , 22. Housing Element Monitoring and Reporting To ensure that the housing programs identified in this Housing Element are implemented and achieve their goals, an accurate monitoring and reporting system is required. Service agencies receiving CDBG funding from the City are required to report on their program accomplishments at least annually. Records from service agencies help the City assess the extent of housing and supportive service needs, particularly regarding the special needs populations. The City is also required to submit annual reports to the state addressing its success in implementing the General Plan and Housing G Element. These reports provide decision makers with useful information regarding how successful the housing programs are with meeting the needs of the community. Fiw- Year Objectizrs: The City will continue to require that service agencies report their accomplishments annually. This information will be used bythe Cityto assess the communitys housing needs and how well these needs are being met by the existing programs. The City will continue to submit annual reports to the state assessing the implementation of the General Plan and Housing Element. C. Summary of Quantified Objectives The following Table H-40 summarizes the City's quantified five-year objectives with regard to housing production, conservation, rehabilitation, and provision of homeowners' assistance. Table H-41 provides the detail for this summary and assigns responsibility for reaching the City's five-year objectives. C I T 7 J F l E ;M E C, U L A H-123 G. E\ E. R A L, P L A N TABLE H-40 SUMMARY OF QUANTIFIED OBJECTIVES Extremely Very Low Low Low Moderate Upper Type of Activities Income Income Income Income Income Total New Construction Conservation At -Risk Housing Section 8 Rehabilitation Homeownership First -Time Homebuyer Total 503 425 570 693 1,622 3,813 — — 95 77 50 100 -- 150 507 531 682 - 793 1,622 4,135 SOURCE: City of Temecula, 2009. Y J F } 1h E C, Ll t., A Cr is -\ E R. A L P L A 1-1-124 95 4 11 62 693 1,622 3,813 — — 95 77 50 100 -- 150 507 531 682 - 793 1,622 4,135 SOURCE: City of Temecula, 2009. Y J F } 1h E C, Ll t., A Cr is -\ E R. A L P L A 1-1-124 TABLE H-41 HOUSING PROGRAM SUMMARY Housing Program Program Objectives 5 -Year Objective and Time Frame Funding Source �,.=J.t...:. Responsible Agency Provision ofAdequate Housing Sites Continue to work with the state, Departmental Planning Housing and Single the development and public agencies and private Budget Department 1. Land Use Element Provide a range of Continue to augment the Land Departmental Planning 0 and Development residential Use Element and Development Budget Department Ll Code development Code to incorporate changes districts deemed appropriate by the City Council. opportunities through appropriate land use required by law, and to facilitate the development of affordable designations. housing by right. Continue to provide an j adequate number of residential sites to accommodate its remaining share of the RHNA, if applicable. Continue to maintain and 1. update its inventory of developable sites and provide _ that information to interested _ developers. Continue to maintain the multi- family sites inventory and to provide copies to multi -family housing developers to solicit development interest. Continue to use the Mixed -Use Overlay Zone to encourage the construction of multi -family housing. By 2009, implement a new "Urban Density Overlay Zone' that allows 30 dwelling units per acre by right (or more with density bonuses) if the project meets certain criteria and is located in a Redevelopment Plan area or a Specific Plan area. 2. Sites for Emergency Provide for sites for Continue to work with public Departmental Planning and Traditional the development and agencies and private entities to Budget Department Housing opportunities for the provide adequate resources for provision of housing its homeless population. To the for the homeless. extent feasible, participate in efforts to unite organizations and entities that provide services to the homeless. Continue efforts to require affordable housing projects that receive assistance from the City to reserve units for transitional housing. 3. Sites for Supportive Provide for sites for Continue to work with the state, Departmental Planning Housing and Single the development and public agencies and private Budget Department Room Occupancies opportunities for the entities to provide adequate provision of short to housing resources for its diverse moderate length stay population. The City will also affordable housing. work to amend the Temecula Municipal Code to allow for these uses within zoning districts deemed appropriate by the City Council. C [ T Y 7} L NI E C U L A G L N E R - A L, P 1 1 :\ H-€25 TABLE H-41 HOUSING PROGRAM SUMMARY P ¢in Housing Program Program Objectives 5 -Year Objective and Time Frame Funding Source Responsible "Urban Density Overlay Zone" to be implemented in 2009 for Agency Affordable Housing Development properties located in a 4. Density Bonus Encourage the Inform residential development Departmental Planning '. Ordinance provision of senior applicants of opportunities for Budget Department making this information /affordable housing density increases. profit housing agencies through development by the development application continuing to process. 6. Second Unit Facilitate the Continue to allow and promote implement the Ordinance development of the construction of affordable -` Density Bonus second units to result in the - a construction of ten new second Ordinance. construction of units by 2014 by publicizing the 5. Land Assemblage and Assist with the Continue to acquire land for use Redevelopment Redevelopment Assist first time home Affordable Housing development of in the provision of affordable Set-aside Funds Agency Budget Department Development affordable housing by housing. and CDBG funds Credit Certificate average of 10 households acquiring land for the Facilitate the development of Program. annually. Affordable Housing Development development of Low housing units affordable to lower 8. First Time Home Assist lower income Amend the FTHB program to Redevelopment Redevelopment and Moderate Income income households by considerably increase Set-aside Agency _ housing. ii ublic' t d b - purchase of a home H—(26 g s ensv onus program (including the new "Urban Density Overlay Zone" to be implemented in 2009 for properties located in a Redevelopment Plan area and/or in a Mixed -Use Overlay Zone) and its incentives, and by making this information available to developers and non- profit housing agencies through the development application process. 6. Second Unit Facilitate the Continue to allow and promote Departmental Planning Ordinance development of the construction of affordable Budget Department affordable housing second units to result in the through the construction of ten new second construction of units by 2014 by publicizing the second units. program. 7. Mortgage Credit Assist first time home Continue to promote the Departmental Planning Certificate Program buyer by promoting regional Mortgage Credit Budget Department the regional Mortgage Certificate program to assist an Credit Certificate average of 10 households Program. annually. Affordable Housing Development 8. First Time Home Assist lower income Amend the FTHB program to Redevelopment Redevelopment Buyer Program first time home considerably increase Set-aside Agency buyers with the assistance from the City to a purchase of a home maximum of $65,000 per unit. through the use of Assist with the purchase of 25 loan assistance. homes when the amended program is in place. 9. Employee Relocation Provide loan Work to increase assistance Redevelopment Redevelopment Program assistance to amount in attempt to make the Set-aside Agency qualified, lower program economically feasible. income relocated employees for the purchase of a home. Removal of Governmental Constraints 10. Development Fees Reduce the cost of Continue to enter into Redevelopment Redevelopment Reimbursement affordable/senior development agreements with Set-aside Agency housing development qualifying senior/affordable through the housing projects on a case -by - C I "C Y J 1 Z} Al E c t.i L A Cs L t E ft. A I-, l' L i R H—(26 purchasers/managers of at -risk housing units Explore funding sources available to preserve at -risk units or to provide replacement units. Assist tenants to apply for priority status on the Section 8 voucher/certificate program immediately should the owners of the at -risk project choose not to enter into additional restrictions. 14. Redevelopment Set- Develop and preserve Continue to utilize the City's Aside affordable housing Housing Set -Aside Fund to through the implement the identified expenditure of housing programs, pursuant to Redevelopment Set- State law. aside funds. 15. Code Enforcement Maintain the existing Continue to enforce the UBC housing stock through and offer information regarding the enforcement of housing rehabilitation programs the UBC. to low and moderate income households cited for code TABLE H-41 Violations. HOUSING PROGRAM SUMMARY Housing Program Program Objectives 5 -Year Objective and Time Frame Funding Source Responsible Agency reimbursement of case basis to provide development fees. development fee reimbursement. 11. Expedite Processing Consider adopting a Investigate the feasibility of Departmental Planning of Affordable Housing program to expedite shorter processing times and Budget Department Projects processing of projects develop criteria to qualify with an affordable projects for expedited - housing component. processing. 12. Periodic Consistency Conduct biannual Staff will track and stay abreast Departmental Planning '.. Review of General review to ensure of changes in state housing law Budget Department Plan, Municipal Code consistency with and work with the City Attorney and State Law legislative and to amend the Municipal Code regulatory amendments, new and General in response to significant case law state laws, and case interpretations. law interpretations. Conserve and Improve Existing Affordable Housing - 13. Preserve At -Risk Encourage the Continue to monitor the status Redevelopment Redevelopment Housing Units continued affordability of Rancho California since the Set-aside Funds, Agency, of at -risk housing affordable restrictions are due CDBG Funds, Planning units to preserve to expire during the planning and Section 8 Department and existing affordable period. Vouchers/ Riverside housing opportunities. Identify non-profit organizations Certificates. Housing as potential Authority. purchasers/managers of at -risk housing units Explore funding sources available to preserve at -risk units or to provide replacement units. Assist tenants to apply for priority status on the Section 8 voucher/certificate program immediately should the owners of the at -risk project choose not to enter into additional restrictions. 14. Redevelopment Set- Develop and preserve Continue to utilize the City's Aside affordable housing Housing Set -Aside Fund to through the implement the identified expenditure of housing programs, pursuant to Redevelopment Set- State law. aside funds. 15. Code Enforcement Maintain the existing Continue to enforce the UBC housing stock through and offer information regarding the enforcement of housing rehabilitation programs the UBC. to low and moderate income households cited for code Violations. Conserve and Improve Existing Affordable Housing 16. Residential Assist with the Fund 30 rehabilitation grants Improvement rehabilitation of and loan annually through the Program existing single and City's Residential Improvement multi -family lower Program. income housing units through the use of loan and grant Redevelopment Redevelopment Set-aside Funds Agency Departmental Budgets Redevelopment Set-aside and CDBG Funds Planning Department Redevelopment Agency Y O 12 T L M E C Ll L A C E N E K, A L 1 L A H -i27 TABLE H-41 HOUSING PROGRAM SUMMARY Housing Program Program Objectives 5 -Year Objective and Time Frame Funding Source 17. Section 8 Rental '. Assistance Program 18. Mobile Home Assistance Program (MPAP) programs. Support the County of Riverside's Section 8 Rental Assistance Program. Avoid the loss of affordable housing within mobile home parks due to the closure of existing parks by providing technical assistance to lower income mobile home park residents pursing MPAP funds. Promote Equal Housing Opportunity 19. Equal Housing Promote equal Opportunity opportunities for housing by participating in the Riverside County Consortium. 20. Housing Referral Directory 21. Housing for Persons with Disabilities Assist community members in locating housing which meets the individual's needs. Analyze and determine whether Continue to contract with the County of Riverside to administer the Section 8 Rental Assistance Program and provide rental assistance to at least 105 Very Low Income Temecula households. Support the County of Riverside's application for additional Section 8 allocation. Promote the Section 8 program to second unit owners. Provide technical assistance to Heritage Mobile Home Park residents in pursuing MPAP funds in the event that the owners propose to close the mobile home park. Continue to participate in the Riverside County Consortium in implementing the fair housing plan. Place fair housing brochures at City counters, public libraries, the Temecula Community Center, and Temecula Community Recreation Center. Continue to post information regarding fair housing services on the City web site. Future fair housing workshops can also be advertised on the City web site. Continue to provide referral services to the Fair Housing Program of Riverside County for residents inquiring about fair housing issues. Continue to update it fair housing brochures to conform to state law. Undertake ongoing efforts to educate the public about affordable housing. Continue to offer housing referral services through the City's Housing Referral Directory. HUD Section 8 allocations Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Departmental Budgetand Redevelopment Set-aside Funds Responsible Agency Planning Department Planning Department Planning Department Planning Department and Redevelopment Agency Continue to monitor the City's Departmental Planning and General Plan and Zoning Code Budget Building C; I I Y O F 1 E N1 E C U L A G E N E: It. A L P L A ti F(-128 TABLE H-41 HOUSING PROGRAM SUMMARY Housing Program Program Objectives 5 -Year Objective and Time Frame Funding Source there are constraints on the development, maintenance, and improvement of housing for persons with disabilities, consistent with SB 520 enacted January1, 2002. Housing Element Monitoring and Reporting 22. Annual Reporting/ Monitor the housing Housing Needs needs of the Database community and the ability of current housing programs to meet these needs through ongoing reporting. to increase opportunities for i development of persons with disabilities and to conform to State law. Continue to require that service Departmental agencies report on their accom- Budget and plishments annually. This CDBG Funds information will be used by the City to assess the community's housing needs and how well these needs are being met by the existing programs. Continue to submit annual reports to the state assessing the implementation of the General Plan and Housing �G. Responsible Agency Departments Planning Department C: i I r o f E ti -f F C: LI L, A G E'N E R A L, P L. A N H-129 £t APPENDIXA: HOUSINGELEMENT GLOSSARY Acre: A unit of land measure equal to 43,560 square feet. Acreage, Net: The portion of a site exclusive of existing or planned public or private road rights-of-way. Affordability Covenant: A property title agreement which places 7. resale or rental restrictions on a housing unit. Affordable Housing: Under State and federal statutes, housing which costs no more than 30 percent of gross household income. Housing costs include rent or mortgage payments, utilities, taxes, insurance, homeowner association fees, and other related costs. Area Median Income (AMI): The AMI is determined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and is the midpoint income for am area — half of all wage earners have salaries higher than the median, and half of all wage earners have salaries lower than the median. Each year, HUD sets area median incomes for the Riverside area. The AMI is then used to establish income limits for certain housing programs. Annexation: The incorporation of land area into the jurisdiction of an existing city with a resulting change in the boundaries of that city. Assisted Housing: Housing that has been subsidized by federal, state, or local housing programs. At -Risk Housing: Multi -family rental housing that is at risk of losing its status as housing affordable for low and moderate income tenants due to the expiration of federal, state or local agreements. California Department of Housing and Community Development - HCD: The State Department responsible for administering State-sponsored housing programs and for reviewing housing elements to determine compliance with State housing law. Census : The official United States decennial enumeration of the population conducted by the federal government. Community Development Block Grant (CDBG): A grant program administered by HUD. This grant allots money to cities and counties for housing rehabilitation and community development activities, including public facilities and economic development. 1 "I Y 0 F l L M L C:: U L A G} N F, it A L p L A Condominium: A building or group of buildings in which units ark d' di 'duall b th m vi y, ut e owne structure, common areas and faciltties are owned by all owners on a proportional, undivided basis. Congregate Care: Apartment housing, usually for senior citizens, or for the disabled in accordance with Health and Safety Code Section 50062.5 that is arranged in a group setting that includes independent living and sleeping accommodations in conjunction with shared dining and recreational facilities (see Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.34.010.B). Congregate Living Health Facility: A facility with a noninstitutional, home -like environment that provides inpatient care, including the following basic services: medical supervision, twenty- four hour skilled nursing and supportive care, pharmacy, dietary, social recreational, and at least one type of service specified in the Health and Safety Code. The primary need of congregate living health facility residents shall be for availability of skilled nursing care on a recurring, intermittent, extended or continuous basis. This care is generally less intense than that provided in general acute care hospitals but more intense than that provided in skilled nursing facilities (see Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.34.0103). Density: The number of dwelling units per unit of land. Density usually is expressed "per acre," e.g., a development with 100 units located on 20 acres has density of 5.0 units per acre. Density Bonus: The allowance of additional residential units beyond the maximum for which the parcel is otherwise permitted usually in exchange for the provision or preservation of affordable housing units at the same site or at another location. Development Impact Fees: A fee or charge imposed on developers to pay for a jurisdiction's costs of providing services to new development. Development Right: The right granted to a land owner or other authorized party to improve a property. Such right is usually expressed in terms of a use and intensity allowed under existing zoning regulation. For example, a development right may specify the maximum number of residential dwelling units permitted per acre of land Dwelling, Multi -family: A building containing two or more dwelling units for the use of individual households; an apartment or condominium building is an example of this dwelling unit type. C;. 1 "C Y' 0 E' 1 E h2 £ is L[ L .A H-131 G 1 N e [t A L P 1. 1t N C t T t Dwelling, Single-family Attached: A one -family dwelling attached to one or more other one -family dwellings by a common vertical wall. Row houses and town homes are examples of this dwelling unit type. Dwelling, Single-family Detached: A dwelling, not attached to any other dwelling, which is designed for and occupied by not more than one family and surrounded by open space or yards. Dwelling Unit: One or more rooms, designed, occupied or intended for occupancy as separate living quarters, with cooking, sleeping and sanitary facilities provided within the unit for the exclusive use of a household. Elderly Household: As defined by HUD, elderly households are one- or two- member (family or non -family) households in which the head or spouse is age 62 or older. Element: A division or chapter of the General Plan. Emergency Shelter. An emergency shelter is a facility that provides shelter to homeless families and/or homeless individuals on a limited short-term basis. Fair Market Rent (FMR): Fair Market Rents (FMRs) are freely set rental rates defined by HUD as the median gross rents charged for available standard units in a county or Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA). Fair Market Rents are used for the Section 8 Rental Program and many other HUD programs and are published annuallybyHUD. First -Time Home Buyer (FTHB): Defined by HUD as an individual or family who has not owned a home during the three-year period preceding the HUD -assisted purchase of a home. Jurisdictions may adopt local definitions for first-time home buyer programs which differ from non -federally funded programs. Floor Area Ratio (FAR): The gross floor area of all buildings on a lot divided by the lot area; usually expressed as a numerical value (e.g., a building having 10,000 square feet of gross floor area located on a lot of 5,000 square feet in area has a floor area ratio of 2.0). Group Home: The City of Temecula's Zoning Code defines a group home as any residential care facility for six or fewer persons which is licensed by the state (Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.344.810.B). J F T E m I: C Li L A H -l3 -> C E\ E St. A L P L A N General Plan: The General Plan is a legal document, adopted byth f legislative body of a City or County, setting forth policies regarding long-term development. California law requires the preparation of seven elements or chapters in the General Plan: Land Use, Housing, Circulation, Conservation, Open Space, Noise, and Safety. Additional elements are permitted, such as Economic Development, Urban Design and similar local concerns. Group Quarters: A facility which houses groups of unrelated persons not living in households (U.S. Census definition). Examples of group quarters include institutions, dormitories, shelters, military quarters, assisted living facilities and other quarters, including single - room occupancy (SRO) housing, where 10 or more unrelated individuals are housed. Growth Management: Techniques used by a government to regulate the rate, amount, location and type of development. HCD: The State Department of Housing and Community Development. Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (NMDA): The Home Mortgage Disclosure Act requires larger lending institutions making home mortgage loans to publicly disclose the location and disposition of home purchase, refinance and improvement loans. Institutions subject to FB/JDA must also disclose the gender, race, and income of loan applicants. Homeless: Unsheltered homeless are families and individuals whose primary nighttime residence is a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings (e.g., the street, sidewalks, cars, vacant and abandoned buildings). Sheltered homeless are families and persons whose primary nighttime residence is a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter (e.g., emergency, transitional, battered women, and homeless youth shelters; and commercial hotels or motels used to house the homeless). Household: The US Census Bureau defines a household as all persons living in a housing unit whether or not they are related. A single person living in an apartment as well as a family living in a house is considered a household. Household does not include individuals living in dormitories, prisons, convalescent homes, or other group quarters. C, t T 5 J F 1 E ;m F. C U L A H-133) G E N E ft. A L P L i N Household Income: The total income of all the persons living in a household. A household is usually described as very low income, low income, moderate income, and upper income based upon household size, and income, relative to the regional median income. Housing Problems: Defined by HUD as a household which: (1) occupies a unit with physical defects (lacks complete kitchen or bathroom); (2) meets the definition of overcrowded; or (3) spends more than 30% of income on housing cost. Housing Subsidy- Housing subsidies refer to government assistance aimed at reducing housing sales or rent prices to more affordable levels. Two general types of housing subsidy exist. Where a housing subsidy is linked to a particular house or apartment, housing subsidy is "project' or "unit" based. In Section 8 rental assistance programs the subsidy is linked to the family and assistance provided to any number of families accepted bywilling private landlords. This type of subsidy is said to be "tenant based." Housing Unit: A room or group of rooms used by one or more individuals living separately from others in the structure, with direct access to the outside or to a public hall and containing separate toilet and kitchen facilities. HUD: See U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Income Category: Four categories are used to classify a household according to income based on the median income for the county. Under state housing statutes, these categories are defined as follows: Very Low (0-50% of County median); Low (50-80% of County median); Moderate (80-120% of County median); and Upper (over 120% of County median). Large Household: A household with 5 or more members. Low Income Home Energy Act Program (LIHEAP): LIHEAP helps pay the winter heating bills or summer cooling bills of low- income owincome and elderly people. Manufactured Housing: Housing that is constructed of manufactured components, assembled partly at the site rather than totally at the site. Also referred to as modular housing. Market Rate Housing: Housing which is available on the open market without any subsidy. The price for housing is determined by the market forces of supply and demand and varies by location. C.. 1 T Y O 1 1 L .M E C: U L A C] E N F.. [t A L P 1. ;i N FI -134 a Median Income: The annual income for each household size withm� a region which is defined annually by HUD. Half of the households in the region have incomes above the median and half have incomes below the median. Mobile Home: A structure, transportable in one or more sections, which is at least 8 feet in width and 32 feet in length, is built on a permanent chassis and designed to be used as a dwelling unit when connected to the required utilities, either with or without a permanent foundation. Mobile Home Park Assistance Program (MPAP):. To preserve affordable housing opportunities found within mobile home parks, HCD provides financial and technical assistance to Low Income mobile home park residents through MPAP. MPAP provides loans of up to 50% of the purchase price plus the conversion costs of the mobile home park so that Low Income residents, or organizations formed by Low Income residents can own and/or operate the mobile home park. Mortgage Credit Certificate (MCC): Administered by Riverside County, and authorized by Congress in the Tax Reform Act of 1984, the MCC provides assistance to fust -time homebuyers for the purchase of owner -occupied single-family homes, townhomes, and condominiums. An MCC reduces the amount of federal income taxes otherwise due but not to exceed the amount of federal taxes owed for the year after other credits and deductions have been taken. (Unused tax credits can be carried forward three years, until used.) Mortgage Revenue Bond (MRB): A state, county or city program providing financing for the development of housing through the sale of tax-exempt bonds. Overcrowding: As defined by the U.S. Census, a household with greater than 1.01 persons per room, excluding bathrooms, kitchens, hallways, and porches. Severe overcrowding is defined as households with greater than 1.51 persons per room Office of Planning and Research (OPR): The Governor's Office of Planning and Research (OPR) provides legislative and policy research support for the Governor's office. OPR also assists the Governor and the Administration in land -use planning and manages the Office of the Small Business Advocate. Overpayment: The extent to which gross housing costs, including Utility costs, exceed 30 percent of gross household income, based on data published by the U.S. Census Bureau. Severe overpayment, or C[ r Y 0 1 T r M L C Ll L A 1-1-135 t_, I] N L R A L P 1. A N 0 C. t T Y J F cost burden, exists if gross housing costs exceed 50 percent of gross income. Parcel: The basic unit of land entitlement. A designated area of land established by plat, subdivision, or otherwise legally defined and permitted to be used, or built upon. Physical Defects: A housing unit lacking complete kitchen or bathroom facilities (U.S. Census definition). Jurisdictions may expand the Census definition in defining units with physical defects. Poverty. The income cutoffs used by the Census Bureau to determine the poverty status of families and unrelated individuals included a set of 48 thresholds. The poverty thresholds are revised annually to allow for changes in the cost of living as reflected in the Consumer Price Index. The average threshold for a family of four persons in 1989 was $12,674. Poverty thresholds were applied on a national basis and were not adjusted for regional, state, or local variations in the cost of living. Project -Based Rental Assistance: Rental assistance provided for a project, not for a specific tenant. A tenant receiving project -based rental assistance gives up the right to that assistance upon moving from the project. Public Housing: A project -based low -rent housing program operated by independent local public housing authorities. A low- income owincome family applies to the local public housing authority in the area in which they want to live. Redevelopment Agency. California Redevelopment Law provides authority to establish a Redevelopment Agency with the scope and financing mechanisms necessary to remedy blight and provide stimulus to eliminate deteriorated conditions. The law provides for the planning, development, redesign, clearance, reconstruction, or rehabilitation, or any combination of these, and the provision of public and private improvements as may be appropriate or necessary in the interest of the general welfare by the Agency. Redevelopment law requires an Agency to set aside 20 percent of all tax increment dollars generated from each redevelopment project area for the purpose of increasing and improving the community's supply of housing for low and moderate income households. Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA): The RHNA is based on State of California projections of population growth and housing unit demand and assigns a share of the region's future housing need to each jurisdiction within the SCAG (Southern California Association of Governments) region. These housing need 1 L M E C. U L A GLNEKAL 1' L A N H-136 numbers serve as the basis for the update of the Housing Element >i1 each California city and county. Rehabilitation: The upgrading of a building previously in dilapidated or substandard condition for human habitation or use. Section 8 Rental Voucher/ Certificate Program: A tenant -based rental assistance program that subsidizes a family's rent in a privately owned house or apartment. The program is administered by local public housing authorities. Assistance payments are based on 30 percent of household annual income. Households with incomes of 50 percent or below the area median income are eligible to participate in the program. Service Needs: The particular services required by special populations, typically including needs such as transportation, personal care, housekeeping, counseling, meals, case management, personal emergency response, and other services preventing premature institutionalization and assisting individuals to continue living independently. Small Household: Pursuant to HUD definition, a small household consists of two to four non -elderly persons. Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG): The Southern California Association of Governments is a regional planning agency which encompasses six counties: Imperial, Riverside, San Bemardino, Orange, Los Angeles, and Ventura. SCAG is responsible for preparation of the RHNA Special Needs Groups: Those segments of the population which have a more difficult time finding decent affordable housing due to special circumstances. Under California Housing Element statutes, these special needs groups consist of the elderly, handicapped, large families, female -headed households, farm workers and the homeless. A jurisdiction may also choose to consider additional special needs groups in the Housing Element, such as students, military households, other groups present in their community. Single -Room Occupancy Structure (SRO): A rented room that often includes shared bathroom and kitchen facilities. Subdivision: The division of a lot, tract or parcel of land in accordance with the Subdivision Map Act (California Government Code Section 66410 et seq). Substandard Housing: Housing which does not meet the minimum standards contained in the State Housing Code (i.e. does not provide C: f T Y O F T f: m 4 C U L A C. E N E R A L P L A N H-[37 0 .R shelter, endangers the health, safety or well-being of occupants). Jurisdictions may adopt more stringent local definitions of substandard housing. Substandard, Suitable for Rehabilitation: Substandard units which are structurally sound and for which the cost of rehabilitation is considered economicallywarranted. Substandard, Needs Replacement: Substandard units which are structurally unsound and for which the cost of rehabilitation is considered infeasible, such as instances where the majority of a unit has been damaged by fire. Supportive Housing: Housing with a supporting environment, such as group homes or Single Room Occupancy (SRO) housing and other housing that includes a supportive service -component such as those defined below. Supportive Services: Services provided to residents of supportive housing for the purpose of facilitating the independence of residents. Some examples are case management, medical or psychological counseling and supervision, child care, transportation, and job training. Tenant -Based Rental Assistance: A form of rental assistance in which the assisted tenant may move from a dwelling unit with a right to continued assistance. The assistance is provided for the tenant, not for the project. Transitional Housing: Transitional housing is temporary (often six months to two years) housing for a homeless individual or family who is transitioning to pertnanent housing. Transitional housing often includes a supportive services component (e.g. job skills training, rehabilitation counseling, etc) to allow individuals to gain necessary life skills in support of independent living. Uniform Building Code (UBC): First enacted by the International Conference of Building Officials (ICBG) in 1927, the UBC provides standards for building codes. Revised editions of this code are published approximately every 3 years. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): The cabinet level department of the federal government responsible for housing, housing assistance, and urban development at the national level. Housing programs administered through HUD include CDBG, HOME and Section 8, among others. C. 1 "I Y 0 E f E .M E C l( L A E N E [t A L l i.. A N 11-138 Western Regional Council of Governments (WRCOG): WRCC� consists of representatives from all 14 cities and the Riverside County Board of Supervisors, which have seats on the WRCCG Executive Committee, the group that sets policy for the organization. Together, as a joint powers agency, they take up regional matters, from air quality to solid waste and from transportation to the environment. Zoning: A land use regulatory measure enacted by local government. Zoning district regulations governing lot size, building bulk, placement, and other development standards vary from district to district, but must be uniform within the same district. Each city and county adopts a zoning ordinance specifying these regulations. ---------- C.1 t "[ Y J F T }:: 1t F (.( L ;� C} F. R A L 0 THIS PAGE LEFTINTEN170NALLYBLANK C, ![ Y O F T E 4t is C: l[ L A GEN LK AL 13 L A N H-140 City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element Update 2008 Appendix B Vacant Land Inventory and Residential Capacity Analysis All Vacant Parcels in the City of Temecula Zone Community Commercial"' High Density Residential Highway Tourist Commercial' Industrial Park Low Density Residential Low Medium Density Residential Medium Density Residential Multiple Zones° Neighborhood Commercial' Open Space Professional Office"' Public Institutional Public Recreation Service Commercial' Very Low Density Residential Number of Parcels Total Acreage Res. Capacity 54 54.57 818 19 70.28 1047 16 23.32 343 89 392.50 0 160 206.14 403 637 367.64 1811 30 214.01 1912 20 398.92 1040 10 37.86 336 10 96.47 _ 0 52 174.11 2585 8 149.18 0 1 1.45 0 60 207.31 3082 170 553.08 206 1336 2946.84 13583 Zones that Permit High Density Residential by Right Zone Community Commercial' High Density Residential' Highway Tourist Commercial' Multiple Zones° Professional Office' Service Commercial' Number of Parcels Total Acreage Res. Capacity 54 54.57 818 19 70.28 1047 16 23.32 343 20 398.92 1041 52 174.11 2585 60 207.31 3082 221 928.51 8916 Zones that Conditionally Permit High Density Residential Zone Number of Parcels Total Acreage Res. Capacity Community Commerciale 54 54.57 818 Professional Office' 52 174.11 2585 106 229 3403 Notes: T 1 Senior Citizen housing (age restricted) is permitted in this zone at 20 units per acre by right. 2 Multiple -Family residential housing is permitted in this zone at 20 units per acre with a Conditional Use Permit. 3 Affordable housing is permitted in this zone at 20 units per acre with a Conditional Use Permit. 4 Residential capacity for parcels with multiple zones is estimated based on the developable acreage for each parcel. City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element Update 2008 Appendix C Underutilized Residemial Properties 945201001 0.85 30682 SOUTHERN CROSS RD TEMECULA CA 92592 GARCIA MARTIN 945080024 2.04 30218 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 LIST FAMILY High Density HDR No 945080004 1.52 30180 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 SCOTT GERALD G Low Density L•1 No 945080003 4.97 30260 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 MARTINEZ JOHN F Low Density L-1 No 945080002 4.71 30250 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 SLANE BRIAN C Low Density L-1 No 945080009 4.69 30270 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 DELGADO CHARLES X Low Density L-1 No 945080023 2.01 30244 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 LIST FAMILY Low Density L-1 No 945060003 945060005 2.53 29960 VIA SERRITO 2.49 TEMECULA CA 92592 RORIPAUGH JOHN ELLIOTT Low Density Low Density L -i L-1 No 945060004 29926 VIA SERRITO 2.5529510 VIA SERRITO. TEMECULA CA 92592 SHAW KELVIN Low Density L•1 No No 945060011 2.46 30052 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 HARLAN FREDAJ TANNA HASMUKH G Low Density L-1 No 945060010 2,50 30026 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 HAM TRACY E Low Density L -i No 945060008 945060012 2.87. 29962 SANTIAGO RD 3.3430080 TEMECULA CA 92592 NEIMEYER RALPH E Low Density Low Density L-1 L-1 No 945060001 SANTIAGO RD 2.45 29920 VIA SERRITO TEMECULA CA 92592 LEWIS CECELIA Low Density L•1 No No 945060022 3.23 30112 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 HERMAN CHRISTINE M TEMPEL STEPHEN E Low Density L-1 No 945060018 2.54 30000 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 LIS STEVEN THADDEUS Low Density L-1 No 945070004 2.24 30675 PAUBA RD TEMECULA CA 92591 RICHARDSON ALLYN L Low Density L-1 No 945070002 2.21 $0705 PAUBA RD TEMECULA CA 92592 HAWK TIMOTHY JOE Low Density L-1 No 945080025 3.23 30680 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 WEIDMAN GARY R Low Density L-1 No 945080015 2.27 30600 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 MARCHISSET RAYMOND Low Density L-1 No 945290045 2.60 30828 BEL MONTE CT TEMECULA CA 92592 TOOR MANJIT Low Density L-1 No 945290044 1.6130821 BEL MONTE CT TEMECULA CA 92592 GOODWIN ERIC Low Density L-2 No 945100013 2.44 31120 GRANVILLE CT TEMECULA CA 92592 JENSEN PERRY E Low Density L-2 No 945090009 3.65 31125 PAUBA RD TEMECULA CA 92592 FAHRION DAVID E Low Density L-2 No 945110006 3.52 31249 SIERRA BONITA TEMECULA CA 92592 LANG MICHAEL Low Density L-1 No 945110011 945290047 2.41 43185 MARGARITA RD 2.44 TEMECULA CA 92592 CIZEK PATRICIA MICHELLE BRE Low Density Low Density L•1 L-1 No 945110007 41195 CRESTE VERDE CT 2.29 31286 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 GALLERY RESERVE PARTNERS Low Density L4 No No 945110016 2.77 31200 SANTIAGO RD TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 DOHRMAN JEFF C ZIMMER RONALD RICHARD Low Density L-1 No 945100008 945110009 3.67 31150 SANTIAGO RD 2.16 TEMECULA CA 92590 HUGHES ORSON GREGG Low Density Low Density L•1 L-2 No 945090018 43121 MARGARITA RD 1.64 43054 BRIGHTON RIDGE TEMECULA CA 92592 DWYER RAYMOND DANIEL Low Density L•2 No No 953490003 LN 0.54 41291 RUE JADOT TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92591 REYNOLDS ROGER J MORGAN CHARLES G Low Density L-2 No 953222003 0.55 32190 COUR MAGOELAINE TEMECULA CA 92591 LANDRUM JEFFREY K Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes 954213001 0.79 31684 PASEO GOLETA TEMECULA CA 92592 KALA) NICK Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes 954280036 0.72 32000 CORTE CANEL TEMECULA CA 92592 BREWER GAYLE M Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes 954280013 0.80 41801 CORTE VALENTINE TEMECULA CA 92592 GOMEZ JOHN A Low Medium Density -3 Yes 954280012 955080018 0.68 41813 CORTE VALENTINE 0.56 42347 TEMECULA CA 92592 FITZPATRICK DONALD A Low Medium Density Low Medium Density P3 SP SP Yes 964402017 CORTE VILLOSA 0.63 32420 CORTE ZAMORA TEMECULA CA 92592 COPE JAMES A Low Medium Density -3 SP3 Yes Yes 954152009 0.82 31465 PASEO GOLETA TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 MONROE CLIFFORD F MENTE CHARLES Low Medium Density SP3 Yes 954372006 0.65 32209 CORTE PARADO TEMECULA CA 92592 MAURER DONALD JOHN Low Medium Density SP3 Yes 954151012 0.64 31335 CORTE SONORA TEMECULA CA 92592 FREESE TIMOTHY K Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes 954140014 0.64 31344 CORTE MONTIEL TEMECULA CA 92592 HARDY MARTIN S Low Medium Density SP3 Yes 954140015 0.57 31339 CORTE MONTIEL TEMECULA CA 92592 ROTH RANDY L Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes 954090028 0.68 31300 CORTE ALHAMBRA TEMECULA CA 92592 WUDRICK JIM J Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes 954090030 0.5131271 CORTE ALHAMBRA TEMECULA CA 92592 BRISTOL JAMES Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes 954082046 0.67 41616 AVENIDA DE LA REINA TEMECULA CA 92592 BUNDERSON DAN C Low Medium Density SP3 Yes 954111012 0.51 31389 CORTE SAN LEANDRO TEMECULA CA 92592 ROBINSON JOHN Low Medium Density SP3 Yes Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village Margarita Village City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element Update 2008 Appendix C Underutilized Residential Properties 954112006 0.61 31401 CORTE MADERA TEMECULA CA 92592 ^�•�•-^��^�^ AGUAS MILA Low Medium Uenslty, Low Medium Density SP -3 SP -3 Yes Yes Margarita Village 954102005 1.18 31011 CORTE ANACAPA TEMECULA CA 92592 MANGOLD JOHN E Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes Margarita Village 954040035 0.59 30910 CORTE ARROYO VISTA TEMECULA CA 92592 CASTILLO TOMAS R Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes Margarita Village 954040017 0.55 30912 CORTE DE LOS SANTOS TEMECULA CA 92592 SAUM PHILIP C Low Medium Density SP -3 Yes Margarita Village 962310022 0.78 45122 WILLOWICK ST TEMECULA CA 92592 STOECKEL BRYAN D Low Medium Density SP -9 Yes Margarita Village 920170009 0.56 39960 SWEET BRIER CR TEMECULA CA 92591 CASTELLANO THOMAS M Low Medium Density SP -1 Yes Redhawk 920170008 0.62 39948 SWEET BRIER CR TEMECULA CA 92591 JOY DAVEN Low Medium Density SPA Yes Roripaugh Estates 920170014 0.53 27698 DANDELION CT TEMECULA CA 92591 RASTEGARNIA SEYED Low Medium Density SP -1 Yes Rodpaugh Estates 920161064 0.56 27695 DANDELION CT TEMECULA CA 92591 MOWLES EDWARD V Low Medium Density SPA Yes Roripaugh Estates 920161031 0.58 27589 SENNA CT TEMECULA CA 92591 NYQUIST CORINNA G Law Medium Density SP -1 Yes Roripaugh Estates 920170001 0.51 39864 SWEET BRIER CR TEMECULA CA 92591 RINCON BENNY L Low Medium Density SP -1 Yes Roripaugh Estates 920170002 0.5339876 SWEET BRIER CR TEMECULA CA 92591 CAPEHART KENNETH W Low Medium Density SP -1 Yes Roripaugh Estates 920170012 0.50 39867 SWEET BRIER CR TEMECULA CA 92591 LOUD OSCAR ZAN JR Low Medium Density SP -1 Yes Roripaugh Estates 920179003 0.61 39888 SWEET BRIER CR TEMECULA CA 92591 FOWLER LEONARD Low Medium Density SP -1 Yes Roripaugh Estates 920170004 0.64 39900 SWEET BRIER CR TEMECULA CA 92591 HOHNBAUM BRUCE E Low Medium Density SP -1 Yes Roripaugh Estates 920170010 0.99 39947 SWEET BRIER CR TEMECULA CA 92591 STOUTSENSERGER KURT M Law Medium Density SP -1 Yes Roripaugh Estates 962520021 0.58 32378 FIRESIDE DR TEMECULA CA 92592 DUBOIS GARY PAUL Law Medium Density SP -12 Yes Roripaugh Estates 962520041 962520060 0.62 46065 HUNTER TRAIL TEMECULA CA 92592 STANDARD PACIFIC CORP Low Medium Density SP -12 Yes Wolf Creek 962520061 0.65 0.61 STANDARD PACIFIC CORP Low Medium Density SP -12 Yes Wolf Creek Wolf Creek 919370025 1.04 40233 DONOMORE CT TEMECULA CA 92591 STANDARD PACIFIC CORP AYERS WILLIAM B Low Medium Density SP -12 Yes Wolf Creek 919370024 0.58 40229 DONOMORE CT TEMECULA CA 92591 SEHGAL KISHORE Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 919370007 919370026 0.90 40246 SENWOOD CT 0.72 40247 DONOMORE CT TEMECULA CA 92591 TEMECULA CA BAIMBRIDGE H WAYNE Low Medium Density LM No 919370038 0.50 40245 HOLDEN CR 92591 TEMECULA CA 92591 COLCLAZIER DALE COURTNEY ANDREW D Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 919370041 957291001 0.50 40246 HOLDEN CR 0.74 40501 CALLE MEDUSA TEMECULA CA 92592 RAMIREZ RAMON CARO Low Medium Density LM No 957291019 0.54 40566 NOB CT TEMECULA CA 92591 TEMECULA CA 92591 WEEKS PHILLIP M MEDINA ERIK Low Medium Density LM No 957291023 0.50 40531 NOB CT TEMECULA CA 92591 FLOHR THOMAS L Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 957292002 957292001 1.27 31638 AVENIDA DEL REPOSO TEMECULA CA 92591 DRAYTON BRUCE K Low Medium Density LM No 957591010 0.76 31618 AVENIDA DEL REPOSO TEMECULA CA 92591 ROGERS PAUL WILLIAM Low Medium Density LM No 953082018 0.70 40969 JULO WY 1.2232041 MERLOTCT TEMECULA CA 92591 TEMECULA CA 92591 BALD BETTY H Low Medium Density LM No 953090028 3.10 31670 RANCHO CALIFORNIA RD TEMECULA CA 92591 PAUL LORRAINE ALLISON RANDY Low Medium Density LM No 945202003 0.69 30669 SOUTHERN CROSS RD TEMECULA CA 92592 OBANION KRISTOPHER E Low Medium Dpnsity Low Medium Density LM LM No No 945202003 945231003 0.69 30669 SOUTHERN CROSS RD TEMECULA CA 92592 OBANION KRISTOPHER E Low Medium Density LM No 945231010 0.6342812 AGENA ST TEMECULA CA 92592 CHAFFIN HUGH Low Medium Density LM No 945231011 0.51 42904 AGENA ST 0.604291SAGENA.ST TEMECULA CA 92592 VANCE GREGORY Low Medium Density LM No 945240003 1.27 43029 ARGO CT TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 SEPULVEDA MICHAEL T RUDEN LARRY J Low Medium Density LM No 945220036 945240013 0.8730567 SPICA CT TEMECULA CA 92592 SAMY MURALITHARAN Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 945240914 0.56 42994 AGENA ST TEMECULA CA 92592 FORGUSON ROY E Low Medium Density LM No 945240015 0.58 43006 AGENA ST TEMECULA CA 92692 KIRSTEIN ERIC Low Medium Density LM No 945220023 OZ3 43020 AGENA ST 0.74 30670 MOONTIDE CT TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 ECKHARDT BRADLEY OUTHUIJSE JOHN H Low Medium Density LM No 945220022 945203002 0.67 30667 MOONTIDE CT TEMECULA CA 92592 LOWGREN RUSSELL R Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 945203001 1.0530638 SOUTHERN CROSS RD TEMECULA CA 92592 HART JULIE Low Medium Density LM No 945220001 0.8042741 AGENA ST TEMECULA CA 92592 ZHANGJOHNNY Low Medium Density LM No 945220035 0.55 30621 SOUTHERN CROSS RD TEMECULA CA 92692 SCARBROUGH DAVID B Low Medium Density LM No 0.66 30566 SPICA CT TEMECULA CA 92692 DANTON LEE Low Medium Density LM No City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element Update 2008 Appendix C Underutilized Residential Properties 945211019 0.56 30447 SPICA CT -- ---- • -• • _---- TEMECULA CA 92592 .._�..� . . +cr,c, , DIAZJIM S Low Medium Density LM No 945220017 945240021 0.68 30601 MOONTIDE CT 0.81 43098 AGENA ST TEMECULA CA 92592 MEDARIS MICHAEL J Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 945220006 0.59 30673 SKY TERRACE DR TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 CHAN PETER STAVENGA HARMEN M Low Medium Density LM No 945220009 944091001 0.54 30695 SKY TERRACE DR 0.84 TEMECULA CA 92592 TANNER ALISON L Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No 944092002 42701 LAS VIOLETTAS CT 0.55 42701 LOMA PORTOLA DR TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA HARMAN RICHARD Low Medium Density LM No No 944100017 0.50 42801 LAS VIOLETTAS CT 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 HOLMES DONNA L MISNER JUDY A Low Medium Density LM No 944092026 944100002 0.57 29811 CAMINO DEL SOL 0.56 42700 LAS VIOLETTAS CT TEMECULA CA 92592 BAUMANN RAYMOND D Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 944100005 0.51 42721 VIA DEL CAMPO TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 ZITLAU JOHN K EWING BRIAN Low Medium Density LM No 944092007 944092010 0.79 29800 CAMINO DEL SOL 0.69 29740 TEMECULA CA 92692 BAINBRIDGE WALTER G Low Medium Low Medium Density ity LM LM No No 944092019 CAMINO DEL SOL 0.55 29855 CAMINO DEL SOL TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 ETTINGER MARCUS STEWART Low Medium Density LM No 944092023 0.64 29821 CAMINO DEL SOL TEMECULA CA 92592 STRUBLE RANDOLF J DAVIES STELLA D Low Medium Density LM No 921781016 921781017 0.70 41914 CARLETON WY 0.58 41911 CARLETON WY TEMECULA CA 92591 WARREN EARNEST D Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 921781023 0.62 41910 CARLETON WY TEMECULA CA 92591 TEMECULA CA 92591 HALLICK GREGORY P BRIGGS DENNIS M Low Medium Density LM No 921781003 921781004 0.56 29532 GEORGETOWN LN 0.54 29538 GEORGETOWN LN TEMECULA CA 92591 BARBEITO CARMEN Low Medium Density Law Medium Density LM LM No No .921541034 0.60 29822 WINDWOOD CR TEMECULA CA 92591 TEMECULA CA 92591 FETKIN ROBERTS CLEMENT GREG A Low Medium Density LM No 921773017 0.53 41781 BRANDEIS CR TEMECULA CA 92591 HARVEY RUBY M Low Medium Density LM No 921640009 0.76 30222 CORTE CANTERA TEMECULA CA 92591 FRICK KESLEY A Low Medium Density LM No 921640010 921640011 0.66 30231 CORTE CANTERA 0.70 30219 CORTE CANTERA TEMECULA CA 92591 HOLDER WENDY JOAN Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 921640024 0.55 30220 CORTE PLATA TEMECULA CA 92591 TEMECULA CA 92591 LARA AMADO C GHADERI KHOSROW Low Medium Density LM No 921640025 921640026 0.71 30238 CORTE PLATA 0.75 30235 CORTE PLATA TEMECULA CA 92591 CAMERON JAIME B Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 953121001 0.73 30659 CALLE PINA COLADA TEMECULA CA 92591LAGUTARIS TEMECULA CA 82581 RACHEAL GAY MICHELLE C Low Medium Density LM No 953121027 953121028 0.59 30851 WHITE ROCKS CR 0.62 30850 WHITE ROCKS CR TEMECULA CAS2591 SHAFFER RONALD L Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 953112005 0.67 41451 YANKEE RUN CT TEMECULA CA 92591 TEMECULA CA 92591 WANNER MARLIN M CRESCENZO VINCENT J Low Medium Density LM No 953112004 953101025 0.74 41461 YANKEE RUN CT 0.55 30860 MEADE RIVER CT TEMECULA CA 92591 HOHENBERGER WESLEY J Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 953101024 0.51 30861 MEADE RIVER CT TEMECULA CA 92591 TEMECULA CA 92591 NELSON GAIL L BERMUDEZ JACK Low Medium Density LM No 953101008 0.52 41696 BIG SAGE CT TEMECULA CA 92591 BUDNEBERNARD B Low Medium Density LM No 953130006 953130007 1.34 41284 BRAVOS CT 0.55 41285 BRAVOS CT TEMECULA CA 92591 CORDELL JON TERRY Low Medium DenY sity Low Medium Density LM LM No No 945271011 0.51 43225 VISTA DEL RANCHO TEMECULA CA 92591 TEMECULA CA 92592 BAIRD THOMAS F FRANCO JAMES Low Medium Density LM No 945271010 945260002 0.75 30610 COLINA VERDE 0.87 30025 CALLE HALCON TEMECULA CA 92592 HARMON PAUL GLEN Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 945040015 0.71 30350 VIA BRISA TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 MAZURKIEWITZ JOHN M NILSSON MERVIN K Low Medium Density LM No 945040016 0.93 30370 VIA BRISA TEMECULA CA 92592 MAFFEI KENNETH C Law Medium Density LM No 945040017 945260004 0.72 30361 VIA BRISA 0.53 30079 CAMPO VERDE TEMECULA CA 92592 EDMUNSON WILLARD R Low Medium Density Lav Medium Density LM LM No No 945040006 0.57'30367 VIA CANADA TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 THOMAS MARK W ZIEMER ROGER C Low Medium Density LM No 945260012 0.70 30155 CAMPO VERDE TEMECULA CA 92592 ODANE PAUL R Low Medium Density LM No 945040018 945260003 0.50 30347 VIA BRISA 0.51 30061 CAMPO VERDE TEMECULA CA 92592 PREIMSBERGER DUANE THEODORE Low Medium Density Low Medium Density LM LM No No 945260006 0.65 43773 CAMPO ROJO TEMECULA CA 92592 TEMECULA CA 92592 CANEDAY RICHARD M BRANDER KEVIN Low Medium Density LM No Low Medium Density LM No 945040006 - 0.5730367 VIA CANADA 922284031 0.63 45580 TOURNAMENT LN 922291001 0.64 30543 BRIDGEVIEW CR 922301008 O.81 45851 PALMETTO WY 922301009 0.73 45848 PALMETTO WY 922301015 0.56 45788 CREEKSIDE WY 922301018 0:84 45798 CREEKSIDE WY 922301047 0.78 30842 BARDMOOR DR 922301048 1.11 30843 BARDMOOR DR 922301025 0.64 30861 BARDMOOR OR 922301026 0.80 30875 BARDMOOR DR 962480030 0.60 45757 BOULDER WY 962480031 0.70 45752 BOULDER WY 962480028 0.57. 45789 BOULDER WY 962480032 0.50 45768 BOULDER WY 965220015 10.40 41455 VIA DEL MONTE 957080016 14.85 30885NICOLAS RD 957190001 18.29 30925NICOLAS RD 945130005 7.70 43880 WINDCREST LN TEMECt City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element Update 2008 Appendix C Underutilized Residential Properties CA 92592 ZIEMER ROGER C Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 MARTINEZ RAMON Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 LEVINGSTON JERRY L Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 BROWN ROBERTS Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 HARRIS RICHARD E Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 NAKAYA MOREY M Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 MALE J MICHAEL Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 OLIVER KARLAL Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 POOLE PETER Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 LOCKLIN WILLIAM R Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 SNYDER LEANNE M Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 WOLF CREEK DEV Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 WOLF CREEK DEV Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 WOLF CREEK DEV Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 WOLF CREEK DEV Low Medium Density LM No CA 92592 PHILLIPS STEVE M Very Low Density VL No CA 92591 LASAGNA LAWRENCE T Very Low Density VL No CA 92591 DAVIS BARBARA Very Low Density VL No CA 92592 HARRIS PHILIP.R Very Low Density VL No City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element Update 2008 Appendix D1 Residential Capacity Summary for Urban Density Overlay Vacant Land Within Urban DensityOverlay maw uata No. of Parcels Total Acreage No. of Parcels Adjusted Data* ITotal AcreageUnit Capacity No A e Restrictions 48 42.14 47 41.99 944.78 Senior Housing Only 44 71.6635 63.09 1419.53 Sub -Total Underutilized Land Within Urban Density Overia 92 113.8 82 105.08 2364.30 Be[ Villa io 16 17.77 16 17.77 53.31 Jefferson Avenue east side 27 38.32 26 37.26 111.78 Jefferson Avenue west side 38 53.46 38 53.46 160.38 Tar et Center 18 50.3 18 50.3 150.90 Tower Plaza 10 23.42 10 23.42 70.26 Sub -Total 109 183.27 108 182.21 546.63 Need per HCD: 1,707 units for Extremely Low, Very Low, and Low Income Households Assumptions: 1 For Urban Density Overlay, density = 30 Units/Acre by right 2 For vacant land capacity calculation, use 75% of acreage 3 For underutilized land capacity calculation, use 10% of acreage 4 Do not include parcels owned by City of Temecula or Riverside County Flood * Adjusted data excludes parcels owned by the City of Temecula and the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element Update 2008 Appendix D2 Summary of Vacant Land Inventory and Residential Capacity Analysis for Urban Density Overlay Zone Community CommerciaP•2 High Density Residential Highway Tourist Commercial' Industrial Park Low Density Residential Low Medium Density Residential Medium Density Residential Multiple Zones° Neighborhood Commercial' Open Space Professional Office' •3 Public Institutional Public Recreation Service Commercial' Very Low Density Residential Number of Parcels Total Acreage Res. Capacity 42 35.05 789 4 5.78 130 4 4.39 99 0 0.00 0 0 0.00 0 0 0.00 0 0 0.00 0 2 5.82 131 0 0.00 0 0 0.00 0 1 1.16 26 0 0.00 -- 0 0 0.00 0 27 _. 52.88 1189 0 0.00 0 80 105.08 2364 Notes: 1 Senior Citizen housing (age restricted) will be permitted in this overlay zone at 30 units per acre by right 2 Mulfiple-Family residential housing will be permitted in this overlay zone at 30 units per acre with a Conditional Use Permit 3 Affordable housing will be permitted in this overlay zone at 30 units per acre with a Conditional Use Permit. 4 Residential capacity for parcels with multiple zones is estimated based on the developable acreage for each parcel. 'City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element Update 2008 Appendix D3 Undenitilized Commercial Land Inventory within Urban Density Overlay POteMlal M4604Jee 01,nunlliee APN ACRES OWNER SITUS ADDRESS SITUS CITY MAILING ADDRESS MAILING CITY ARENSO RED TYPE ZONING West el6a 0f Jefferson Avenue LAND USE 900240001 808240002 2.92 WINCHESTER TEMECULA ONE 2,80 SANOELMAN SUSAN 27415 JEFFERSON AV TEMEGUTACA925W 1800 CENTURY PARK E NO 81 LOS ANGELES CA 80012 909240005 808240008 1.59 WINCHESTERTEMECULA, ONE 27415JEFFERSONAV 27+15 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULACAWSW 185 NW SPANISH RIVER IW TEMECUTACA92590 IWC CENTURY PARK E NO 01 SOCARATON FL33431 PM 117 66831 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 809240015 0.53 WINOHESTERTEMECULA ONE 0.34 WINCHESTER TEMECULA 27515JEFFERSONAV TEMECULA CA 92SW 1880 CENTURY PARK E NO BI LOS ANGELES CA 88312 LOSANGELES CA 901167 46240.x4 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 900260018 ONE 0.08 WINCHESTER TEMECULA ONE 27515 JEFFERSON AV 27481 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA 925W 18W CENTURY PARK E No al TEMECULACAW5W 1883 CENTURY PARK E LOSANGELES CA904] 23284.89 PM 14943.0,1 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL WQ4W19 90924W23 1.56 WINCHESTER TEMECULA ONE 0.59 WINCHESTER TEMECULA ONE 27481 JEFFERSON AV NO 81 TEMECUTACA90W 18BOCENTURY PARKE NO 81 LOSANGELES CA 95912 LOS ANGELES CA 80007 3340.17 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERIbAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 908240025 0.07 WINCHESTERTEMECULA ONE 275% JEFFERSON AV 27516JEFFERWNAV TEMECULACAMOO 1 SW CENTURY PARK E NO 61 TEMECULA CA WSW IWC CENTURY PARK LOS ANGELES CA 9347 6W71.20 PM 237.17 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 909240028 908240028 0,49 WINCHESTER TEMECULA, ONE ZOOS WRIGHT GERALD N 27515JEFFERSONAV E NO 01 TEMECULA CA WSW IBM CENTURY PARK E NO 01 LOS ANGELES CAW59] LOS ANGELES CAWM7 3110.85 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL' 809270043 0.73 SOURIS MIKE 21525 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA WSW POBOXW1000 TEMECULA CA M89 21421.34 PM 89385.77 COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL OOQT83U 1.2727349 JEFFERSON AVE 41540 WINCHESTER RD 27349 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA RUN POtOX92 TEMECULACA825W 8815 RUTGERS SUN CITY CA 925% PM 31858.0 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 9092]8345 W927W16 0.83 PLAZA SEVILLE 0.71 PLAZA SEVILLE 27375 JEFFERSON AV OR TEMECUTACAWWO 840LAMESABLVSTE115 ANAHEIM CA 92807 LA MESA CA 910,11 55161.13 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 9092700270.7 PLAZA SEVILLE 27371 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA 05800080 LA MESA BLV STE 115 LAMESA CAPIWI 2)338.51 PM 31129.27 COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 809270040 0.62 PLAZA SEVILLE 2730 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA WSW SON LA MESA BLV STE 115 LAMESA CA01941 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 909270049 1.4 PLAZA SEVILLE 273M JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA WSW 60831.q MESABLV STE 115 LA MESA CA4B41 83927000 2.631750 FIFTH 27355 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA 82583 W60 LA MESA BLV STE 115 LA MESA CA 91041 2]]08586 PM 44&d]2 COMMUNITYCOMMERCIIAL CCOMMUNITYCOMMERDIAL OMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 9092]0058 1.19 ENTERPRISE PROFESSIONAL BUILDING 21518 JEFFERSON AV 41530 ENTERPRISE OR W TEMECUTACA92SW 61823 MARGARRA RD NO I83 TEMECULADA0590 4162 MARGO 1872 GLEWOO TEMECULA CA BOB, PM PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIA. COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 82100003 82100012 1.67 KAPLAN KENNETH M 1.37MAROVIC PI 2701 OLD TOWN FRONT AV OD14787.9 TEMECULA CA WSW 381 STE 201 Si.ECENTRO CA 92243 LAGUNA REACH CA WWI 51787.52 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUMTVCOMMERCIAL 9210W13 1.57 CLAIN JOHN 2]91 f OLD TOWN FRONT AV TEMECULACA925W POFORESTfi ORANGE CA82W3 72920:52 M8 COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 921400023 1.83 JEFFERSON CAPITAL 27919 OLD TOWN FRONT AV 27713 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA WSW 2807ox"78RA GLEN TEMECULA CA WSW 2837 CXTEGRA GLENN AVE ESCONDIDO CA 92026 5982888 Me 68543.5 MB COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNI'TVOOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 0140W24 921400+15 2.92 JEFFERSON CAPITAL 27]15 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA WSW 41823 MARGARITA RD NO IN TEMECULA CA WSW 68284.02 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCILL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921400020 0.78 JEFFERSON CAPITAL 1.41 MALIASSISTANCEBU T 27717 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA 92583 41623 MARGARITA RD NO IN TEMECULA CA 92591 TEMECULA CA 92591 127158 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 921408330 2,15 RICHARD LEAGUE OF TEMECULA VALLEY 2]]27 JEFFERSON AV 28720 VIA TEMECULA CA 925W 27717 JEFFERSON AVE TEMECULA CA WSW 28720VMMONTEZUMA TEMECULA CA. 9250 33291.W PM 61260.88 MB COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 921400031 021400042 1.18 1.16 KELLY RICHARD YRONCOC JEFFERSON 2]]25 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA B25W 41623 MARGARITA RO NO IW TEMECULA CA. 925W TEMECULA CAWSBI 535x1'21 MB COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 9214000/3 KELLY C 1.19 KELLYSON 2)620 COMMERCE CENTER OR TEMECULA CA 24581 HAWTHORNE BLV NO 201 TORRANCE CA WSW 50182.25 MB COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921600832 JEFFERSON 1.8 JEFFERSON COURT 27810 COMMERCE CENTER DR TEMECULA CA WSW 245& HAWTHORNE BLV NO 201 TORRANCE CA W50 ]5981.]9 MB COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 821400081 2]e JEFFERSON COURT COU 275]0 COMMERCE CENTER DR WIN TEMECULA CA B25W 24584 HAWTHORNE BLV NO 201 TORRANCE CA 83505 51&51.11 MB COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921480027 1.4 GUNARATNEPRADEEPW 21576 COMMERCE CENTER DR TEMECULA CA B25W 24584 HAWTHORNE BLV NO 201 TORRANCE CA WSM ME COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY 9214800/8 92145835] 1.07 DW82 278WJEFFERSONAV 27625 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA B250 1028 COTUIT CIR TEMECULA CAVNO 738 WATERMAN HUNTINGTON BEACH CA 82018 1122488.2 PM 4]310,7 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCI851,07 AL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921480059 4.3108382 4.34 OWES 27855 JEFFERSON AV AVE NO 835 TEMECUTACA925W 730 S WATERMAN AVE NO 835 SAN BERNARDINO CA 8240 BAN BERNARDINO CA 924W 3949.89 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 921488308 2.55 HOSTLER CHARLES W 2]845 JEFFERSON AV TEMECUTACA925W 7385 WATERMAN AVE NO 835 SAN BERNARDINO CA 92408 45820.89 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 53.45RONADO 2)688 JEFFERSON AV TEMECUL4 CA B25W 1101 1ST ST UNIT 302 COCA92118 88 1938.4 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 11103.6 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL E.9.1d. of Jegeraon Avenue APN ACRES OWNER 918310003 1.37 RAMSAY JAMES L 9141WO4 SITUS ADDRESS 27600 JEFFERSON AV SITUS CITY MAILINGADDRESS TEMECULA CA 9260102W WILLOW CREEK MAILING CITY I I AREAISO REC TYPE OMMUNITRCOMM COMMUNE 9141004 1.53 RAMSAY JAMES L 1.24 RAMSAY JAMESL 275WJEFFERSONAV RD TEMECULA CA WSW POSOX52 TEMECULA CA TEMECULA CA 92596 59935.83 PM COMMUNITY COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 00310005 910310001 2.71 CROSSROADS AT WINCHESTER p0 27570 JEFFERSON AV 87N BALBOA AVE STE 2i0 TEMECULA CA W50 27570 JEFFERSON SAN DIEGO CA 92IN 86541.96 PM 7,2 PM 179.9 COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL. COMMUNI11'COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 910310008 2.37 J6 G BOSCH 1.83 M SJ RAMSAYCORP 275W JEFFERSON AV AVE TEMECULA CA 925W 150 CARRIAGE CIR TEMECULA CA 9250 HEMET CA 92545 110PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 910310008 2.94 M S J R4MS4Y CORP 27470 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA B25W 41823 MARGARITA RD IW CA 92591 14995.8 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCW. COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 91031W10 0.9 M 6 J RAMSAY CORP 27452 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA B25W 41923 MARGARITA RD IW TEMTEMECULA 82581 BINES PM 101,138.8 COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 810310011 1.0 M 6 J RAMSAY CORP 2]484 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA B25W STE 270 SAN DIEGO CA2WO PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 810318312 0]8 M8JRA CORP 27410 JEFFERSON AV. 75WBALBOAAVE TEMECULA CA 755RAINTREE RSTE 283 CARLSBAD CA 02599 39x04,8 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 910310015 1.88 BREESA PRO 27620 JEFFERSON AV WSW TEMECULA CA B25W 416Z3MARGARITARDIW TEMECULA 84184.35 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 81418318 0 M6JRAMSAY CORP RMVUgAP 27622 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA 9250 IOODUNR41W3MA SPARTABURG9S02 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 82100001 124 HOFF INV 21610 JEFFERSON AV 27740 OLD TOWN FRONT AV TEMECULA CA 0250 41W3 MARGARRA RD 100 MARGARITA TEMECULA CA B25W 25792 OBRERO RD TEMECULA GA 92591 TEMECULA CA UOJ IsW.W 81892.12 M8 38243.12-0M COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 821050002 621400092 1.6 RANCHO 10 LTD 9.6 RHYTHM SEA 2]]80 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA B25W 41M9 VAROON OR TEMECMISSIONACA 92582891 82591 4(U.&I MB COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL W145943 9214WON1 0.58 JEFFERSON FREEWAY INV 277W JEFFERSON AV 2T4 JEFFERSONAV TEMECULACAWSW 405 N MCKINLEY ST TEMECULA CA 92591 VMS VIA INDUSTRIA CORONA CA 929]8 68402.&MB 21]1..3 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL ITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNTYCOMMERCIAL 92140035 2.24 INVESTMENTTRUST ASSOC 2.24 PLAZACIELO 27710 JEFFERSON AV 101 TEMECULA CA 9250 41623 MARGARITA RD 159 TEMECULA TEMECUL4 CA B25W TEMECULA CA 92591 25076.29 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 921408338 0.87 RHYTHM SEA 27720 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA B25W 43529 RIDGE PARK DR TEMECULA CA B25W 87488.88 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 92140009] 1.01 JEFFERSON FREEWAY INV 2774JEFFERSONAV 2]708 JEFFERSON TEMECULA CA B25W 485 N MCKINIEY ST 97026.2 PM 3]-1.81 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL AV TEMECULA CA U691 V30 VIA INDUSTRIA 101 TEMCA CA WSW 44139.84 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 921490*38 0.15 PLAZACIELO 0 - 0 921480088 9T148(0W 0.96 HBURGS 27672 JEFFERSON AV 43570 RIDGE PARK DR TEMECULA CA 9259D 122 DEL PgCIFICO TEMECULA CA 02580 SAN CLEMENTS CA 92672 8]04.1 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 921480088 IN N OUTTHOMAS 1.04 INNOUT BURGER INC 27700 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA MOO 4199 CAMPUS OR NO WO IRVINE CA92612 41541.22 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921480074 1.08 MACDONALD MICHAEL B 27698JEFFERSONAV TEMECULA CA 9259039844 MOUNT BLANC AVE MURRIETA CA 82502 46970.911 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL B2ueaW0 12.53 .49 SG NG PHILIPTEMECULA Y PROP 27024 JEFFERSON AV TEMEWUCAWSW 27624JEFFERSCNAVE TEMECULA CA. 92690 40129.54 PM 85099,01 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL IN 31,06 CITY OF TEMECUU OF TEMECULA 27880 JEFFERSON AV TEMECULA CA 92590 27ONJEFFERSONAVE TEMECULA CA. 92590 110284.4 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL Bel Villa9B1e APN ACRES OWNER 621830001 1.55 WGA BEL VILUGGIO SITUS ADDRESS 41721 MARGARITA RD SITUS CITY MAILINGADDRESS TEMECULACA925819252 CHESAPEAKE OR MAILING CITY AREAISO RISC TYPE ZONE DESCRIPTION LAND USE 921890002 0.57 WGA BEL VILLAGGIO 41257 MARGARITA RD TEMECULA CA 92591 9252 CHESAPEAKE OR SAN DIEGO CA 92123' SAN DIEGO CA 82123 MOST PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 921880(03 921830004 0.55 WGA SBEL VILUGGIO 0.49 WGABELVILLAGGIO 0 41279 MARGARITA RD 0 0352 CHESAPEAKE DR TEMECUUCA92591 MIN DIEGO CA 82123 24703.6 PM 24124.17 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 9718 30 0 0 5 LBS WGA BEL VILUGGIO 0 9252 CHESAPEAKE DR 0 $qN DIEGO CA 82123 18850.88 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921830008 0.08 WGA BELVILUGGIO 41377 MARGARITA RD 8752 CHESAPEAKE DR TEMECULA CA 52591 8252 CHESAPEAKE DR SAN DIEGO CA 82123 SAN DIEGO 72019.21 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921830007 921830008 0.18 WGA BEL VILLAGGIO OA2 WGA BEL VILLAGGIO 41301 MARGARITA RD 0 TEMECULA CA 92591 9252CHESAPEAKEDR 0 CA 82123 SAN DIEGO. CA92123 3367.05 PM 7011.58 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921830(09 1.13 WGA BEL VILUGGIO 41377 MARGARITA RD 9252 CHESAPEAKE DR TEMECUU CA 82582 9252 CHESAPEAKE DR SAN DIEGO CA 92123 SAN DIEGO 18090.35 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921830010 921830011 1.32 WGA BEL VILLAGGIO 0 0 9252 CHESAPEAKE OR CA U123 SAN DIEGO CA 82123 49185.89 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 92189(012 0.33 WGA BEL VIU.MGI0 41425 MARGARITA RD TEMECULA CA B25B1 9252 CHESAPEAKE OR SAN DIEGO CA 92123 ]9280.08 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 92183W14 0.23 WGA BEL VILUGGIO 213 WGA BEL VILUGGIO 41901 MARGARITA RD 0 TEMECUUCAB25010252CHESAPEAKEOR SAN DIEGO CA 92123 14381.02 PM 8035.33 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 92183(014 1.13 WGA BEL VILUGGIO 111 0 0 9252 CHESAPEAKE OR 0 9252 CHESAPEAKE DR SAN DIEGO CA 92123 94942.95 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 821830015 1.24 WGA BEL VILUGGIO III 61533 MARGgftITA RD TEMECULA CA 92591 8252 CHESAPEAKE DR SAN DIEGO CA 92173 SAN DIEGO C4 B212J 49035 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 821830018 4.3 WGA BEL VILLAGGIOIII 41677 MARGARITA RD TEMECULA CA 025918252 CHESAPEAKE DR SAN DIEGO CA 82123 54157.54 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL n.n 387474.6 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL Tarn, Center APN ACRES OWNER 921320012 0.52 UKHA PROP TEMECULATC SITUS ADDRESS 27848 YNEZ RD SITUS CITY MAILING ADDRESS TEMECULA CA 92580 5(0108TH AVE NE NO 2050 MAILING CITY AREWSO REC TYPE ZONE DESCRIPTION LAND USE 921320018 921320018 0.85 MOBIL OIL CORP 295(O.RANCHO CALIFORNIA RD TEMECULACA B25Bi POBO%53 BELLEVUE WA98(04 HOUSTON TX 77001 77608,81 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 82132O02t 0.04 LAKHA PROP TEMECULA TO 1.9 PROP TEMECULA 257]8 - TEMECULACAM91 5MINTH AVE NE NO 2050 BELLEVUE WA 98004 36071.08 PM 27704,18 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921320097 VON. TC 3.79 VON& RANCHO 28)20 RANCHOCALIFORNIA AD TEMECUUGq,,W SOD IOBDI AVE HE NO 2050 29530 RANCHO CALIFORNIA RD TEMECULA CA MEN 1371 OAKLAND BL NO 200 BELLEVUE WA S80(4 82]31.77 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921320038 92132(041 2.96 UKHA PROP TEMECULA TC PROP 278. YNEZ RD TEMECULA.CARMI 500108TH AVE HE NO 2050 WALNUT CREEK CA 96596 BELLEVUE WA 98(04 155181.4 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 92132(045 225 UKHA PROP TEMECULA TC 27570YNEZRD TEMECULA CA 82591600108TH AVE HE NO 2050 9EUEVUE WA 96004 611482 PM � COMMUNITYCOMMERCUL, COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 921320048 0.24 UKHA PROP TEMECULATC 28860 RANCHO CALIFORNIA RD TEMECULA CA 825915W 108TH AVE HE NO 2050 BELLEVUE WA 91 DIXON)16 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921320052 323 LAKHA PROP TEMECULA TO 9.53 LAKHA V5B0.YNEZ RD TEMECULA CA 92591 500100TH AVE NE NO 2(50 BELLEVUE WA98004 38456.30 PM 142042.8 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921320053 OW TC. 7.N DAYTON HUDSON CORP DAYTON HUDSON 27530 YNEZRD TEMECULACA92500 SWIMTH AVE NE NO n50 29878 RANCHO CALIFORNIA RD TEMECULACA9269O PO BOX 15585 BELLEVUE WA98004 415299 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921320056 9213211056 10.70 .48 WELLS F NATLASSN 27858 YNEZ RD TEMECULA CA 92591 POSOX2009 ANAHEIM LA 92803 CARLSBAD CAU018 908702.3 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 92132(052 MIGOBANK MIGUEI SAS 5.45 LAKHA PROP TEMECULA TO 0 27520 YNEZ RD 0 26188 WHISPERING CREEK AVE MURRIETA CA 82587 TEMECULACAMi5015W 83471.93 MB 39150.88 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921320058 5.72 UKHA PROP TEMECUU TC 27488 YNEZ RD. 1W]H AVE HE NO 2050 TEMECUU.CA BMW 500108TH AVE NE NO BELLEVUE WA B80O{ 231288.8 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 9.01 TNITTA EMECULA CORP PLAZA CENTER 2]450 YNEZ RD 21150 TEMECULA OA 0259010(0OUAILSTNO2W BELLEVUE WA NOM 251735.9 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL U1320080 921320081 1.67 RANCHO CALIFORNIA RD TEMECULA CA 92591 16721 MILS KAN AVE NO NEWPORT BEACH CA 92880 IRVINE CAMEOS 131043 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCW. 921920082 GOLDBERG20540 0.89 GOLDBRTED 29400 RANCHO CALIFORNIA RD TEMECUILAMOSB1 PO BOX 888 CARDIFF CARW7 68210.98 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 50.9 30183.04 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL Tower Plan APN ACRES OWNER 821260018 0.93 TOWER OFFICE PLAZA II 81il 273USADORD 2]383 YNEZ RD SITUSGItt MAILING ADDRESS TEMECULAMOM91 43629 RIDGE PARK OR I MAILING CITY A SO RED TYPE ZONE DESCRIPTION LAND USE 921280019 1.53 TOWER OFFICE PLAZA 118111 27403 YNEZ RD TEMECULACA9259143529 RIDGE PARK DR TEMECULA CA 975(0 40SeS17 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 821280022 92128(023 DES WEBB JAMESC BANK 0.03 PACIFIC TRUSTAURA 27423 YNEZ RD TEMECULA CA 92591 27542 YNEZ RG STE IB TEMECULA CA 9258D TEMECULA CA 82581 80793.32 PM 2400].51 COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 921280024 O.N DEL TACO RESTAURANT PROP III 27425 YNEZ RD 27453 YNEZ RD TEMECULA CA 9$90010 BAV BLV TEMECULA CA 82581 25521 COMMERCENTRE CHUU VISTA CA91912 PM 2]011.69 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCML COMMUNITYCOMMERCW 921260025 0.98 BANK OF AMERICA NAIL TR&SVGS ASSN 27489 YNEZ RD OR TEMECUU CA 82581101 N TRYON ST LAKE FOREST CA 82830 CHARLOTTE NC2825S 97147.91 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL 021260020 92128(030 27511 1.03 TOWER 4.06 TOWER PLAZA INC AIN 27401 YNEZ RD TEMECULA CA 92580 2447 P C H STE 201 HERMOSA BEACH CA 90¢54 41811.44 PM 579OZ79 PM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL 921270044 0.16 KELLER KARL HEINZ 27411 YRD YNEZ RD TEMECULA CA 92692 PO SOX 2156 TEMECULA C"2591 2788 LOKER AVEW BEVERLY HILLS CA 90213 117719.1 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL'27UINEZ 821270055 11.8 27511 YNEZ ROAD 27511 YNEZ RD TEMECULA CA 82580 2447 P C H STE 201 CARLSBAD CA 92008 3324823 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUMTYCOMMERCNL 23.42 HERMOSA BEACH CA W254 614058.4 PM COMMUNITYCOMMERCIAL COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL City of Temecula Urban Density Overlay C3RDA Boundary nParcels Vacant Properties with Land Use = High (13-20 DUTAC Max) - Community Commercial Highway Tourist Commercial TProfessional Office _ Service Commercial Under Utilized Properties with Land Use ® Community Commercial ® Highway Tourist Commercial EM March 31, 2009 0 395 790 1,580 2,370 3,160 Fee[ =Vkemmena�iWa��newroam�s�ryo�en� amen_xn.mm TAF,C6YDF Underutilized Bel Villaggio C,- ANTEMAR PR01yENa10 Legend G city N Sonata p Parcels YO �r GO c� z Q K 2 W C 0 500 _ 1000 1500 ft. Map center: 6286901, 2135232 Scale: 1:5,152 Th'a map Is a user generrated static outerenceput from an Internet mapping site and la for general afhe'se re Iable�h115aMAP S NOT TO BE US EO fl�R NAV�CrATIbe ONemurate, wrrent, m THECPlYOF Underutilized east side Jefferson Avenue �¢ M RLegend ICO 0 City i tI , Streets FN���0 yet z� r] Parcels 20 P yS $q O meq, 8' 0 1000 2000 3000 ft. Scale: 1:9,979 Ma center: 6284131, 2132419 This map is l user generated static output from an Internet mapping site and Is for general reference only. Data W ars that appear on this map may or mayy not be attune, current, or otherwise reliable. THIS MAP IS NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION. TSrprff'9F Underutilized west side Jefferson Avenue r .r. Legend C3 city ,✓ Streets p Parcels p Otai �5 O 0 5 0� 4 p$ 90.0 $�cpp 000, � r 0 850 1700 2550 ft. Map center: 6283451, 2132497 Scale: 1:8,644 This map Is a user generetetl stapcautput from an Intemat mapping site end Is for general reference only. DaW layers that appear on this map may or may not be accurate, cunant, or otherwise reliable. TNIS MAP IS NOT TO BE llSED FOR NAVYGATION. Underutilized Target Center G ay Streets Parcels n. and Is for general l rate, current, or Legend Scale: 1:5,902 Underutilized Tower Plaza O 01ty Streets p Parcels n. a an Internet mapping site and Is for general r m•p mayor ma not be accurate, current, or USED FOR mart not Legend Scale: 1:6,336 13:25 9163272638 DEP DIR CRESWELL PAGE 02 STAT r- =F08NIA_RIISINE92TRA NSPQTATIOh 6N HOUSLI4�AGENCY ARNAL�5C � .rwwg R 1 ter1..-o.-t, 4 r Ma..r1M+KY.Ia+'•1 DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION OF HOUSING POLICY DEVELOPMENT 1800 Thlyd Street, Suite 430 P. O. Box 952053 �M Sacramento, CA 94252-2053 (916) 3233177 FAX (916) 327.2643 June 4, 2010 Mr. Patrick Richardson Director of Planning and Redevelopment City of Temecula 43200 Business Park Drive Temecula, CA 92589-9033 Dear Mr. Richardson: RE: Review of the City of Temecula's Revised Draft Housing Element Thank you for submitting Temecula's revised draft housing element received for review on May 19, 2010 with subsequent revisions received June 2, 2010. The Department is required to review draft housing elements and report the findings to the locality pursuant to Government Code Section 65585(h). The review was facilitated by communications with you and Ms. Dana Schuma, of your staff. The revised draft element addresses the statutory requirements described in the Department's February 17, 2010 review. For example, the element now identifies adequate sites demonstrated by Program 1 to establish an Urban Density Overlay to sites identified in Appendix D by June 2012 to accommodate Temecula's regional housing need for lower-income households. The Urban Density Overlay will allow for multifamily uses by -right at minimum densities of 20 units per acre and the City will ensure a minimum of 35 acres will be zoned to allow exclusively residential uses from sites identified in Appendix D-2, In addition, Programs 5, 10 and 11 commit Temecula to provide additional incentives and encourage lot consolidation, reduce fees and expedite processing to facilitate mixed-use and residential development within Urban Density and Mixed -Use Overlays. The revised element will comply with State housing element law (Article 10.6 of the Government Code) when these revisions are adopted and submitted to the Department, pursuant to Government Code Section 65585(g), The Department appreciates the cooperation and assistance of Ms. Shuma throughout the course of the review and looks forward to receiving Temecula's adopted housing element. If you have any additional questions, please contact Jennifer Seeger, of our staff, at (916) 445-3485. Sincerely, G� Cathy . Creswell Deputy Director ca Dana Schuma, Associate Planner, City of Temecula STAFF REPORT — PLANNING CITY OF TEMECULA PLANNING COMMISSION DATE OF MEETING: July 7, 2010 PREPARED BY: Dana Schuma, Associate Planner APPLICANT NAME: City of Temecula PROJECT Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017, revisions to the SUMMARY: adopted City of Temecula 2008-2014 Housing Element Update CEQA: Notice of Determination RECOMMENDATION: Recommend that the City Council adopt revisions to the adopted 2008-2014 Housing Element Update BACKGROUND SUMMARY State Housing Law requires local jurisdictions to update their Housing Element every six years. The original City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element was approved in 1993 and updated in 2002 pursuant to the amendment cycle for local agencies under the jurisdiction of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG). Subsequently, a Comprehensive General Plan Update was adopted by the City Council on April 12, 2005. An Environmental Impact Report was certified for the comprehensive update. In November 2007, the City entered into an agreement with Environmental Science Associates (ESA) to assist in the development of the Housing Element update for the current cycle. A draft Housing Element was completed and sent to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) for review in February 2008. Staff received comments from HCD on April 11, 2008, and worked with ESA to complete a revised draft which was submitted to HCD for a second review on July 2, 2008. On August 29, 2008, HCD contacted the City to state that several comments from its April 11, 2008, letter had not adequately been addressed. Additional comments were received from HCD via email on September 11, 2008. City staff met with HCD staff on October 17, 2008, to discuss the deficiencies in the draft Housing Element and to obtain direction. In December 2008, HCD notified City staff that it did not accept the City's analysis of appropriate density although it acknowledged that there is adequate capacity. Staff continued to work with HCD to prepare a housing element that meets the requirements of State law. On April 9, 2009, a third draft of the Housing Element was sent to HCD for review. Comments were received on June 9, 2009. This comment letter indicated that some revisions and clarifications would still be necessary to bring the draft Housing Element into compliance with State Housing Law; however, it also indicated that HCD was generally accepting of the inventory and capacity analysis. As no further comments were received on this subject, staff revised the draft Housing Element Update to address the latest comments from HCD and scheduled the project for hearing. Following recommendation of approval by the Planning Commission on September 2, 2009, and adoption by the City Council on November 10, 2009, the Housing Element Update was sent to HCD for a 90 -day certification review. On February 23, 2010, City staff received a fourth comment letter from HCD. HCD requested additional revisions to particular programs to further address specific requirements of housing element law. Upon approval of the proposed revisions, the Housing Element Update will again be sent to HCD for certification. Staff has worked closely with HCD to ensure all concerns have been addressed and that the Housing Element will meet all State -mandated requirements for final certification (see attached HCD comment letter dated June 4, 2010). ANALYSIS The requested revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update are required by HCD to address the following housing element laws. Government Code Section 65583(a)(5): Analyze constraints and provide reasonable accommodations for housing designed for persons with disabilities; Government Code Section 65583(c)(1): Facilitate the development of a variety of housing types, including supportive housing, transitional housing, and single -room occupancies; and • Government Code Section 65583.2(h): Specify minimum densities of 20 units per acre for Urban Density Overlay areas, and ensure that 50 percent of the remaining housing need is on sites designated exclusively for residential uses. Constraints on Housing for Persons with Disabilities Currently, the City has no formalized reasonable accommodation process for individual homeowners requesting exceptions to zoning and development standards to accommodate a specific disability, for example a ramp request. In order to comply with statutory requirements of Chapter 671, Statues 2001 (SB 520), the City's adopted 2008-2014 Housing Element Update must include procedures within Program 21 to establish a reasonable accommodation ordinance to reduce constraints on housing for persons with disabilities. Specific revisions were made to two sections of the Housing Element document (Governmental Constraints and Program 21) to clarify the City's analysis of housing constraints on persons with disabilities, and establish that the City will adopt a written reasonable accommodation ordinance to provide exceptions in zoning and land use for housing for persons with disabilities. Transitional Housing- Housing and Single -Room Occupancies (SROs) To comply with the requirements of Chapter 633, Statutes 2007 (SB 2), both transitional and supportive housing must be treated as residential uses subject to the same permitting and processing requirements as other residential uses in the same zone. Several of the Housing Element Update sections were revised to clarify that the City will amend the Municipal Code to allow transitional, supportive, and single -room occupancies (SROs) by right without a Conditional Use Permit or other discretionary action. Urban Density and Mixed Use Overlays In July 2007, the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) completed and distributed a Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) for all local agencies under its jurisdiction. The total RHNA for Temecula was 4,086 units. Because the last Housing Element Update cycle for the SCAG region ended on December 31, 2005, the City can credit affordable housing projects completed after January 1, 2006, projects currently under construction, and projects currently in the pipeline toward meeting the current RHNA. When the credits are subtracted from the total above, the remaining total RHNA for Temecula is 3,703. Of the 3,703 total units, the City must provide enough suitable sites with appropriate zoning and density to accommodate the affordable housing needs for Extremely Low -Income, Very Low -Income and Low -Income households. This means the City must be able to provide for the opportunity for 1,381 affordable units. To accommodate this need, an inventory of vacant parcels located within the confines of the proposed Urban Density Overlay shows that there are 82 parcels having a combined total of 105.08 acres and a potential capacity of 2,364 dwelling units. As noted above, the City's remaining obligation for affordable housing after credits that can be claimed by the City is 1,381 units. Therefore, this obligation can be met by suitable vacant sites located within the proposed Urban Density Overlay as long as owner occupied and rental multi -family housing is permitted by right at minimum densities of 20 units per acre. In addition, at least 50 percent of the remaining need for lower income households will need to be accommodated on sites designated exclusively for residential uses. This will require the City to provide 35 acres of vacant residential land. The City currently has 806 acres of vacant residential land with the potential to develop 1,581 residential dwelling units based on the zoning densities. Municipal Code Amendments Upon certification of the Housing Element Update by HCD, two Municipal Code Amendments will be required by State Housing Law. Pursuant to State Housing Law (SB 2, 2007), Supportive Housing and Single Room Occupancy uses must be allowed as uses that are permitted by right in at least one residential zone. Such uses must be subject to the same permitting processes as other housing in similar zones without undue special regulatory requirements, e.g. no Conditional Use Permit. Staff recommends that Single Room Occupancy and Supportive Housing uses be permitted by right in both the Medium and High density residential zones. Further, staff recommends allowing these uses by right in the Community Commercial and Professional Office zones when adjacent to or part of a multi -family residential use. Pursuant to SB 520, a written reasonable accommodation ordinance is required to provide exception in zoning and land use for housing for persons with disabilities. Residential care facilities and group homes for persons with disabilities (serving six or fewer) must be treated no differently than other by -right single-family housing uses. Staff recommends that residential care facilities for persons with disabilities uses be permitted by right in all residential zones. Additionally, the City will establish a reasonable accommodation ordinance to address housing constraints on persons with disabilities. LEGAL NOTICING REQUIREMENTS Notice of the public hearing was published in the Californian on June 26, 2010. ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINATION Staff has reviewed the project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and based on an initial study, the proposed project has been determined to be consistent with the previously adopted Negative Declaration and is exempt from further environmental review pursuant to Section 15162 of the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines. The proposed revisions do not involve significant new effects, does not change the baseline environmental conditions, and does not represent new information of substantial importance which shows that the Housing Element Update will have one or more significant effects not previously discussed in the Negative Declaration. The Negative Declaration previously analyzed the potential environmental impacts for the Housing Element Update. The revisions are consistent with what was previously approved and analyzed in the Negative Declaration. All potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed revisions are adequately addressed by the adopted Negative Declaration. A Notice of Determination pursuant to Section 15162 of the CEQA Guidelines is therefore the appropriate type of CEQA documentation for the revisions to the Housing Element Update, and no additional environmental documentation is required. FINDINGS General Plan Amendment The proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update are in conformance with the General Plan for Temecula and with all applicable requirements of State law and other Ordinances of the City. The revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update have been designed to be consistent with State Housing Law, the Regional Housing Needs Assessment for local agencies under jurisdiction of the Southern California Association of Governments, and to be internally consistent with the other elements of the Temecula General Plan. The proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update will not have a significant impact on the character of the built environment. The Housing Element Update is compatible with the nature, condition and development of existing uses, buildings and structures and the proposed revisions will not adversely affect the existing or planned uses, buildings, or structures. The proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update clarify specific programs that provide opportunity for affordable housing through the identification of appropriate sites and density, provisions for transitional and supportive housing, as well as establish reasonable accommodation to improve constraints on housing for persons with disabilities. Furthermore, these proposed revisions are consistent with the previously adopted environmental analysis indicating that impacts related to the built environment will be less than significant as result of this project. The nature of the proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update is not detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of the community. The proposed revisions will not expose people to an increased risk of negative health or public safety impacts and are consistent with the previously adopted environmental analysis indicating that impacts related to the health, safety and general welfare of the community will be less than significant as a result of this project. ATTACHMENTS Redlined Revisions to 2008-2014 Housing Element Update PC Resolution Draft CC Resolution Exhibit A — Revised 2008-2014 Housing Element Update HCD Comment Letters Notice of Public Hearing PC RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT REVISIONS TO THE ADOPTED 2008-2014 HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE (LR08-0017) Section 1. Procedural Findings. The Planning Commission of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. State Housing Law requires that local jurisdictions periodically update their Housing Element pursuant to the update cycle of its Council of Governments. 1993. B. The City of Temecula adopted its first Housing Element on November 9, C. The City of Temecula first amended its Housing Element on October 8, 2002. D. The City of Temecula adopted a Comprehensive Update of its General Plan on April 12, 2005. E. The Southern California Association of Governments completed the Regional Housing Needs Assessment for this Housing Element cycle on July 12, 2007. F. On September 2, 2009, the Planning Commission recommended that the City Council approve Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017, a statutory update of the City of Temecula General Plan Housing Element. G. On November 10, 2009, the City Council adopted the 2008-2014 General Plan Housing Element Update, Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017. H. On July 7, 2010, the Planning Commission recommended that the City Council approve revisions to the adopted General Plan 2008-2014 Housing Element Update, Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017. 1. This Housing Element Update was processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law. J. The Planning Commission, at a regular meeting, considered the revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update and environmental review on July 7, 2010, at a duly noticed public hearing as prescribed by law, at which time the City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. K. At the conclusion of the Commission hearing and after due consideration of the testimony, the Commission recommended that the City Council approve revisions to Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017, subject to and based upon the findings set forth hereunder. L. All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Resolution have occurred. Section 2. Further Findings. The Planning Commission, in recommending approval of the Application hereby finds, determines and declares that: General Plan Amendment A. The proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update are in conformance with the General Plan for Temecula and with all applicable requirements of State law and other Ordinances of the City; The revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update have been designed to be consistent with State Housing Law, the Regional Housing Needs Assessment for local agencies under jurisdiction of the Southern California Association of Governments, and to be internally consistent with the other elements of the Temecula General Plan. B. The proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update will not have a significant impact on the character of the built environment; The Housing Element Update is compatible with the nature, condition and development of existing uses, buildings and structures and the proposed revisions will not adversely affect the existing or planned uses, buildings, or structures. The proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update clarify specific programs that provide opportunity for affordable housing through the identification of appropriate sites and density, provisions for transitional and supportive housing, as well as establish reasonable accommodation to improve constraints on housing for persons with disabilities. Furthermore, these proposed revisions are consistent with the previously adopted environmental analysis indicating that impacts related to the built environment will be less than significant as result of this project. C. The nature of the proposed revisions to the adopted Housing Element Update is not detrimental to the health, safety and general welfare of the community; The proposed revisions will not expose people to an increased risk of negative health or public safety impacts and are consistent with the previously adopted environmental analysis indicating that impacts related to the health, safety and general welfare of the community will be less than significant as a result of this project. Section 3. Environmental Findings. The Planning Commission hereby makes the following environmental findings and determinations in connection with the approval of the revisions to adopted General Plan Amendment Application, Long Range Planning Project No. LR08-0017: A. Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act ("CEQA"), the Planning Commission has considered the proposed revisions to the adopted 2008-2014 Housing Element Update. The Planning Commission has also reviewed the adopted Negative Declaration for the Housing Element Update, including the impacts and mitigation measures identified therein, and the subsequent environmental reviews required as mitigation measures identified therein. Based on that review, the Planning Commission finds that the proposed project does not require the preparation of a subsequent Negative Declaration as none of the conditions described in Section 15162 of the CEQA Guidelines (14 Cal. Code Regs. 15162) exist. B. The Planning Commission also finds that the proposed revisions do not involve significant new effects, does not change the baseline environmental conditions, and does not represent new information of substantial importance which shows that the Housing Element Update will have one or more significant effects not previously discussed in the Negative Declaration. The Negative Declaration previously analyzed the potential environmental impacts for the Housing Element Update. The revisions are consistent with what was previously approved and analyzed in the Negative Declaration. All potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed revisions are adequately addressed by the adopted Negative Declaration. A Notice of Determination pursuant to Section 15162 of the CEQA Guidelines is therefore the appropriate type of CEQA documentation for the revisions to the Housing Element Update, and no additional environmental documentation is required. Section 4. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the City of Temecula Planning Commission this 7th day of July 2010. Carl Carey, Chairman ATTEST: Patrick Richardson, Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE )ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Patrick Richardson, Secretary of the Temecula Planning Commission, do hereby certify that the forgoing PC Resolution No. 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula at a regular meeting thereof held on the 7th day of July 2010, by the following vote: AYES: PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: NOES: PLANNING COMMISSIONERS ABSENT: PLANNING COMMISSIONERS ABSTAIN: PLANNING COMMISSIONERS Patrick Richardson, Secretary Item No. 24 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Rich Johnston, Building Official DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Weed Abatement Lien Resolution for FY 2009-2010 RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council Adopt a resolution entitled: RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ORDERING CONFIRMATION OF THE SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS AGAINST PARCELS OF LAND WITHIN THE CITY OF TEMECULA FOR COSTS OF ABATEMENT AND REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS VEGETATION FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2009-2010 BACKGROUND: The City of Temecula is responsible for weed abatement for properties that are not cleared of hazardous weeds during the spring and summer abatement season. The City contracts with local weed abatement specialists to bring parcels with hazardous conditions into compliance with the Temecula Municipal Code. The owners of these parcels are billed by the City to recover the costs of the contractor plus an administrative fee. If the owners do not respond to the billing request, the City is required to place a lien on the property to recover the costs. All of the owners were properly notified of the need to abate weed conditions on their properties and were given ample opportunity to remove the weed themselves prior to the City taking weed abatement action. The lien process requires that a public hearing be held before the City Council to take comments from the property owners with respect to the costs proposed to be assessed against their properties and to confirm those costs. Following the public hearing, the Council must adopt a resolution for the Fiscal Year which: • Confirms the cost incurred by the City in performing the weed abatement work. • Provides that the actual abatement costs will become a lien upon the properties, and upon recordation, in the amount of the costs shown on the attached Exhibit "K. • Provides that the Resolution will be transmitted to the Riverside County Treasurer -Tax Collector so the amounts of the assessment can be entered upon the parcels as they appear on the assessment rolls and the costs will be collected on the property tax bill. Staff is requesting Council action for the Fiscal Year 2009-2010. With the Council's positive action, staff will forward the adopted Resolutions for filing with the Riverside County Treasurer - Tax Collector and for recording with the County Recorder. FISCAL IMPACT: The recording of these liens will enable the City to recover abatement costs through the County's property tax collection system. The City will recover the line item budgeted amounts paid out to the weed abatement contractors. Further, the City will recover the administrative fee placed on each parcel that was abated by the City's contractors. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution No. 10 - Exhibit "A" Abatement Charges for the Fiscal Year 2009-2010 RESOLUTION NO. 10- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA ORDERING CONFIRMATION OF THE SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS AGAINST PARCELS OF LAND WITHIN THE CITY OF TEMECULA FOR COSTS OF ABATEMENT AND REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS VEGETATION FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2009-2010 THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Chapter 8.16 of the Temecula Municipal Code provides for expedited abatement of hazardous vegetation from vacant lots and parcels. Section 2. Abatement of hazardous vegetation has been completed for each of the parcels as described in the attached list of parcels (Exhibit "A"), at a cost equal to the costs of abatement and removal of hazardous vegetation on each parcel. Section 3. A hearing was held on July 27, 2010, duly noticed in accordance with the requirements of Chapter 8.16 of the Temecula Municipal Code, concerning the costs of abatement of these parcels at which time the Council heard all objections of property owners liable to be assessed for the costs of abatement. Section 4. The list of parcels and costs of abatement and removal of hazardous vegetation for each parcel is hereby reconfirmed and said costs shall constitute special assessments against the respective parcels of land, and are a lien of said land in the amount of the respective assessments. Section 5. A copy of this resolution shall be transmitted to the Treasurer -Tax Collector who shall enter the amounts of the respective assessments against the respective parcels of land as they appear in the current assessment roll, and shall collect said assessments at the same time in the same manner as ordinary municipal ad valorem taxes as provided in Section 39577 of the Government Code. Section 6. The costs against any parcel of land listed in Exhibit "A" assessed by this resolution and the lien created thereby shall be deemed discharged and released upon the payment for said parcel of the property taxes for the tax year above - noted. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 27h day of July, 2010. Jeff Comerchero, Mayor ATTEST: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Susan W. Jones, MMC, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 10- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 27 day of July, 2010, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: IG1 011�Ko1l1►NllNdiIAdi1:l4:&1 ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Susan W. Jones, MMC City Clerk Resolution No. 10 - Exhibit "A" Abatement Charges Fiscal Year 2009-2010 Weed Abatement CV cle FY 2009-2010 Parcel Owner Balance Due 909290001 RIDGE VIEW BUSINESS PARK DEV $344.50 909290003 RIDGE VIEW BUSINESS PARK DEV $272.50 909290004 RIDGE VIEW BUSINESS PARK DEV $295.00 909290005 RIDGE VIEW BUSINESS PARK DEV $277.00 909290006 RIDGE VIEW BUSINESS PARK DEV $299.50 909290007 RIDGE VIEW BUSINESS PARK DEV $295.00 909290056 RIDGE VIEW BUSINESS PARK DEV $344.50 909290057 RIDGE VIEW BUSINESS PARK DEV $299.50 909370013 LUCKYEIGHTS8 $568.75 916400030 WINCHESTER HILLS 1 $1,062.75 916400031 WINCHESTER HILLS 1 $2,095.50 916400032 WINCHESTER HILLS 1 $3,897.25 916410001 LANDSOURCE HOLDING CO $1,062.75 920090003 WINCHESTER MEADOWS INV $2,684.25 920110005 TSENG LIN SHU YIN $793.25 921050004 KAPLAN KENNETH M $317.50 921180003 LOPEZ SYLVIA $614.50 921242004 PISCIOTTA JOSEPH L $344.50 921300013 SABELLA ANGELA $1,400.00 922053013 MID COAST MORTGAGE INC $569.00 922053037 S & L HASAN INC $299.50 922054011 MID COAST MORTGAGE INC $344.50 922062010 MUNIZ ANTONIO RAUL $299.50 922130002 GOTAY ANGEL ROBERTO $794.25 922190013 EL DORADO HOMES $749.00 922190033 TEMECULA VALLEY HOSPITALITY $569.00 922200017 MARTIN DOROTHY $658.50 922210042 CHAI KING Y $434.25 940310014 REGENCY OUTDOOR ADVERTISING INC $400.00 944060006 CA REZA TEMECULA $1,153.25 944370005 TEMECULA VILLAGE DEV $524.50 944370006 TEMECULA VILLAGE DEV $479.50 944370007 TEMECULA VILLAGE DEV $487.50 944370008 TEMECULA VILLAGE DEV $1,095.00 944370010 TEMECULA VILLAGE DEV $704.25 944370013 TEMECULA VILLAGE DEV $749.25 945070001 GUENTHERALFREDW $344.25 945110001 AHMAD M FAROOQ $254.50 945110013 RIOS GEORGE F $366.75 945140014 HUANG FRANK $254.50 945150011 TPMC SERVICES $254.50 945180023 NGUYEN GIA $299.37 953390007 VINYARDS VIEW ESTATES $1,782.75 957090010 COELHO STEPHEN M $479.00 957130017 INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK $434.25 957130020 GROPP THOMAS L $479.00 957130022 TURGEON JOSEPH G $703.50 957170032 ANDU $1,027.50 957170033 ANDU $825.00 957170037 J & L PROP $1,307.50 957340020 YANG MOON S $600.00 959010006 BANK OF AMERICA $344.25 959050011 TEMECULA DEV $661.75 921612013 PECKHAM COLLEEN $250.00 922312027 MARGOLIN STEPHEN LEE $250.00 918292037 RECONTRUST COMPANY $250.00 919210002 HAKIM CHRIS N $659.50 919230009 MARTIN ROBERT $479.50 919362061 STORY DANNY R $250.00 919362062 US BANK NATL ASSN $250.00 955281003 CAMBEROS GINO G $250.00 957150019 NGUYEN DAVE VAN $568.75 959333033 EDELBLUTE SCOTT $250.00 961380002 LARA DAVID $250.00 961380007 ALEXANDER TANZANIA $250.00 965101003 SARABIA TERESITA A $250.00 921422010 IPUGH LANCE $285.00 $42,490.37 Item No. 25 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Herman D. Parker, Director of Community Services DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Donation of Art for Civic Center RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council approve an agreement between the City of Temecula and Paul J. Price and Kathi L. Price for the assignment of all rights to the "Santa Margarita Creek" painting. BACKGROUND: Artist Paul J. Price has generously offered to donate to the City Temecula one of his most recently created art pieces entitled "Santa Margarita Creek". After review of the art piece, staff would recommend that the City accept this generous offer by Mr. Price and that the painting be displayed in a prominent location, as requested by Mr. Price, at the new civic center for the public's enjoyment. Artist Paul Jay Price has been involved in the worlds of art, anthropology, preservation, and scholarship for over forty years. However, it is as an artist that Price has made his most significant mark. His painted landscapes and subjects are powerful, sweeping, and epic. He has the instinctive and sensitive ability to draw the emotions from the very heart of his subjects. His creative designs for both commercial and public attractions can be seen around the world. He worked on the historic restoration and theming of the Santa Cruz Beach and Boardwalk, help developed the original Chuck E. Cheese (and associated characters) for Pizza Time Theatre in Irving, TX, and directed and produced fabric lines and wall decor for national sales for Studio Four (Chicago, IL) and Environmental Graphics (Minnetonka, MN). Paul Price painted this art piece entitled "Santa Margarita Creek" after taking a group of 30 hikers on a three day journey to the sea. Mr. Price reflected on his experience traversing the streambeds as he led the hikers on their journey. Mr. Price states that the beauty and remoteness of Temecula Canyon made a profound impression and led him to capture the experience with this art piece. The painting is approximately 3' x 4' in measurement and exhibits a beautiful, natural environmental setting. This painting would be an excellent accompaniment to the decor of the new civic center. The agreement between Paul J. Price and Kathi L. Price and the City of Temecula assigns the City all rights to the painting. The agreement would allow for consultation from Mr. Price should the City elect to reproduce the painting for marketing or other purposes. The City would also install a small plaque near the painting once it is installed in the Civic Center recognizing the artist and the name of the painting. Artist Paul J. Price is here tonight to present the art piece to the City Council. FISCAL IMPACT: None. ATTACHMENTS: Agreement AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE CITY OF TEMECULA AND PAUL J. PRICE AND KATHI L. PRICE FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF ALL RIGHTS TO THE SANTA MARGARITA CREEK PAINTING This assignment of the Santa Margarita Creek Painting agreement ("Agreement"), effective July 27, 2010 ("Effective Date") is between the City of Temecula ("City") and Paul J. and Kathi L. Price ("Donors"). RECITALS A. Donors are the sole and exclusive owners of a painting, entitled "Santa Margarita Creek" ("Painting"). B. Donors desire to donate to City, free of charge, the Painting, which is to be placed in the City of Temecula's Civic Center, located at 41000 Main Street, Temecula, Temecula, California 92590 ("Civic Center") and which will enhance and contribute to the appreciation of history of the Temecula Valley within the City of Temecula. C. City may accept such a gift under the terms and conditions prescribed in this Agreement pursuant to Government Code Sections 37354 and 37355. D. City is hereby made an express beneficiary of this Agreement. NOW THEREFORE, for other good and valuable consideration, the adequacy of which is hereby acknowledged, the parties, each intending to be legally bound, hereby promise and mutually agree as follows: Section 1. Assignment. Donors hereby donates, transfers and assigns to City, free of charge, all rights, title and interest in the Painting. Section 2. Acceptance. City hereby accepts the donation of the Painting upon its delivery to City, pursuant to Government Code Section 37354. Section 3. City Responsibilities. City gratefully accepts the donation of the Painting and agrees to the following responsibilities with regard to the Painting: A. Display the Painting in a public space in the Civic Center for the enjoyment of the citizens of the City of Temecula. B. Prepare and affix a small plaque near the Painting that indicates that the Painting was donated by the estate of Paul J. Price and Kathi L. Price. C. Display the Painting for public view at the Civic Center's Grand Opening, to be held in September 2010. r:\ziglerg\xagreemn\paul price art donation agreement.doc D. Obtain prior written approval from Donors, for the duration of Donors' lifetime, to copy or reproduce the Painting. E. Properly maintain and care for the Painting. F. Mount the Painting with locked frame mounts. G. Shall not sell the Painting to any person or entity. Section 4. Ownership Rights. Donors acknowledge City's exclusive rights in the Painting and that City is and shall remain the owner of the Painting upon the delivery of the Painting to the City. Donors agree that Donors retains no right, title, or interest in or to the Painting upon delivery of the Painting to City. Donors waive all claim of and to ownership of any rights in the Painting and agree that it shall not at any time dispute or contest City's ownership of the Painting, City's exclusive right and title to the Painting and City's right to use the Painting, or the validity of the Painting, nor shall Donors assist others in doing so. Section 5. Representation and Warranty. Donors represent and warrant to City that, to the best of Donors' knowledge, Donors are the lawful owners of the Painting and that Donors are not aware of any claim or controversy as to Donors' right, title and interest to the Painting and that Donors have the legal authority to transfer title of the Painting to City. Section 6. Cooperation. Donors shall cooperate fully and in good faith with City for the purpose of securing, preserving and protecting City's rights in and to the Painting. Donors shall cooperate with City, by providing to City any information or knowledge Donors may have regarding the Painting, if City ever needs to defend any and all claims relating to the ownership of the Painting. Section 7. Entire Agreement. This Agreement constitutes the entire agreement and understanding of the parties with respect to the Painting, and supersedes all previous negotiations and agreements, oral or written, regarding the Painting. There are no other representations, warranties, promises, covenants or understandings other than those contained in this Agreement. Section 8. Modifications. This Agreement may be amended or terminated only by a written instrument signed by both of the parties to this Agreement. Section 9. Third Parties. City shall not be obligated or liable under this Agreement to any third parties under this Agreement. Section 10. Notices. All notices, requests, and other communications shall be in writing and sent to the following: If to City: City of Temecula _ P.O. Box 9033 43200 Business Park Drive Temecula, CA 92589-9033 Attention: Director of Community Services r:\ziglerg\xagreemn\paul price art donation agreement.doc If to Donors: Paul J. and Kathi L. Price 24119 Cruise Circle Canyon Lake, CA 92587 Section 11. No Agency or Joint Venture. The parties understand and agree that this Agreement does not make them an agent or legal representative of each other for any purpose, and that no partnership or joint venture is intended to be created by this Agreement. No party is granted, by this Agreement or otherwise, any right or authority to assume or create any obligation or responsibility on behalf of or in the name of the other party to this Agreement, or to bind the other party hereto in any manner whatsoever. Section 12. Authority. Each party hereto represents and warrants that its execution, delivery and performance of this Agreement has been duly and validly authorized, and that this Agreement is binding upon and enforceable against such party in accordance with the terms of this Agreement. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto, intending to be legally bound hereby, have each caused this Agreement to be signed in its name by a duly authorized officer or representative thereof. ATTEST: (SEAL) SUSAN W. JONES, MMC City Clerk CITY OF TEMECULA JEFF COMERCHERO Mayor PAUL J. PRICE r:\ziglerg\xagreemn\paul price art donation agreement.doc APPROVED AS TO FORM: PETER M.THORSON City Attorney KATHI L. PRICE SHAWN NELSON City Manager HERMAN PARKER Director of Community Services r:\ziglerg\xagreemn\paul price art donation agreement.doc 9]01V_1:MIA101 Allk I REPORTS Item No. 26 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Patrick Richardson, Director of Planning and Redevelopment DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Monthly Report The following are the recent highlights for the Planning Division of the Community Development Department for the month of June, 2010. CURRENT PLANNING ACTIVITIES New Cases The Division received 64 new applications for administrative, other minor cases, and home occupations including 14 applications for public hearings during the month of June. Special Projects & Long Range Planning Activities The Long Range Planning Division commits work efforts toward larger scale and longer time frame projects for both private and public purposes. These activities can range from a relatively simple ordinance or environmental review to a new specific plan or a general plan amendment. Some of the major special projects and long range planning activities currently in progress are described in the paragraphs below: Temecula Regional Hospital — This project was approved by the City Council on January 22, 2008. On December 30, 2009 the applicant submitted an application for a one year extension of time and Council approved this extension on January 26, 2010, extending the approval until January 22, 2011. The applicant submitted a Major Modification application on June 18, 2010, to reduce the number of hospital beds in the first phase from 178 beds to 140 beds and to change the construction of the building from concrete to framed construction. Staff has reviewed the modification application and will meet with the applicant's architect and engineer on July 15, 2010 to provide comments (FISK) ■ General Plan Housing Element Update — Staff submitted the final draft Housing Element to HCD on April 9, 2009, and HCD completed its review on June 9, 2009. Comments received on the final draft contained several suggested corrections and sample language to add to the Housing Element. Staff completed an initial study and circulated a Negative Declaration for a 30 -day public review and comment period from July 31, 2009 through August 31, 2009. A Planning Commission hearing was held on September 2, 2009, and the Commission recommended that the City Council approve the Housing Element Update and adopt the Negative Declaration. City Council adopted the Housing Element on November 10, 2009 and the Housing Element was submitted to HCD for a 90 -day Certification review. HCD completed its review on February 17, 2010, and requested further revisions in order to fully comply with State housing element law. Staff addressed the latest comments and received an acceptance letter from HCD on June 4, 2010. The Planning Commission unanimously adopted a resolution recommending that the City Council adopt revisions to the adopted 2008-2014 Housing Element Update on July 7, 2010 and the Housing Element Update is scheduled for City Council on July 27, 2010. (SCHUMA) SCE Triton Substation — The CPUC has granted the City's request for "Party" status in the approval process. Having Party status will ensure that the City will get noticed of all actions involving this case/project, and gives the City the right (versus the privilege) to file comments and participate in the process. In addition to Party Status, staff provided a comment letter on the Draft Mitigated Negative Declaration for the proposed Triton Substation to be located at the southeast corner of Nicolas Road and Calle Medusa in the Nicolas Valley Rural Preservation Area. Based on substantial inadequacies in the Draft MND, the City requested that the California Public Utilities Commission suspend further consideration of the project and prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Report that fully discloses the potential impacts of the Project and fully complies with all other CEQA requirements. Specifically, the City has contended that Site Alternative B (located further to the west along Nicolas Road) is a superior site and would significantly reduce aesthetic impacts to the Nicolas Valley. The PUC determined that an EIR was not required pursuant to CEQA and released a Final Mitigated Negative Declaration in March 2010; there is no public comment period for this review. City staff reviewed this final CEQA document and believes it is still inadequate in addressing the City's concerns. On April 20, 2010, the City Attorney transmitted a letter to the CPUC Administrative Law Judge requesting a pre -hearing conference to allow the City to further present its position that the Final MND/IS is flawed and legally unsupportable. As of July 6, 2010 a response to this request had not been received. (KITZEROW/PETERS) I-15 Interregional Partnership (IRP) — Staff is working with WRCOG, SCAG, RCTC, RTA, SANDAG, and the Cities of Temecula, Murrieta, and Lake Elsinore on Phase III of the I-15 IRP which includes the development of a Smart Growth Concept Map, which will coordinate land use and transportation decisions to accomplish the goals of SB 375 and AB 32. The Smart Growth Concept Map is intended to fulfill the Sustainable Communities Strategy requirement of SB 375. A draft was completed and presented to the I-15 Interregional Partnership Policy Committee in March 2010. A second phase to the Smart Growth Concept Map involves expanding the study area to include the Cities of Wildomar, Menifee and Perris and utilizing a GIS planning tool to evaluate population, housing, employment, and vehicle trips. The land use information collected from the cities, and the data generated from the analysis done with the GIS software will be forwarded on to SCAG for their use in the development of the regional Sustainable Community Strategy that is required by SB 375. This information and data will be used to help meet the greenhouse gas emission reduction target for the region. (WEST) City of Temecula Sustainability Plan — Staff presented the draft City of Temecula Sustainability Plan to the Community Services Commission on June 14, 2010, the Planning Commission on June 16, 2010, and then recommended the Plan for adoption to the City Council on June 22, 2010 which the City Council approved. Implementation of the Plan will begin in Fiscal Year 2010-2011. (WEST) • Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant — The City was awarded $940,700 in DOE funds to implement an adaptive traffic signal synchronization project, a municipal facility energy retrofit project, and residential energy efficiency improvement loan project. The projects will begin implementation in Fiscal Year 2010-2011. (WEST) The Green House Gas (GHG) Emissions Inventory—The Green TAC selected 2007 as the base year for GHG emissions inventory analysis. Two inventories were prepared: 1) a municipal operations inventory and, 2) a communitywide inventory. Staff has worked through the various City Departments to obtain data for the municipal operations inventory, and worked with the utility companies and water agencies for the communitywide inventory. The next steps are to select a target emission reduction and identify implementation measures that will achieve the selected target. The Green TAC established a test target of 15 percent below the 2007 base year. Staff is currently reviewing potential reduction measures to see if a 15 percent reduction in GHG emissions below baseline is feasible. (WEST) Energy Efficiency Loan Program — Staff is developing a residential energy efficiency loan program funded through the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant. The Residential Energy Efficiency Program will make low interest loans available to moderate and low income homeowners to make energy efficient improvements. The Program allows for specific types of energy efficiency improvements based on the year of construction; coinciding with the changes to Energy Codes of the California Building Standards. The type of improvements allowed include but are not limited to: HVAC replacements, window replacements, additional attic insulation, and attic fans. The Residential Energy Efficiency Program will work in conjunction with the Redevelopment Agency Residential Improvement Program, which offers forgivable loans for general interior and exterior home improvements. (WEST) Santa Margarita Area Annexation — On February 23, 2010, the City Council approved resolutions to proceed with a Sphere of Influence amendment and Annexation of approximately 4,510 acres southwest of the City including SDSU's Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve and some hillside residential properties ("Santa Margarita Area Annexation No. 2"). Associated Ordinances were adopted by the City Council on March 9, 2010 and the applications were submitted March 10, 2010 to the Riverside County Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO). On June 24, 2010, LAFCO voted unanimouslyto approve the Santa Margarita Area Annexation (No. 2); however mandated an additional requirement. At the request of Granite Construction (and another landowner under contract to sell property to Granite Construction), it was LAFCO's determination that a portion of the City of Temecula's existing Sphere of Influence (an area that was not a part of the Santa Margarita Area Annexation No. 2 boundaries but south and east of it) be reduced to accommodate Granite Construction's request that their proposed Surface Mine Liberty Quarry application not be within the City's existing Sphere of Influence. Although this particular area has been within the City's Sphere of Influence area since 1991 due to its dramatic view shed to the City of Temecula (which has not changed), LAFCO determined that itwas important to accommodate Granite Construction's request so that their proposed project is not plotted, or partially plotted, within the City's Sphere of Influence. Therefore, as a condition of approval of the Santa Margarita Area Annexation No. 2, the City must file a separate LAFCO application to modify the City's existing Sphere of Influence no later than September 22, 2010. (LOWREY/RICHARDSON) Liberty Quarry Draft Environmental Impact Report —The County of Riverside has released the Draft Environmental Impact Report for Granite Construction's Liberty Quarry Surface Mining Permit, Change of Zone, and Noise Ordinance Exception. The project is a 75 -year land use permit for a rock quarry and associated aggregate processing facilities, hot mix asphalt plant, ready mix concrete plant, concrete and asphalt recycling facility, administration and employee buildings, a maintenance facility with diesel, gas and propane tanks, water tanks, natural gas fuel engines for electric power generation, water and gas lines, settling ponds, truck scales, and truck and equipment parking areas within a 414 acre -site located approximately % mile from the City's southwest boundary within the County of Riverside. The public review and comment period was extended 60 days beyond the original commenting deadline. The City reviewed the Draft Environmental Impact Report and provided comments to the County of Riverside on November 23, 2009. The City is awaiting a response to comments and/or revised and re -circulated EIR from the County. (LOWREY/RICHARDSON) Jefferson Corridor Specific Plan — Staff is studying the Jefferson Corridor to create a Specific Plan for the area. The boundaries of the Jefferson Corridor are preliminarily defined to include all properties north of Rancho California Road, east of Diaz, south of the Murrieta City boundary and west of Interstate 1-15. On Thursday, June 2"d, approximately 15 representatives of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) together with City Staff conducted a tour of the Jefferson Corridor. The ULI Technical Advisory Panel consists of design, architectural, engineering, retail, and planning experts and will provide the City an outside expert review of the Jefferson Corridor with land use recommendations. The ULI Technical Advisory Panel held a one day planning summit in the Council Chambers from 7:30-5:00 p.m. on June 23rd and shared their findings and recommendations with City staff. Staff believes this effort on the part of ULI will provide valuable information from outstanding and diverse professionals to the City as we embark on our own planning effort for the Jefferson Corridor. (RICHARDSON/WEST/LOWREY/INNES) SCAG 2012 Regional Transportation Plan — The update to the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) 2012 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) is underway. The RTP will include a Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS), which is a new component to the RTP as a result of the passage of SB 375. Staff will be working with the abovementioned agencies throughout the update process and has provided land use, employment and population data to SCAG and the County of Riverside Center for Demographic Research to establish Base Year Conditions and General Plan Based Growth Forecast/Distribution and land use for years 2020 and 2035. Staff is awaiting a response from SCAG staff regarding the land use data provided. SCAG and WRCOG will use this data to develop the Sustainable Community Strategy (SCS) that achieves the greenhouse gas reductions targets as established by AB 32. The Regional Transportation Plan, including the SCS is scheduled to be adopted by SCAG by November 2012. (WEST) • WRCOG Non -Motorized Transportation Plan — Staff is working with Western Riverside Council of Governments on a multi -jurisdictional backbone network of bike and pedestrian routes which will link transit and regional points of interest to local bicycle and multi -use trails. A draft plan has been completed and will be presented to the WROCG Planning Directors on July 8, 2010. (WEST) Planning Agenda Report 6/1/2010 through 6/30/2010 1. Recently Approved _ APN # • PA10-0010 River Springs Minor CUP 955150027 ERIC JONES A Minor Conditional Use Permit to allow the River Springs Charter School (K-12) to occupy two existing buildings (no external modifications) located at 43040 Margarita Road Submitted Date Approved Date 1/19/2010 Jun 32010 APN # • PA10-0182 Special Olympics Torch Run 922036011 CHERYL KITZEROW/MATT PETERS A Major Temporary Use Permit for the 10th Annual Law Enforcement Torch Run benefiting Special Olympics Southern California- Temecula Valley on June 19 2010 from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Submitted Date Approved Date 6/14/2010 Jun 18 2010 APN # • PA10-0165 Roripaugh Security Trailer TUP 957350003 CHERYL KITZEROW/MATT PETERS A Major Temporary Use Permit for a security trailer (RV-motorhome) and temporary power to the trailer which will be parked in front of the Roripaugh Ranch Clubhouse located at Polo Creek Drive Tract 29661-3 Submitted Date Approved Date 5/28/2010 Jun 18 2010 APN # • PA10-0177 Wahoos Metal Mulisha Event 921810033 CHERYL KITZEROW/MATT PETERS A Major Temporary Use Permit at Wahoos Tacos for a Metal Mulisha Event to include autograph signings live music and prize giveaways on June 19 2010 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Submitted Date Approved Date 6/9/2010 Jun 18 2010 APN # • PA10-0088 Harveston /Barrington Models 916410004 CHERYL KITZEROW/MATT PETERS Model Home Complex for Barrington @ Harveston TM32437-2 / Lot 1-2 (Product Review under PA10-0021) Submitted Date Approved Date 3/22/2010 Jun 42010 APN # • PA09-0268 Feduniw Family Day Care Minor 957550002 ERIC JONES A Large Family Daycare Permit to allow a home-based family day care facility to operate with up to 14 children at 30713 East Gate Parkway Submitted Date Approved Date 9/2/2009 Jun 72010 APN # • PA10-0063 Barno's Liquor Store Minor CUP 960020059 ERIC JONES A Conditional Use Permit to operate a 1704 square foot liquor store located at 32475 Temecula Parkway Suite 103 A (APN: 960-020-059). (Related Application: PA10-0064 - Public Convenience or Necessity) 1 of 4 Planning Agenda Report 6/1/2010 through 6/30/2010 Submitted Date Approved Date 3/2/2010 Jun 16 2010 2 of Planning Agenda Report 6/1/2010 through 6/30/2010 Scheduled for Hearing APN # • PA10-0072 Harveston Emery 1 916410003 CHERYL KITZEROW/MATT PETERS A Home Product Review application for a 29 unit single-family cluster product review at Harveston's Emery Place I (TR 32436-F) generally located near the northeast corner of Ynez Road and Date Street. Submitted Date DRC Meeting Date Planning Commision 3/9/2010 Jul 21 2010 APN # • PA08-0125 Temecula Village PDO -5 Amend1 944290012 CHERYL KITZEROW/MATT PETERS A Zoning Amendment to modify PDO -5 (Temecula Village) to permit Grocery Stores up to 15000 square feet with a Conditional Use Permit (currently allowed up to 10000 SF w/CUP). Other changes include reducing landscape buffer/setback along Rancho California Road from 25 to 20 feet and miscellaneous clean-up/references to previous approvals. Temecula Village is located along the south side of Rancho California Road east of Moraga Road. (Associated projects PA08-0122 and PA08-0123 - Fresh and Easy DP/CUP) Pending City Council hearing (date to be determined). Submitted Date DRC Meeting Date Planning Commision 6/4/2008 6/26/2008 Oct 15 2008 APN # • PA10-0161 Paseo del Sol KB 24188-2 TR24188 CHERYL KITZEROW/MATT PETERS A Home Product Review application for KB Homes to construct 118 single-family homes in Tract 24188-2 of Paseo del Sol generally located north of Leena Way South of Pauba Road West of Butterfield Stage Road and East of Meadows Parkway Submitted Date DRC Meeting Date Directors Hearing 5/21/2010 Aug 19 2010 3 of 3 Planning Agenda Report 6/1/2010 through 6/30/2010 New Submittals Pending DRC Meeting APN # • PA10-0210 Lyndie Lane Zone Change 921310018 ERIC JONES A Zoning Amendment Application to change the zoning of a parcel located at 42210 Lyndie Lane from High Density Residential to Community Commercial. The site's current General Plan designation is Community Commercial (APN: 921-310-018). (Corresponding Application: PA10-0211 - Minor Modification) Submitted Date Anticipated DRC Meeting Date Hearing Planned 7/13/2010 TBD APN # • PA10-0213 Simms TTM 945120001 ERIC JONES A Tentative Tract Map application to create 15 residential lots located approximately 1500 feet east of Santiago and Ynez Road. Lots will range in size from 1.31 - 2.80 acres. (Related Application PA10-0214) Submitted Date Anticipated DRC Meeting Date Hearing Planned 7/14/2010 TBD APN # • PA10-0214 Simms Zoning & GPA 945120001 ERIC JONES A Zoning Map and Land Use Map Amendment application. Current zoning and General Plan designation is Very Low Residential. Proposed zoning and General Plan designation is L-1 (Low Density Residential). The project is located approximately 1500 east of the Santiago and Ynez Road intersection (related application PA10-0213) Submitted Date Anticipated DRC Meeting Date Hearing Planned 7/14/2010 TBD APN # • PA10-0194 Temecula Regional Hospital 959080001 STUART FISK A Major Modification application for the UHS Temecula Regional Hospital (PA07-0200) to modify the phasing of the project reducing the bed count from 178 to 140 in phase one and to build out the project to 320 beds by the year 2026. The project also includes other minor site plan revisions and a change in the hospital building construction from concrete to framed construction. The project is located on the north side of Temecula Parkway approximately 650 feet west of Margarita Road. Submitted Date Anticipated DRC Meeting Date Hearing Planned 6/18/2010 7/15/2010 TBD APN # • PA10-0036 Fall Rod Run 2010 922026008 CHRISTINE DAMKO A Special Event Permit for the Fall Rod Run to take place on October 8th and 9th in Old Town. Front St. will be closed for the event. Submitted Date Anticipated DRC Meeting Date Hearing Planned 2/11/2010 TBD 4 of N Item No. 27 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Shawn D. Nelson, City Manager DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: City Council Travel/Conference Report - June 2010 PREPARED BY: Sue Steffen, Executive Assistant RECOMMENDATION: Receive and file On June 2, 2010 Mayor Pro Tem Ron Roberts traveled to Los Angeles, California to attend the Southern California Association of Governments Executive/Administration Committee, Transportation Committee, and Regional Council meetings. On June 6, 2010 Mayor Pro Tem Ron Roberts traveled to Vancouver, British Columbia to attend the American Public Transport Association's Rail Conference. On June 17, 2010 Mayor Pro Tem Ron Roberts traveled to Los Angeles, California to attend the National League of Cities' Transportation and Infrastructure Services Steering Committee Meeting. Attachment: Meeting Agendas SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION of GOVERNMENTS Main Office 818 West Seventh Street 12th Floor Los Angeles, California 90017-3435 t(213)236-1800 f(213)236-1825 www.scag.ca.gov Officers President Larry M<Callon, Highland First Vire President Pam O'Connor, Santa Monica Second Vice President Glen Becerra, Simi Valley Executive/Administration Committee Chair Larry McCallon, Highland Policy Committee Chairs Community, Economic and Human Development Bill Jahn, Big Bear Lake Energy & Environment Transportation Greg Pettis, Cathedral City MEETING OF THE Thursday, June 3, 2010 9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. SCAG Offices 818 W. 7th Street, 12th Floor Board Room Los Angeles, CA 90017 (213) 236-1800 If members of the public wish to review the attachments or have any questions on any of the agenda items, please contact Deby Salcido at (213) 236-1993 or via email salcidoPscag.ca.gov Agendas & Minutes for the Executive/Administration Committee are also available at: www.scag.ca..qov/committees/­eac.htm SCAG, in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), will accommodate persons who require a modification of accommodation in order to participate in this meeting. If you require such assistance, please contact SCAG at (213) 236-1928 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting to enable SCAG to make reasonable arrangements. To request documents related to this document in an alternative format, please contact (213) 236-1928. The Regional Council is comprised of 82 elected officials representing 189 cities, six counties, six County Transportation Commissions and a Tribal Government representative within Southern California. 5.12.10 EXECUTIVE/ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE AGENDA JUNE 39 2010 TJME PG# The Executive/Administration Committee may consider and act upon any of the items listed on the agenda regardless of whether they are listed as information or action items. CALL TO ORDER & PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE (Hon. Larry McCallon, Chair) PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD — Members of the public desiring to speak on items on the agenda, or items not on the agenda, but within the purview of the Executive/Administration Committee, must, fill out and present a speaker's card to the Assistant Prior to speaking. Comments will be limited to three minutes. The chair may limit the total time for all comments to twenty minutes. REVIEW AND PRIORITIZE AGENDA ITEMS CONSENT CALENDAR Approval Items 1. Minutes of April 1, 2010 Meeting 2. Minutes of April 19, 2010 Special Meeting 3. Sponsorship of Western Riverside Council of Governments General Assembly Conference June 24. 2010 ($2,500) 4. Legal Services Contracts Receive & File 5. Contracts/Purchase Orders between $5,0004200,000 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION Of GOVERNMENTS Attachment Attachment Attachment Attachment Attachment 1 7 9 13 15 EAC — June 2010 Salcido EXECUTIVE/IAD MINI STRATI ON COMMITTEE AGENDA JUNE 39 2010 ACTION ITEMS 6. Strategic Growth Council Proposition 84 Funded Modeling Incentive Award (Wayne Moore, Chief Financial Officer) SCAG applied for and was awarded the Strategic Growth Council, Proposition 84 funded, Modeling Incentive Grant. This award will fund gaps that will allow SCAG to undertake all necessary model improvements to meet SB 375. Recommended Action: Recommend that the Regional Council approve Resolution No. 10-520-01 accepting the $1,000,000 award and amend the FY 2009-2010 Overall Work Program accordingly. TIME Attachment 5 min 7. AB 155 (Mendoza) — Local Government Bankruptcy Proceedings Attachment (Sharon Neely, Interim Deputy Executive Director) Recommended Action: Oppose. 8. AB 1955 (De La Torre) — Public Officers: Incompatible Offices Attachment (Sharon Neely, Interim Deputy Executive Director) Recommended Action: Oppose Unless Amended. CFO MONTHLY FINANCIAL REPORT Attachment (Wayne Moore, Chief Financial Officer) FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS Any Committee member or staff desiring to place items on a future agenda may make such request. ANNOUNCEMENTS ADJOURNMENT The next regular meeting of the Executive/Administration Committee is scheduled for Thursday, July 1, 2010 at the SCAG Los Angeles office. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION of GOVERNMENTS PG# 31 5 min 35 5 min 43 5 min 47 EAC —June 2010 Salcido SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION of GOVERNMENTS Main Office 818 West Seventh Street 12th Floor Los Angeles, California 90017-3435 1(213)236-1800 f(211) 2361825 www,scag,ca.gov Officers President Larry McCallon, Highland Flrsx Nce Presidenr Pam O'Connor, Santa Monica Second vice President Glen Becerra. Simi valley Executive/Administration Committee Chair Larry M<Callon, Highland Policy Committee Chairs Community, Economic and Humanoevelopment Bill Jahn, Big Bear Lake Energy&Environment Transportation Greg Pettis, Cathedral City MEETING OF THE Thursday, June 3, 2090 90:00 a.m. - 92;00 p.m. SCAG Offices 818 W. 7th Street, 12th Floor Board Room Los Angeles, CA 90017 (213) 236-1800 If members of the public wish to review the attachments or have any questions on any of the agenda items, please contact Deby Salcido at (213) 236-1993 or via email at salcido .scag.ca.clov Agendas & Minutes for the Transportation Committee are also available at: www.scag.ca.gov/committees/tc.htm SCAG, in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), will accommodate persons who require a modification of accommodation in order to participate in this meeting. If you require such assistance, please contact SCAG at (213).236-1928 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting to enable SCAG to make reasonable arrangements. To request documents related to this document in an alternative format, please contact (213).236-1928. The Regional Council is comprised of 82 elected officials representing 189 cities, six counties, six County Transportation Commissions and a Tribal Government representative within Southern California. 5,12.10 TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE AGENDA JUNE 3, 2010 TIME PG# The Transportation Couunittee may consider and act upon any of the ilerns listed on the agenda regardless of whether they are listed as information or action items. CALL TO ORDER & PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE (/Inn. Greg Pettis, Chair) PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD—Members of the public desiring to speak on items on the agenda, or items not on the agenda, but within the purview of the Transportation Committee, must fill out and present a speaker's card to the Assistant prior to speaking. Comments will be limited to three minutes. The Chairman may limit the total time for all comments to twenty minutes. REVIEW AND PRIORITIZE AGENDA ITEMS CONSENT CALENDAR Approval Item 1. Minutes of April 1, 2010 Meeting INFORMATION ITEMS 2. Overview of Goods Movement in Southern California and the Comprehensive Regional Goods Movement Plan and Implementation Strategy Update (Rich Macias, Director of Transportation Plavidag) Staff will provide an overview of the region's goods movement system as well as an update on the Comprehensive Regional Goods Movement Plan and Implementation Strategy. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION of GOVERNMENTS Attachment Attachment 25 min TC - ]UNE2010 NO 156953 Strain - 5/2612010 TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE lx""il 1 JUNE 3, 2010 INFORMATION ITEMS —CON'r'D 3. Port and Modal Elasticity Study Phase Il (Annie Nam, SCAG Staff Staff will provide a presentation on the purpose, findings, and potential policy considerations of SCAG's Port and Modal Elasticity Study Phase 1I. 4. SCAG Regional Aviation Pro ram Update (Mike Armstrong, SCAG Staff) Staff will present an overview and update of the SCAG Regional Aviation Program, and development of the Aviation Chapter of the 2012 Regional Transportation Plan (RTA). CHAIR'S REPORT STAFF REPORT (Naresh Antalya, SCAG Staff FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS TIME PG# Attachment 45 min 22 Attachment 15 min 36 Any Committee member or staff desiring to place items on a future agenda may make such a request. ADJOURNMENT The new meeting of Me Transportation Committee is schedttled for Thursday, July I, 2010 at the SCAG Los Angeles office. H SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA rc nrNr:zoio ASSOCIATION of GOVERNMENTS Door 150953 Swam - 5/20!-2010 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION of GOVERNMENTS Main Office 818 West Seventh Street 12th Floor Los Angeles, California 90017-3435 t(213)236-1800 f(213)236-1825 www.scag.ca.gov Officers President Larry McCallon, Highland First Vice President Pam O'Connor, Santa Monica Second Vice President Glen Becerra, Simi Valley Executive/Administration Committee Chair Larry McCallon, Highland Policy Committee Chairs Community, Economic and Human Development Bill Jahn, Big Bear Lake Energy & Environment Transportation Greg Pettis, Cathedral City No. 520 MEETING OF THE Thursday, June 3, 2010 12:15 p.m. — 2:00 p.m. SCAG Offices 818 W. 7th Street, 12th Floor Board Room Los Angeles, CA 90017 (213) 236-1993 If members of the public wish to review the attachments or have any questions on any of the agenda items, please contact Deby Salcido at (213) 236-1993 or via email at saicidoPscao.ca.aov. In addition, regular meetings of the Regional Council may be viewed live or on demand at www.scaa.cagov/scagt_v Agendas & Minutes for the Regional Council are also available at: www.scaci.ca.ciov/committees/rc.htm SCAG, in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), will accommodate persons who require a modification of accommodation in order to participate in this meeting. If you require such assistance, please contact SCAG at (213) 236-1928 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting to enable SCAG to make reasonable arrangements. To request documents related to this document in an alternative format, please contact (213) 236- 1928. The Regional Council is comprised of 82 elected officials representing 189 cities, six counties, six County Transportation Commissions and a Tribal Government representative within Southern California. 5.12.10 REGIONAL COUNCIL AGENDA JUNE 39 2010 PAGE# The Regional Council may consider and act upon any of the items listed on the agenda regardless of whether they are listed as information or action items. CALL TO ORDER & PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE (Hon. Larry McCallon, President) PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD — Members of the public desiring to speak on items on the agenda, or items not on the agenda, but within the purview of the Council, must sill out and present a speaker's card to the Assistant prior to speaking. Comments will be limited to three minutes. The President may limit the total time for all comments to twenty minutes. REVIEW AND PRIORITIZE AGENDA ITEMS PRESIDENT'S REPORT New Committee Appointments COMMITTEE REPORTS/ACTION ITEMS Executive/Administration Committee (EAC) Report (Hon. Larry McCallon, Chair) 2. Strategic Growth Council Proposition 84 Funded Modeling Attachment Incentive Award (Wayne Moore, Chief Financial Officer) SCAG applied for and was awarded the Strategic Growth Council, Proposition 84 funded, Modeling Incentive Grant. This award will fund gaps that will allow SCAG to undertake all necessary model improvements to meet SB 375. Recommended Action: Approve Resolution No. 10-520-01 accepting the $1,000,000 award and amend the FY 2009-2010 Overall Work Program accordingly. Leuislative/Communications & Membership Committee (LCMC) Report (Hon. Glen Becerra, Chair) 3. AB 155 (Mendoza) — Local Government- Bankruptcy Proceedings Attachment 5 (Sharon Neely, Interim Deputy Executive Director) Recommended Action: Oppose. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION Of GOVERNMENTS REGIONAL COUNCIL AGENDA JUNE 39 2010 PAGE# Legislative/Communications & Membership Committee (LC'MC) Report — Cont'd 4. AB 1955 (De La Torre)— Public Officers: Incompatible Offices Attachment 13 (Sharon Neely, Interim Deputy Executive Director) Recommended Action: Oppose unless amended. 5. Federal and State Legislative Update (Sharon Neely, Interim Deputy Executive Director) Recommended Action: For information purposes only. Community. Economic and Human Development Committee (CEHD) Report (Hon. Bill Jahn, Chair) 6. Fiscalization of Land Use Update Attachment 17 (Huasha Liu, Director of Land Use & Environmental Planning) Recommended Action: Accept CEHD recommendation to direct staff to take no further action to develop options for local government finance reform. 7.. Status Report of 2012 RTP Growth Forecast Panel of Experts Attachment 23 Meetin (Huasha Liu, Director of Land Use & Environmental Planning) Recommended Action: For information purposes only. 8. Status Report of Projects: Pilot GIS and SCAG's Local Attachment 24 Sustainability Tool (Huasha Liu, Director of Land Use & Environmental Planning) Recommended Action: For information purposes only. Energy and Environment Committee (EEC) Report (Hon. Margaret Clark, Chair) Transportation Committee (TC) Report (Hon. Greg Pettis, Chair) SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION Of GOVERNMENTS REGIONAL COUNCIL AGENDA JUNE 39 2010 PAGE# CONSENT CALENDAR Approval Items 9. Minutes of May 6, 2010 Meeting Attachment 37 10. Sponsorship of Western Riverside Council of Governments General Attachment 43 Assembly Conference June 24 2010 ($2,500) 11. Legal Services Contracts Attachment 47 Receive & File 12. Contracts/Purchase Orders Between $5,0004200,000 Attachment 49 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT (Hasan Ikhrata, Executive Director) 13. Monthly Report INFORMATION ITEMS 14. CFO Monthly Report (Wayne Moore, Chief Financial Officer) The next meeting of the Regional Council will be held on July 1, 2010 at the SCAG Los Angeles Office. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA III ASSOCIATION of GOVERNMENTS Attachment 65 -nom,... -n., Iv,1c � I YczuPl'JURE 0 7a.m.-2p.m. RAIL RODEO COMPETITION 7 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. APTA Registration 8a.m.-5:30p.m. Committee Meetings 7:30 a.m.-2p.m.. RAIL SHOWCASE. Breakfast/Lunch 12-5p.m.: APTA Rail System Safety Seminar 8a.m.-1:30p.m.. Project Update Sessions 1-5p.m. . APTA Registration. 2-3:30 p.m. Technical Sessions 2-4p.m. Discover Vancouver City Tour 2-.5p.m. TransLink Technical Tours 2:30-4:30 p.m. Interactive Presentations `. SUNDAY, JUNE 6 & COPS Round Table 7:30a.m.-6p.m, Committee Meetings 4-5:30 p.m. Technical Sessions '8a.m.-6p.m. APTA Registration 2-4p.m. Discover Vancouver City: Tour WEDNESDAY, `JUNE 9 14-5p.m. This is APTA - 8-9:30 a.m. Technical Sessions 6-7p.m. Welcome to Vancouver Reception 8a.m.-12 p.m. APTA Registration 7-9:30p.m International Rail Rodeo Awards Banquet 9:45-11 a.m. Technical Sessions. 11:15a.m.-12:45p,m. CLOSING GENERAL SESSION MONDAY, iJUNE 7 1:45 - 5:30 p.m. Guided Self -Tour: ` 7-8:15 a.m.'. > Business. Member Election A Multimodal Tour of Greater Vancouver's & Networking Breakfast 2-5p.m. TSI Training Session '7a.m.-4p.m. APTA Registration 2:30-4:30 p.m. Livability and Sustainability Considerations 7:30-8;30a.m. Continental Breakfast in Project Planning; Peer Exchange `8:30-10a.m. OPENING GENERAL SESSION I 10:15-11:45a.m. Technical Sessions THURSDAY, JUNE 10 12-2 p.m. GENERALLUNCHEON 8:30a.m.-4p.m. FTA New Start/Small Start Workshop `2-5p.m. '. TransLinkTechnical Tours 8:30a.m.-4p.m. NTI Training Course — Part 1 2:30-4:30 p.m. Technical Sessions & COPS Round Table FRIDAY, JUNE 11 8:30a.m.-4p.m." NTI Training Course —Part 2 '. 7a.m.-2p.m. RAIL RODEO COMPETITION 7a.m.-2:30p.m. APTA Registrati< 8a.m.-5:30p.m. Committee Meetings 7:30a.m.-2p.m.. RAIL SHOWCASE - 12-5p.m.- APTA Rail System Safety Seminar 8a.m.-1:30p.m. Project ;Update S 1-5p.m.:. APTA Registration 2.-3:30 p.m. Technical Sessio 2-4p.m. - Discover Vancouver City Sour 2-5p.m. TransLink Techn 2:30-4:30p.m.. Interactive Presi SUNDAY, JUNE b '- &COPS Round T: 7:30 a.m.-6p.m. Committee Meetings 4:-5:30p.m..:: Technical Sessio 8a.m.-6p.m. APTA Registration ' 2-4p.m. Discover Vancouver City Tour WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9 4-5p.m. This is APTA 8-9:30a.m. Technical Sessio -6-7p.m. ': Welcome to Vancouver Reception 8a.m.-12p.m. APTA Registratic `7-9:30p.m.: International Rail Rodeo Awards Banquet 9:45-11 a.m. Technical Sessio 11:15a.m.-12:45p.m. CLOSING GENER MONDAY, JUNE 7 1:45-5:30p.m.'. Guided: Self-Tour '.7-8:15a.m.: Business Member Election AMuttimodal Tot &: Networking Breakfast 2-5p.m. TSI TrainingSesi 7a.m.-4p.m. APTA Registration 2:30-4:30 p.m. Livability and Su. .7:30-8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast in Project Ptannii 8:30-10a.m. OPENING GENERAL SESSION 10:15-11:45 a.m. Technical Sessions THURSDAY, JUNE 10 `12-2p.m.-' GENERALLUNCHEON 8:30a.m.-4p.m. FTANew Start/S `.2-5p.m. TransLink Technical Tours 8:30 a.m.-4p.m. NTI Training Cou 2:30-4:30p.m. Technical Sessions& COPS Round Table FRIDAY, JUNE 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. INTERNATIONAL RAIL RODEO VCCJClark Station, East 6th avenue at Keith Drive 8-1oa.m. Commuter Rall Safety & Security Subcommittee Plaza BallmomA&B, Second Floor 9 -10:30 a.m. Light Reil Transit Technical Forum Georgia A,Second Floor 10 a.m. -12 P.M. Rail Safety Committee Plaza Ballroom A&B, Second Floor 11 a.m.-12:30 P.M. TRB-Committee on Intercity Passenger Rail Kensington, Fourth Floor 12-S P.M. APTA RRH System Safety Seminar Plaza BallmomA&S,Second Floor 1 - 2:15 p.m. TRB-Committee on Light Rail Transit Kensington, Fourth Floor 1- 3 p.m. Procurement Steering Committee Oxford, Third Floor 1-5 p.m. APTA Registration Desk F Host Information Desk Balmomij ire Floor 2-4 p.m. Discover Vancouver City Tour " to P¢.19 Pa Pall pezo 2:35 - 3:45 p.m. TRB-Committee on Commuter Reil Kensington, Fourth Floor 4 - 5 p.m. TRO -Joint Subcommittee on Self -Powered Rail Cars Kensington, Fourth Floor 4 - 5:30 p:m. Commuter & Intercity Joint Legislative Subcommittee Grouse, 340, Floor SUNDAY, JUNE 6 7:30 - 9 a.m. Business Member Procurement Committee Dxford,Thim Fluor 2;30 - 10:30 a.m. Commuter Rail CEOs Subcommittee Gro es, 34th Floor 8 - 9:30 a.m. . Capital Projects Subcommittee Plaza BalimomA, Second Floor •. Track and NniseNibration Technical Forum GeorgiaA, Second Floor > Security Standards Policy& Planning Committee Prince or Wales, Third Floor 9 a.m. - 6 P.M. a APTA Registration Desk a Host information Deck Balmoral, Third Floor a Moderators/Speakers & AN Room Kensington, Fourth Floor P TCRP Information Center Regency Ballroom foyer, Third Floor e a.m. -12 p.m. Pewar, Signals & Communications Technical Forum Stanley, 34th Floor 9 -10:30 a.m. Business Member Business Development Committe Oxfam, Third Floor 9:30 -11 a.m. Ventilation Technical Forum Georgia %Second Floor R Rolling Stock Equipment Technical Forum Georgia A, Second floor 990 -11:30 a.m. Security Affairs Steering Committee Prince Twiner, Third Floor 10:30 a.m. -12 P.m. Business Member Small Business Committee Oxford, Third floor 11 a.m. -12:30 P.M. Rail Transit CEOs Subcommittee Plaza Ballroom B. Second Floor Automated Transit Technical Farum Geargla B, Second Floor > Streetcar& Heritage Trolley Subcommittee Plaza Ballroom A, Second Floor 12 - 2 p.m. Research &Technology Committee Grouse, 34th Floor 12:30 - 2 p.m. Business Member Liaison &Outreach Committee [Island, Third Floor 1-3 P.m. _ High -Speed & Intercity Rail Committee Placa Ballroom A. Second Floor J V IV UH I I ON T IN UE DI M U N UAY, If:0NIINUEDI T - ails a.m. a Commuter Rail Committee Plaza Ballroom B, Second Floor Rail Standards Policy & Planning Committee Stanley, 34th Floor 7 - 6:15 a.m. Business Member Election&Networking Breakfast Pg29 GCm,rA,St,.m Floor 7;30 - 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast Regency Ballroom Foyer, Third Floor 6 a.m. - 5 p.m. 1:90 - 2:30 p.m. o Moderators/Speakers & AN Room Multimodal Operations Planning Subcommittee Kensington, Fourth Floor Georgia B, Second Fluor Business Member Resource Room 2 - 3 p.m. Oxford, Third Floor Business Member Government Affairs Committee R TCRP Information Center Richard, Third Floor Regime, Ballroom Foyer, Third Floor 2-3:30 p.m. Peg Committee on Public Transit(COPS) p211 Prince of Wales, Third Floor Public Transportation Takes Us There 2-4p.m. Pecs Discover Vancouver Cly Tour pezo 10:15 -11:45 a.m. 2-4 p.m. n6.16 Transit Wireless Communications Joint Council Plaza BallmomA, Second Floor Grouse, 34th Floor g2 Safety Culture and Organizational Change 2:30 -4 p.m. Georgia B, Second Floor Reil Transit Committee PIES Canada Line—Innovation from Start to Finish Georgia A, Second Floor Plaza Ballroom C, Second Floor 3 - 4:30 p.m. e Land Use&Economic Development Subcommittee Georgia A, Second Floor Plaza Ballroom B,Second Floor k8 High -Speed and Intercity Rail: Legislation and future 3 - 5 P.M. Financinghom Federal, State, and Private Perspectives Business Member Board of Governors(SMOG) Plaza Ballroom a, Second Floor Regency Ballroom E&F, Third Floor TffiRall Transit Bolling Stock—Mazlmizing the Use 4-5 p.m. Grouse, 341h Floor ENThIs IsAPIA—Realizingthe Full Potential ofidembership pg 26 I2-2 p.m. Lord Byron, Fourth Floor OWESCAST SESSION/GENERAL LUNCHEON 4- 5 p.m. A New Era efTronspertation Choices: UTFSTask Force Linking Transportation, Land Use, and Sustainabilly Georgia B, Second Flour Regency Buiraom,Third Fluor 4- 6 p.m. 2-sp... Communications Subcommittee TECBNICALTOURS pe:.38.40 Plaza Be llraom C, Second Fla., _ TOUR ITrolley Buses and Transit Centers 4:30 - B p.m. Teas z VancouverUght Rall:SkyTraln Neamthe CuamerCemury Major Capital Investment Planning Subcommittee Plaza Ballroom B, Second Floor YOUR s Marine Service. antl the North Shore 6 -P p.m. Welcome to Vancouver Reception Pg.22 Regency Ballroom A D, Third Floor T-9:30 p.m. APTA INTERNATIONAL RAIL ROBED AWARDS BANOUET PC 27 Pacific Ballroom, Conference Level, Fairmont MONDAY, JUNE 7 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. APTA Registration Desk PC 9 p Nast Information Desk It Balmoral, Third Floor M U N UAY, If:0NIINUEDI T - ails a.m. a Commuter Rail Committee Plaza Ballroom B, Second Floor Rail Standards Policy & Planning Committee Stanley, 34th Floor 7 - 6:15 a.m. Business Member Election&Networking Breakfast Pg29 GCm,rA,St,.m Floor 7;30 - 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast Regency Ballroom Foyer, Third Floor 6 a.m. - 5 p.m. o Moderators/Speakers & AN Room Pets Kensington, Fourth Floor Business Member Resource Room Pe 14 Oxford, Third Floor R TCRP Information Center Pe 16 Regime, Ballroom Foyer, Third Floor 8:30-10 a.m. ESOPENING GENERALSESSION Public Transportation Takes Us There Pg.30 Regency Ballroom, Third Floor 10:15 -11:45 a.m. ESTelling Our Story Pe31 Plaza BallmomA, Second Floor g2 Safety Culture and Organizational Change Pa.3z Georgia B, Second Floor PIES Canada Line—Innovation from Start to Finish pa.33 Plaza Ballroom C, Second Floor 01osltive Train Control Plans "31 Georgia A, Second Floor k8 High -Speed and Intercity Rail: Legislation and future Financinghom Federal, State, and Private Perspectives Pe.3s Plaza Ballroom a, Second Floor TffiRall Transit Bolling Stock—Mazlmizing the Use "31 Grouse, 341h Floor I2-2 p.m. OWESCAST SESSION/GENERAL LUNCHEON A New Era efTronspertation Choices: Linking Transportation, Land Use, and Sustainabilly Pe.3f Regency Buiraom,Third Fluor 2-sp... TECBNICALTOURS pe:.38.40 TOUR ITrolley Buses and Transit Centers Teas z VancouverUght Rall:SkyTraln Neamthe CuamerCemury Toua 3 Canada Line: A New Model for Project Delivery TOUR 4 Suburban Transit and System Communications YOUR s Marine Service. antl the North Shore M D N D AY coNTINUEOI 2:30 - 4:30 p.m. EILIThe Rall Safety Improvement Act of 2009 and Its Impact: The Times, They Area Changin' Georgia A, Second Floor Olt Takes a Region: Integrating Reil Investment In Multimodal Plans and Programs Plaza Ballroom A, Second Floor 92 New Business Models for Transit Projects Plaza Ballroom C, Second Floor Cry High -Speed Rail Technical Session: Systems &Systems Integration Plaza Ballroom B. Second Floor 01ractian Power Georgia B, Se cons Floor F3Energy. Environment So Transit Grouse, 341h Floor 2:36 - 4:30 p.m. Committee on Public Safety (COPS) Round Table Prince of Wales, Third Floor 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. Business Member Programs Committee Tennyson, Fourth Floor 4:90 - 6:30 p.m. Systems Engineering Subcommittee Lord Byron, Fourth Floor TUESDAY, JUNE 8 Pe4T ,C43 P6.44 pe46 pg46 ? -a a.m. 9 Public-PFIVaL@ Partnerships Committee Georgia B, Second Floor Pela ? a.m. - 2:30 p.m. r APTA Registration Desk mi9 e Host Information Desk m11 Balmoral, Third Floor is 16 ?:3a a.m.-2 p.m. at RAI L PRODUCTS& SERVICES SHOWCASE Pe48 British Columbia Ballroom&Vancouver Island Room, pgS4 Conference Level, Fairmont a-lae... Pe ss WHlgh-Speed Reil 101 Pg4a Pacific Ballroom, Conference Level, Fairmont ' 0 a.m. - Liao P.M. g,®PROJECT UPDATES Streetcars, Subways, Light Reil, Commuter Rail, Facilities Be Mega Projects res 50,11 Waddington&Samrna, Conference Flom, Fairmont Pesv I UtSUAYlcahrrnaUPol 9 8 a.m. - 5 P.M. r Moderators/Speakers &A/VRoom Pela Kensington, Fourth Floor r Business Member Resource Room pe14 Oxford, Third Floor r TCRP Information Center is 16 Regency Ballroom Faye, Third Floor at 2 - 3:90 p.m. Pglz 01.rdor-Management Partnerships pgS4 Regency Ballroom O, Third Floor M liedestricn Be Motorist Safety in a Railroad's Path Pe ss Regency Ballroom k, Third Floor hil"State of Good Repair pe it Regency Ballroom R Third Floor 'RVAPreparing an integrated State Rail Plan Pe 66 Regency Ballroom Fruit Floor Pe. e4 "Public -Private Partnerships. Pesv Roger, Ballroom B, Third Floor g3RetroRts: Integrating New Technology Pi Into Older Infrastructure pg. So Plaza Ballroom B. Second Floor. TV ?I ii Shared Use: Light at the End ofthe Tunnel Pass Plaza Ballroom A, Second Floor or le F$High-Speed Reil Technical Session: Infrastructure "lis Regency Ballroom C, Third Floor as k:3Automated/Driverl ass Trains: ,.at A Outlier Century of Experience Pg. it Plaza Ballroom C, Second Floor pg 15 2-5 p.m. TECHNICALTOURS Pew TOURS z- a(A repeat of Monday's tours.) not 38-40 TOUR 6 Cyclingthe City and Transit Integration Pe62 2:30-4:90 p.m. EBINTERACTIVE PRESENTATIONS Pe: 63.64 Pacific Bailmom, Conference Flom. Fairmont 2:30-4:30 p.m. Pe39 Committee on Public Safety (COPS) Round Table Prince owners. Third Floor 4- 5:30 p.m. •RecmitingandDevelopingaNew GenerationWarkforce pe. as Regency Ballroom Billiard Floor p,¢ Enhancing Asset Value through Safety Certification Pg 66 - Regency Ballroom A, Third Floor • Integrating Passenger Facilities lntothe Community Peal Regency Ballroom B, Third Floor • Rail Operations: Planning for the Extremes pg 68 Regency Ballroom S Third Floor TUESDAYIc0NTINUEo1 4 - 5:30 p.m. (ca n:: nvod ki Commuter and hoardty Rail Belling Stock Georgia A, Second Floor MOriverless System Choices: "What about That? Why Did you Make That Decision?" Plaza Ballroom C, Second Floor g9lmplemenntlan of Positive Train Control Plaza Ballroom B, Second Floor G2 Building LRT Urban Track Stmmures— EmbeddedTrackDesign Regency Ballroom E, Third Floor m69 pg 69 is 10 Pell WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9 0 Recognizing Maintenance Errors Involved Shared Use Working Group as lx Grouse, 34th Floor ""Operations Control Centers Pg.ec Coffee Service Regency Ballroom Faye, Third Floor 9 - 9:30 a.m. at "Accessible Rall — Freedom to Move Pglz Regency Ballroom E, Third Floor post 13 Protecting Our Rail Infrastructure; What Are Our Risk Exposures? Pe 13 Regency Ballroom F, Third Floor kyURisk Assessment: Identification & Mitigation Pg]4 Plaza Ballroom 0, Second Floor C4Trends in Ridership Forecasting PvS Plaza Bailmom C, Second Floor Pe. e4 nSWEBCAST SESSION Fact or Myth: The Return on Investment of a National High -Speed & Intercity Rail Program Pi Regency Ballroom O, Third Floor Pe. air OCommunications Systems TV ?I Georgia A. Second Floor OCrashworthlness— Innovations in Vehicle Design or le Georgia B, Second Floor 9 L.m.-12 p.m. r APTA Registration Desk as r Host Information Desk ,.at Balmoral, Third Floor Mod erators/Speakers&A/VRoom pg 15 Kensington, Fourth Floor r Business Member Resource Room Pew Oxford, Third Floor . TCRP Information Center PC 16 Regency Ballroom Faye,Third Floor WEDNESDAY(C.0NTINUFDI 9:45 -11 a.m. 0 Recognizing Maintenance Errors Involved in High Consequence Events - rely Regency Ballroom E. Third Floor ""Operations Control Centers Pg.ec Regency Ballroom F, Third Flaor € 0raveloping Federal and Local Partnerships to Expedite Project Delivery at Plaza Bailmom C. Second Floor MCESystems Engineering post Georgia A, Second Floor MARRA Status Reports —High-Speed&Intercity Reil Pest Regency Ballroom D, Third Floor &3Traln Control n 2D1D pg,03 Plaza Ballroom B, Second Floor ESVibration and Noise Mitigation for the 21st Century: Real Problems with Real Solutions Pe. e4 Georgia B, Second Floor 11:15 a.m. -12:45 p.m. RCLOSING GENERAL SESSION: Rail Safety Leadership for High Bellobllity Organizations Pe. air Regency BallmomA C, Third Floor 1:39 - 3 p.m. Rail Conference Planning Subcommittee Cypress, 340h Floor 1:05 - 5:30 p.m. GUIDED SELF -TOUR A Multimodal Tour of Greater Vancouver is e6 2-5 P.M. National Rall Plan: Stakeholder Outreach Session pgsfi Regency Ballroom E, Third Floor 29APTA Symposium: Managing Maintenance Error "BP Regency Ballroom R Third Flaor TSI TRAI NINE Current Issues in Rail Safety Ps. es Grouse, 34th Floor 2:30 - 4:39 p.m. OA Livability and Sustainal ilityConsiderations in Project Planning Pe39 Plaza Ballroom A, Second Floor THURSDAY, JUNE 10 8:30 a.m. - 3 P.M. FTA New Start/Small Start Workshop Pe 90 Georgia B,Second Floor 8:30 a.m.- 4 p.m. NTI TRAINING Project Management far Transit Professionals—Pard Pg.90 Prince of Wales, Third Floor (Part II: Friday, June It 8:30 a,m.-4p.m., Pmeaeof Wales Room) TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING LOS ANGELES, CA Thursday, June 17, 2010 — Saturday, June 19, 2010 Meeting Site Wilshire Grand Hotel 930 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90017 Phone: (213) 688-7777 Presiding Steve Elkins, Chair Council Member Bloomington, MN NLC Staff Leslie Wollack Program Director, Infrastructure and Sustainability (202)626-3029 wollackknlc.org Julia Pulidindi Senior Associate, Infrastructure, Center for Research and Innovation (202) 626-3176 pulidindi(@nlc.org TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING TENTATIVE AGENDA DRAFT Los Angeles, California Thursday. June 17.2010 2:00 p.m. SUBWAY TO HISTORIC UNION STATION AND TOUR (Meet in hotel lobby at 1:45PM) 3:30 p.m. SUBWAY AND WALKING TOUR — TOUR ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT 5:00 p.m. — 8:00 p.m. RECEPTION & DINNER (Logistics to be Announced) Friday, June 18, 2010 8:00 a.m. — 8:45 a.m. BREAKFAST Brentwood Room, Wilshire Grand 8:45 a.m. WELCOME AND MEETING OVERVIEW Steve Elkins, Chair Council Member, Bloomington, Minnesota HOST CITY WELCOME Richard Alarcon Council Member, Los Angeles, California 9:00 a.m. TRANSPORTATION FINANCE DISCUSSION (PP. 3-6) • Los Angeles 30/10 initiative 11:00 a.m. HIGH SPEED RAIL (PP. 7-9) 12:00 p.m. —1:30 p.m. LUNCH Fernwood Room, Wilshire Grand 1:30 p.m. METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATIONS (PP. 10-16) Hasah Ikhrata Chief Operating Officer, Southern California Association of Governments 3:30 p.m. LOS ANGELES COUNTY METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY Art Leahy Chief Executive Officer 4:00 p.m. — 5:00 p.m. FREE TIME 5:00 p.m. MTA ESCORTED SUBWAY & BLUE RAIL LINE & ALAMEDA SHIPPING CORRIDOR TOUR 1 TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING TENTATIVE AGENDA 6:30 p.m. DINNER Los Angeles & Long Beach Port Authority Tour of Los Angeles and Long Beach Port (departing from Port of Long Beach) 8:30 p.m. RETURN TO LOS ANGELES Saturday. June 19. 2010 8:00 a.m. — 9:00 a.m. BREAKFAST Femwood Room, Wilshire Grand 9:15 a.m. NLC BOARD AND ADVISORY COUNCIL REPORTS Brentwood Room, Wilshire Grand 9:30 a.m. RESEARCH AND INNOVATION UPDATE Julia Pulidindi Senior Associate, Infrastructure, NLC Center for Research and Innovation 10:00 a.m. LEGISLATIVE UPDATE (PP. 17-21) Leslie Wollack Program Director for Infrastructure and Sustainability, NLC Center for Federal Relations • Climate Change Legislation • Livable Communities Act • Surface Transportation Authorization • Airport Reauthorization 11:00 a.m. TIS COMMITTEE REVIEW (Directory --P. 22) Discussion: Potential Fall Meeting 12:00 p.m. ADJOURNMENT 12:00 p.m. —3:00 p.m. OPTIONAL TOURS WITH LOS ANGELES CITY STAFF 2 Item No. 28 Approvals City Attorney Director of Finance City Manager CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Greg Butler, Director of Public Works/City Engineer DATE: July 27, 2010 SUBJECT: Public Works Department Monthly Report RECOMMENDATION: Receive and file the attached Department of Public Works Monthly Activity Reports for the month of June, 2010. MEMORANDUM TO: Greg Butler, Director of Public Works FROM: Rodney Tidwell, Maintenance Supervisor DATE: July 8, 2010 1989 SUBJECT: Monthly Activity Report - June, 2010 The following activities were performed by Public Works Department, Street Maintenance Division in-house personnel for the month of June, 2010: I. SIGNS A. Total signs replaced 40 B. Total signs installed 11 C. Total signs repaired 48 D. Banners Replaced 82 H. TREES A. Total trees trimmed for sight distance and street sweeping concerns 48 III. ASPHALT REPAIRS A. Total square feet of A. C. repairs 2,247 B. Total Tons 39.5 IV. CATCH BASINS A. Total catch basins cleaned 271 B. Down Spouts 0 C. Under sidewalks 0 1t�:7(fl;_�IS� � : �/ � :.. a ►YI A. Total square footage for right-of-way abatement 540 VI. GRAFFITI REMOVAL A. Total locations 167 B. Total S.F. 9,453 VII. STENCILING A. 568 New and repainted legends B. 1,762 L.F. of new and repainted red curb and striping C. 9 Bull Nose D. 7 Thermal Plastic R:\MAINTAIMMOACTRPT Also, City Maintenance staff responded to 98 service order requests ranging from weed abatement, tree trimming, sign repair, A. C. failures, litter removal, and catch basin cleanings. This is compared to 68 service order requests for the month of MTv. 2010. The Maintenance Crew has also put in 55 hours of overtime which includes standby time, special events and response to street emergencies. The total cost for Street Maintenance performed by Contractors for the month of June 2010 was $99,130.00 compared to $233,325.04 for the month of May, 2010. Account No. 5402 Account No. 5401 Account No. 999-5402 Electronic Copies: Amer Attar, Principal Engineer Mayra De La Torre, Senior Engineer Jerry Gonzalez, Associate Engineer $ 99,130.00 (Capital Improvements) (Land Development) (Traffic Division) UMAINTAIMMOACTM DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS MONTHLY ACTIVITY REPORT STREET MAINTENANCE FISCAL YEAR 20 - 20 4th QUAR'T'ER . Date Submitted: July 7, 2010 Submitted By: Greg Butler Prepared By: Rodney Tidwell R:UAINTAIN\MOACTRPT\STREETMAINTWPRIL, MAY, JUNE. WORK: ' . WORK TOTAL COST, TOTAL COST FOR = COMPLETED COST kOR APR COMPLETEDOST FOR MA?,. COMPLETED COST FOR JUNE THIS, FISCAL- 1V13T FISCAL S$OPE;OF.WORK AP '10 .- 70 MAY,'1b - 10 JUNE'10 '10 YEAR YEAR ASPHALTAC Square Footage: 4,599 $13,659.03 3,585 $10,647.45 2,247 $6,673.59 $188,440.50 $220,978.22 Tons: 103 58 40 $0.00 $0.00 SIDEWALK CURB & GUTTER REPAIR Square Footage: 30 $89.10 0 $0.00 0 $0.00 $7,664.10 $0.00 PCC Yards: $0.00 $23,765.00 STRIPING LINEAR FEET: 52,118 $3,648.26 19,843 $1,389.01 1,762 $123.34 $1,419,585.46 $131,385.09 IN-HOUSE PAINTING LEGENDS: 0 214 $1,712.00 568 $4,544.00 $29,664.00 $28,408.00 SIGNS REPLACED Material: 67 $3,350.00 29 $1,450.00 40 $2,000.00 $23,600.00 $32,500.00 Labor: $765.31 $1,055.60 $12,456.08 $17,153.50 SIGNS INSTALLED Material: 25 $1,250.00 4 $200.00 11 $550.00 $9,650.00 $4,750.00 Labor: $659.75 $105.56 $290.29 $5,093.27 $2,506.66 GRAFFITI Square Footage: 8,803 10,323 9,453 DRAINAGE CHANNELS CLEANED Basins: 259 $6,835.01 351 $9,262.89 271 $7,151.69 $92,167.91 $109,070.57 Channels: 0 5 $31,360.00 0 $0.00 $150,853.00 $103,237.78 IN-HOUSE TREES TRIMMED: 71 $1,873.69 53 $1,398.67 48 $1,266.72 $20,710.65 $11,453.26 SERVICE ORDER REQUESTS: 92 68 98 AFTER HOURS CALL OUTS: 56 $2,217.04 89 $3,523.51 55 $2,177.45 $55,604.13 $48,438.36 R.O.W. WEED ABATEMENT: 1,200 $40.80 800 $27.20 540 $18.36 $351.56 $2,939.96 TOTALS $35,390.81 $61,841.60 $25,851.04 $738,210.66 $736,586.40 R:UAINTAIN\MOACTRPT\STREETMAINTWPRIL, MAY, JUNE. DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS MAINTENANCE WORK COMPLETED FISCAL YEAR 2009-2010 Date Submitted: 07-JulA0 Submitted By: GREG BUTLER Prepared By: RODNEY TIDWELL CONTRACTORS < h i` y i JANU{j1Y,;, ` , zFBRU/�tY ", ,jVIARCH, ` APRIL MAY ' JUNETOTALS 2ND kALF , YEAR-TO-DATE Asphalt Square Feet 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 Concrete Square Feet 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 440 Drainage Channels 3 3 0 0 0 0 6 8 TOTAL COSTS $82,768.00 $21,800.00 $140,616.00 $0.00 $0.00 $60,000.00 $305,184.00 $332,301.00 CONTRACT STRIPING Striping Linear Feet 0 0 0 0 2,305,672 0 2,305,672 4,277,695 SandblastingLinear Feet 0 0 0 0 $152,799.04 0 $152,799.04 $152,799.04 TREE CONTRACTORS Trees Trimmed 356 411 339 465 483 197 2,251 2,594 Trees Removed 1 4 16 7 5 3 36 43 TOTAL COSTS $18,070.00 $21,852.00 $19,730.00 $24,432.00 $26,216.00 $10,858.00 $121,158.00 $142,046.00 R.O.W. SPRAYING SQUARE FEET 550 0 138,500 312,500 410,200 174,000 1,036,200 1,331,488 TOTAL COSTS $30,950.00 $0.00 $7,750.00 $17,500.00 $22,950.00 $9,750.00 $88,900.00 $735,270.00 CITY MAINTENANCE CREW Signs Replaced 56 41 4 67 29 40 237 472 Signs Installed 11 23 1 25 4 11 75 193 Catch Basins Cleaned 348 111 242 259 346 271 1,577 3,364 Trees Trimmed 55 5 78 71 53 48 307 805 R.O.W. Weed Abatement 0 0 2,700 1,200 800 540 5,240 8,540 New & Repainted Legends 70 127 310 0 214 568 1,289 3,708 After Hours Call Outs 294 55 148 56 89 55697 8,333 Service Order Requests 123 90 88 92 68 98 559 1,002 Graffiti Removal - Sq Ft 4,202 7,678 9,996 8,803 10,323 9,453 50,4551 109,477 TOTAL COSTS $131,788.00 $43,652.00 $168,096.00 $41,932.00 $201,965.04 $80,608.00 $668,041.04 1 $1,062,652.32 STREET MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS The following contractors have performed the following projects for the month of June, 2010 Date: 05.21.10 CITYWIDE 2ND APPLICATION OF "AQUA MASTER" TOTAL COST 777T;750.00_ WINCHESTER AT ENTERPRISE CIRCLE Date: 06.02.10 CITYWIDE WEED ABATEMENT, DEBRIS AND TRASH CLEAN-UP TOTAL COST $ 3,323.00 Date: 06.30.10 CITYWIDE MOWING 32 ACRE LOT, TRASH AND DEBRIS CLEAN-UP TOTAL COST $ 15,199.00 Date: # TOTAL COST Date: 06.12.10 CITYWIDE TREE TRIMMING (R.O.W.) TOTAL COST $ 2,558.00 Date: 05.15.10 CITYWIDE R.O.W. TREE TRIMMING TOTAL COST $ 8,300.00 Date: 06.18.10 WINCHESTER AT 15 FWY REMOVE AND REPLACED. ASPHALT AND STRIPING WINCHESTER AT ENTERPRISE CIRCLE # WEST TOTAL COST $ 60,000.00 Date: TOTAL COST TOTAL COST ACCOUNT #5401 TOTAL COST ACCOUNT #5402 $99,130.00 TOTAL COST ACCOUNT #99-5402 RAINTAIMMOACTRPT CITY OF TEMECULA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ROADS DIVISION ASPHALT (POTHOLES) REPAIRS MONTH OF JUNE, 2010 ,.rv_n..n, e' 06/03/10 ........: o .L -n -ns .... ...m.n. _s..,., -}.. -- ..:✓w. ........... NICOLAS ROAD FROM JOSEPH TO CALLE GIRASOL .. .. ........�a._.n_.:.._ w....x... AC O/L S rs>nsiAt Slu.' 130 6c.'tSrt. T: RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT YNEZ POTHOLES 20 VIA BRISA AC 0/L 230 3 06/08/10 N/B MARGARITA 500' SOUTH OF PAUBA R & R 465 12 06/09/10 N/B MARGARITA AT RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD POTHOLE 4 TEMP N/B MARGARITA 100' N/O RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD POTHOLE 1 TEMP N/B MARGARITA AT PIO PICO POTHOLE 4 TEMP RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD WEST CITY LIMITS POTHOLE 2 TEMP MARGARITA 500' SOUTH OF PAUBA R & R #2 LANE 301 MARGARITA 500' SOUTH OF PAUBA CAP #1 LANE 64 MARGARITA AT RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD POTHOLE 2 MARGARITA AT SOLANA POTHOLE 7 OLD TOWN FRONT AT SANTIAGO EP REPAIR 40 9 06/10/10 S/B MARGARITA AT LA SERENA R & R 434 S/B OLD TOWN FRONT AT 1ST EP REPAIR 80 12 NICOLAS ROAD POTHOLES 8 TEMP 06/11/10 MARGARITA ROAD POTHOLES 10 TEMP 06/14/10 NICOLAS ROAD POTHOLES 24 TEMP 06/21/10 CITYWIDE POTHOLES 51 TEMP 06/29/10 REDHAWK PARKWAY 100' E/O VIA SALTIO R & R 6 YNEZ AT COUNTY CENTER R & R 28 2ND STREET AC O/L 214 STAMPEDE PARKING LOT AC O/L 2 MO ENO AT OLD TOWN FRONT STREET AC O/L 120 3.5 TOTAL S.F. OF REPAIRS 2.247 TOTAL TONS 39.5 RA NTAINSWKCWLTDWSPH T.RPR CITY OF TEMECULA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ROADS DIVISION CATCH BASIN MAINTENANCE MONTH OF JUNE, 2010 06/01/10 e x 4Gw Q tea. CITYWIDE "HOT SPOTS" CLEANED & CHECKED —a 32 CATCH BASINS 06/07/10 CITYWIDE "HOT SPOTS" CLEANED & CHECKED 23 CATCH BASINS 06/08/10 AREA #1 CLEANED & CHECKED 5 CATCH BASINS 06/11/10 AREAS #3 & #4 CLEANED & CHECKED 4 CATCH BASINS 06/14/10 CITY HOT SPOTS CLEANED & CHECKED 16 CATCH BASINS 06/21/10 CITY HOT SPOTS CLEANED & CHECKED 20 CATCH BASINS 06/22/10 AREAS #2 & #3 CLEANED & CHECKED 22 CATCH BASINS 06/23/10 AREA #3 CLEANED & CHECKED 27 CATCH BASINS 06/24/10 OLD TOWN FRONT STREET CLEANED & CHECKED 2 CATCH BASINS AREA #3 CLEANED & CHECKED 44 CATCH BASINS 06/28/10 CITYWIDE "HOT SPOTS' CLEANED & CHECKED 24 CATCH BASINS 06/29/10 OLD TOWN CLEANED & CHECKED 37 CATCH BASINS 06/30/10 OLD TOWN CLEANED & CHECKED 15 CATCH BASINS TOTAL CATCH BASINS CLEANED & CHECKED 271 R:\�CWLMT CATC AS\ CITY OF TEMECULA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ROADS DIVISION GRAFFITI REMOVAL MONTH OF JUNE, 2010 06/01/10 sima-mmm IA WOLF CREEK DRIVE REMOVED 12 S.F. OF GRAFFITI TEMECULA PARKWAY AT KEVIN PLACE REMOVED 8 S.F. OF GRAFFITI AVENIDA DE MISSIONS AT VIA RIO TEMECULA REMOVED 40 S.F. OF GRAFFITI CUPA LANE REMOVED 12 S.F. OF GRAFFITI VAIL RANCH PKWY. AT CAMINO PIEDRA ROJO REMOVED 4 S.F. OF GRAFFITI BUTTERFIELD STAGE AT WOLF STORE REMOVED 30 S.F. OF GRAFFITI LONG VALLEY AT ROANOAKE REMOVED 12 S.F. OF GRAFFITI EMPIRE CREEK TARGET CENTER REMOVED 75 S.F. OF GRAFFITI EMPIRE CREEK TRAIL REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI TOWER PLAZA REMOVED 50 S.F. OF GRAFFITI WINCHESTER BRIDGE AT SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK REMOVED 900 S.F. OF GRAFFITI NO. GENERAL KEARNY AT SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK REMOVED 150 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/03/10 MARGARITA AT STONEWOOD REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI CALLE PINA COLADA REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI SO. GENERAL KEARNY REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI DEL REY AT CALLE PINA COLADA REMOVED 3 S.F. OF GRAFFITI DEL REY AT SOLANA WAY REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI VIA NORTE AT CALLE PINA COLADA REMOVED 3 S.F. OF GRAFFITI SUNNY MEADOWS AT CORBIE REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 44753 CORTE GUTIERREZ DRIVE REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/04/10 MARGARITA AT RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD REMOVED 3 S.F. OF GRAFFITI LINDY LANE REMOVED 10 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/07/10 MARGARITA BRIDGE / WINCHESTER ROAD REMOVED 240 S.F. OF GRAFFITI MARGARITA BRIDGE / WINCHESTER ROAD REMOVED 730 S.F. OF GRAFFITI MAIN STREET BRIDGE REMOVED 16 S.F. OF GRAFFITI RAINBOW CANYON BRIDGE REMOVED 198 S.F. OF GRAFFITI LOMA LINDA AT PECHANGA REMOVED 3 S.F. OF GRAFFITI R:�MMW CWLTMGR RTR 06/07/10 ++� VIA RIO TEMECULA REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT CALLE TAJO REMOVED 404 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 15 FWY AT TEMECULA PKWY REMOVED 80 S.F. OF GRAFFITI YNEZ BRIDGE REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/04/10 SOLANA WAY BETWEEN CALLE AMENDA / DEL REY REMOVED 3 S.F. OF GRAFFITI MAIN STREET BRIDGE AT OLD TOWN REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/07/10 BEHIND TARGET CENTER REMOVED 112 S.F. OF GRAFFITI PECHANGA AT MURFIELD DRIVE REMOVED 40 S.F. OF GRAFFITI PECHANGA PKWY AT TEMECULA CREEK REMOVED 400 S.F. OF GRAFFITI N/B 15 FWY AT WINCHESTER REMOVED 3 S.F. OF GRAFFITI N/B MARGARITA AT WINCHESTER REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI RORIPAUGH AT SENNA COURT REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT CALLE TAJO REMOVED 20 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/08/10 MARGARITA ROAD AT PAUBA REMOVED 15 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/0910 ROANOAK AT LONG VALLEY REMOVED 3 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 33323 CALLE ALFREDO REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI BUTTERFIELD STAGE AT WOLF STORE REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/04/10 N/B 15 FWY REMOVED 140 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/10/10 PECHANGA PKWY AT WOLF VALLEY REMOVED 40 S.F. OF GRAFFITI PECHANGA PKWY AT MURFIELD REMOVED 36 S.F. OF GRAFFITI PECHANGA PKWY AT CLUBHOUSE REMOVED 46 S.F. OF GRAFFITI TEMECULA LANE AT PALA COMMUNITY PARK REMOVED 4 S.F. OF GRAFFITI LOMA LINDA AT VIA DEL CORONADO REMOVED 7 S.F. OF GRAFFITI WOLF VALLEY AT WOLF CREEK REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 31610 CORTE PADRERA REMOVED 60 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 39576 JUNE ROAD REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI LA SERENA AT MARGARITA REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/11/10 MARGARITA AT WINCHESTER REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI MARGARITA AT AVENIDA BARCA REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI SOLANA AT VIA LA VIDA REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI NO. GENERAL KEARNYAT V -DITCH REMOVED 16 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/11/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT YUKON IN REMOVED gmgg 4 S.F. OF GRAFFITI LONG VALLEY AT ROANOAK REMOVED 6 S.F. OF GRAFFITI ROYAL OAKS AT CYPRESS POINT REMOVED 75 S.F. OF GRAFFITI PINE NEEDLES AT ROYAL BIRKDALE REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI BUTTERFIELD STAGE AT ROYAL CREST REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/14/10 MEDINAH WAY AT ASHBURN REMOVED 6 S.F. OF GRAFFITI LA SERENA AT SO. GENERAL KEARNY REMOVED 6 S.F. OF GRAFFITI WINCHESTER ROAD AT CROWN BOOKS REMOVED 10 S.F. OF GRAFFITI SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK AT WINCHESTER REMOVED 160 S.F. OF GRAFFITI WINCHESTER AT RUSTIC REMOVED 6 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 115 FWY AT TEMECULA PKWY REMOVED 65 S.F. OF GRAFFITI TOWER PARKING PLAZA REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI YNEZ AT EMPIRE CREEK REMOVED 40 S.F. OF GRAFFITI NO. GENERAL KEARNY AT CHANTEMAR REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI NO. GENERAL KEARNY AT CAMINO CAMPOS VERDE REMOVED 8 S.F. OF GRAFFITI MARGARITA ROAD AT SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK REMOVED 10 S.F. OF GRAFFITI WINCHESTER ROAD BRIDGE AT SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK REMOVED 130 S.F. OF GRAFFITI NO. GENERAL KEARNY AT SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK REMOVED 6 S.F. OF GRAFFITI RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT DIAZ BRIDGE REMOVED 25 S.F. OF GRAFFITI S/E CORNER OF MARGARITA AT PAUBA REMOVED 16 S.F. OF GRAFFITI CAMPANULA AT VOLTA REMOVED 12 S.F. OF GRAFFITI BUTTERFIELD STAGE ROAD REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 31480 CULBERTSON REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/16/10 RANCHO VISTA AT MIRA LOMA REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI NICOLAS AT RORIPAUGH REMOVED 4 S.F. OF GRAFFITI JOSEPH BIKE TRAIL REMOVED 75 S.F. OF GRAFFITI PASEO GALLANTS AT CALLESITO VALLARTA REMOVED 12 S.F. OF GRAFFITI VIA LA COLORADA AT CORTE SABRINAS REMOVED 4 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/17/10 PASEO PARALLON REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI MARGARITA AT STONEWOOD REMOVED 7 S.F. OF GRAFFITI LA SERENA AT WILLOW RUN REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI RIMAIIJTAftW CNPLTMGRI FITP R: VvINNTAIMWICCWLTD\GRAFFITI\ mmmg n�487 s" - w 06;18/10 30975 LASERENA REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI NICOLAS AT WINCHESTER REMOVED 3 S.F. OF GRAFFITI ROYAL BIRKDALE AT SUMMERSET HILLS REMOVED 3 S.F. OF GRAFFITI R: VvINNTAIMWICCWLTD\GRAFFITI\ 06/25/10 rigN .1p g rA ;:. MARGARITA AT VERDES LANE vPrK..o»L�r REMOVED 6 S.F. OF GRAFFITI MARGARITA AT NO. GENERAL KEARNY REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 41463 MARGARITA REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI PROMENADE WAY AT OVERLAND REMOVED 240 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 41649 OVERLAND REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI OVERLAND AT PROMENADE WAY REMOVED 3 S.F. OF GRAFFITI WINCHESTER AT PROMENADE MALL EAST REMOVED 6 S.F. OF GRAFFITI WINCHESTER ATRORIPAUGH REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK AT MARGARITA BRIDGE REMOVED 550 S.F. OF GRAFFITI SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK AT NO. GENERAL KEARNY REMOVED 240 S.F. OF GRAFFITI MEADOWS PARKWAY AT RANCHO VISTA REMOVED 5 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/28/10 CAMINO CARMARGO AT ANGUILA STREET REMOVED 110 S.F. OF GRAFFITI VAIL RANCH AT CAMINO PIEDRA ROJO REMOVED 4 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 44860 CORTE ANTIGUA REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI REDHAWK AT PEPPERCORN REMOVED 50 S.F. OF GRAFFITI REDHAWK AT EASTRIDGE PLACE REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI BUTTERFIELD STAGE BRIDGE AT TEMECULA CREEK REMOVED 670 S.F. OF GRAFFITI BUTTERFIELD STAGE ROAD REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI PIO PICO AT MONTELEGRO WAY REMOVED 6 S.F. OF GRAFFITI VIA LAS COLINAS AT RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD REMOVED 10 S.F. OF GRAFFITI HUMBER AT LONG VALLEY REMOVED 4 S.F. OF GRAFFITI TARGET CENTER REMOVED 78 S.F. OF GRAFFITI HUMBER AT LONG VALLEY CHANNEL REMOVED 64 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 30430 DEL REY ROAD REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 30470 DEL REY ROAD REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI YNEZAT WINCHESTER BRIDGE REMOVED 20 S.F. OF GRAFFITI MARGARITA AT WINCHESTER BRIDGE REMOVED 110 S.F. OF GRAFFITI NO. GENERAL KEARNY AT SIERRA MADRE PLACE REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI GOLDEN ROD ROAD AT NO. GENERAL KEARNY REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI SIERRA MADRE AT CROSS CREEK REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI NICOLAS ROAD AT JOSEPH CHANNEL REMOVED 240 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/28/10 32975 ADELANTE STREET Fg REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI CALLE ARANDA AT SOLANA WAY REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI STONEWOOD AT MARGARITA REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/29/10 AVENIDA BICICLETA AT JOHNSTON REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI VAIL RANCH AT JOHNSTON REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI VAIL RANCH AT OVERLAND TRAIL REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI OVERLAND CHANNEL REMOVED 125 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 42105 PASEO BRILLANTE REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI MARGARITA AT MORAGA REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT LYNDIE LANE REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI LA SERENA AT CALLE MEDUSA REMOVED 1 S.F. OF GRAFFITI 06/30/10 31220 KAHWEA STREET REMOVED 120 S.F. OF GRAFFITI RANCHO VISTA AT SOUTHERN CROSS REMOVED 4 S.F. OF GRAFFITI LA SERENA AT VIA AGUILA REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI N/E CORNER OF CALLE MEDUSA AT ERNEST ROAD REMOVED 50 S.F. OF GRAFFITI S/E CORNER OF RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT YNEZ REMOVED 2 S.F. OF GRAFFITI TOTAL S.F. GRAFFITI REMOVED 9.453 TOTAL LOCATIONS 167 R:\MAWAMWKCMPLM\GR FFITl\ CITY OF TEMECULA 2010 GRAFFITI REMOVAL 51000 49000 47000 45000 43000 41000 39000 37000 35000 33000 31000 JAN FEB MAR APRIL MAY JUNE JLY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC $Q Fr rt.N1n¢TrENarvcecxumnUme1Gu cnan�o.� CITY OF TEMECULA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ROADS DIVISION RIGHT-OF-WAY TREE TRIMMING MONTH OF JUNE, 2010 06/02/10 AwM E/B RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT CITY LIMITS �- TRIMMED MWID 1 R.O.W. TREES 06/03/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT HOPE TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT RIESLING TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT HUMBER TRIMMED 3 R.O.W. TREES RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT CALLE PORTOFINO TRIMMED 2 R.O.W. TREES 46081 VIA LA COLORADA TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES 06/04/10 VIA LAS COLINAS AT RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT YUKON TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT BUTTERFIELD STAGE TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT CALLE TAJO TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES 06/09/10 PREECE AT VIA FANITA TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES DATE ATYNEZ - TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES 06/11/10 YUKON R.D. TRIMMED 3 R.O.W. TREES MARGARITA AT DATE TRIMMED 8 R.O.W. TREES 06/15/10 VIA ANGELES AT FOX TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES 06/16/10 SERAPHINA AT JONS PLACE TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES 06/22/10 HARVESTON AREA' TRIMMED 11 R.O.W. TREES 06/29/10 RANCHO HIGHLAND AT YNEZ TRIMMED 3 R.O.W. TREES 06/30/10 1'AT 15 FWY. TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES RANCHO VISTA AT LOMA PORTOLA TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES RANCHO VISTA AT SANTA SUZANNA TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES RANCHO VISTA AT MIRA LOMA TRIMMED 2 R.O.W. TREES RANCHO VISTA BETWEEN MIRA LOMA & MARGARITA TRIMMED 1 R.O.W. TREES TOTAL R.O.W. TREES TRIMMED 48 R: UTARJTAINMMCO W LTMTREES CITY OF TEMECULA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ROADS DIVISION RIGHT-OF-WAY WEED ABATEMENT MONTH OF JUNE, 2010 i�i 06/02/10 m .. wan 15 V'ii p'�' _=n .__ --�W_.. '.nom c F W/B RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD 15 FWY. N/B ON-RAMP =^:a.naffiLYJ.F,x17 ABATED YS 500 S.F. R.O.W. WEEDS 06/10/10 BUTTERFIELD STAGE ROAD AT WOLF STORE ABATED 40 S.F. R.O.W. WEEDS TOTAL S.F. R.O.W. WEEDS ABATED 540 R:\ TAIMWKCOWLTD\WEEDS CITY OF TEMECULA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ROADS DIVISION SERVICE ORDER REQUEST LOG MONTH OF JUNE, 2010 05/27/10 1 VIA LOBO AT DEER MEADOW GRAFFITI 06/03/10 05/28/10 CALLE MEDUSA AT NICOLAS ROAD ASPHALT REPAIR 05/28/10 06/01/10 44775 CUPA / 32784 HISLOP GRAFFITI 06/01/10 SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK AT WINCHESTER GRAFFITI 06/01/10 MARGARITA AT PAUBA DEBRIS 06/01/10 ANZA ROAD AT CORTE MISLANCA DEBRIS 06/01/10 06/02/10 BEECH BETWEEN LOMA LINDA & HICKORY WEEDS 06/04/10 46081 VIA LA COLORADA SIGN REPAIR / TREE TRIM 06/03/10 44753 CORTE GUTIERREZ DRIVE GRAFFITI 06/03/10 CORBIE AT SUNNY MEADOWS GRAFFITI 06/03/10 CALLE PINA COLADA GRAFFITI 06/03/10 S/B MARGARITA AT SOMERSET APARTMENTS GRAFFITI 06/03/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT MORAGA SHOPPING CARTS (7) 06/03/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT HOPE WAY SHOPPING CARTS (1) 06/03/10 06/03/10 RANCHO VISTA ROAD GRAFFITI 06/03/10 NICOLAS ROAD BETWEEN CALLE MEDUSA & GATLIN ASPHALT 06/07/10 LYNDIE LANE AT RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD GRAFFITI 06/04/10 NICOLAS AT WINCHESTER ROAD CATCH BASIN (CELL PHONE) 06/03/10 DEODAR ROAD OWNERSHIP ISSUE 06/04/10 06/04/10 33945 LYDIA COURT DEBRIS 06/07/10 MAIN STREET BRIDGE GRAFFITI 06/04/10 06/07/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT CALLE TAJO GRAFFITI 06/07/10 41065 VINTAGE CIRCLE TREE 06/07/10 44044 MOUNTAIN VIEW SIGN REPAIR 06/07/10 33349 MANCHESTER ROAD DEBRIS 06/08/10 06/08/10 VAIL RANCH PARKWAY ATTERZICH SIGN REPAIR 06/08/10 OLD TOWN FRONT / NORTH ARCHWAY T.C. 06/08/10 06/09/10 1 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT HOPE WAY SHOPPING CARTS (6) 06/09/10 06/08/10 33323 CALLE ALFREDO GRAFFITI 06/09/10 ROANOAK AT LONG VALLEY GRAFFITI 06/09/10 06/04/10 SOLANA AT CALLE ARANDA GRAFFITI 06/04/10 06/02/10 BUTTERFIELD STAGE AT WOLF STORE DEBRIS 06/10/10 06/09/10 MARGARITA AT PIO PICO DEBRIS 06/09/10 PECHANGA AT RAINBOW CANYON GRAFFITI 06/10/10 06/10/10 31610 CORTE PADRERA GRAFFITI 06/10/10 CAMINO MAREA AT VIA ASTURIAS SIGN REPAIR 06/11/10 39576 JUNE ROAD GRAFFITI 06/10/10 06/11/10 MARGARITA RD..BETWEEN AVE. BARCA & AVE. SONOMA GRAFFITI 06/11/10 ROYAL OAKS DRIVE AT MONTEREY PLACE GRAFFITI 06/11/10 ROYAL OAKS DRIVE AT SOMMERSET HILLS GRAFFITI 06/11/10 BUTTERFIELD STAGE AT ROYAL CREST GRAFFITI 06/11/10 ROANOAK STREET AT LONG VALLEY GRAFFITI 06/11/10 MEDINAH WAY AT ASHBURN ROAD GRAFFITI 06/14/10 CAMPANULA AT VOLTA GRAFFITI 06/14/10 NICOLAS ROAD AT NO. GENERAL KEARNY GRAFFITI 06/14/10 06/13/10 MAIN STREET BRIDGE GRAFFITI 06/13/10 06/14/10 29696 RAMSEY COURT SIDEWALK REPAIR 06/18/10 31480 CULBERTSON LANE GRAFFITI 06/14/10 BUTTERFIELD STAGE AT WELTON GRAFFITI 06/14/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT HOPE WAY SHOPPING CARTS (5) 06/15/10 LA SERENA AT SO. GENERAL KEARNY GRAFFITI 06/14/10 06/15/10 31046 RUIDOSA STREET TREE 06/15/10 27100 RAINBOW CREEK GRAFFITI 06/15/10 MARGARITA AT AVENIDA CIMA DEL SOL GRAFFITI 06/15/10 NO. GENERAL KEARNY AT JOSEPH GRAFFITI 06/15/10 42968 AGENA STREET TREE 06/17/10 TEMECULA CREEK GRAFFITI 06/16/10 06/16/10 PASEO FARALLON AT CORTE HIDALGO GRAFFITI 06/16/10 06/17/10 MARGARITA ATSTONEWOOD GRAFFITI 06/17/10 06/09/10 32809 TRINI COURT DEBRIS 06/18/10 R:\MMNTA W \ W MC0 W LTDWM\ 06/17/10 NIGHTINGALE AT PHEASANT PLACE SIGN REPAIR 06/21/10 NICHOLAS ROAD AT HIGH SCHOOL GRAFFITI 06/18/10 06/18/10 LA SERENA AT 80. GENERAL KEARNY GRAFFITI 06/18/10 BEHIND TARGET SHOPPING CENTER GRAFFITI 06/18/10 06/19/10 LONG VALLEY AT YUKON SHOPPING CARTS (5) 06/21/10 RYCREST AT SKYWO09D GRAFFITI 06/21/10 RYCREST AT WINDWOOD GRAFFITI 06/21/10 06/20/10 RYCREST AT END OF STREET GRAFFITI 06/21/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT HUMBER GRAFFITI 06/21/10 PEACH TREE AT DEER HOLLOW GRAFFITI 06/21/10 CALLE PINA COLADA AT DEL REY GRAFFITI 06/21/10 RYCREST AT WINDWOOD CIRCLE GRAFFITI 06/21/10 06/21/10 RYCREST ATNIGHTVIEW GRAFFITI 06/21/10 39739 WESTCHESTER COURT WATER ISSUE 06/21/10 30069 SANTA CECILIA TREE 06/21/10 06/22/10 39668 RORIPAUGH GRAFFITI 06/22/10 44077 NORTHGATE TREE 06/21/10 VIA NORTE AT CALLE PINA COLADA GRAFFITI 06/23/10 06/23/10 PROMENADE WAY NEXT TO COSTCO SIGN REPAIR 06/28/10 06/24/10 SHOWALTER ROAD DEBRIS 06/24/10 CHURCHILL AT HUMBER - SIGN REPAIR 06/25/10 06/25/10 PIO PICO AT MONTELEGRO GRAFFITI 06/25/10 06/28/10 CORTE CANTERA AT CALLE ARANDA GRAFFITI 06/28/10 MARGARITA AT STONEW OOD GRAFFITI 06/28/10 MARGARITA AT SUMMERSET APARTMENTS GRAFFITI 06/28/10 06/25/10 30537 MILKY WAY DRIVE TREE 06/25/10 06/29/10 MEADOWS PARKWAY AT RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD HAZMAT 06/28/10 29110 VALLEJO AVENUE TREE 06/29/10 06/28/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT HOPE WAY SHOPPING CARTS (6) 06/29/10 06/29/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT HOPE WAY SHOPPING CARTS (3) 06/29/10 MARGARITA AT MORAGA GRAFFITI 06/29/10 MARGARITA AT YMCA GRAFFITI 06/29/10 RAMA NTA�COM LTMSOMS 06/29/10 42105 PASEO BRILLANTE GRAFFITI 06/29/10 WINCHESTER AT DIAZ SIGN REPAIR 06/29/10 06/28/10 44789 CORTE GUTIERREZ SIGN REPAIR 06/29/10 06/26/10 SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK BIKE PATH GRAFFITI 06/28/10 06/29/10 N/B 1-15 AT SANTIAGO BRIDGE GRAFFITI 06/30/10 06/30/10 31220 KAHWEA GRAFFITI 06/30/10 40529 CALLE MEDUSA GRAFFITI 06/30/10 TOTAL SERVICE ORDER REQUESTS 98 CITY OF TEMECULA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ROADS DIVISION SIGNS MONTH OF JUNE, 2010 .. s��w.. - 06/03/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT HUMBER REPAIR W3-3 DEL REY ROAD TO CALLE PINA COLADA REPLACED R2-35 VIA LA COLORADA AT CAMINO SAN DIMAS REPAIR R1-4 AVENIDA BICICLETA AT JOHNSTON REPAIR R1-1 VIA MONTEZUMA AT DIAZ REPLACE41D 1 DELINEATOR 06/04/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT VINTAGE HILLS REPAIR R26 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT VIA LAS COLINAS REPAIR W-73 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT YUKON REPAIR R-26 CAMPANULA ATPAUBA - REPLACED R1-1 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT MEADOWS PKWY REPAIR R4-7 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT HUMBER REPAIR R-26 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT 15 FWY REPAIR R4-7' 06/07/10 MARGARITA AT PASEO BRILLANTE REPAIR R1-1 / R-26 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT MARGARITA REPAIR R4-7 MOUNTAIN VIEW AT YNEZ REPAIR R1-1 MOUNTAIN VIEW AT YNEZ REPLACED R-26 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT CALLE TAJO REPAIRED SNS 06/08/10 VAIL RANCH AT HARMONY REPLACED R4-7 & K MARKER PAVIA AT CAMPANULA REPAIRED R4-7 & K MARKER MEADOWS PARKWAY AT DE PORTOLA REPAIRED R4-7 06/09/10 LONG VALLEY AT YUKON REPAIRED R1-1 06/04/10 WINCHESTER CREEK REPAIRED W3-3 MARGARITA ROAD REPLACE W3-3 06/10/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT MARGARITA REPAIR 2 R4-7 YUKON AT RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD REPAIR R1-1 E�d COSMIC AT RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD REPAIR R4-7 R:\�C=D\SIGNS\ ..,a?x _... � �UQRiEi 06/10/10 RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT MORAGA REPAIR R4-7 JEFFERSON AT RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD REPAIR R4-7 06/11/10 VIA NANZO AT CALLE NOVELDA REPLACED R1-1 CAMINO MAREA AT VIA ASTURIAS REPAIR SNS 06/14/10 JEFFERSON AT OVERLAND REPAIR W3-3 WOLF VALLEY AT ROCKY BAR REPLACED R1-1 VAIL RANCH AT CUTCHOGUE DRIVE REPAIR R4-7 06/15/10 28069 DIAZ REPLACED 11 DELINEATORS WINCHESTER ATRORIPAUGH REPLACED R26 PAUBA AT RAMSEY REPLACED 1 DELINEATOR 06/17.10 SERAPHINA NEW INSTALL (6) R-28 06/18/10 OLD TOWN FRONT STREET ATTEMECULA PKWY REPLACED (3) DELINEATORS MARGARITA AT MORAGA REPLACED (1) DELINEATOR MARGARITA AT MORAGA REPLACED R61-18 27309 JEFFERSON REPLACED 1DELINEATOR NICOLAS AT WINCHESTER REPLACED (5) DELINEATORS ALCOBA AT DE PORTOLA REPAIR R4-7 06/21/10 DE PORTOLAAT VERDES REPLACED R245 VAIL RANCH AT HARMONY REPAIR R1-1 VAIL RANCH AT CAMINO PIEDRA ROJO REPAIR R1-1, R4-7, R-26 VAIL RANCH AT JOHNSTON REPAIR R4-7 VAIL RANCH AT NIGHTHAWK REPAIR R4-7 NORTH GATE AT JAGUAR REPLACED SNS NORTH GATE AT PHEASANT REPLACED SNS 06/23/10 3RD STREET NEW INSTALL (4) R2-26 06/25/10 WOLF VALLEY AT WOLF CREEK REPLACED R-26 HUMBER REPAIR SNS WINCHESTER ATRORIPAUGH REPAIR R3-7 WINCHESTER AT MARGARITA REPAIR R4-7 MARGARITA AT GEORGETOWN REPAIR R4-7 MARGARITA AT NO. GENERAL KEARNY REPAIR R4-7 06/29/10 JOHNSTON AT AVENIDA BICICLETA REPAIR SNS R:\MAINTAIM W KC W L]D\SIGNS\ 06/29/10 WINCHESTER ATDIAZ REPAIR R-26 NIGHTHAWK AT CHANNEL NEW INSTALL R2-25 06/30/10 RANCHO VISTA AT MIRA LOMA REPAIR W3-3 & R2-26 TOTAL SIGNS REPLACED 40 TOTAL SIGNS INSTALLED 11 TOTAL SIGNS REPAIRED 48 R:\MAINTAIM W KC W L]D\SIGNS\ CITY OF TEMECULA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ROADS DIVISION STENCILS / STRIPING MONTH OF JUNE, 2010 06/01/10 CITYWIDE REPAINTED 45 BIKE LANES 06/02/10 PALOMA DEL SOL REPAINTED 45 BIKE LANES 06/08/10 CROWNE HILL AREA REPAINTED 47 BIKE LANES 06/09/10 CITYWIDE REPAINTED 36 BIKE LANES 06/10/10 NORTH SIDE OF TOWN REPAINTED 42 BIKE LANES 06/14/10 CITYWIDE REPAINTED 58 BIKE LANES YNEZ ROAD AT TOWN CENTER REPAINTED 20 LEGENDS 06/15/10 REDHAWKAT OVERLAND TRAIL THERMAL 4 CROSSWALKS PEPPERCORN AT REDHAWK THERMAL 2 CROSSWALKS MARGARITA ATDARTOLO THERMAL 1 CROSSWALK CITYWIDE REPAINTED 53 BIKE LANES YNEZ AT TOWN CENTER REPAINTED 19LEGENDS 06/16/10 SERAPHINA NEW INSTALL 125 MPH RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT JEFFERSON REPAINTED 2 BIKE LANES SERAPHINA REPAINTED 9 BALL NOSES AVENIDA BARCA AT MARGARITA REPAINTED 2 SCHOOL LEGENDS RANCHO CALIFORNIA ROAD AT YNEZ REPAINTED 5 LEGENDS JEFFERSON AT YNEZ REPAINTED 6 LEGENDS AVENIDA BARCA AT MARGARITA REPAINTED 10 LEGENDS 06/17/10 AVENIDA BARCA AT MARGARITA REPAINTED 6 LEGENDS MARGARITA AT MORAGA REPAINTED 5 LEGENDS JOSEPH AT RITA NEW INSTALL 1 STOP & BAR MARGARITA AT MORAGA REPAINTED 5 LEGENDS MARGARITA AT STONEWOOD REPAINTED 6 LEGENDS 06/21/10 YNEZ AT WINCHESTER REPAINTED 19 LEGENDS 06/22/10 WINCHESTER FROM YNEZ TO JEFFERSON REPAINTED 25 LEGENDS 06/23/10 WINCHESTER FROM YNEZ TO JEFFERSON REPAINTED 33 LEGENDS 06/28/10 MARGARITA ROAD BETWEEN RANCHO VISTA & PAUBA REPAINTED 1,762 YELLOW BERM RANCHO VISTA NEXT TO PARK REPAINTED 33 LEGENDS 06/30/10 RANCHO VISTA AND MARGARITA AREA REPAINTED 33 LEGENDS TOTAL NEW & REPAINTED LEGENDS 568 NEW & REPAINTED RED CURB & STRIPING L.F. 1,762 THERMOPLASTIC 7 R MTAIMW COWLTDWWPING CITY OF TEMECULA PAGE 1 OF 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS - MONTHLY WORK PROGRESS SHEET 7/16/2010 %TIME PROJECT PRIORITY PROJECT NAME, DESCRIPTION, PROJECT COMPLETE CONTRACT CURRENT STATUS & PROGRESS NO CONTRACTOR & CONTRACT $'s ENGINEER (Est. comp./ PAID ($) bid date) PROJECTS UNDER CON RUCTION Roripaugh Ranch Fire Station The majority of work was completed by April of 2006. The remaining work will be Contractor: Tovey Shultz Construction, Inc. completed when the mainline utilities are installed, which the City is undertaking - ContractAmount: $3,298,000 estimated start in September of 2010. Afire engine/truck venting system PW03-01 I Approved Change Orders: $237,795 DavidMcBride 97%(1210) 93% (requested/added on 2/06) will be installed when the Contractor re -mobilizes, this cost is Account No. 210-165-741 also included in the approved change order total. Temporary power, initially established in 2003 by the developer, had to re-established in May of 2010. City Property at Diaz Road and Dandy Parkway This project provided for the rough grading of the vacant City property at Diaz Road and (Northwest RDA Property) - Rough Grading Dandy Parkway. Al work was completed on March 28, 2007. Site restoration, including Contractor: Skanska hydroseeding, was completed in December of 2008. A notice of completion was approved PW06-03 I Final Contract Cost $5,948,799.71 David McBride Complete 100% by the City Council at the 1/13/09 meeting. Ongoing maintenance expenses will be incurred for NPDES measures until such time the property is developed. Minor BMP improvements were completed in April of 2010. Old Town Infrastructure Project -Town Square and This project involves construction of the Town Square and street improvements on Mercedes & Main Street Mercedes & Main Streets. The project was awarded on March 18, 2008. Various Contractor: LH Engineering Contract Amt: specialty items and added work extended the completion date through Summer of 2010. 7 PWO6-07 $3,458,495.00 ha Approveedd Change Orders) $336,297 David McBride99% (9110) 97% In addition final paving in this contract will be deferred until completion of the Civic Center. (1C & 1 Account Nos.: 210-165-636 210-165-643 Pechanga Parkway Phase II Street Improvements This project widens Pechanga Pkwy to its ultimate width from Temecula Pkwy to from Temecula Parkway to City Limits @ Pechanga Pechanga Rd. The contractor has completed the improvements. The EMWD claim against PW99-11 Rd. Mayne De La AAA has been settled. Final steps are being taken to close out this claim which in turn will (Ph II) Contractor: All American Asphalt (AAA) Torre/Amer 100% 95% Closeout this project. P ) Contract Amount: $8,131,964.98 Attar Account No. 210-165-668-58XX Old Town Infrastructure Projects The structure was opened to the public on March 1, 2010. Punch list and close out work - Parking Structure & Office/Retail Frontage will be ongoing for two to three months. In addition a long term (5 year) maintenance PW06-07 David contract will be established for enhanced landscaping constructed in the Caltrans right of (1 D) Contractor: PCL Construction Contract Amount: $15,797,010.00 McBride/ Bill 100%(5110) 100% way as part of this project (authorization to bid on 7/13/10). Approved Change Orders: $775,436.81) McAteer Account No. 210-165-644 Ronald Reagan Sports Park Channel Silt Removal & This project includes restoring the Best Management Practices (BMP) of the Stormwater Desiltation Pond William Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP), the Water Quality Management Plan (WQMP) and PWOS-13 Contractor: Sean Malek Becerra/ Avlin 99% 59% the requirements of RWQCB by des the basin located near the Sports Park. 401 Engineering Contract Amount: $182,900 Otiviar Certification, Streambed Alteration Agreement, and Nationwide Permits have been g Account No. 210-190-187-58XX acquired. Contract with current contractor is in the process of being closed out. CITY OF TEMECULA PAGE 2 OF 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS - MONTHLY WORK PROGRESS SHEET 7/16/2010 %TIME PROJECT PRIORITY PROJECT NAME, DESCRIPTION, PROJECT COMPLETE CONTRACT CURRENT STATUS & PROGRESS NO CONTRACTOR & CONTRACT $'s ENGINEER (Est. comp./ PAID ($) bid date) Old Town Civic Center This project will construct the Old Town Civic Center. City Council awarded the contract to Edge Development, Inc. on 09/09/08. Edge began work on 4/8/09. Work is ongoing on PWO6-07 Contractor: Edge ment g P David 81% interior drywall, painting, file work, drop ceilings, casework and detail work for mechanical, Ph2 Order 5,500 Approvedct Change Approved Change Orders: $278,061.85 McBride 1 Bill McAteer (10/22/10) 77% electrical and plumbing. Carpet install starting 7/26 and systems furniture on 8/2/10. Account No. 210-165-751-58XX Temecula Community Center Expansion - Phase 2, Phase 2 of this project will renovate the Escallier House and Barn. Bids were opened on Renovation of Historical Buildings William March 4, 2010. A recommendation to award a contract was approved at the City Council PW06-05 III Contractor: Becerra) David 32.5% 20% at the 03/23/10 meeting. Notice to proceed is effective 05/03/10 for Phase 2. Grade Contract Amount: McBride beams are complete. Utilities, rough -in of plumbing and electrical is in process. Account No. 210-190-197 Redhawk Park Improvements This project will add amenities, which include ADA accessible parking, a restroom, a half - Contractor: IAC Engineering, Inc. Kendra court basketball court, and permanent dog park at Redhawk Community Park. As part of PWO6-O6 Contract Amount: $787,094.92 Hannah- 20%(1012010) 0% this project, a seatwall will be installed at Sunset Park. The Notice To Proceed was Account No. 210-190-144-58XX Meistrell1 Avlin Odviar issued 12/21/09. Construction activities began in January 2010. Completion is anticipated in October 2010. Pavement Rehabilitation Rancho California Road This project will rehabilitate Rancho California Road from Ynez Road to the City limits on (Ynez to East City Limit) - STPL Project Kendra the east. Construction began on June 3, 2009. The contractor is just about done with PW06-14 I Contractor: All American Asphalt Hannah- gg% (0612010) 91 punchlist items. Contract Amt: $3,666,004.25 Meistrelll Avlin Odviar Account No. 210-165-657 Winchester Road / State Route 79 North - North This federally funded project will design and construct landscaping and irrigation Corridor Beautification enhancements to the existing raised medians along Winchester Road between Ynez Contractor: Belaire-West Landscape, Inc. Chris Whitel Road and the easterly City limits. The contractor is currently working on phases 1, 2 & 3 in PW06-15 $920,027.00 Attar 72% 47% the existing medians installing the irrigation systems and constructing the monument ApproCon ved Change ,5Amer Approved Change Orders: $2,500.00 walls. Account No. 210-165-638 Citywide Slurry Seal Project FY 2009-2010 This project will slurry seal local streets within the Roripaugh Hills Estates, Campus PW 09-06 1 Contractor: Roy Allan Slurry Seal, Inc. Chris White 1 0� 0% Verdes and Nicholas Valley Areas. Proposition 1 B funds will be used to fund this project. Contract Amount: $421,208.55 Amer Attar A Pre -Con is set for July 15, 2010. Account Number: 210-165-512-58xx Road and Storm Drain Repair at Rancho California Storm drain pipes have been determined to be essentially sound. The approach from this Road point will take the form of debris removal, surface preparation, and installation of concrete PW09-08 I Projectwill construct concrete paving on the invert of Jon Salazarl 0% 0% paving in the pipe invert to extend the life of the pipe; no roadway repair is anticipated. approximately 140 feet of aging triple corrugated Amer Attar Construction contract awarded at the 6/22/10 Council meeting; pre -construction meeting metal pipes under Rancho California Road, east of to be held week of 7/12/10. Hope Drive, to prolong its life. Citywide Storm Drain Improvements- Rancho Project consists of installing two catch basins and approx. 100' of RCP drainage pipe California Rd at Vincent Moraga Dr across Rancho California Road at Vincent Moraga Drive, as well as relocation of an PW09-09 I Design and construct storm drain improvements to Jon Salazar/ 0% 0% existing RCWD waterline. Bid opening was held 6/29/10, ATOM Engineering is apparent correct Flooding problems during storm events at this Amer Attar h l lg, pre -construction C d t t d d f th il 7/13/10 C ti bidder. er. onracaward scheduled e Council meeting, location. meeting to be held shortly. CITY OF TEMECULA PAGE 3 OF 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS - MONTHLY WORK PROGRESS SHEET 7/16/2010 %TIME PROJECT PRIORITY PROJECT NAME, DESCRIPTION, PROJECT COMPLETE CONTRACT CURRENT STATUS & PROGRESS NO CONTRACTOR & CONTRACT $'s ENGINEER (Est. comp./ PAID ($) bid date) Road Reconstruction at Jedediah Smith Road Project will rehabilitate roadway surface using the Asphalt Rubberized Aggregate Projectwill rebuild 28 feet (width) of roadway on Membrane (ARAM) method on Jedediah Smith Road between Temecula Parkway and Jedediah Smith Road between Temecula Parkway Jon Salazarl Cabrillo Ave; on Cabrillo Ave between Jedediah Smith Road and Vallejo Ave; and on PW09-10 I and Cabrillo Ave. Amer Attar 0% 0% Vallejo Ave between Cabrillo Ave and Ynez Road. Bid opening was held on 5/17/10, contract awarded to ICE Engineering at the 6/8/10 Council meeting. Pre -construction meeting held 6/24/10, construction anticipated to begin the week of 7/19/10. Citywide Concrete Repairs FY 2009-2010 This project will consist of various concrete repairs throughout the City. A Pre -Con is PW 10-02 1 Contractor: Mamco, Inc. Chris White 1 0% 0% currently being scheduled. ContractAmount: 170,170.70 Amer Attar Account Number: 001-164-601 PROJECTS BEING ADVERTISED FOR BIDS Citywide Slurry Seal Project FY 2009-2010 This Project is the annual slurry seal project that will slurry seal local streets within the PW 10-01 1 Contractor: xx Chris White 1 0% 0% City. Bid opening is scheduled for July 26, 2010. Contract Amount: xx Amer Attar Account Number: xx Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Installation on This Project will install fiber optic cable in existing conduits and 4 television cameras at Temecula Parkway Jerry four intersections to monitor traffic flow on Temecula Parkway between Pechanga PW 07-07 1 Contractor xx Gonzalez/Chri 0% 0% Parkway and Butterfield Stage Road. Bid opening is scheduled for July 20, 2010. ContractAmount xx s White Account Number: xx PROJECTS BEING DESIGNED BY CONSULTANTS Re -Stripe Route 79 South to 8lanes from Pechanga This project will provide four lanes in each direction on Temecula Parkway (formerly State Parkway to I-15 Kendra Route 79 South) from 1-15 to Pechanga Parkway. This project is on hold until the 1-15 / SR PW07-08 I Consultant: JMD Hannah- 60% (0612010) 50% -79S Ultimate Interchange, Project No. PW04-08 is complete. Amount: $29,210.00 ain Odll l Avlin viar Account No. 210-165-676-58XX Pechanga Parkway Storm Drain Improvements- This project includes construction of new wetlands for the Wolf Valley Creek Channel Environmental Mitigation Improvements -Stage 1. The wetlands will be created through construction of new Iandscapelrrigation systems. The site is located along the north bank of Temecula Creek PW99- 1 Consultants: Community Works Design Mayne De La 98% 98% (within flood-plain/way areas). The environmental regulatory agencies have approved this 11 EM Contract Amount: $29,840 Torre new mitigation area. Mylars are ready for signature. A site visit with the DFG took place on 03/16/10. Another site visit, this time with Army Corps and Regional Water Board was Account No. 210-165-668-58Xx conducted on April 23rd. Water table level tests showed no sign of water within 18' depth. Resource agencies are being consulted as to the next step. Murrieta Creek Bridge and Overland Drive Extension The project includes the extension of Overland Drive from Commerce Center Drive to Diaz from Commerce Center to Diaz Rd Road with a bridge over Murrieta Creek. Coordination with RCFC & WCD, U.S. Army PW00-26 I Consultant: Project Design Consultants Chris White / 100% 100% Corps of Engineers and the state environmental regulatory agencies is required. the Contract Amount: $466,940 Amer Attar design is complete and the City has the mylars and the electronic files of the plans. Account No. 210-165-602-58XX CITY OF TEMECULA PAGE 4 OF 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS - MONTHLY WORK PROGRESS SHEET 7/16/2010 %TIME PROJECT PRIORITY PROJECT NAME, DESCRIPTION, PROJECT COMPLETE CONTRACT CURRENT STATUS & PROGRESS NO CONTRACTOR & CONTRACT $'s ENGINEER (Est. comp./ PAID ($) bid date) Main Street Bridge Over Murrieta Creek This project will replace the existing Main Street Bridge over Murrieta Creek. Design (Replacement) consultant Simon Wong Engineering (SWE) and the City are continuing to pursue Consultant: Simon Wong Engineering environmental permitting and coordination issues associated with pursuing the bridge Contract amount: $Contr 9 Amendment No. 1: Contract term 93% (Phases I replacement as a project separate from the Army Corps of Engineer's Murrieta Creek PW03-05 extension Amendment No 2: Contract term extension Jon Salazar) Amer Attar 97%(2110) & II) - 97% Improvement project. Environmental technical reports required for NEPA clearance were Amendment No. 3: $322,305 (Phase 3) resubmitted to Caltrans on 4/15/10; response on cultural reports was received on 5/27/10, Amendment No. 4: $24,063 (RCWD waterline) biology comments received and forwarded to consultant on 6/23/10. Revised technical reports anticipated from consultant the week of 7/12/10, resubmittal to Caltrans for final Account No. 210-165-743-58XX review to follow. Pedestrian/Bicycle Bridge Over Santa Gertrudis This project includes the construction of an approx. 150' long ped/bike bridge over Santa Creek Gertrudis Creek near Chaparral H.S. This is a federally funded project, which will involve a PW05-11 I Consultant: Nolte Associates Jon Salazar/ 99 (2/10) 91% NEPA document. Environmental clearance (Categorical Exclusion) was obtained from ContractAmount: $132,807 Amer Attar Caltrans on 5/20/10. Request for Authorization (RFA) to Proceed with Construction Account No. 210-165-738-58XX package submitted to Caltrans on 06/24/10, approval anticipated by end July/mid-August. Western Bypass Bridge Over Murrieta Creek This project involves the design, environmental clearance, and construction of a new Consultant: TYLIN International bridge over Murrieta Creek at the westerly terminus of Western Bypass and an extension Contract Amt: $378,776.20 William of Pujol Street to the new structure. Once constructed, this will serve as the southerly PW06-04 I Amendment 2 Amt: $244,824.80 Becerra/ Avlin 80% 90% connection of the Western Bypass Corridor. 100% Plans and Specs are being reviewed. Account No. 210-165-660-58XX Otiviar The Mitigated Negative Declaration was adopted. Applications to the various environmental agencies have been submitted. Temecula Park and Ride (79 South) This project will design and construct a park and ride facility on Temecula Parkway (formerly 79 South) at La Paz. The consultant is working to finalize the plans. 100% submittal is expected during the next period. PW06-09 Design Development AAE, Inc. Amer Attar 100% 85% Contract amount $109,085 Amendment#1 $20,500 Account No. 210-165-747-58XX Pechanga Pkwy -Dual Right Turn Lanes from This project included the design and construction of 2 right -turn lanes on eastbound Temecula Parkway (SR 79S) Temecula Pkwy to southbound Pechanga Pkwy. The contractor for the Pechanga Pkwy PW06-11 I Consultant: Cozad & Fox Mayne De La 100% 98% Ph 11 Street Improvements has completed this work, as a change order to their contract. Contract Amount: $29,010 Tome Account No. 210-165-637-58XX French Valley Parkway / Interstate 15 Over -Crossing A southbound off -Ramp to Jefferson, an auxiliary lane, and widening the bridge over and Interchange Improvements- Phase 1 (PS&E) Santa Gertrudis Creek at the Winchester southbound off -ramp are the components of Consultant: Moffatt & Nichol Phase 1. City continued the design work. Status is as follows: Amend. No. 1: $ 507,881.00 Amend. No. 4: $ 632,058.00 William > 95% PS&E - Being prepared for submittal to Caltrans July 2010. PW07-04 I Amend. No. 8: $1,087,300.00 Becerrat 65%(06111) 65% > Right of Way Establishing limits of dedication. Notes: Avlin Odviar/ > Declaration of Units - Caltrans Approved Metric Exception for this ph ase. pp p p > Amend. Nos. 1, 4, & 8 amend original agreement Amer Attar > Utilities - Pothole of existing utilities within APE are complete. Relocation Claim Letter under PW02-11. was sent to all utility companies. > Amendment amounts represent portion appropriated for PW07-04. CITY OF TEMECULA PAGE 5 OF 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS - MONTHLY WORK PROGRESS SHEET 7/16/2010 %TIME PROJECT PRIORITY PROJECT NAME, DESCRIPTION, PROJECT COMPLETE CONTRACT CURRENT STATUS & PROGRESS NO CONTRACTOR & CONTRACT $'s ENGINEER (Est. comp./ PAID ($) bid date) Old Town Gymnasium This projects involves the design of the approximately 9,000 square foot gymnasium Consultant: WLC Architects adjacent the Boys & Girls Club on Pujol Street. The land is to be utilized as staging area Contract Amount: $307,390.00 Kendra for the Murrieta Creek Improvements project and it will need to be acquired from Riverside PW07- II Hannah- 15%(1210) 13% County Flood Control (RCFC) for the current design. A time line was established by OSCSD Account No. 210-190-186 Ml l Avlin tln Ociviar TCSD for the design and environmental work. The TCSD Board of Directors approved the Conceptual Master Plan on May 11, 2010. Consultant has begun design and environmental work. Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail The project will provide a Class I bicycle trail that connects the existing Santa Gertrudis Extension and Interconnect Kendra Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail at Ynez Road to the Murrieta Creek Multi -Purpose Trail at Alignment Study, Design & Environmental Clearance Hannah- Diaz Road. The City Council approved an agreement with Hall & Foreman at the 11/25/08 PW08-04 II Consultant: Hall & Foreman, Inc. Meistrell1 70% (1212010) 48% meeting. The kick off meeting was held on 01/08/09. The alignment study has been Contract Amount: $246,865.00 Avlin Otiviar completed. Extension of time for the Bicycle Transportation Account funds was approved Account No. 210-165-739-58XX on 05/01/09. The consultant is working on 90% plans, specifications and estimate. Nicolas Valley- Assessment District (Liefer Road) Kendra This project will study assessment district feasibility and formation, including completing Consultant: David Evans &Associates (DEA) Hannah- the street and minor storm drain improvements on the unimproved portions of certain PW08-06 11 Contract Amount: $120,900.00 Meistrell1 99% (0712010) 91% streets within Nicolas Valley (Liefer Road) area. Consultant is finalizing 100% plans for Avlin Otiviar 1 signature. Account No. 210-165-502-58XX Amer Attar Roripaugh Ranch Street Improvements- Phase I Ph I includes the design & construction of Butterfield Stage Road (BSR) from Murrieta Hot Construction of Butterfield Stage Road/MHSR Springs Road (MHSR) to Calle Chapos, a portion of MHSR, Calle Chapos, South Loop Rd Consultant: David Evans &Associates (DEA) Mayne De La and making the Fire Station functional. David Evans and Associates' (DEA) and Hirsh & PW09-02 I Contract Amount: $304,125 Tome/Amer0% 0% Associates, Inc. (HAI) were awarded contracts to complete the design. Final (100%) plans Account No. 210-165-723-58XX Attar ar were returned to DEA for corrections. Staff is working on the Bid Docs. The City Attorney is to review the impacts of the FDIC's new involvement. Traffic Signal Installation - Citywide Kendra This project will install traffic signals at two intersections; Meadows Parkway at Pauba Meadows Parkway at Pauba Road and Rancho Hannah- Road and Rancho California Road at Yukon Road. Completion of Plans and PW09-07 I California Road at Yukon Road Meistrell I 99% (0712010 ) 66% Specifications is anticipated in July 2010. Consultant is finalizing 100% plans for Consultant: Engineering Aylin Otiviar signature. Contract Amt: $28, 610 t: $26, I-15 / SR -79S Ultimate Interchange 30% PS&E - Comments received from Caltrans on 05/20/10. Revisions are being PW04-08 Consultant: RBF Avlin Otiviar 60%(0612011) 60% prepared. Contract Amt: $2,032,600 60% PS&E -Submittal to Caltrans scheduled for August 2010. EWA 01 Amt: $142,973 PROJECTS BEING DESIGNED BY STAFF Long Canyon Detention Basin - Access Road Plans and specifications are 90% complete. City is seeking FEMA funds to remove FE: ?????????? 0% NIA excess silt deposited within the basin before constructing the access road. Project is on hold until FEMA determination is finalized. CITY OF TEMECULA PAGE 6 OF 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS - MONTHLY WORK PROGRESS SHEET 7/16/2010 %TIME PROJECT PROJECT NAME, DESCRIPTION, PROJECT COMPLETE NO PRIORITY CONTRACTOR & CONTRACT $'s ENGINEER (Est. comp./ CONTRACT CURRENT STATUS & PROGRESS PAID ($) bid date) PROJECTS IN THE PLAI STAGE French Valley Parkway / Interstate 15 Over -Crossing Project Report - Approved January 2010. and Interchange Improvements (PA & ED) Environmental Document - Approved January 2010. Consultant: Moffatt & Nichol New Connection Report - Approved April 2010. Agreement Amount: $1,091,693.00 Freeway Agreements - City Council to evaluate for signature 07/13/2010. Amend. No. 1 202,652.40* : Amend. No. 2: 21,630.00 CCO No. 1: 25,000.00 CCO No. 2: 8,000.00 CCO No. 3: 18,008.00 CCO No. 4: 11,320.00 William PW02-11 I CCO No. 5: 37,645.00 Becerral Avlin 95%(08110) 95% Amend. No. 3: 283,982.52 Odviarl Amer Amend. No. 4: See PW07-04 Attar Amend. No. 5: 169,000.00 Amend. No. 6: 110,917.00 Amend. No. 7: 14,573.36 Amend. No. 8 See PW07-04 Amend. No. 9 100,000.00 Amend No. 10 414,774.00 Notes: > Amend. No. 1 also applies to PW07-04. See PW07 -04 for add'1 apportionment. PROJECTS WAITING IN THE WINGS Temecula Creek Crossing - Access to Highway 79 The project consists of performing an alignment study to set a specific horizontal and South (Temecula Parkway) vertical alignment for an extension of Avenida de Missions southerly to gain vehicular Bridge Alignment Study- Avenida de Missions over Kendra access to Loma Linda Road, including a bridge crossing over Temecula Creek. Final PW08-03 II Temecula Creek Consultant Creek Associates, Inc. Hannah- Hannah - Meisannh- 100% 100% engineering report is complete. Project is pending allocation of funds for design. Contract Amount: $87,923.00 Odviar Account No. 210-165-677-58XX Multi -Trails System- Margarita Road Under Crossing This project will construct a trail for bicycles and pedestrians along Santa Gertrudis Creek Consultant: LAN Engineering under Margarita Road. Data regarding existing utilities are being incorporated into the PW04-13 I Contract Amount: $114,426.00 William 100% 100% design. RCFC has provided an Encroachment Permit. Plans & Specs are complete. This Becerra project cannot be constructed until adequate funds are identified. An application was submitted for State Bicycle Transportation Account (BTA) funds on 12/1/06. Auxiliary Lanes on 1-15 in Temecula A feasibility study will be conducted to determine if auxiliary lanes can be added between on and off -ramps on 1-15 in Temecula to improve the freeway operation. An RFP to PW06-17 I Amer Attar conduct the study was published on the City's website on 02/14/07. Proposals were received on 03/16/07. The City reviewed the proposals and selected a consultant. Due to funding constraints, this project is being delayed indefinitely. CITY OF TEMECULA PAGE 7 OF 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS - MONTHLY WORK PROGRESS SHEET 7/16/2010 %TIME PROJECT PRIORITY PROJECT NAME, DESCRIPTION, PROJECT COMPLETE CONTRACT CURRENT STATUS & PROGRESS NO CONTRACTOR & CONTRACT $'s ENGINEER (Est. comp./ PAID ($) bid date) RIGHT OF WAY RELill PROJECTS French Valley Parkway/ I-15 Overcrossing and The review appraisal is complete. Caltrans has approved the appraisals. The City Council Interchange, Project Report (PR) William reviewed this matter in Closed Session on June 9, 2009. Negotiations with two property PW02-11 I Becerral Amer NIA NIA owners have begun. The City Council approved the Purchase & Sale Agreement with Attar Basics Etc. at its 06/22/10 meeting. Negotiations with the other property owner are on- going. Butterfield Stage Road - Roripaugh CFD The developer will perform his MOU commitments and Obtain the required RNV. He was Project Description: Right -of -Way issues associated directed to first focus on the RNV issues related to properties within Ph 1 of the project. He with the construction of specific improvements (BSR, Mayne De La was given City Attorney -approved release forms that the property owners must sign CFD 03-02 MHSR, fire station, etc.) Contractor: N/A; Contract: N/A Tome/Amer releasing the developer from all obligations. To date, the developer hasn't obtained any Attar signed release form. The FDIC has taken over the bank, Amtrust. Any funds to be disbursed will have to be approved by the FDIC. It is unclear if the Developer is going to have any future involvement. Discussions with the City Attorney are on-going. Pechanga Parkway, Mitigation Land Purchase & Sale Agreement was sent to the property Owner. He has not accepted the City's offer. City Council has adopted the Resolution of Necessity at the 11/25/08 meeting. The City is working on the legal documents to gain possession of the property. The California Department of Fish & Game (DFG) is now involved due to impacts to properties PW 99-11 Amer Attar that has Conservation Easements on them. They will have to sign off on this acquisition. A site visit with the DFG took place on 03/16/10. Another site visit, this time with Army Corps and Regional Water Board was conducted on April 23rd. Water table level tests revealed that there is no water within 18' depth. The resource agencies are being consulted as to the next step. Riverside County Flood Control Parcels -Old Town Final Purchase and Sale agreements4egals for portions of Museum, Theater and vacant Beryl property parcels are in process. Army Corp is reviewing revised legal descriptions. Yaskyl Amer Attar Amer Attar 1st/Front Street parcel agreement4egal description is under review. RCFC will be revising the purchasing documents in accordance with the field staking. Murrieta Creek Bridge and Overland Drive Extension To initiate this right of way work, seven title reports were ordered on 12/2/08. The City received all Iegals and plats from the consultant. Staff met with the appraiser to go over PW00-26 Amer Attar what needs to be acquired. Property staking will be done during the week of 07/12/10. Staff reviewed the draft appraisal reports and met with the appraiser. The reports are been finalized based on the City's comments. Western Bypass Bridge Over Murrieta Creek Will Becerra) City accepted the Offer of Dedication that was not accepted by County on Parcel Map PM PW06-04 I Beryl 8248, which was recorded on 2/15/1977. Four Iegals and plats will be prepared by the Yasinosky/ consultant. Title Reports for the required parcels were ordered. Legals/plats have been Amer Attar received and we are proceeding with appraisals. CITY OF TEMECULA PAGE 8 OF 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS - MONTHLY WORK PROGRESS SHEET 7/16/2010 %TIME PROJECT PRIORITY PROJECT NAME, DESCRIPTION, PROJECT COMPLETE CONTRACT CURRENT STATUS & PROGRESS NO CONTRACTOR & CONTRACT $'s ENGINEER (Est. comp./ PAID ($) bid date) SPECIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS PROJECTS Roripaugh Ranch CFD Staff reviewed the submitted Reimbursement Request for the two bridges. Comments were provided to Ashby USA representatives. Meetings were held with the developer CFD 03-02 Annie Bostre- NIA seeking these reimbursements to finalize the numbers. The City Attorney was provided Lel Amer Attar the information. All outstanding liens have been paid. The City Attorney is to review the impacts associated with the FDIC's new involvement.. CFD 01-02 Harveston CFD Amer Attar NIA No activities during the last period CFD 03-06 Harveston CFD Amer Attar NIA NIA No activities during the last period. CFD 03-01 Crown Hill CFD Amer Attar NIA NIA No activities during the last period. Wolf Creek CFD Standard Pacific continues to obtain the required soundwall waivers. As of 09-08-09, 23 waivers have been received by the City. These waivers have been recorded. With respect to properties in foreclosure, Caltrans advised the the developer is to write letters to the CFD 03-03 Amer Attar NIA NIA banks asking them to sign the waivers and that if developer does not hear from them within a reasonable time, they can assume that the bank does not want the wall. The developer sent the City the remaining documents concerning the sound walls. Some of the documents will be returned to the developer for corrections. CFD 02-08 Serena Hills CFD Amer Attar NIA NIA No activities during the last period. Quarterly Review- Tracking, preparing, and Various Projects. Various I processing Federal, State and TUMF Funds Julie Dauer On-going NIA Reimbursements Contract Administration On-going review of CIP project contracts, amendments, extra work authorizations & Various I Julie Dauer On-going NIA change orders and maintaining budget accounts. Providing assistance to staff in processing invoices for all CIP division projects. Murrieta Creek Multi Purpose Trail Project is complete and balance of federal funding to be requested for reimbursement and PW01-27 Julie Dauer NIA NIA submitted along with 'Final Report of Expenditures' for project closeout. Surface Transportation Program (STP) - De Portola Federal funding reimbursement requests will be submitted to Caltrans as project PW06-10 I Road Pavement Rehabilitation Julie Dauer NIA NIA progresses. $458,990 STP funds PW03-05 I Highway Bridge Replacement & Rehabilitation Julie Dauer NIA NIA Total HERR funds $4,337,970. Program (HBRR) - Main Street Bridge SR2S- Safe Routes to School Program - Ped/Bicycle Awaiting approval of environmental document from Caltrans. SR2S funding has been PW05-11 I Bridge over Santa Gertrudis Creek to Chaparral Hig Julie Dauer NIA NIA awarded in the amount of $425,520. In addition to SR2S funding we have been awarded $132,000 in SB821 funding. Various I Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Julie Dauer NIA NIA TUMF reimbursement requests prepared quarterly for submittal to WRCOG & RCTC. TE - Transportation Enhancement Received approval of our 'Request for Allocation' through the CTC and have submitted our PW06-15 I Winchester Road/State Route 79 North Corridor Julie Dauer NIA NIA RFA package to Caltrans for'Authorization to Proceed with Construction'. Total funds Beautification Projec awarded per TE Funding adjustments $1,646,000. CITY OF TEMECULA PAGE 9 OF 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS - MONTHLY WORK PROGRESS SHEET 7/16/2010 %TIME PROJECT PRIORITY PROJECT NAME, DESCRIPTION, PROJECT COMPLETE CONTRACT CURRENT STATUS & PROGRESS NO CONTRACTOR & CONTRACT $'s ENGINEER (Est. comp./ PAID ($) bid date) Pechanga Parkway Phase II Street Improvements- Project is essentially complete and upon payment of retention to contractor will process PW99-11 I Public Land & Highways Funded Julie Dauer NIA NIA 'Final Report of Expenditures' and final invoice for reimbursement to Caltrans. Total PLH (Phase II) funding is $4,000,000. Various I Bond Releases Julie Dauer NIA NIA Continued review of CIP project bonds scheduled for release. 2006/07 Bicycle Transportation Account Cooperative Work Agreement (CWA) has been approved by Caltrans, BTA division. The BTA Funds CWA will extend the terms of the original agreement to allow for the continuation of project PW08-04 I Santa Gertrudis Creek Bicycle Trail Extension and Julie Dauer NIA NIA design. 2006/07 BTA funds approved for the planning & preliminary engineering and total Interconnect award of $395,000. Standardize the format of the Specifications for all Specifications library is continuously being updated and amended. The boiler -plate section projects is also being reviewed and updated. All specifications were updated to 2010. Federal David McBride On-going NIA specifications were updated to new DBE regulations. CDBG boilerplate specifications were added to our library of specifications. Bid protest language per City Attorney was added to all boilerplates in June 2010. Circulation Element Implement Plan This Project is to identify all future projects necessary so that the current Circulation Amer Attar NIA NIA Element of the General Plan is fully implemented. The information developed in this project are now accessible through the City's GIS system. Update Plans to Reflect As -Built Conditions for All City receives blue prints from many contractors marked with As -Built conditions for various Recent Projects projects. Some of these As -Built conditions have never been transferred to the project ?????????? On-going NIA mylars. As -Built plans will be created for all recent projects, if it was not done at the time of submission. Consultant Selection Information is now available on the City's web -site on how to be placed on the consultant Various I Julie Dauer On-going NIA (vendor) list and data stored in this manner will be source for future RFP's & RFQ's for upcoming projects. Pavement Rehabilitation - Rancho California Road Project is currently in construction and preparation of reimbursement invoices will be PW06-14 I (STPL) Julie Dauer NIA NIA prepared for submittal to Caltrans as project progresses. STPL funding of $2,958,000. Pavement Rehabilitation of Rancho California Road from Ynez Road to Butterfield Stage Road Citywide Traffic Light Synchronization System City has been awarded $515,000 in Traffic Light Synchronization Program (TLSP) funding Purchase, install & implement an adaptive traffic (Prop 1 B). Our request for Allocation has been submitted to the California Transportation TBD I signal synchronization system along six corridors Julie Dauer NIA NIA Commission (CTC) for placement on their agenda for November 12, 2009 meeting. State within the City. to sell additional bonds to meet allocation requests. 14FI-11:111r_l0I►yi1:1:101TANI►yiINIL1119:1:1110]N161K Monthly Activity Report June / July 2010 Prepared by: Amer Attar Submitted by: Greg Butler Date: 7/27/2010 PROJECTS UNDER CONSTRUCTION Roripaugh Ranch Fire Station The majority of work was completed by April of 2006. The remaining work will be completed when the mainline utilities are installed, which the City is undertaking - estimated start in March of 2010. A fire engine/truck venting system (requested/added on 2/06) will be installed when the Contractor re- mobilizes, this cost is also included in the approved change order total. Temporary power, initially established in 2003 by the developer, had to re-established in May of 2010. City Property at Diaz Road and Dendy Parkway (Northwest RDA Property) - Rough Grading This project provided for the rough grading of the vacant City property at Diaz Road and Dendy Parkway. All work was completed on March 28, 2007. Site restoration, including hydroseeding, was completed in December of 2008. A notice of completion was approved by the City Council at the 1/13/09 meeting. Ongoing maintenance expenses will be incurred for NPDES measures until such time the property is developed. Minor BMP improvements were completed in April of 2010. Old Town Infrastructure Project -Town Square and Mercedes & Main Street This project involves construction of the Town Square and street improvements on Mercedes & Main Streets. The project was awarded on March 18, 2008. Various specialty items and added work extended the completion date through Spring of 2010. In addition final paving in this contract will be deferred to the completion of the Civic Center. Pechanga Parkway Phase II Street Improvements from Temecula Parkway to City Limits @ Pechanga Rd. This project widens Pechanga Pkwy to its ultimate width from Temecula Pkwy to Pechanga Rd. The contractor has completed the improvements. The EMWD claim against AAA has been settled. Final steps are being taken to close out this claim which in turn will closeout this project. Old Town Infrastructure Projects - Parking Structure & Office/Retail Frontage The structure was opened to the public on March 1, 2010. Punch list and close out work will be ongoing for two to three months. In addition a long term (5 year) maintenance contract will be established for enhanced landscaping constructed in the Caltrans right of way as part of this project (authorization to bid on 7/13/10). Ronald Reagan Sports Park Channel Silt Removal & Desiltation Pond This project includes restoring the Best Management Practices (BMP) of the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP), the Water Quality Management Plan (WQMP) and the requirements of RWQCB by desilting the basin located near the Sports Park. 401 Certification, Streambed Alteration Agreement, and Nationwide Permits have been acquired. Contract with current contractor is in the process of being closed out. Old Town Civic Center This project will construct the Old Town Civic Center. City Council awarded the contract to Edge Development, Inc. on 09/09/08. Edge began work on 4/8/09. Work is ongoing on interior drywall, painting, tile work, drop ceilings, casework and detail work for mechanical, electrical and plumbing. Carpet install starting 7/26 and systems furniture on 8/2/10. Temecula Community Center Expansion - Phase 2, Renovation of Historical Buildings Phase 2 of this project will renovate the Escallier House and Barn. Bids were opened on March 4, 2010. A recommendation to award a contract was approved at the City Council at the 03/23/10 meeting. Notice to proceed is effective 05/03/10 for Phase 2. Grade beams are complete. Utilities, rough in of plumbing and electrical is in process. Redhawk Park Improvements This project will add amenities, which include ADA accessible parking, a restroom, a half -court basketball court, and permanent dog park at Redhawk Community Park. As part of this project, a seatwall will be installed at Sunset Park. The Notice To Proceed was issued 12/21/09. Construction activities began in January 2010. Completion is anticipated in October 2010. Pavement Rehabilitation Rancho California Road (Ynez to East City Limit) - STPL Project