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HomeMy WebLinkAbout120120 CC Agenda - SpecialIn compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the office of the City Clerk (951) 694-6444. Notification 48 hours prior to a meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to that meeting [28 CFR 35.102.35.104 ADA Title 11]. AGENDA TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL SPECIAL MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBERS 41000 MAIN STREET TEMECULA, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 1, 2020 -10:00 AM IMPORTANT NOTICE REGARDING THIS MEETING This meeting is being conducted utilizing teleconferencing and electronic means consistent with State of California Executive Order N-29-20, dated March 17, 2020, regarding the COVID-19 pandemic. The live stream of the meeting may be viewed on television and/or online. Details can be found at temeculaca.gov/tv. In accordance with Executive Order N-29-20, the public may only view the meeting on television and/or online and not in the Council Chamber. Submission of Public Comments on Public Hearing Item: For those wishing to make public comments at this Council meeting on the Public Hearing Item, please submit your comments by email to be read aloud at the meeting by the City Clerk. Email comments must be submitted to the City Clerk at randi.johl@temeculaca.gov prior to the time that the item is called. All email comments shall be subject to the same rules as would otherwise govern speaker comments at the Council meeting. Electronic comments on agenda items for this Council meeting may only be submitted via email and comments via text and social media will not be accepted. Reading of Public Comments: The City Clerk shall read all email comments, provided that the reading shall not exceed three (5) minutes, or such other time as the Council may provide, consistent with the time limit for speakers at a Council meeting. The email comments submitted shall become part of the record of the Council meeting. CALL TO ORDER: Mayor Pro Tempore Maryann Edwards FLAG SALUTE: Mayor Pro Tempore Maryann Edwards ROLL CALL: Edwards, Naggar, Rahn, Schwank PUBLIC HEARING Any person may submit written comments to the City Council before or during a public hearing in support of or in opposition to the approval of the project(s) in the manner prescribed in the important notice at the top of this agenda. If you challenge any of the project(s) in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised in written correspondence delivered to the City Clerk prior to, the public hearing. Page 1 City Council Agenda December 1, 2020 1. Consider Amendment #2 to the Harveston Specific Plan, a General Plan Amendment, and Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (Planning Application Nos. PA18-0569 and PA 18-0660) Recommendation: That the City Council conduct a public hearing to consider resolutions approving a Specific Plan Amendment to the Harveston Specific Plan, a General Plan Amendment, and a Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report, and adopt the resolutions entitled: RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA CERTIFYING THE FINAL SUBSEQUENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPTING FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPTING A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPTING A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (SP 13) (PA18-0660) RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING A GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT APPLICATION TO REVISE THE GENERAL PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION FOR THE PARCELS WITHIN THE RESIDENTIAL OVERLAY OF PLANNING AREA 12 OF THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN FROM SERVICE COMMERCIAL TO A SPECIFIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION (SPI) LAND USE (PA18-0659) RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (SP 13) (PA18-0660) Page 2 City Council Agenda December 1, 2020 Attachments: Agenda Report Aerial Map SEIR CC Resolution Exhibit A CEQA Findings and SOC Exhibit B Mitijzation Monitoring and Reporting Program. GPA CC Resolution Exhibit A Amended General Plan Land Use Man SPA CC Resolution Exhibit A Harveston Specific Plan Amendment SEIR PC Resolution No. 2020-36 GPA PC Resolution No. 2020-37 SPA PC Resolution No. 2020-38 Specific Plan Amendment Draft Subsequent Environmental Impact Report Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report Fiscal Impact Analysis Public Correspondence Notice of Determination Notice of Public Hearing ADJOURNMENT The next regular meeting of the City Council will be held on Tuesday, December 8, 2020, at 5:30 p.m., for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 p.m., at the Council Chambers located at 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC The full agenda packet (including staff reports, public closed session information, and any supplemental material available after the original posting of the agenda), distributed to a majority of the City Council regarding any item on the agenda, will be available for public viewing online at temeculaca.gov at least 72 hours prior to the meeting. If you have questions regarding any item on the agenda, please contact the City Clerk's Department at (951) 694 6444. Page 3 Item No. 1 CITY OF TEMECULA AGENDA REPORT TO: City Manager/City Council FROM: Luke Watson, Community Development Director DATE: December 1, 2020 SUBJECT: Consider Amendment #2 to the Harveston Specific Plan, a General Plan Amendment, and Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (Planning Application Nos. PA18-0569 and PA18-0660) PREPARED BY: Scott Cooper, Associate Planner RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council conduct a Public Hearing to consider resolutions approving a Specific Plan Amendment to the Harveston Specific Plan, a General Plan Amendment, and a Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report, and adopt the resolutions entitled: RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA CERTIFYING THE FINAL SUBSEQUENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPTING FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPTING A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPTING A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (SP 13) (PA18-0660) RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING A GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT APPLICATION TO REVISE THE GENERAL PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION FOR THE PARCELS WITHIN THE RESIDENTIAL OVERLAY OF PLANNING AREA 12 OF THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN FROM SERVICE COMMERCIAL TO A SPECIFIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION (SPI) LAND USE (PA18-0659) RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (SP 13) (PA18-0660) BACKGROUND: The Harveston Specific Plan (Specific Plan No. 13) was approved by the City Council on August 14, 2001 by the adoption of Resolution No. 01-72. On August 26, 2003, the City Council adopted Amendment No. 1 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) by the adoption of Resolution No. 03-110. On May 7, 2018, Harveston-SAB LLC, a California Limited Liability Company, filed a General Plan Amendment application to amend the underlying General Plan Land Use Service Commercial designation on a portion of Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan to a Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) Land Use. Harveston-SAB LLC also filed a Specific Plan Amendment application to amend the Harveston Specific Plan to include a residential overlay on an 87.54-acre portion of Planning Area 12 that would allow for the future development of a maximum of 1,000 residential units, new development standards and design guidelines for future projects developed within the residential overlay, and a new architectural style allowed for multifamily development. The project was presented to the City Council Ad Hoc Winchester Hills Subcommittee on June 12, 2018, which at that time consisted of Council Members Jeff Commerchero and Mike Naggar. Following that meeting the project was also presented to the Subcommittee consisting of Council Members Mike Naggar and Matt Rahn on April 21, 2020, and September 1, 2020. General Plan Amendment Planning Application PA18-0659 is a proposed General Plan Amendment (GPA) to amend the underlying General Plan Land Use Service Commercial designation on a portion of Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan to a Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) Land Use. The SPI land use will allow the General Plan to defer to the provisions and restrictions of the Specific Plan. The GPA is needed to allow residential development to be proposed within the planning area as the current Service Commercial land use does not allow for residential development. Specific Plan Amendment Planning Application PA 18-0660 is a proposed Specific Plan Amendment requested by the Owner of the project including a residential overlay on an 87.54-acre portion of Planning Area 12 that would allow the future development of a maximum of 1,000 residential units, new development standards and design guidelines for future projects developed within the residential overlay, a new architectural style allowed for multifamily development, requirments for private recreation centers, and revised landscape design guidelines. Planning Commission Recommendation Staff presented the project to the Planning Commission on November 9, 2020. The Planning Commission recommended that the City Council approve the project and adopt the Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report. There were two public comments provided by email to staff regarding the project. FISCAL IMPACT: In accordance with the City's fiscal policies, a fiscal impact analysis (FIA) has been completed. The City's fiscal policies require FIAs to be completed for development that proposes an increase in residential density from what is currently allowed in the General Plan. The City requested that Keyser Marston Associates, Inc. (KMA) prepare a Fiscal Impact Analysis to analyze the impact of the proposed 87.54-acre Residential Overlay being developed as residential as well as alternative non-residential development scenarios. These scenarios were identified based on a review of the existing zoning allowances for the study area and not based on input from the developer. KMA did not conduct comprehensive market and financial feasibility analyses to determine the near -term viability of these uses. The scenarios are intended for illustrative fiscal impact purposes only. For calculation purposes, there was a reduction of 14.19 acres for the approved congregate care facility (Lantern Crest) as well as a reduction factor of 20% for internal circulation, streets, and open space for a total adjusted study area of 58.68 acres (Study Area). - Should the study area develop fully as residential development, KMA estimates a recurring fiscal deficit of approximately negative $374,000 annually ($6,370 per net acre). - Should the study area develop fully as mixed commercial and office use (for example, 722 hotel rooms, 361,000 square feet of retail, 512,000 square feet of office), KMA estimates a recurring fiscal surplus of approximately $5,090,000 annually ($87,000 per net acre). Additional analysis was also prepared for the study area developed fully as hotel, retail, and office which all resulted in an annual surplus per allowed land use. ENVRIONMENTAL: A Draft SEIR concering the project was prepared in accordance with the provisions of the California Enviornmental Quality Act (CEQA). The City Council must certify the Final SEIR for the Projet, including Findings of Facts in Support of Findings, a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program and Statement of Overridting Consideration for Air Quality impacts. ATTACHMENTS: 1. Aerial Map 2. City Council Resolution Certifying Subsequent Environmental Impact Report Adopting Statement of Overriding Considerations 3. Exhibit A - CEQA Findings and SOC 4. Exhibit B - Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program 5. City Council Resolution - General Plan Amendment 6. Exhibit A — Amended General Plan Land Use Map 7. City Council Resolution - Specific Plan Amendment 8. Exhibit A — Specific Plan Amendment 9. Planning Commission Resolution Recommending Certification of the Subsequent Environmental Impact Report Adopting Statement of Overriding Considerations 10. Planning Commission Resolution Recommending Approval of a General Plan Amendment 11. Planning Commission Resolution Recommending Approval of a Specific Plan Amendment 12. Specific Plan Amendment (Underline/Strikeout) can be downloaded at: h!tps://temeculaca.gov/362/Environmental- Review-CEQA 13. Draft Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) with Appendices which can be downloaded at: h!Ltps://temeculaca.gov/362/Environmental-Review-CEQA 14. Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) which can be downloaded at: h!Ltps://temeculaca.gov/362/Environmental-Review-CEQA 15. Fiscal Impact Analysis 16. Public Correspondence 17. Notice of Determination 18. Notice of Public Hearing CITY OF TEMECULA PA18-0660 L r' l +Cr w. S L. } +! `eye r �p �y •i� �.. w . } s. IF '._ �•�' y� 'Y' rah-' � • �'•" G U 1 inch = 600 feet 1:7,200 0 200 400 800 1,200 Feet l c7�, The Heart of Southern California Date Created: 7/2/2019 Wine Country The map PA18-0660 2.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis RESOLUTION NO.2020- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA CERTIFYING THE FINAL SUBSEQUENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPTING FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPTING A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPTING A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (SP 13) (PA18-0660) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Procedural Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. On May 7, 2018, Harveston-SAB LLC, a California Limited Liability Company, filed Planning Application Nos. PA18-0659, for a General Plan Amendment, and PA18-0660, for a Specific Plan Amendment. These applications (collectively, "Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. B. The Project was processed, including but not limited to all public notices, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Public Resources Code § 21000, et seq.) and the CEQA Guidelines (14 Cal. Code Regs. § 15000 et seq.). C. Pursuant to CEQA, the City is the lead agency for the Project because it is the public agency with the authority and principal responsibility for reviewing, considering, and potentially approving the Project. D. The Project was processed, including but not limited to all public notices, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including CEQA. E. The Harveston Specific Plan (Specific Plan No. 13) was approved by the City Council on August 14, 2001 by the adoption of Resolution No. 01-72. Amendment No. 1 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) was approved by the City Council on August 26, 2003, by the adoption of Resolution No. 03-110. On August 14, 2001, the City Council certified the Program Environmental Impact Report for the Harveston Specific Plan (SCH #99041033). F. CEQA encourages "tiering" EIRs for a sequence of actions so that later EIRs build on information in previous EIRs (Public Resources Code sections 21068.5 and 21093; CEQA Guidelines section 15152(d)). The Project is located within the Harveston Specific Plan area and, therefore, tiers off of the Program EIR for the Harveston Specific Plan. G. Pursuant to CEQA, City staff determined that the Project could have a significant effect on the environment and therefore a Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) should be prepared for the Project. H. On July 24, 2019, in accordance with CEQA Guidelines section 15082, the City published and distributed a Notice of Preparation (NOP) to all agencies and persons that might be affected by the Project. The NOP was also distributed through the State Office of Planning and Research, State Clearinghouse (SCH #2019070974). The NOP was circulated from July 24, 2019 through August 22, 2019 to receive comments and input from interested public agencies and private parties on issue to be addressed in the SEIR. I. On August 8, 2019, in accordance with CEQA Guidelines section 15082(c)(1), the City held a public scoping meeting to obtain comments from interested parties on the scope of the Draft SEIR. J. In response to the NOP, four (4) written comments were received from various individuals and organizations. These comment letters assisted the City in formulating the analysis in the Draft SEIR. K. Thereafter, the City contracted for the independent preparation of a Draft SEIR for the Project, including all necessary technical studies and reports in support of the Draft SEIR. In accordance with CEQA and the CEQA Guidelines, the City analyzed the Project's potential impacts on the environment, potential mitigation, and potential alternatives to the Project. L. Upon completion of the Draft SEIR in January 2020, the City initiated a public comment period by filing a Notice of Completion with the State Office of Planning and Research on January 31, 2020. The City also published a Notice of Availability for the Draft SEIR in San Diego Union Tribune, a newspaper of general circulation within the City. A Notice of Availability was also posted on the project site. M. The Draft SEIR was circulated for public review from January 31, 2020 through March 16, 2020. Copies of the Draft SEIR were sent to various public agencies, as well as to organizations and individuals requesting copies. In addition, copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Community Development Department, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590; the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located at 41000 County Center Drive; the Temecula Chamber of Commerce located at 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A; and the City of Temecula website, where the documents have been available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. N. In response to the Draft SEIR, the City received seven (7) written comments from various agencies, individuals, and organizations. In compliance with CEQA Guidelines section 15088, the City prepared written responses to all comments. None of the comments presented any new significant environmental impacts or otherwise constituted significant new information requiring recirculation of the Draft SEIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines section 15088.5. Those comments and the Response to Comments, together with the Draft SEIR, the Corrections and N Additions to the Draft SEIR, and the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, constitute the Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (Final SEIR). O. Pursuant to Public Resources Code section 21092.5, at least 10 days prior to certification, the City provided the Final SEIR, including responses to comments, to the public and all commenting public agencies. P. On November 9, 2020, the Planning Commission held a duly noticed public hearing to consider the Final SEIR and the Project, at which time heard and considered information presented by City staff on the Project and its environmental review. In addition, interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify regarding this matter.. Q. Following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearing and due consideration of the Project, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution No. 2020-36 recommending that the City Council certify the Final SEIR prepared for Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan, adopt Findings pursuant to CEQA, adopt a Statement of Overriding Considerations, and adopt a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for the Project. The Planning Commission also adopted Resolution No. 2020-37 and Resolution No. 2020-38, thereby recommending that the City Council take various actions, including adoption of a Specific Plan Amendment and General Plan Amendment related to the approval of the Project. R. Section 15091 of the State CEQA Guidelines requires that the City, before approving a project for which an EIR is required, make one or more of the following written finding(s) for each significant effect identified in the Final SEIR accompanied by a brief explanation of the rationale for each finding: 1. Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the project which avoid or substantially lessen the significant environmental effects as identified in the Final SEIR; or, 2. Such changes or alterations are within the responsibility and jurisdiction of another public agency and not the agency making the finding. Such changes have been adopted by such other agency or can and should be adopted by such other agency; or, 3. Specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including provision of employment opportunities for highly trained workers, make infeasible the mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the Final SEIR. S. These required written findings are set forth in Exhibit A, attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference as if set forth in full. 1. Environmental impacts, or certain aspects of impacts, identified in the Final SEIR as potentially significant, but that can be reduced to less than significant levels with mitigation, are described in Exhibit A, Section IV. 3 2. The one environmental impact identified in the Final SEIR as significant and unavoidable despite the imposition of all feasible mitigation measures is described in Exhibit A, Section V. 3. Alternatives to the Project that might eliminate or reduce significant environmental impacts are described in Section VI of Exhibit A. T. CEQA section 21081.6 requires the City to prepare and adopt a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for any project for which mitigation measures have been imposed to ensure compliance with the adopted mitigation measures. The Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program is attached to this Resolution as Exhibit B, and is herein incorporated by reference as if set forth in full. U. CEQA Guidelines section 15093 requires that if a project will cause significant unavoidable adverse impacts, the City must adopt a Statement of Overriding Considerations prior to approving the project. A Statement of Overriding Considerations states that any significant adverse project effects are acceptable if expected project benefits outweigh unavoidable adverse environmental impacts. The Statement of Overriding Considerations is part of the findings, and is attached hereto as Exhibit A, and is incorporated herein by reference as if set forth in full. V. Prior to taking action, the City Council has heard, been presented with, reviewed, and considered the information and data in the administrative record, including the Final SEIR, the written and oral comments on the Draft SEIR and Final SEIR, responses to comments, staff reports and presentations, technical studies, appendices, and all oral and written testimony presented prior to and during the public hearings on the Project. W. Custodian of Records. The City Clerk of the City of Temecula is the custodian of records, and the documents and other materials that constitute the record of proceedings upon which this decision is based are located at the Office of the City Clerk, City of Temecula, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590. Section 2. Substantive Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula, California does hereby: A. Declare that the above Procedural Findings are true and correct, and hereby incorporates them herein by this reference as though set forth in full. B. Find that agencies and interested members of the public have been afforded ample notice and opportunity to comment on the Final SEIR and on the Project. C. Find and declare that the City Council has independently considered the administrative record before it, which is hereby incorporated by reference and which includes the Final SEIR, the written and oral comments on the Draft SEIR, responses to comments 4 incorporated into the Final SEIR, staff reports and presentations, and all testimony related to environmental issues regarding the Project. D. Find and determine that the Final SEIR fully analyzes and discloses the potential impacts of the Project, and that those impacts have been mitigated or avoided to the extent feasible for the reasons set forth in the Findings attached as Exhibit A and incorporated herein by reference, with the exception of those impacts found to be significant and unmitigable as discussed therein. E. Find and declare that the Final SEIR reflects the independent judgment of the City Council. The City Council further finds that the additional information provided in the staff reports, in comments on the Draft SEIR, the responses to comments on the Draft SEIR, and the evidence presented in written and oral testimony, does not constitute new information requiring recirculation of the SEIR under CEQA. None of the information presented has deprived the public of a meaningful opportunity to comment upon a substantial environmental impact of the Project or a feasible mitigation measure or alternative that the City has declined to implement. F. Certify the Final SEIR as being in compliance with CEQA. The City Council further adopts the Findings pursuant to CEQA as set forth in Exhibit A; adopts the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program attached as Exhibit B; and adopts the Statement of Overriding Considerations as set forth in Exhibit A. The City Council further determines that all of the findings made in this Resolution (including Exhibit A) are based upon the information and evidence set forth in the Final SEIR and upon other substantial evidence that has been presented at the hearings before the Planning Commission and the City Council, and in the record of the proceedings. The City Council further finds that each of the overriding benefits stated in Exhibit A, by itself, would individually justify proceeding with the Project despite any significant unavoidable impacts identified in the Final SEIR or alleged in the record of proceedings. G. The City Council hereby imposes as a condition on the Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan each mitigation measure specified in Exhibit B, and directs City staff to implement and to monitor the mitigation measures as described in Exhibit B. 5 PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 1st day of December, 2020. Maryann Edwards, Mayor Pro Tern ATTEST: Randi Johl, City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Randi Johl, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 2020- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the Is' day of December, 2020 by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Randi Johl, City Clerk Final HARVESTON GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT AND SPECIFIC PLAN AMENDMENT - PLANNING AREA 12 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations State Clearinghouse No. 2019070974 Prepared for City of Temecula October 2020 F ESA Final HARVESTON GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT AND SPECIFIC PLAN AMENDMENT - PLANNING AREA 12 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations State Clearinghouse No. 2019070974 Prepared for City of Temecula 2121 Alton Parkway Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92606 949.753.7001 esassoc.com Bend Orlando San Jose Camarillo Pasadena Santa Monica Delray Beach Petaluma Sarasota Destin Portland Seattle Irvine Sacramento Tampa Los Angeles San Diego Oakland San Francisco D181343 October 2020 ESA OUR COMMITMENT TO SUSTAINABILITY I ESA helps a variety of public and private sector clients plan and prepare for climate change and emerging regulations that limit GHG emissions. ESA is a registered assessor with the California Climate Action Registry, a Climate Leader, and founding reporter for the Climate Registry. ESA is also a corporate member of the U.S. Green Building Council and the Business Council on Climate Change (BC3). Internally, ESA has adopted a Sustainability Vision and Policy Statement and a plan to reduce waste and energy within our operations. This document was produced using recycled paper. TABLE OF CONTENTS Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations for Harveston General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan Amendment — Planning Area 12 Paqe I. Introduction.....................................................................................................................1 II. Project Description........................................................................................................1 III. Previous Environmental Review..................................................................................2 IV. Potentially Significant Environmental Impacts Determined to be Mitigated to a Less Than Significant Level..................................................................................4 V. Potentially Significant Environmental Impacts Determined to be Significant and Unavoidable.......................................................................................25 VI. Project Alternatives ................................... VII. Statement of Overriding Considerations 26 31 Harveston GPA/SPA— Planning Area 12 I ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Table of Contents This page intentionally left blank Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 II ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of April 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations Harveston General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan Amendment — Planning Area 12 I. Introduction The California Environmental Quality Act, Public Resources Code § 21000, et seq. ("CEQA") and the State CEQA Guidelines, 14 Cal. Code Regs. § 15000, et seq. (the "Guidelines") provide that no public agency shall approve or carry out a project for which an environmental impact report has been certified that identifies one or more significant effects on the environment caused by the project unless the public agency makes one or more of the following findings: A. Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the project, which avoid or substantially lessen the significant environmental effects identified in the Environmental Impact Report (EIR). B. Such changes or alterations are within the responsibility of another public agency and not the agency making the finding. Such changes have been adopted by such other agency or can and should be adopted by such other agency. C. Specific economic, social, or other considerations make infeasible the mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the EIR.1 Pursuant to the requirements of CEQA, the City Council of the City of Temecula hereby makes the following environmental findings in connection with the proposed Harveston General Plan Amendment (GPA) and Specific Plan Amendment (SPA) — Planning Area 12 Project (Project), as more fully described in the Final Subsequent EIR (SEIR). These findings are based upon written and oral evidence included in the record of these proceedings, comments on the Draft SEIR and the written responses thereto, and reports presented to the Planning Commission and City Council by City staff and the City's environmental consultants. II. Project Description The Project is located within the Harveston Specific Plan that was approved in 2001. This Specific Plan covers approximately 550 acres and is located between Margarita Road and Interstate 15, along the Temecula City limits, in the northwest section of the City. The Specific 1 Cal. Pub. Res. Code § 21081; 14 Cal. Code Regs. § 15091. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Plan depicts a land use designation of Service Commercial for the Project Site. The Project would include a GPA that would change the existing General Plan land use designation from Service Commercial (SC) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) and a SPA that would include a residential overlay to the Specific Plan on an 87.54-acre portion of Planning Area 12. The residential overlay would allow the future development of a maximum of 1,000 residential units. As set forth in the SEIR, objectives that the City of Temecula and applicant seek to achieve with this Project (the "Project Objectives") are as follows: The Project objectives include: • Create a development compatible with and sensitive to the existing land uses in the Project area. • Provide high -quality residential development that would help to fulfill the City's regional housing needs. • Promote the development of residential land uses that convey a high quality visual image and character. • Provide high -quality residential architecture that will be required/needed within the proposed residential overlay. III. Previous Environmental Review The Harveston Specific Plan Draft EIR (State Clearinghouse No. 99041033), dated November 2000, and the Harveston Specific Plan Final EIR and Response to Comments (State Clearinghouse No. 99041033), dated February 2001, were certified on August 14, 2001. City staff has determined that the Project would result in new significant environmental impacts that were not previously addressed in the certified Harveston Specific Plan EIR, and therefore a Subsequent EIR, in accordance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15162, is the appropriate document to respond to the Project -specific changes. CEQA Guidelines Section 15150(a) states that an EIR: may incorporate by reference all or portions of another document which is a matter ofpublic record or is generally available to the public. Where all or part of another document is incorporated by reference, the incorporated language shall be considered to be set forth in full as part of the text of the EIR. In light of the previous environmental review contained in the Harveston Specific Plan EIR (2001), the Draft SEIR incorporated by reference the relevant analysis of environmental topics considered in the previously certified Harveston Specific Plan EIR. On July 24, 2019, in accordance with CEQA Guideline Section 15082, the City published a Notice of Preparation (NOP) of a Draft SEIR that included an Initial Study and circulated it to governmental agencies, organizations, and persons that may be interested in the Project, including land owners, tenants, and business owners in proximity to the site. The NOP requested comments Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 2 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations on the scope of the Draft SEIR, and asked that those agencies with regulatory authority over any aspect of the Project to describe that authority. The comment period extended through August 22, 2019. Responses to the NOP were received from the following agencies: (1) the Native American Heritage Commission, Cultural and Environmental Department, (2) the Riverside Transit Agency and (3) the South Coast Air Quality Management District. No project -specific concerns were raised by these agencies. In addition to the pubic noticing required under CEQA, City staff held an informational meeting on August 8, 2019 at the Harveston Lake House located at 29005 Lakehouse Road, Temecula, CA 92591. At the public scoping meeting, a brief presentation and overview of the Project was provided. After the presentation, oral and written comments on the scope of the environmental issues to be addressed in the Draft SEIR were accepted. The following list provides the key issues raised during the NOP comment period (refer to Appendix A of the Draft SEIR): • Recommended consultation with California Native Tribes (refer to Section 3.3, Cultural Resources, and Section 3.12, Tribal Cultural Resources, of the Draft SEIR); • Construction impacts with bus stop/relocation of bus stop temporarily (refer to Chapter 2.0, Project Description and Section 3.11, Transportation, of the Draft SEIR); • Recommendations provided by SCAQMD regarding the analysis of air quality (refer to Section 3.1, Air Quality, and Section 3.5, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with aesthetics; • Concerns with air quality (refer to Section 3.1, Air Quality, and Section 3.5, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with hazards and hazardous materials; • Concerns with traffic on Ynez Road (refer to Section 3.11, Transportation, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with school capacities (refer to Section 3.9, Public Services, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with traffic generated by the Project (refer to Section 3.11, Transportation, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with traffic and how the overpass to I-15 is the key to traffic (refer to Section 3.11, Transportation, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with safe path to travel to schools (refer to Section 3.9, Public Services, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with parks (refer to Section 3.9, Public Services, and Section 3.10, Recreation, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with crime (refer to Section 3.9, Public Services, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with health issues for homes near the freeway (refer to Section 3.1, Air Quality, and Section 3.5, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change, of the Draft SEIR). Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 3 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations The level of specificity of an EIR is determined by the nature of the project and the rule of reason. Based on the environmental evaluations provided in the IS/NOP and the Draft SEIR, the environmental issues that were found to have no impact related to Project implementation included: aesthetics, agriculture and forestry, geology and soils, hazards and hazardous materials, hydrology and water quality, mineral resources, and wildfire. The environmental issues where impacts were found to be less than significant included: energy, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, land use and planning, population and housing, public services, recreation, and utilities and service systems. Through the preparation of an Initial Study and issuance of a Notice of Preparation, the City, as lead agency, has determined the key environmental issues that could have significant impacts prior to the implementation of mitigation, and which are the focus of this SEIR analysis, are: (A) air quality, (B) biological resources, (C) cultural resources, (D) noise, (E) transportation, and (F) tribal cultural resources. As discussed further below, air quality impacts remain significant and unavoidable following the imposition of all feasible mitigation. IV. Potentially Significant Environmental Impacts Determined to be Mitigated to a Less Than Significant Level The Draft SEIR identified the potential for the Project to cause significant environmental impacts in specific areas of: air quality; biological resources; cultural resources; noise; transportation; and tribal cultural resources. Measures have been identified that would mitigate all of the impacts in this section to a less than significant level. The City Council finds that the feasible mitigation measures for the Project identified in the Final Subsequent EIR would reduce the Project's impacts to a less than significant. A. Air Quality 1. Violation of Air Quality Standards (Project and Cumulative Construction) Construction activities associated with implementation of the Project could violate air quality standards related to NOx emissions and would result in significant air quality impacts. As described below, these impacts can be mitigated to less than significant levels. The Project would involve the construction of approximately 1,000 residences on 87.5 acres. Construction activities associated with the Project would generate NOx emissions from the following construction activities: (1) grading, and excavation; (2) construction workers traveling to and from Project Site; (3) delivery and hauling of construction supplies to, and debris from, the Project Site; (4) fuel combustion by on -site construction equipment; (5) building construction. The amount of NOx emissions generated on a daily basis could vary as a function of vehicle trips per day associated with debris hauling, delivery of construction materials, vendor trips, worker commute trips, and the types and number of heavy-duty, off -road equipment used and the intensity and frequency of their operation. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 4 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations The modeled peak daily NOx emissions associated with the Project's worst -case construction air emission scenario is provided in Table 3.1-7 of the Draft SEIR that shows the maximum NOx emissions could be 141 lbs/day. These potential maximum NOx emissions would exceed the SCAQMD regional significance threshold of 100 lbs/day, and therefore, represent a significant air quality impact. As described below, the impact from the generation of NOx emissions can be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the significant project and cumulative regional construction NOx emissions identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measure would reduce the project and cumulative regional construction NOx emissions to less than significant. Mitigation Measure AQ-1: During Project construction, all internal combustion engines/construction equipment (including tug boats but excluding crew and bio- survey boats) exceeding 50 horse power and operating on the Project Site shall meet Tier 4 CARB/U.S. EPA emission standards. If not already supplied with a factory equipped diesel particulate filter, all off -road diesel -powered construction equipment shall be outfitted with BACT devices certified by CARB. Any emissions control device used by the contractor shall achieve emission reductions that are no less than what could be achieved by a Level 3 diesel emissions control strategy for a similarly sized engine as defined by CARB regulations. In addition, construction equipment shall incorporate, where feasible, emissions savings technology such as hybrid drives and specific fuel economy standards. In the event that all off -road diesel -powered construction equipment cannot meet the Tier 4 engine certification, each project applicant shall use alternative measures, which include, but would not be limited to, reduction in the number and/or horsepower rating of construction equipment, limiting the number of daily construction haul truck trips to and from the Project, using cleaner vehicle fuel, and/or limiting the number of individual construction project phases occurring simultaneously. The effectiveness of alternative measures must be demonstrated through a future air emissions study with written findings supported by substantial evidence that is approved by the lead agency before use. b) Facts in Support of Findings The SEIR analysis of the Project determined that under an estimated worst -case construction scenario, implementation of the Project would result in significant air quality impacts associated with NOx emissions. Implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-1 would reduce the emissions of NOx. EPA Tier 4 standards require a significant reduction in NOx emissions associated with the internal combustion engines of construction equipment. As shown in Table 3.1-9 in Section 3.1, Air Quality, of the Draft SEIR, the modeled mitigated peak daily NOx emissions associated with the Project's worst -case construction scenario would be reduced to a maximum of 37 lbs/day which would not exceed the SCAQMD regional significance Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations threshold for NOx of 100 lbs/day. Therefore, construction NOx emissions would be reduced to less than significant. 2. Exposure of Sensitive Receptors to Pollutant Concentrations (Project and Cumulative Localized Operational Emissions) The daily on -site operational emissions generated by the Project were evaluated against SCAQMD's LSTs for a five -acre site at a distance of 82 feet to determine whether the emissions would cause or contribute to adverse localized air quality impacts. The nearest offsite sensitive receptors are the single-family residential dwelling units located across Ynez Road, approximately 100 feet from the Project Site. The Project's total operational -related emissions generated onsite are 2.14 lbs/day for PM2.5 which exceeds the SCAQMD's screening operational LST of 2.0 for PM2.5. Therefore, localized PM2.5 emissions from operational activities would be potentially significant. As described below, the impacts from the generation of operational PM2.5 emissions can be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the significant project and cumulative localized operational PM2.5 emissions to less than significant as identified in the Final SEIR. Mitigation Measure AQ-2: The following measures will be implemented to reduce operational emissions of ROG and NOX. These measures are not all inclusive and additional measures can be substituted or added to further reduce emissions. No residential units shall be constructed with fireplaces/hearths. If this measure is substituted, total emissions reductions from the added mitigation shall meet or exceed the emissions reductions from the removal of fireplaces from the Project (i.e., a reduction in emissions equal to or greater than the reduction in emissions between Table 3.18 and Table 3.1 10). • Residents of single-family units shall be provided information documenting the benefits of using low VOC paints and cleaning supplies. A Traffic Demand Management (TDM) program shall be developed to encourage the use of non -single occupant vehicles, including information on ride share, carpool, vanpool, bus, train and trolley opportunities within the City and the region. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 6 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations • All residential parking spaces provided shall be designed to, at a minimum, achieve CALGreen Tier 1 standards for electric vehicle supply equipment of the most current Title 24 iteration at the time of building construction.'. Implementing projects proposed within the SPA shall quantify NOX and ROG emissions from the implementing project operational activities and shall demonstrate achievement of the emissions performance standard of less than 55 pounds per day of ROG and less than 55 pounds per day of NOX. If the performance standard cannot be achieved, implementing projects shall incorporate all feasible project -level mitigation such that emissions of ROG and NOX are reduced to the furthest extent possible. b) Facts in Support of Findings The SEIR analysis of the Project determined that with the implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2, specifically banning fireplaces within the residential development, the Project's PM2.5 localized operational emissions would reduce from 2.14 lbs/day of PM2.5 (refer to Table 3.1-12, of the Draft SEIR) to 1.0 lbs/day of PM2.5 (refer to Table 3.1-14, of the Draft SEIR) which would not exceed the SCAQMD's significance threshold of 2.0 lbs/day. Therefore, the PM2.5 localized operational emissions would be reduced to less than significant. 3. Exposure of Sensitive Receptors to Pollutant Concentrations (Project and Cumulative Construction TAC Emissions) Project construction would result in short-term emissions of diesel PM, which is a toxic air contaminant (TAC). Diesel PM poses a carcinogenic health risk that is measured using an exposure period of 70 years. The exhaust of off -road heavy-duty diesel equipment would emit diesel PM during site grading; paving; installation of utilities, materials transport and handling; building construction; and other miscellaneous activities. The dose to which receptors are exposed is the primary factor used to determine health risk (i.e., the potential exposure to TACs to be compared to applicable standards). Dose is a function of the concentration of a substance or substances in the environment and the duration of exposure to the substance. Dose is positively correlated with time, meaning that a longer exposure period would result in a higher exposure level for the maximally exposed individual. Thus, the risks estimated for a maximally exposed individual are higher if a fixed exposure occurs over a longer period of time. According to OEHHA, carcinogenic health risk assessments, which determine the exposure of sensitive receptors to TAC emissions, should be based on a 70-year exposure period; however, such assessments should be limited to the period or duration of activities associated with the Proj ect. 2 The 2019 CALGreen standards require all single and two-family dwellings and townhouses with private attached garages to include a dedicated 208/240-volt branch circuit to be installed and for multi -family dwellings 15 percent of the total parking spaces (but no less than 1) shall provide capabilities for electrical vehicle charging. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 7 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Risk was calculated for the offsite and onsite residential receptors within 1,000 feet of the Project Site. There are no school receptors within this 1,000-foot radius. AERMOD was used to quantify concentrations at the offsite receptors. Health risk calculations were performed using a spreadsheet tool consistent with the OEHHA guidance. Detailed risk assessment is included as Appendix B, of the Draft SEIR. With Project construction activities, the maximum incremental increase in cancer risk is projected to be up to approximately 36-in-one million for construction risk for offsite residential receptors and 69-in-one million for onsite receptors. Risk for residential receptors would exceed the SCAQMD significance threshold of 10-in-one million, and therefore, impacts would be potentially significant. The maximum exposed offsite residential receptor is located directly across Ynez Rd west of Date Street. The maximum exposed onsite receptor would change depending on the location that is developed first. However, under a worst -case condition, the maximum exposed onsite receptor would be located close to and west of Date Street. As described below, the maximum cancer risk during construction activities would be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into the Project, which avoid or substantially lessen the potentially significant maximum cancer risk during construction activities. Mitigation: Implement Mitigation Measure AQ-1 and the following Mitigation Measure: Mitigation Measure AQ-3: During construction activities, the construction supervisor will ensure that any welders used onsite will be electric. b) Facts in Support of Findings The SEIR analysis of the Project determined that implementation of Mitigation Measures AQ-1 and AQ-3 would reduce maximum cancer risk for onsite residential receptors from 69 in one million prior to mitigation (refer to Table 3.1-13, of the Draft SEIR) to 2 in one million after mitigation (refer to Table 3.1-15, of the Draft SEIR). The reduction of the maximum cancer risk to 2 in one million would be less than SCAQMD's significance threshold of 10 in one million. Therefore, cancer risk impacts to onsite residential receptors would be reduced to less than significant. B. Biological Resources (Project and Cumulative) 1. Special Status Species, Sensitive Species, or Candidate Species (project and cumulative) The project would result in grading activities to the 87.5-acre Project Site. Project construction activities would result in the removal of non-native grassland habitat, Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 8 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations disturbed habitat, and urban/developed areas. The Project Site contains suitable nesting habitat for raptors and birds, including the California horned lark, protected under the MTBA and California Fish and Game Code (Sections 3503, 3503.5 and 3513) and contains suitable burrowing owl habitat. The proposed grading operations associated with the Project could result in significant impacts to suitable nesting habitat for raptors and birds, including the California horned lark and to suitable burrowing owl habitat. As described below, the potential impact to suitable nesting habitat for raptors and birds, and to suitable burrowing owl habitat would be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the significant raptors and birds nesting habitat and burrowing owl habitat as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce impacts to raptors and birds nesting habitat and burrowing owl habitat to less than significant. Mitigation Measures MM-BI0-1: Within three days of the start of any ground - disturbing activity during the nesting season (February 1 to August 31 for songbirds; January 15 to August 31 for raptors), a qualified biologist shall conduct a survey to determine if there are active nests within the onsite trees and vegetation. If an active nest is not found, no biological monitor is required. If active nests are detected, a minimum buffer (e.g., 300 feet for songbirds or 500 feet for raptors) around the nest shall be delineated and flagged, and no construction activity shall occur within the buffer area until a qualified biologist determines the nesting species have fledged and is no longer active or the nest has failed. The buffer may be modified (i.e., increased or decreased) and/or other recommendations proposed (e.g., a temporary soundwall) as determined appropriate by the qualified biologist to minimize impacts. The qualified biologist shall monitor the removal of onsite trees and vegetation. Nest buffer distance will be based on species, specific location of the nest, the intensity of construction activities, existing disturbances unrelated to the project and other factors. Mitigation Measure MM-BIO-2: Prior to the start of any ground -disturbing activity, each project applicant shall conduct protocol BUOW surveys in accordance with the protocols established by CDFW in the CDFW 2012 Staff Report on Burrowing Owl Mitigation to confirm the presence/absence of BUOW within the Project Site and the buffer area identified within the CDFW protocol; namely, a breeding season survey consisting of four visits (one during the period February 15 — April 15; two visits, at least three weeks apart, between April 15 and June 15; and a fourth visit after June 15, to be conducted at least three weeks after the third visit), and a one -day pre -construction survey to take place no more than 14 days before beginning ground -disturbing activities on the Project Site. For the timings of the breeding season surveys, these may be modified in collaboration with CDFW. If the burrowing owl is present, protective measures, including active or passive relocation, shall be developed in consultation with CDFW to ensure compliance with the Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 9 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Migratory Bird Treaty Act and other applicable CDFW Code requirements and include, but are not limited to the following: • Occupied BUOW shall not be disturbed during nesting season unless a qualified biologist verifies through non-invasive methods that either 1) the birds have not begun egg -laying or incubation or 2) that juveniles from the occupied burrows are foraging independently and are capable of an independent survival flight. A burrowing owl relocation plan shall be prepared that recommends methods needed to relocate the burrowing owls from the project site and provide measures that will be implemented for the maintenance, monitoring, and reporting of the relocated burrowing owls to increase chances of survivorship and better ensure compliance with CDFW guidelines. This plan shall be implemented during the non -breeding season, and prior to seasonal rains to promote the best outcome for conservation of the burrowing owl. In addition to the above, each project applicant can choose to conduct additional BUOW surveys in advance of the prescribed pre -construction survey(s) protocol established by CDFW in order to assess the presence/absence of BUOW on the project site. Surveys conducted earlier than the prescribed pre -construction surveys per CDFW guidelines, would allow each project applicant to start early consultation with CDFW regarding BUOW relocation (assuming BUOW are present within the project site) well in advance of project construction activities. However, early surveys and consultation with CDFW does not eliminate the need to conduct a pre - construction clearance survey in accordance with CDFW guidelines. The pre - construction clearance survey shall be conducted within 14 days of ground disturbance to document the continued absence of burrowing owl from the project site as well as the buffer areas. If construction is delayed or suspended for more than 30 days after the clearance survey, the project site as well as the buffer areas shall be resurveyed. All protective measures, including relocation, shall be reviewed and approved by the CDFW prior to the initiating any ground disturbing activities. b) Facts in Support of Findings With the implementation of Mitigation Measure BIO-1, a qualified biologist would conduct a survey of active nests if construction activities were to occur during the nesting season. If nests are present, the qualified biologist would establish a minimum buffer around the nest so that no construction activities would occur within the buffer area. The implementation of Mitigation BIO-1 would reduce potential impacts to nesting raptors and birds to less than significant. With the implementation of Mitigation Measure BIO-2, a protocol survey prior to construction activities would occur to ensure that no burrowing owls were present on the site. If the burrowing owl is present, buffer areas identified within the CDFW protocol would be required to be established and a burrowing owl relocation plan Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 10 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations would be implemented. The implementation of Mitigation Measure 13I0-2 would reduce potential impacts to burrowing owls to less than significant. C. Cultural Resources 1. Historical Resources (Project and Cumulative) The Project has the potential to impact historical resources on the portions within the Harveston Specific Plan area. Although the Eastern Information Center (EIC) records search did not identify known archaeological or historic architectural resources within the Project, the subsurface archaeological sensitivity analysis indicates that the Project area has low potential to contain subsurface archaeological resources. Although no known historical resources were identified within the Project area, there exists the possibility, however slight, that Project -related ground disturbing activities may encounter disturbed and/or intact archaeological deposits that may qualify as historical resources. Therefore, the Project has the potential to cause a substantial change in the significance of a historical resource. As described below, potential impacts to historical resources would be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to historical resources as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce potential impacts to historical resources to less than significant. Mitigation Measure CUL-1: Prior to issuance of each grading permit and prior to the start of any ground -disturbing activity, each project applicant shall retain a qualified archaeologist, defined as an archeologist meeting the Secretary of the Interior's Professional Qualification Standards for archeology (U.S. Department of Interior 2012) and as approved by the City of Temecula, to provide archaeological expertise in carrying out all mitigation measures related to archeological resources (Mitigation Measures CUL 2 through CUL-7). Mitigation Measure CUL-2: Prior to any ground disturbing activities associated with the Project, the qualified archaeologist shall conduct cultural resources sensitivity training for all construction personnel. Construction personnel shall be informed of the types of archaeological resources that may be encountered, and of the proper procedures to be enacted in the event of an inadvertent discovery of archaeological resources or human remains. Each project applicant shall ensure that construction personnel are made available for and attend the training and retain documentation demonstrating attendance. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 11 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Mitigation Measure CUL-3: If grading activities are proposed within intact native sediments on the Project Site which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater, the qualified archaeologist shall monitor ground disturbing activities. If cultural resources are discovered, the qualified archaeologist shall have the authority to stop and redirect grading in the immediate area of a find in order to evaluate the find and determine the appropriate next steps in consultation with the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. During the course of monitoring, if the qualified archaeologist can demonstrate based on observations of subsurface conditions that the level of monitoring should be reduced, increased, or discontinued, the archaeologist, in consultation with each project applicant and the City of Temecula may adjust the level of monitoring, as warranted. Mitigation Measure CUL-4: If grading activities occur within previously graded sediments and inadvertent discoveries of subsurface cultural resources are discovered, each construction contractor shall suspend grading within 100 feet of the find until the qualified archaeologist evaluates the find and determines the appropriate next steps in consultation with the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. Mitigation Measure CUL-5: If inadvertent discoveries of subsurface cultural resources are discovered either within the intact native sediments or previously graded sediments, grading activities shall be suspended within 100 feet of the find and each project applicant, the qualified archaeologist, and the Pechanga Tribe shall assess the significance of such resources and shall meet and confer regarding the mitigation for such resources. • Pursuant to PRC Section 21083.2(b), avoidance is the preferred method of preservation for archaeological resources. If preservation in place is not feasible, each project applicant and Pechanga Tribe shall discuss reburial of the resources on the Project property, in perpetuity. The measures for reburial shall include, at least, the following: Measures and provisions to protect the future reburial area from any future impacts in perpetuity. Reburial shall not occur until all legally required cataloging and basic recordation have been completed, with an exception that sacred items, burial goods and Native American human remains are excluded. Any reburial process shall be culturally appropriate. Listing of contents and location of the reburial shall be included in the confidential Phase IV report. The Phase IV Report shall be filed with the City under a confidential cover and not subject to Public Records Request. If each project applicant and the Pechanga Tribe cannot agree on the significance or the mitigation for such resources, these issues will be presented to the Planning Director for decision. The Planning Director will make the determination based on the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act with respect to archaeological resources and will take into account the religious beliefs, customs, and practices of the Pechanga Tribe. Notwithstanding any other rights available under the law, the decision of the Planning Director will be appealable to the City Planning Commission and/or City of Temecula City Council. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 12 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations Any newly discovered cultural resources shall be subject to a cultural resources evaluation pursuant to state law prior to restarting grading within 100 feet of the discovered resources. The cultural resources evaluation of the newly discovered cultural resources shall be detailed in a Cultural Resources Treatment Plan ("Plan"). Furthermore, after ground disturbing activities are completed, the archeologist shall prepare a monitoring report (consistent with the County of Riverside Phase IV monitoring report requirements) and submit the monitoring report to the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. Mitigation Measure CUL-6: The landowner shall relinquish ownership of all cultural resources, including sacred items. burial goods and all archaeological artifacts that are recovered as a result of Project implementation to the Pechanga Tribe for proper treatment and disposition. Mitigation Measure CUL-7: The developer is required to enter into a Cultural Resources Treatment Agreement with the Pechanga Tribe. The agreement shall be in place prior to issuance of each grading permit. To accomplish this, each project applicant should contact the Pechanga Tribe no less than 30 days and no more than 60 days prior to issuance of each grading permit. This Agreement will address the treatment and disposition of cultural resources, the designation, responsibilities, and participation of professional Pechanga Tribal monitors during grading, excavation and ground disturbing activities; project grading and development scheduling; terms of compensation for the monitors; and treatment and final disposition of any cultural resources, sacred sites, and human remains discovered onsite. The Pechanga monitor's authority to stop and redirect grading will be exercised in consultation with the project archaeologist in order to evaluate the significance of any potential resources discovered on the property. Pechanga and archaeological monitors shall be allowed to monitor all grading, excavation and groundbreaking activities, and shall also have the limited authority to stop and redirect grading activities should an inadvertent cultural resource be identified. b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with CEQA Guidelines Sections 15064.5(b)(1), and 15064.5(b)(4), which require a lead agency to identify feasible measures to mitigate a substantial adverse change in the significance of a historical resource. Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7 present feasible measures to reduce substantial adverse changes in the significance of historical resources by requiring qualified technical specialists to provide oversight and worker training, as well as define the specialists' qualifications. These measures also provide clear parameters for resource monitoring and steps to be executed if a cultural resources qualifying as unique archaeological resources are discovered. With implementation of these measures, impacts to resources qualifying as historical resources would be less than significant. 2. Unique Archeological Resources (Project and Cumulative) The Project has the potential to impact unique archeological resources on the portions within the Harveston Specific Plan area. Although the Eastern Information Center (EIC) records search did not identify known archaeological or historic architectural resources Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 13 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations within the Project, the subsurface archaeological sensitivity analysis indicates that the Project area has low potential to contain subsurface archaeological resources. Although no known archaeological resources were identified within the Project area, there exist the possibility, however slight, that archaeological resources that qualify as unique archaeological resources could be encountered during Project -related ground disturbance within intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site. Therefore, the Project has the potential to cause a substantial change in the significance of a unique archeological resource. As described below, these impacts can be mitigated to less than significant levels. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to unique archaeological resources as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce potential impacts to unique archaeological resources to less than significant. Mitigation: Implementation of Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7. b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with CEQA Section 21083.1(a), which requires reasonable efforts be made to preserve in place any and all identified unique archaeological resources, as defined in Section 21083.2, that a lead agency has determined would be significantly impacted by a project. Mitigation Measures CUL- 1 through CUL-7 present reasonable efforts for the preservation in place of unique archaeological resources by requiring qualified technical specialists to provide oversight and worker training, as well as define the specialists' qualifications. These measures also provide clear parameters for resource monitoring and steps to be executed if a cultural resources qualifying as unique archaeological resources are discovered. With implementation of these measures, impacts to unique archaeological resources would be less than significant. 3. Human Remains (Project and Cumulative) There are no human remains known to exist within the Project, and given past mass grading, the potential for intact human remains is extremely low within previously disturbed sediments. However, should Project ground disturbing activities extend into intact native sediments underlying the zone subject to mass sheet grading in 2003, it is possible that such actions could unearth, expose, or disturb previously unknown human remains. Therefore, the Project has the potential to disturb human remains and impacts would be potentially significant. As described below, these impacts can be reduced to less than significant. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 14 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to human remains as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measure would reduce potential impacts to human remains to less than significant. Mitigation Measure CUL-8: If human remains are encountered, California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5 states that no further disturbance shall occur until the Riverside County Coroner has made the necessary findings as to origin. Further, pursuant to PRC Section 5097.98(b), remains shall be left in place and free from disturbance until a final decision as to the treatment and disposition has been made. If the Riverside County Coroner determines the remains to be Native American, the NAHC must be contacted within 24 hours. The NAHC must then immediately identify the MLD upon receiving notification of the discovery. The MLD shall then make recommendations within 48 hours and engage in consultation concerning the treatment of the remains as provided in PRC Section 5097.98. b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5 and California Public Resources Code Section 5097.98, which require protocols to be implemented should human remains be identified during excavation activities. Mitigation Measure CUL-8 includes the requirements as outlined in California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5 and California Public Resources Code Section 5097.98, and would reduce potential impacts on human remains to less than significant. 4. Paleontological Resources (Project and Cumulative) The Project is underlain by the Pauba Formation, which is known to contain vertebrate fossils of late Irvingtonian and early Rancholabrean ages, and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (LRCM) records search has identified a number of fossil localities associated with the Pauba Formation within approximately 0.5 mile of the Project. As such, the Pauba Formation has a high paleontological sensitivity, and there exists the possibility that Project -related ground disturbing activities extending beyond the disturbed zone previously subject to mass sheet grading in 2003 could result in significant impacts to paleontological resources. As described below, these impacts can be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to paleontological resources as identified in the Final SEIR. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 15 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations The following mitigation measures would reduce potential impacts to paleontological resources to less than significant. Mitigation Measure CUL-9: Prior to the start of earth moving activities, each project applicant shall retain a qualified paleontologist defined as one meeting SVP standards (Society for Vertebrate Paleontology, 2010) to attend any pre -grade construction meetings to determine when and where excavations extend into intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site Working with each project applicant and the construction crew, the qualified paleontologist shall determine a paleontological monitoring schedule. The qualified paleontologist, or a paleontological monitor working under the direct supervision of the qualified paleontologist, shall monitor all ground -disturbing activity that are proposed to extend into intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site. The location, duration, and timing of monitoring shall be determined by the qualified paleontologist designated for the Project in consultation with each project applicant and City and shall be based on a review of geologic maps and grading plans. During the course of monitoring, if the qualified paleontologist can demonstrate based on observations of subsurface conditions that the level of monitoring should be reduced, increased, or discontinued, the paleontologist, in consultation with each project applicant and City of Temecula may adjust the level of monitoring, as warranted. Monitoring activities shall be documented in a Paleontological Resources Monitoring Report to be prepared by the qualified paleontologist at the completion of construction and shall be provided to the City of Temecula and filed with the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County within six (6) months of grading completion for each individual project on the Project Site. Mitigation Measure CUL-10: Prior to start of earth moving activities that are proposed to extend into intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site, the qualified paleontologist shall conduct pre - construction worker paleontological resources sensitivity training. This training shall include information on what types of paleontological resources could be encountered during excavations, what to do in case an unanticipated discovery is made by a worker, and laws protecting paleontological resources. All construction personnel shall be informed of the possibility of encountering fossils and instructed to immediately inform the construction foreman or supervisor if any bones or other potential fossils are unexpectedly unearthed in an area where a paleontological monitor is not present. Mitigation Measure CUL-11: In the event of unanticipated discovery of paleontological resources when a paleontological monitor is not present, each construction contractor shall cease ground -disturbing activities within 50 feet of the find until it can be assessed by the qualified paleontologist. The qualified paleontologist shall assess the find, implement recovery and reporting measures, if necessary, and determine if paleontological monitoring is warranted once work resumes. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 16 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with Public Resources Code (PRC) Section 5097.5 and Section 30244, which require reasonable mitigation of adverse impacts to paleontological resources from developments on public (state, county, city, district) lands. Mitigation Measures CUL-9 through CUL-11 present reasonable mitigation of adverse impacts to paleontological resources by requiring qualified technical specialists to provide oversight and worker training, as well as define the specialists' qualifications. These measures also provide clear parameters for resource monitoring and steps to be executed if a paleontological resource is discovered. With implementation of these measures, impacts to paleontological resources would be less than significant. D. Noise (Cumulative) 1. Operational Noise New development within the Project area may introduce noise levels that could exceed the City's exterior and interior noise standards at future onsite residential locations. Temecula's Noise Element includes an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn for outdoor living areas such as backyard associated with residential uses and an interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Specifically, new development within the Project area could expose nearby onsite sensitive receptors to exterior noise levels exceeding 65 dBA Ldn over ambient levels and expose nearby onsite sensitive receptors to interior noise levels exceeding 45 dBA Ldn due to traffic levels, thus resulting in potentially significant noise impacts to onsite sensitive receptors. The onsite sensitive receptors could be exposed to significant exterior and interior noise levels from future traffic noise levels along (1) Ynez Road from Date Street to Country Center Drive, (2) Ynez Road from Date Street to Waverly Lane, (3) Date Street/French Valley Parkway from Ynez Road to the I-15/French Valley Parkway Interchange, (4) I-15 North of the I- 15/French Valley Parkway Interchange, (5) I-15 South of the I-I5/French Valley Parkway Interchange. As described below, these impacts can be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant exterior and interior noise impacts as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce potential exterior and interior noise impacts to less than significant. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 17 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations Exterior Noise Mitigation Mitigation Measure N-1: Ynez Road from Date Street to County Center Drive: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 304 feet of the Ynez Road centerline. The noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences proposed to be located within 304 feet of Ynez Road between Date Street and County Center Drive, each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-2: Ynez Road from Date Street to Waverly Lane: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 271 feet of the Ynez Road centerline. The noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences proposed to be located within 271 feet of Ynez Road between Date Street and Waverly Lane, each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-3: Date Street/French Valley Parkway from Ynez Road to the I 15/French Valley Parkway Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 551 feet of the Date Street/French Valley Parkway centerline. The noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences proposed to be located within 551 feet of Date Street/French Valley Parkway between Ynez Road to the I 15/French Valley Parkway Interchange, each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-4: 115 North of the Future I 15/French Valley Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located anywhere on the Project Site. The noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 18 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations uses. The features to attenuate freeway noise levels so that the exterior noise standards could be achieved include sound walls, berms, or a combination of the two. Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-5: 115 South of the Future I 15/French Valley Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located anywhere on the Project Site. The noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential uses. The features to attenuate freeway noise levels so that the exterior noise standards could be achieved include sound walls, berms, or a combination of the two. Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Interior Noise Mitigation Mitigation Measure N-6: Ynez Road from Date Street to County Center Drive: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 121 feet of the Ynez Road centerline to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within 121 feet from the Ynez Road centerline need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building construction (i.e., windows ranging up to STC-28). Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-7: Ynez Road from Date Street to Waverly Lane: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 108 feet of the Ynez Road centerline to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within 108 feet from the Ynez Road centerline need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building construction (i.e., windows ranging up to STC-28). Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-8: Date Street/French Valley Parkway from Ynez Road to the I 15/French Valley Parkway Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 219 feet of the Ynez Road centerline to achieve the interior noise Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 19 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within 219 feet from the Ynez Road centerline need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building construction (i.e., windows ranging up to STC-28). Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-9: I-15 North of the future I 15/French Valley Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features for all onsite residences to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within each residence need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building construction would provide. Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-10: I-15 South of the future I 15/French Valley Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features for all onsite residences to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within each residence need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building construction would provide. Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. b) Facts in Support of Findings The implementation of Mitigation Measures N-1 through N-5 would reduce exterior noise levels to achieve the exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn. This reduction would result in a less than significant impact. The implementation of Mitigation Measures N-6 through N-10 would reduce interior noise levels to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. This reduction would result in a less than significant impact. E. Transportation 1. Impacts on Transportation from Existing (2019) Conditions With Project (Project) The Project would result in the generation of 8,648 daily trips. These increase trips were distributed on the surrounding roadway network using the RivTAM traffic model and the distribution was manually refined based on the understanding of roadway conditions and local traffic patterns. After distribution of Project traffic, levels of service and increase in delay at intersections were evaluated. According to the City of Temecula Traffic Impact Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 20 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations Analysis Guidelines, "an increase in delay at an intersection of 2.0 seconds or more at intersections operating at an unacceptable level shall be considered a significant impact and mitigation measures will be required to reduce the delay to pre -project or acceptable conditions." The Project is not responsible for mitigating intersections for which the Project does not cause in an increase in delay of 2.0 or more seconds, even if the intersection is operating at an unacceptable LOS (LOS E or LOS F). Based on the evaluation in the Traffic Study, the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection is projected to operate at LOS F during the PM peak hour for Existing (2019) Conditions (With Project) with a change in average control delay of 28.8 seconds. As such, the Project is forecast to result in a significant impact at Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection under Existing (2019) Conditions With Project. As described below, the impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection can be reduced to less than significant level. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measure would reduce the potential impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection to less than significant. Mitigation Measure T-1: Ynez Road and Waverly Lane: Prior to the first building permit, the developer shall install a traffic signal with left and right turns permitted. b) Facts in Support of Findings After implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1, the intersection at Ynez Road & Waverly Lane would operate at an acceptable LOS A with a delay of 4.9 seconds. With implementation of this mitigation, this impact would be reduced to less than significant. 2. Impacts on Transportation from Cumulative Year (2024) Conditions With Project (Cumulative) Ambient growth rates and traffic assumed from local pending and approved development projects were applied to develop Cumulative Year (2024) Conditions Without Project traffic forecasts. Growth rates gathered from the RivTAM model were used to create ambient traffic forecasts for this scenario. The City of Temecula provided a list of pending and approved development projects assumed to be in operation by 2024 as well as assuming that the 1-1 5/French Valley Parkway Interchange project would be constructed. With the addition of Project traffic, the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection would operate at LOS F during the PM peak hour for Cumulative (2024) Conditions With Project with a change in average control delay of 23.3 seconds which is considered a significant cumulative impact. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 21 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations As described below, the 2024 cumulative impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection can be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential 2024 cumulative significant impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measure would reduce the potential 2024 cumulative impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection to less than significant. Mitigation: Implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1. b) Facts in Support of Findings After implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1, the intersection at Ynez Road & Waverly Lane would improve during the PM peak hour from LOS F to LOS C or better. Therefore, with the implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1, the Project would result in a less than significant 2024 cumulative impact at this intersection. 3. Impacts on Transportation from General Plan Buildout (2035) Conditions (With Project) A detailed travel demand model was used to evaluate growth within the City of Temecula and in the surrounding region. RivTAM utilizes inputs such as land use, travel behavior, and roadway network characteristics (number of lanes, speed, etc.) to estimate traffic demand on area roadways. The model is calibrated specifically to evaluate Riverside County and meets state and federal guidelines for model calibration. Model traffic volume growth from base year to future year was applied to the existing (2019) traffic counts to develop the General Plan Buildout (2035) Conditions (Without Project) traffic forecasts. The project trip generation estimates were applied to the traffic forecasts developed for General Plan Buildout (2035) Conditions Without Project. The addition of the General Plan Buildout roadway improvement did not impact trip distribution. Based on the traffic evaluation, the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane would operate at LOS F during the AM and PM peak hour for General Plan Buildout (2035) Conditions With Project with a change in average control delay of 12.7 seconds during the AM peak hour and 34.6 sections during the PM peak hour. As such, the Project is forecast to result in a significant impact at Ynez Road/Waverly Lane under General Plan Buildout (2035) Conditions With Project. As described below, the 2035 cumulative impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection can be reduced to less than significant. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 22 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential 2035 cumulative significant impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measure would reduce the potential 2035 cumulative impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection to less than significant. Mitigation: Implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1. b) Facts in Support of Findings After implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1, the intersection at Ynez Road & Waverly Lane would improve during the AM and PM peak hour from LOS F to LOS A and LOS B, respectively. Therefore, with the implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1, the Project would result in a less than significant 2035 cumulative impact at this intersection. F. Tribal Cultural Resources 1. Tribal Cultural Resources (Public Resources Code section 5020.1(k)) (Project and Cumulative) The Project Site has undergone mass sheet grading in 2003 as part of the Harveston Specific Plan development. The mass grading extending to depths of 10 to 24 feet below surface, which removed all surface native soils that could have contained tribal cultural resources. Although no known resources were identified within the Project area, there exists the possibility, however slight, that Project -related ground disturbing activities may encounter disturbed and/or intact tribal cultural resources that may qualify as historical resources. Therefore, the Project has the potential to cause a substantial change in the significance of a tribal cultural resource that is eligible for listing in the California Register of Historical Resources, or in a local register of historical resources as defined in Public Resources Code section 5020.1(k). As described below, these impacts can be mitigated to less than significant levels. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to tribal cultural resources as defined in Public Resources Code section 5020.1(k) as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce potential impacts to tribal cultural resources as defined in Public Resources Code section 5020.1(k) to less than significant. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 23 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Mitigation: Implementation of Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7. b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with PRC Section 21082.3, which requires any mitigation measures agreed upon in the consultation conducted pursuant to Section 21080.3.2 shall be recommended for inclusion in the environmental document and in an adopted mitigation monitoring and reporting program, if determined to avoid or lessen the impact pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (b), and shall be fully enforceable. The measures should be feasible to avoid or substantially lessen the impact on the identified tribal cultural resource. Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7 are feasible measures that will substantially lessen potential impacts to tribal cultural resources should they be identified during project construction. With implementation of these measures, impacts to tribal cultural resources would be less than significant. 2. Tribal Cultural Resources (Public Resources Code section 5024.1) (Project and Cumulative) The Project Site has undergone mas sheet grading in 2003 as part of the Harveston Specific Plan development. The mass grading extending to depths of 10 to 24 feet below surface, which removed all surface native soils that could have contained tribal cultural resources. Although no known resources were identified within the Project area, there exists the possibility, however slight, that Project -related ground disturbing activities may encounter disturbed and/or intact tribal cultural resources that may qualify as historical resources. Therefore, the Project has the potential to cause a substantial change in the significance of a tribal cultural resource that is a resource determined by the lead agency, in its discretion and supported by substantial evidence, to be significant pursuant to criteria set forth in subdivision (c) of Public Resources Code section 5024.1. As described below, these impacts can be mitigated to less than significant levels. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to tribal cultural resources as defined in subdivision (c) of Public Resources Code section 5024.1 as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce potential impacts to tribal cultural resources as defined in subdivision (c) of Public Resources Code section 5024.1 to less than significant. Mitigation: Implementation of Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 24 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with PRC Section 21082.3, which requires any mitigation measures agreed upon in the consultation conducted pursuant to Section 21080.3.2 shall be recommended for inclusion in the environmental document and in an adopted mitigation monitoring and reporting program, if determined to avoid or lessen the impact pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (b), and shall be fully enforceable. The measures should be feasible to avoid or substantially lessen the impact on the identified tribal cultural resource. Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7 are feasible measures that will substantially lessen potential impacts to tribal cultural resource should they be identified during project construction. With implementation of these measures, impacts to tribal cultural resources would be less than significant. V. Potentially Significant Environmental Impacts Determined to be Significant and Unavoidable In the environmental topical area of Air Quality, there are instances where potential environmental impacts would remain significant and unavoidable despite the inclusion of all feasible mitigation, as discussed below: A. Air Quality 1. Violation of Air Quality Standards — Operation (Project and Cumulative) Operation of the Project would result in long-term regional emissions of ozone precursors (NOx and ROG) associated with area sources, such as natural gas consumption, landscaping, applications of architectural coatings, and consumer products, in addition to operational mobile emissions. According to the Project's Traffic Study (refer to Appendix I, of this Draft SEIR), development of the Project would result in an increase in 8,648 daily vehicle trips. Modeled operations emissions are presented in Table 3.1-8. As shown, the Project would result in long-term regional emissions of NOx (79 lbs/day) and ROG (65 lbs/day) that would exceed the SCAQMD's thresholds for NOx and ROG of 75 lbs/day. Therefore, operational NOx and ROG emissions would have the potential to result in significant regional impacts. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into the Project that avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant environmental effect as identified in the SEIR. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 25 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including provision of employment opportunities for highly trained workers, make infeasible the mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the Final SEIR. Mitigation: Implement Mitigation Measure AQ-2. b) Facts in Support of Findings Implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 would reduce NOx and ROG emissions by increasing energy efficiencies and reducing vehicle miles traveled. However, because the Project does not have a specific design, nor the total number of units to be constructed is known, the reductions that would be afforded by the implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 cannot be quantified. It is not possible, without specific Project data, to identify which and to what extent the measures identified under Mitigation Measure AQ-2 would be implemented. Therefore, while implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 will result in reduced NOx and ROG emissions, it is not possible to determine if these reductions will be sufficient to reduce emissions to below regulatory thresholds. Therefore, with the implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2, which bans the inclusion of fireplaces in the residential development, ROG and NOx emissions would be reduced to 63 Ibs/day and 64 Ibs/day, respectively, but both emissions would continue to exceed the SCAQMD regional significance threshold of 55 lbs/day and the impact would be significant and unavoidable. VI. Project Alternatives A. Alternatives Considered but Rejected in the Program SEIR An EIR must briefly describe the rationale for selection and rejection of alternatives. The Lead Agency may make an initial determination as to which alternatives are potentially feasible and, therefore, merit in-depth consideration, and which are clearly infeasible. Alternatives that are remote or speculative, or the effects of which cannot be reasonably predicted, need not be considered (CEQA Guidelines, Section 15126.6(f)(3)). The development of the Project on an alternative site was not considered feasible, because no other sites are owned or controlled by the Project Applicant. No other sites were identified that would support the Project and meet the project objectives based on size, configuration, location, and proximity to existing infrastructure. Furthermore, the use of an alternative site would be expected to result in the same or similar environmental impacts as the Project. Accordingly, an alternative site was rejected from further consideration. B. Alternatives Considered in the Program EIR Four alternative scenarios, representing a range of reasonable alternatives to the Project, were selected for detailed analysis. The goal for evaluating these alternatives is to identify ways to Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 26 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations avoid or lessen the significant environmental effects resulting from implementation of the Project, while attaining most of the project objectives. The following sections provide a general description of each alternative, its ability to meet the project objectives, and a qualitative discussion of its comparative environmental impacts. As provided in Section 15126.6(d) of the CEQA Guidelines, the significant effects of these alternatives are identified in less detail than the analysis of the Project in Chapter 3 of this SEIR. • No Project/No Development Alternative (Alternative 1) • No Project/Existing Specific Plan Alternative (Alternative 2) • Mixed Residential Development Alternative (Alternative 3) • Alternative/Mixed Land Use Alternative (Alternative 4) 1. Alternative 1 —No Project/No Development Alternative a) Summary of Alternative The No Project/No Development Alternative (Alternative 1) assumes that the proposed General Plan Amendment (GPA) to update the land use designation from Service Commercial (SC) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) and the proposed Specific Plan Amendment (SPA) that would include a residential overlay would not be adopted and not implemented. Further, the No Project/No Development Alternative also assumes no development would occur with the current land use designation of Service Commercial (SC). The Project Site would be left in its current undeveloped and previously graded state. b) Reasons for Rejecting Alternative The No Project/No Development Alternative would result in no environmental impacts. As a result, this alternative would have less overall environmental impacts compared to the Project. However, this Alternative would not meet any of the project objectives. In addition, this Alternative would not support the development objectives for the Harveston General Plan Amendment/Specific Plan amendment for Planning Area 12. The City Council hereby finds that each of the reasons set forth above is an independent ground for rejecting Alternative 1, and by itself, independent of any other reason, justifies rejection of Alternative 1. 2. Alternative 2 —No Project/Existing Specific Plan Alternative a) Summary of Alternative The No Project/Existing Specific Plan Alternative (Alternative 2) assumes that the proposed General Plan Amendment (GPA) to update the land use designation from Service Commercial (SC) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) and the proposed Specific Plan Amendment (SPA) that would include a residential overlay would not Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 27 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations be adopted and not implemented. Instead, Alternative 2 assumes the current land use designation of Service Commercial (SC) would remain, and there would be no residential overlay within Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan. Based on the Temecula General Plan Land Use Element, the target floor area ratio for service commercial is 0.3. Therefore, the estimated buildable square footage for the 87.54- acre Project Site is approximately 1,143,973 square feet3 of service commercial uses. b) Reasons for Rejecting Alternative The No Project/Existing Specific Plan Alternative (Alternative 2) would result in the same impacts compared to the Project related to odors, biological resources, cultural resources, excessive groundborne vibrations, and tribal cultural resources. Alternative 2 would result in less impacts compared to the Project related to land use and planning, noise, population and housing, public services, recreation, and utilities and service systems. The No Project/Existing Specific Plan Alternative would result in greater impacts compared to the Project related to air quality, energy, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, and transportation. As stated previously, the air quality standards/violations related to regional operational emissions of NOx and ROG (Project and Cumulative level) is considered significant and unavoidable with implementation of the Project. Because Alternative 2 would result in 2.6 times more traffic volumes compared to the Project, substantially more air emissions would be generated during operational activities. The additional NOx and ROG emissions under Alternative 2 would result in a greater significant and unavoidable impact to air quality compared to the Project. Overall, Alternative 2 would result in greater environmental impacts as compared to the Project. Further, this Alternative would not meet key Project objectives as no residential development is proposed. Therefore, Alternative 2 would not fully achieve all of the Project objectives, and would not achieve some Project objectives at all (for example, provide high quality residential development to help fulfill the City's regional housing needs). The City Council hereby finds that each of the reasons set forth above is an independent ground for rejecting Alternative 2, and by itself, independent of any other reason, justifies rejection of Alternative 2. 3. Alternative 3 — Mixed Residential Development Alternative a) Summary of Alternative The Mixed Residential Development Alternative (Alternative 3) assumes that, similar to the Project, the proposed General Plan Amendment (GPA) to update the land use designation from Service Commercial (SC) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) and the proposed Specific Plan Amendment (SPA) that would include a residential overlay to Harveston Specific Plan on an 87.54-acre portion of Planning Area 12 3 87.54 acres X 43,560 square feet = 3,813,242 square feet X 0.3 = 1,143,973 square feet of service commercial uses. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 28 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations would be adopted and implemented. However, the residential overlay would not allow the future development of a maximum of 1,000 single-family residential units. Instead, for Alternative 3, it is assumed the residential overlay would allow the future development of a maximum of 570 single-family residential units (i.e., detached and attached) and 430 multi -family units (i.e., apartments). b) Reasons for Rejecting Alternative The Mixed Residential Development Alternative (Alternative 3) would result in the same impacts compared to the Project related to odors, biological resources, cultural resources, land use and planning, groundborne vibration, and tribal cultural resources. Alternative 3 would result in less impacts compared to the Project related to air quality, energy, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, noise, population and housing, public services, recreation, transportation, and utilities and service systems. The Mixed Residential Development Alternative would not result in greater impacts when compared to the Project. Air quality standards/violations related to regional operational emissions of NOx and ROG (Project and cumulative level) is considered a significant and unavoidable impact with the implementation of the Project. This Alternative would reduce the regional operational NOx and ROG emissions; however, even with this reduction, as well as the implementation of Mitigation Measures AQ-1 and AQ-2, the Alternative would still result in an exceedance of the South Coast Air Quality Management District's daily significance threshold for NOx and ROG, emissions would remain significant and unavoidable, and the Alternative's reduction in emissions is not considered a substantial reduction. Overall, this Alternative would result in less impacts compared to the Project; however, this Alternative would not avoid or substantially lessen any of the significant and unavoidable environmental effects of the Project. Alternative 3 could achieve all Project objectives; however, the implementation of Alternative 3 would eliminate the flexibility for home builders to respond to market conditions and the 57 percent to 43 percent housing mix of Alternative 3 may not be likely to be built. Alternative 3 limits the number and type of units built with a maximum of 570 single-family residential units (i.e., detached and attached) and a maximum of 430 multi -family units (i.e., apartments). Although this housing mix was identified as an alternative that could achieve the Project objectives, there is no market justification or housing study that demonstrates that this specific housing mix will provide the high -quality residential development consistent with the Project's objectives, and information submitted to the City subsequent to the publication of the Draft EIR, and contained in the record, suggests that it will not. Although Alternative 3 would result in less impacts compared to the Project, this alternative is less likely to lead to any housing if it cannot be built due to the elimination of the flexibility for home builders to respond to market conditions. In that event, the alternative will not achieve the critical objective of providing high -quality residential development that would help Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 29 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations fulfill the City's regional housing needs. The City Council hereby finds that each of the reasons set forth above is an independent ground for rejecting Alternative 3, and by itself, independent of any other reason, justifies rejection of Alternative 3. 4. Alternative 4 — Alternative/Mixed Use Land Use Alternative a) Summary of Alternative The Alternative/Mixed Use Land Use Alternative (Alternative 4) assumes that the current land use designation of Service Commercial (SC) would remain for the four (4) parcels adjacent and nearest the I-15 (APNs 916400058, 916400042, 916400052, and 91600053). The existing acreages for APNs 916400058, 916400042, 916400052, and 91600053 are approximately 4.81 acres, 10.21 acres, 5.36 acres, and 7.87 acres, respectively. These four (4) parcels comprise of approximately 28.25 acres, or approximately 32 percent of the Project Site. Applying the target floor area ratio of 0.3 for service commercial uses per Table 3.1, Detailed Land Use Summary, of the approved Harveston Specific Plan, Alternative 4 would assume a proposed 369,1714 square feet of service commercial uses within the Project Site. It is assumed the remaining parcels would include the General Plan Amendment (GPA) to update the land use designation from Service Commercial (SC) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI). It is also assumed the remaining parcels would include the proposed Specific Plan Amendment (SPA) which would include a residential overlay. The remaining parcels comprise of approximately 59.29 acres, or approximately 68 percent of the Project Site which would comprise of approximately 680 single-family residential units (i.e., detached and attached). b) Reasons for Rejecting Alternative The Alternative/Mixed Land Use Alternative (Alternative 4) would result in the same impacts compared to the Project related to odors, biological resources, cultural resources, energy, land use and planning, noise, and tribal cultural resources. Alternative 4 would result in less impacts compared to the Project in regards to population and housing, public services, recreation, and utilities and service systems. The Alternative/Mixed Land Use Alternative would result in greater impacts compared to the Project related to air quality, greenhouse gas emission and climate change, and transportation. Air quality standards/violations related to regional operational emissions of NOx and ROG (Project and cumulative level) is significant and unavoidable with the implementation of the Project. This Alternative would result in a greater significant and unavoidable impact to air quality standards/violations related to regional operational emissions of NOx and ROG (Project and cumulative level) as compared to the Project. Overall, Alternative 4 would result in greater environmental impacts as compared to the Project. The City Council hereby finds that each of the reasons set 4 28.25 acres X 43,560 square feet = 1,230,570 square feet X 0.3 = 369,171 square feet of service commercial uses. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 30 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations forth above is an independent ground for rejecting Alternative 4, and by itself, independent of any other reason, justifies rejection of Alternative 4. C. Environmentally Superior Alternative As required by CEQA Guidelines Section 15126.6, one of the alternatives must be identified as on Environmentally Superior Alternative. The Environmentally Superior Alternative is the one that would result in the fewest or least significant impacts. If the Environmentally Superior Alternative is the No Project Alternative, then an Environmentally Superior Alternative must be selected from the remaining alternatives. As discussed above, air quality standards/violations related to regional operational emissions of NOx and ROG (Project and cumulative level) is considered significant and unavoidable with the implementation of the Project. Alternative 3 would reduce the regional operational NOx and ROG emissions; however, even with this reduction, as well as the implementation of Mitigation Measures AQ-1 and AQ-2, Alternative 3 would still result in an exceedance of the South Coast Air Quality Management District's daily significance threshold for NOx and ROG, emissions would remain significant and unavoidable, and the decrease in emissions is not considered to be substantial. This Alternative could meet the objectives established for the Project. With the reduction of impacts, Alternative 3 is considered to be the environmentally superior alternative but, for the reasons stated above, is hereby rejected by the City Council. VII. Statement of Overriding Considerations The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires the lead agency to balance the benefits of a proposed project against its unavoidable environmental risks in determining whether to approve the project. The City of Temecula proposes to approve the Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 Project although significant and unavoidable impacts have been identified in the EIR. Specifically, the significant and unavoidable project and cumulative impacts are described below. A. Significant and Unavoidable Impacts 1. Air Quality Violation of Air Quality Standards — Operation (Project and Cumulative) Operation of the Project would result in long-term regional emissions of ozone precursors (NOx and ROG) associated with area sources, such as natural gas consumption, landscaping, applications of architectural coatings, and consumer products, in addition to operational mobile emissions. According to the Project's Traffic Study (refer to Appendix I, of this Draft SEIR), development of the Project would result in an increase in 8,648 daily vehicle trips. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 31 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Modeled operations emissions are presented in Table 3.1-8. As shown, the Project would result in long-term regional emissions of NOx (79 lbs/day) and ROG (65 lbs/day) that would exceed the SCAQMD's thresholds for NOx and ROG of 75 lbs/day. Therefore, operational NOx and ROG emissions would have the potential to result in significant regional impacts. Implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 would reduce NOx and ROG emissions by increasing energy efficiencies and reducing vehicle miles traveled. However, because the Project does not have a specific design, nor the total number of units to be constructed is known, the reductions that would be afforded by the implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 cannot be quantified. It is not possible, without specific Project data, to identify which and to what extent the measures identified under Mitigation Measure AQ- 2 would be implemented. Therefore, while implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 will result in reduced NOx and ROG emissions, it is not possible to determine if these reductions will be sufficient to reduce emissions to below regulatory thresholds. Therefore, with the implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2, which bans the inclusion of fireplaces in the residential development, ROG and NOx emissions would be reduced to 63 lbs/day and 64 lbs/day, respectively, but both emissions would continue to exceed the SCAQMD regional significance threshold of 55 lbs/day and the impact would be significant and unavoidable. 2. Project Benefits The City of Temecula has balanced the Project's benefits against the Project's significant and unavoidable impacts. The City of Temecula finds that each of the following benefits supports the overriding of the significant impacts identified above and in the EIR. • The Project will create a development compatible with and sensitive to the existing land uses in the Project area. Specifically, the Project will allow for a transition area between existing single family development to the east and the I-15 freeway and commercial uses to the west, thereby ensuring a gradual shift in scale. • The Project will provide the opportunity for high -quality residential development that would help to fulfill the City's regional housing needs, including the City's Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) requirement. • The Project allows for residential development in an area that already includes development, and thus the Project will help to reduce development pressure in rural areas. • The Project is located near an area with commercial, retail, and restaurant uses, and thus will encourage reduction in vehicle miles traveled. • The Project will promote the development of residential land uses that convey a high quality visual image and character. • The Project will provide high -quality residential architecture that will be required/needed within the proposed residential overlay. • The Project will provide flexibility for home builders to respond to market conditions. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 32 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and TABLE 5-1 MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR THE HARVESTON GENERAL PLAN (GPA) AND SPECIFIC PLAN (SPA) — PLANNING AREA 12 PROJECT Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Mitigation Measures Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Air Quality Mitigation Measure AQ-1: During Project construction, all internal Construction City of City of Field combustion engines/construction equipment (including tug boats but Temecula Temecula Verification and excluding crew and bio-survey boats) exceeding 50 horse power Sign -Off by and operating on the Project Site shall meet Tier 4 CARB/U.S. EPA City of emission standards. If not already supplied with a factory equipped Temecula diesel particulate filter, all off -road diesel -powered construction equipment shall be outfitted with BACT devices certified by CARB. Any emissions control device used by the contractor shall achieve emission reductions that are no less than what could be achieved by a Level 3 diesel emissions control strategy for a similarly sized engine as defined by CARB regulations. In addition, construction equipment shall incorporate, where feasible, emissions savings technology such as hybrid drives and specific fuel economy standards. In the event that all off -road diesel -powered construction equipment cannot meet the Tier 4 engine certification, each project applicant shall use alternative measures, which include, but would not be limited to, reduction in the number and/or horsepower rating of construction equipment, limiting the number of daily construction haul truck trips to and from the Project, using cleaner vehicle fuel, and/or limiting the number of individual construction project phases occurring simultaneously. The effectiveness of alternative measures must be demonstrated through a future air emissions study with written findings supported by substantial evidence that is approved by the lead agency before use. Mitigation Measure AQ-2: The following measures will be Pre -Construction/ City of City of City of implemented to reduce operational emissions of ROG and NOx. Post -Construction Temecula Temecula Temecula These measures are not all inclusive and additional measures can Building Official Project be substituted or added to further reduce emissions. or other Approval • No residential units shall be constructed with fireplaces/hearths. Designee If this measure is substituted, total emissions reductions from the added mitigation shall meet or exceed the emissions reductions from the removal of fireplaces from the Project (i.e., a reduction in emissions equal to or greater than the reduction in emissions between Table 3.1-8 and 3.1-10). • Residents of single-family units shall be provided information documenting the benefits of using low VOC paints and cleaning supplies. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 55-2 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 Mitigation Measures Air Quality (cont.) Responsible Action Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance 5. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting I Verification of Compliance Initials Date Remarks A Traffic Demand Management (TDM) program shall be developed to encourage the use of non -single occupant vehicles, including information on ride share, carpool, vanpool, bus, train and trolley opportunities within the City and the region. All residential parking spaces provided shall be designed to, at a minimum, achieve CALGreen Tier standards for electric vehicle supply equipment of the most current Title 24 iteration at the time of building construction. Implementing projects proposed within the SPA shall quantify NOx and ROG emissions from the implementing project operational activities and shall demonstrate achievement of the emissions performance standard of less than 55 pounds per day of ROG and less than 55 pounds per day of NOx. If the performance standard cannot be achieved, implementing projects shall incorporate all feasible project -level mitigation such that emissions of ROG and NOx are reduced to the furthest extent possible. Mitigation Measure AQ-3: During construction activities, the Construction City of City of Field construction supervisor will ensure that any welders used onsite will Temecula Temecula Verification and be electric. Sign -Off by City of Temecula Biological Resources Mitigation Measure BIO-1: Within three days of the start of any Pre -Construction City of City of Issuance of ground -disturbing activity during the nesting season (February 1 to Temecula Temecula Grading Permit August 31 for songbirds; January 15 to August 31 for raptors), a Qualified qualified biologist shall conduct a survey to determine if there are Biologist active nests within the onsite trees and vegetation. If an active nest is not found, no biological monitor is required. If active nests are detected, a minimum buffer (e.g., 300 feet for songbirds or 500 feet for raptors) around the nest shall be delineated and flagged, and no construction activity shall occur within the buffer area until a qualified biologist determines the nesting species have fledged and is no longer active or the nest has failed. The buffer may be modified (i.e., increased or decreased) and/or other recommendations proposed (e.g., a temporary soundwall) as determined appropriate by the qualified biologist to minimize impacts. The qualified biologist shall monitor the removal of onsite trees and vegetation. Nest buffer distance will be based on species, specific location of the nest, the intensity of construction activities, existing disturbances unrelated to the project and other factors. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 55-3 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Biological Resources (cont.) Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure BIO-2: Prior to the start of any ground -disturbing Pre -Construction City of City of Issuance of activity, each project applicant shall conduct protocol BUOW surveys Temecula Temecula Grading Permit in accordance with the protocols established by CDFW in the CDFW Qualified 2012 Staff Report on Burrowing Owl Mitigation to confirm the Biologist presence/absence of BUOW within the Project Site and the buffer area identified within the CDFW protocol.Lnamely, a breeding season survey consisting of four visits (one during the period February 15 — April 15; two visits, at least three weeks apart, between April 15 and June 15; and a fourth visit after June 15, to be conducted at least three weeks after the third visit), and a one -day pre -construction survey to take place no more than 14 days before beginning ground -disturbing activities on the Project Site. For the timings of the breeding season surveys, these may be modified in collaboration with CDFW. If the burrowing owl is present, protective measures, including active or passive relocation, shall be developed in consultation with CDFW to ensure compliance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and other applicable CDFW Code requirements and include, but are not limited to the following: • Occupied BUOW shall not be disturbed during nesting season unless a qualified biologist verifies through non-invasive methods that either 1) the birds have not begun egg -laying or incubation or 2) that juveniles from the occupied burrows are foraging independently and are capable of an independent survival flight. • A burrowing owl relocation plan shall be prepared that recommends methods needed to relocate the burrowing owls from the project site and provide measures that will be implemented for the maintenance, monitoring, and reporting of the relocated burrowing owls to increase chances of survivorship and better ensure compliance with CDFW guidelines. This plan shall be implemented during the non -breeding season, and prior to seasonal rains to promote the best outcome for conservation of the burrowing owl. In addition to the above, each project applicant can choose to conduct additional BUOW surveys in advance of the prescribed pre - construction survey(s) protocol established by CDFW in order to assess the presence/absence of BUOW on the project site. Surveys conducted earlier than the prescribed pre -construction surveys per CDFW guidelines, would allow each project applicant to start early consultation with CDFW regarding BUOW relocation (assuming BUOW are present within the project site) well in advance of project construction activities. However, early surveys and consultation with CDFW does not eliminate the need to conduct a pre -construction clearance survey in accordance with CDFW guidelines. The re- Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-4 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Responsible Action Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Verification of Compliance Initials Date Remarks construction clearance survey shall be conducted within 14 days of ground disturbance to document the continued absence of burrowing owl from the project site as well as the buffer areas. If construction is delayed or suspended for more than 30 days after the clearance survey, the project site as well as the buffer areas shall be resurveyed. All protective measures, including relocation, shall be reviewed and approved by the CDFW prior to the initiating any ground disturbing activities. Cultural Resources Mitigation Measure CUL-1: Prior to issuance of each grading permit and prior to the start of any ground -disturbing activity, each project applicant shall retain a qualified archaeologist, defined as an archeologist meeting the Secretary of the Interior's Professional Qualification Standards for archeology (U.S. Department of Interior 2012) and as approved by the City of Temecula, to provide archaeological expertise in carrying out all mitigation measures related to archeological resources (Mitigation Measures CUL-2 through CUL-7). Pre -Construction City of Temecula City of Temecula Qualified Archeologist Issuance of Grading Permit Mitigation Measure CUL-2: Prior to any ground disturbing activities Pre -Construction City of City of Issuance of associated with the Project, the qualified archaeologist shall conduct Temecula Temecula Grading Permit cultural resources sensitivity training for all construction personnel. Qualified Construction personnel shall be informed of the types of Archeologist archaeological resources that may be encountered, and of the proper procedures to be enacted in the event of an inadvertent discovery of archaeological resources or human remains. Each project applicant shall ensure that construction personnel are made available for and attend the training and retain documentation demonstrating attendance. Mitigation Measure CUL-3: If grading activities are proposed within Pre -Construction/ City of City of Verification by intact native sediments on the Project Site which are anticipated to Construction Temecula Temecula City of be 10 feet in depth or greater, the qualified archaeologist shall Qualified Temecula in monitor ground disturbing activities. If cultural resources are Archeologist consultation discovered, the qualified archaeologist shall have the authority to and Pechanga with Pechanga stop and redirect grading in the immediate area of a find in order to Tribal Tribe evaluate the find and determine the appropriate next steps in Representatives consultation with the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. During the course of monitoring, if the qualified archaeologist can demonstrate based on observations of subsurface conditions that the level of monitoring should be reduced, increased, or discontinued, the archaeologist, in consultation with each project applicant and the City of Temecula may adjust the level of monitoring, as warranted. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-55 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Cultural Resources (cont.) Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure CUL-4 If grading activities occur within previously graded sediments and inadvertent discoveries of subsurface cultural resources are discovered, each construction contractor shall suspend grading within 100 feet of the find until the qualified archaeologist evaluates the find and determines the appropriate next steps in consultation with the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. Pre -Construction/ Construction City of Temecula City of Temecula Qualified Archeologist and Pechanga Tribal Representatives Verification by City of Temecula in consultation with Pechanga Tribe Mitigation Measure CUL-5: If inadvertent discoveries of subsurface Pre -Construction/ City of City of Verification by cultural resources are discovered either within the intact native Construction Temecula Temecula City of sediments or previously graded sediments, grading activities shall Qualified Temecula in be suspended within 100 feet of the find and each project applicant, Archeologist consultation the qualified archaeologist, and the Pechanga Tribe shall assess and Pechanga with Pechanga the significance of such resources and shall meet and confer Tribal Tribe regarding the mitigation for such resources. Representatives • Pursuant to PRC Section 21083.2(b), avoidance is the preferred method of preservation for archaeological resources. • If preservation in place is not feasible, each project applicant and Pechanga Tribe shall discuss reburial of the resources on the Project property, in perpetuity. The measures for reburial shall include, at least, the following: Measures and provisions to protect the future reburial area from any future impacts in perpetuity. Reburial shall not occur until all legally required cataloging and basic recordation have been completed, with an exception that sacred items, burial goods and Native American human remains are excluded. Any reburial process shall be culturally appropriate. Listing of contents and location of the reburial shall be included in the confidential Phase IV report. The Phase IV Report shall be filed with the City under a confidential cover and not subject to Public Records Request. • If each project applicant and the Pechanga Tribe cannot agree on the significance or the mitigation for such resources, these issues will be presented to the Planning Director for decision. The Planning Director will make the determination based on the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act with respect to archaeological resources and will take into account the religious beliefs, customs, and practices of the Pechanga Tribe. Notwithstanding any other rights available under the law, the decision of the Planning Director will be appealable to the City Planning Commission and/or City of Temecula City Council. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-6 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Responsible Action Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Verification of Compliance Initials Date Remarks Any newly discovered cultural resources shall be subject to a cultural resources evaluation pursuant to state law prior to restarting grading within 100 feet of the discovered resources. The cultural resources evaluation of the newly discovered cultural resources shall be detailed in a Cultural Resources Treatment Plan ("Plan"). Furthermore, after ground disturbing activities are completed, the archeologist shall prepare a monitoring report (consistent with the County of Riverside Phase IV monitoring report requirements) and submit the monitoring report to the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. Cultural Resources (cont.) Mitigation Measure CUL-6: The landowner shall relinquish ownership of all cultural resources, including sacred items. burial goods and all archaeological artifacts that are recovered as a result of Project implementation to the Pechanga Tribe for proper treatment and disposition. Construction/ Post -Construction City of Temecula City of Temecula Qualified Archeologist and Pechanga Tribal Representatives Verification by City of Temecula in consultation with Pechanga Tribe Mitigation Measure CUL-7: The developer is required to enter into Pre -Construction City of City of Verification by a Cultural Resources Treatment Agreement with the Pechanga Temecula Temecula City of Tribe. The agreement shall be in place prior to issuance of each Qualified Temecula in grading permit. To accomplish this, each project applicant should Archeologist consultation contact the Pechanga Tribe no less than 30 days and no more than and Pechanga with Pechanga 60 days prior to issuance of each grading permit. This Agreement Tribal Tribe will address the treatment and disposition of cultural resources, the Representatives designation, responsibilities, and participation of professional Pechanga Tribal monitors during grading, excavation and ground disturbing activities; project grading and development scheduling; terms of compensation for the monitors; and treatment and final disposition of any cultural resources, sacred sites, and human remains discovered onsite. The Pechanga monitor's authority to stop and redirect grading will be exercised in consultation with the project archaeologist in order to evaluate the significance of any potential resources discovered on the property. Pechanga and archaeological monitors shall be allowed to monitor all grading, excavation and groundbreaking activities, and shall also have the limited authority to stop and redirect grading activities should an inadvertent cultural resource be identified. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-7 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Cultural Resources (cont.) Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure CUL-8: If human remains are encountered, California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5 states that no further disturbance shall occur until the Riverside County Coroner has made the necessary findings as to origin. Further, pursuant to PRC Section 5097.98(b), remains shall be left in place and free from disturbance until a final decision as to the treatment and disposition has been made. If the Riverside County Coroner determines the remains to be Native American, the NAHC must be contacted within 24 hours. The NAHC must then immediately identify the MLD upon receiving notification of the discovery. The MLD shall then make recommendations within 48 hours and engage in consultation concerning the treatment of the remains as provided in PRC Section 5097.98. Pre -Construction/ Construction City of Temecula City of Temecula Qualified Paleontologist Verification by City of Temecula Mitigation Measure CUL-9: Prior to the start of earth moving Pre -Construction City of City of Issuance of activities, each project applicant shall retain a qualified Temecula Temecula Grading Permit paleontologist defined as one meeting SVP standards (Society for Qualified Vertebrate Paleontology, 2010) to attend any pre -grade construction Paleontologist meetings to determine when and where excavations extend into intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site Working with each project applicant and the construction crew, the qualified paleontologist shall determine a paleontological monitoring schedule. The qualified paleontologist, or a paleontological monitor working under the direct supervision of the qualified paleontologist, shall monitor all ground -disturbing activity that are proposed to extend into intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site. The location, duration, and timing of monitoring shall be determined by the qualified paleontologist designated for the Project in consultation with each project applicant and City and shall be based on a review of geologic maps and grading plans. During the course of monitoring, if the qualified paleontologist can demonstrate based on observations of subsurface conditions that the level of monitoring should be reduced, increased, or discontinued, the paleontologist, in consultation with each project applicant and City of Temecula may adjust the level of monitoring, as warranted. Monitoring activities shall be documented in a Paleontological Resources Monitoring Report to be prepared by the qualified paleontologist at the completion of construction and shall be provided to the City of Temecula and filed with the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County within six (6) months of grading completion for each individual project on the Project Site. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-8 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 Mitigation Measures Cultural Resources (cont.) 5. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting I Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure CUL-10: Prior to start of earth moving activities Pre -Construction/ City of City of Verification by that are proposed to extend into intact native sediments which are Construction Temecula Temecula City of anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site, the Qualified Temecula qualified paleontologist shall conduct pre -construction worker Paleontologist paleontological resources sensitivity training. This training shall include information on what types of paleontological resources could be encountered during excavations, what to do in case an unanticipated discovery is made by a worker, and laws protecting paleontological resources. All construction personnel shall be informed of the possibility of encountering fossils and instructed to immediately inform the construction foreman or supervisor if any bones or other potential fossils are unexpectedly unearthed in an area where a paleontological monitor is not present. Mitigation Measure CUL-11: In the event of unanticipated Pre -Construction/ City of City of Verification by discovery of paleontological resources when a paleontological Construction Temecula Temecula City of monitor is not present, each construction contractor shall cease Qualified Temecula ground -disturbing activities within 50 feet of the find until it can be Paleontological assessed by the qualified paleontologist. The qualified paleontologist shall assess the find, implement recovery and reporting measures, if necessary, and determine if paleontological monitoring is warranted once work resumes. Noise Mitigation Measure N-1: Ynez Road from Date Street to County Construction City of City of Issuance of Center Drive: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each Temecula Temecula Building Permit project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to Building Official Noise Study residences located within 304 feet of the Ynez Road centerline. The or other Approval by noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard Designee Community of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as City of Development backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation Temecula Department features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound Community walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences Development proposed to be located within 304 feet of Ynez Road between Date Department or Street and County Center Drive, each project applicant shall other Designee demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-9 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Re Mitigation Measures Noise (cont.) Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure N-2: Ynez Road from Date Street to Waverly Construction City of City of Issuance of Lane: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project Temecula Temecula Building Permit applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences Building Official Noise Study located within 271 feet of the Ynez Road centerline. The noise or other Approval by attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 Designee Community dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as City of Development backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation Temecula Department features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound Community walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences Development proposed to be located within 271 feet of Ynez Road between Date Department or Street and Waverly Lane, each project applicant shall demonstrate other Designee that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-3: Date Street/French Valley Parkway from Construction City of City of Issuance of Ynez Road to the 1-1 5/French Valley Parkway Interchange: Prior to Temecula Temecula Building Permit the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall Building Official Noise Study provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 551 or other Approval by feet of the Date Street/French Valley Parkway centerline. The noise Designee Community attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 City of Development dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as Temecula Department backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation Community features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound Development walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences Department or proposed to be located within 551 feet of Date Street/French Valley other Designee Parkway between Ynez Road to the 1-15/French Valley Parkway Interchange, each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Harveston GPA/SPA— Planning Area 12 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report 5-10 ESA / D181343 October 2020 Mitigation Measures Noise (cont.) 5. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting I Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure N-4: 1-15 North of the future 1-15/French Valley Construction City of City of Issuance of Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project Temecula Temecula Building Permit applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located Building Official Noise Study anywhere on the Project Site. The noise attenuation features shall or other Approval by achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for Designee Community outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential City of Development uses. The features to attenuate freeway noise levels so that the Temecula Department exterior noise standards could be achieved include sound walls, Community berms, or a combination of the two. Each project applicant shall Development demonstrate that the City's exterior standards will be achieved through Department or the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula other Designee Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-5: 1-15 South of the future 1-15/French Valley Construction City of City of Issuance of Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project Temecula Temecula Building Permit applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located Building Official Noise Study anywhere on the Project Site. The noise attenuation features shall or other Approval by achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for Designee Community outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential City of Development uses. The features to attenuate freeway noise levels so that the Temecula Department exterior noise standards could be achieved include sound walls, Community berms, or a combination of the two. Each project applicant shall Development demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved Department or through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of other Designee Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-6: Ynez Road from Date Street to County Construction City of City of Issuance of Center Drive: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each Temecula Temecula Building Permit project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to Building Official Noise Study residences located within 121 feet of the Ynez Road centerline to or other Approval by achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Designee Community Windows proposed within 121 feet from the Ynez Road centerline City of Development need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) Temecula Department higher than standard building construction (i.e., windows ranging up Community to STC-28). Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's Development interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation Department or and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community other Designee Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-11 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Noise (cont.) Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure N-7: Ynez Road from Date Street to Waverly Construction City of City of Issuance of Lane: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project Temecula Temecula Building Permit applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences Building Official Noise Study located within 108 feet of the Ynez Road centerline to achieve the or other Approval by interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed Designee Community within 108 feet from the Ynez Road centerline need to be upgraded City of Development with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard Temecula Department building construction (i.e., windows ranging up to STC-28). Each Community project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise Development standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of Department or a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development other Designee Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-8: Date Street/French Valley Parkway from Construction City of City of Issuance of Ynez Road to the 1-1 5/French Valley Parkway Interchange: Prior to Temecula Temecula Building Permit the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall Building Official Noise Study provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 219 or other Approval by feet of the Ynez Road centerline to achieve the interior noise Designee Community standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within 219 City of Development feet from the Ynez Road centerline need to be upgraded with sound Temecula Department transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building Community construction (i.e., windows ranging up to STC-28). Each project Development applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards Department or will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise other Designee Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-12 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 Mitigation Measures Noise (cont.) 5. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting I Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure N-9: 1-15 North of the future 1-15/French Valley Construction City of City of Issuance of Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each Temecula Temecula Building Permit project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features for all Building Official Noise Study onsite residences to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA or other Approval by CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within each residence need to be Designee Community upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than City of Development standard building construction would provide. Each project applicant Temecula Department shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be Community achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to Development the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Department or Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the other Designee City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-10: 1-15 South of the future 1-15/French Construction City of City of Issuance of Valley Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, Temecula Temecula Building Permit each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features for all Building Official Noise Study onsite residences to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA or other Approval by CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within each residence need to be Designee Community upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than City of Development standard building construction would provide. Each project applicant Temecula Department shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be Community achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to Development the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Department or Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the other Designee City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Transportation Mitigation Measure T-1: Ynez Road and Waverly Lane: Prior to the Construction City of City of Issuance of first building permit, the developer shall install a traffic signal with Temecula Temecula Building Permit left and right turns permitted. Building Official or other Designee Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-13 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 RESOLUTION NO. 2020- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING A GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT APPLICATION TO REVISE THE GENERAL PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION FOR THE PARCELS WITHIN THE RESIDENTIAL OVERLAY OF PLANNING AREA 12 OF THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN FROM SERVICE COMMERCIAL TO A SPECIFIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION (SPI) LAND USE (PA18-0659) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA HEREBY FINDS, DETERMINES AND RESOLVES AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Procedural Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. The Harveston Specific Plan (Specific Plan No. 13) was approved by the City Council on August 14, 2001 by the adoption of Resolution No. 01-72. On August 26, 2003, the City Countil approved Amendment No. 1 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) by the adoption of Resolution No. 03-110. The Harveston Specific Plan as originally approved and as amended by Amendment No. 1 shall be referred to in this Resolution as the "Specific Plan". B. On May 7, 2018, Harveston-SAB LLC, a California Limited Liability Company filed two Planning Applications: No. PA 18-0659, a General Plan Amendment and No. PA18-0660, a Specific Plan Amendment. These applications (collectively "Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. C. The Project was processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including the California Environmental Quality Act. D. A Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) and Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program were prepared for the Project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act and the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines ("CEQA"). On July 24, 2019, the City published and distributed a Notice of Preparation (NOP) to all agencies and persons that might be affected by the Project. The NOP was also distributed through the State Office of Planning and Research, State Clearinghouse (SCH # 2019070974). The NOP was circulated from July 24, 2019 through August 22, 2019 to receive comments and input from interested public agencies and private parties on issues to be addressed in the SEIR. On August 8, 2019, a scoping session was held, at which time City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to determine the extent of issues to be addressed in the SEIR for the Project. The Draft SEIR was prepared under staff s direction by Environmental Science Associates (ESA). Thereafter, City staff filed a Notice of Completion with the State Clearinghouse, and circulated a Notice of Availability with the Draft SEIR and Appendices to the public and other interested parties, for a 45-day comment period between January 31, 2020 through March 16, 2020. A Notice of Availability was also posted on the project site. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Community Development Department, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590; the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located at 41000 County Center Drive; the Temecula Chamber of Commerce located at 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A; and the City of Temecula website. During the comment period, the City received seven (7) written comments on the Draft SEIR from various agencies, individuals, and organization. In compliance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15088, the City prepared written responses to all comments. None of the comments presented any new significant environmental impacts or otherwise constituted significant new information requiring recirculation of the Draft SEIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15088.5. The "Final SEIR" consists of the Draft SEIR and all of its appendices, the comments and responses to comments on the Draft SEIR, revisions to the Draft SEIR, and the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program. The Final SEIR was made available to the public and to all commenting agencies in accordance with the law. E. On November 9, 2020 the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula held a duly noticed public hearing on the proposed Final SEIR, proposed General Plan Amendment, and proposed Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) at which time all persons interested in these actions had the opportunity and did address the Planning Commission. F. After hearing all written and oral testimony on the proposed Project and duly considering the comments received, and following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearing, the Planning Commission adopted (1) Resolution No. 2020-36 recommending to the City Council that it certify the Final SEIR, (2) Resolution No. 2020- 37 recommending that the City Council adopt a resolution approving a General Plan Amendment to revise the General Plan Land Use designation for the parcels within the residential overlay of Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan from Service Commercial to a Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) land use, and (3) Resolution No. 2020-38 a resolution recommending that the City Council adopt a resolution approving Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13). G. On December 1, 2020 the City Council of the City of Temecula considered the Project and the Final SEIR for the Project, at a duly noticed public hearing at which time all interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. The Council considered all the testimony and any comments received regarding the Project and the Final SEIR prior to and at the public hearing. H. Following the public hearing, the Council adopted Resolution No. 2020- certifying the SEIR for the Harveston Specific Plan Amendment Project. L All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Resolution have occurred. Section 2. Legislative Findings. Consistent with Government Code section 65358, the City Council in approving the Project hereby finds, determines and declares that: General Plan Amendment A. The General Plan Amendment is in the public interest. z The current General Plan designation for the residential overlay portions of PlanningArea 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan is a Service Commercial (SC) land use as specified in the Harveston Specific Plan. The General Plan Amendment is in the public interest because it allows for various types of residential housing including single-family residential and multi family residential which willprovide the opportunity for high -quality residential development that would help to fulfill the City's regional housing needs, including the City's Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) requirement This General Plan amendment will provide property owners located within the Project site with additional options for developing their properties. Property owners will still be permitted to develop service commercial and will also have the option to develop commercial and/or residential uses within the project site. Section 3. Amendment to General Plan Text. The City Council approves and amends the Land Use Element of the General Plan to revise the General Plan Land Use designation for the parcels within the residential overlay of Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan from Service Commercial to a Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) land use and amends Figure LU-3 of the Land Use Element of the General Plan as shown on Exhibit A, "Proposed General Plan" attached hereto and incorporated herein as though set forth in full. Section 4. City Manager Authorization. The City Manager is hereby authorized and directed to take all steps necessary to implement this General Plan Amendment. Section 5. Consistency with General Plan. The Land Use Element of the General Plan, as amended by this Resolution, is consistent with the other elements of the General Plan, consistent with Government Code Section 65300.5. Insofar as other portions of the General Plan need to be revised to effectuate this General Plan Amendment, the City Clerk is hereby authorized and directed to make all necessary revisions to effectuate this General Plan Amendment. Section 6. Severability. If any portion, provision, section, paragraph, sentence, or word of this Resolution is rendered or declared to be invalid by any final court action in a court of competent jurisdiction, or by reason of any preemptive legislation, the remaining portions, provisions, sections, paragraphs, sentences, and words of this Resolution shall remain in full force and effect and shall be interpreted by the court so as to give effect to such remaining portions of the Resolution. Section 7. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon its adoption. Section 8. Notice of Adoption. The City Clerk shall certify to the adoption of this Resolution. 3 PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 1st day of December, 2020. Mary Ann Edwards, Mayor Pro Tempore ATTEST: Randi Johl, City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Randi Johl, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 2020- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 1st day of December, 2020 by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Randi Johl, City Clerk Existing General Plan Land Use Proposed General Plan Land Use 2� a . Sc $ 0 \ PARK - US \� > � T. � Project Site s I , & EM * �P e . _ ._ _ %gI ( RESOLUTION NO. 2020- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (SP 13) (PA18-0660) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA HEREBY FINDS, DETERMINES AND RESOLVES AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Procedural Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. The Harveston Specific Plan (Specific Plan No. 13) was approved by the City Council on August 14, 2001 by the adoption of Resolution No. 01-72. On August 26, 2003, the City Countil approved Amendment No. 1 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) by the adoption of Resolution No. 03-110. The Harveston Specific Plan as originally approved and as amended by Amendment No. 1 shall be referred to in this Resolution as the "Specific Plan". B. On May 7, 2018, Harveston-SAB LLC, a California Limited Liability Company filed two Planning Applications: No. PA 18-0659, a General Plan Amendment and No. PA18-0660, a Specific Plan Amendment. These applications (collectively "Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. C. The Project was processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including the California Environmental Quality Act. D. A Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) and Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program were prepared for the Project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act and the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines ("CEQA"). On July 24, 2019, the City published and distributed a Notice of Preparation (NOP) to all agencies and persons that might be affected by the Project. The NOP was also distributed through the State Office of Planning and Research, State Clearinghouse (SCH # 2019070974). The NOP was circulated from July 24, 2019 through August 22, 2019 to receive comments and input from interested public agencies and private parties on issues to be addressed in the SEIR. On August 8, 2019, a scoping session was held, at which time City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to determine the extent of issues to be addressed in the SEIR for the Project. The Draft SEIR was prepared under staff s direction by Environmental Science Associates (ESA). Thereafter, City staff filed a Notice of Completion with the State Clearinghouse, and circulated a Notice of Availability with the Draft SEIR and Appendices to the public and other interested parties, for a 45-day comment period between January 31, 2020 through March 16, 2020. A Notice of Availability was also posted on the project site. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Community Development Department, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590; the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located at 41000 County Center Drive; the Temecula Chamber of Commerce located at 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A; and the City of Temecula website. During the comment period, the City received seven (7) written comments on the Draft SEIR from various agencies, individuals, and organization. In compliance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15088, the City prepared written responses to all comments. None of the comments presented any new significant environmental impacts or otherwise constituted significant new information requiring recirculation of the Draft SEIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15088.5. The "Final SEIR" consists of the Draft SEIR and all of its appendices, the comments and responses to comments on the Draft SEIR, revisions to the Draft SEIR, and the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program. The Final SEIR was made available to the public and to all commenting agencies in accordance with the law. E. The Specific Plan provides standards and guidelines for development of specific land uses. Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan would update and modify those standards and land uses by adding a residential overlay land use with associated development and design standards along with a new architectural style. F. On November 9, 2020 the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula held a duly noticed public hearing on the proposed Subsequent Environmental Impact Report, proposed General Plan Amendment, and proposed Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) at which time all persons interested in these actions had the opportunity and did address the Planning Commission. G. After hearing all written and oral testimony on the proposed Project and duly considering the comments received, and following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearing, the Planning Commission adopted (1) Resolution No. 2020-36 recommending to the City Council that it certify the Final SEIR, (2) Resolution No. 2020- 37 recommending that the City Council adopt a resolution approving a General Plan Amendment to revise the General Plan Land Use designation for the parcels within the residential overlay of Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan from Service Commercial to a Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) land use, and (3) Resolution No. 2020-38 a resolution recommending that the City Council adopt a resolution approving Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13). H. On December 1, 2020 the City Council of the City of Temecula considered the Project and the Final SEIR for the Project, at a duly noticed public hearing at which time all interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. The Council considered all the testimony and any comments received regarding the Project and the Final SEIR prior to and at the public hearing. I. Following the public hearing, the Council adopted Resolution No. 2020- certifying the Subsequent Final Environmental Impact Report for the Harveston Specific Plan Amendment Project. J. All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Resolution have occurred. Section 2. Further Findings. Consistent with Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.16.020, the City Council, in approving Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) hereby finds, determines and declares that: N A. The proposed specific plan amendment is consistent with the general plan and development code. The Harveston Specific Plan discusses, at length, the consistency between the Specific Plan and the General Plan. Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan does not make any material changes to the Specific Plan that would impact the consistency findings set forth in the Specific Plan. The findings of consistency contained in the Harveston Specific Plan are applicable and are incorporated herein by this reference. The General Plan's Land Use Element Goal I is to have a diverse and integrated mix of residential, commercial, industrial, recreational, public and open space land uses. The Harveston Specific Plan creates unified, cohesive neighborhoods, and commercial/mixed-use areas. In addition to these land uses, the Harveston Specific Plan provides neighborhood amenities, as well as open space and recreational facilities. Policy 1.6 of the General Plan 's Land Use Element is to encourage flexible zoning techniques in appropriate locations to encourage mixed use development, achieve innovative site design, and achieve a range of transition of densities. The residential overlay designation would overlay the existing Service Commercial (SC) zone that is designated on the Project Site within the existing Specific Plan. However, the allowance to develop Service Commercial (SC) will remain, as future developers will have the flexibility to develop commercial and/or residential uses within the Project Site. Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan is also consistent with the City's development code because the City will require that all new construction comply with the City's design and building standards. B. The proposed specific plan amendment would not be detrimental to the public interest, health, safety, convenience or welfare of the city. Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan would not be detrimental to the public interest, health, safety, convenience or welfare of the City because the Specific Plan clearly defines land uses, and establishes development standards, regulations and building criteria for each land use type. The proposed residential overlay and architectural style provides an additional land use option for development but does not add any additional acreage or lots to the previously approved Specific Plan. C. The subject property is physically suitable for the requested land use designations and the anticipated land use developments. The subject property area has been previously mass graded and additional acreage or area is not proposed as part ofAmendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan. The proposed residential overlay is located adjacent to existing residential development and a public community sports park accessible to future residents and near an area that contains commercial, retail, and restaurant uses. Therefore, the property is physically suitable for development under either the proposed residential overlay or the existing service commercial land use developments. D. The proposed specific plan amendment shall ensure development of desirable character which will be compatible with existing and proposed development in the surrounding neighborhood. Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan shall ensure development of desirable character which will be compatible with existing and proposed development in the surrounding neighborhood. With the proposed residential overlay and architectural style the Specific Plan will provide development standards which will be compatible with the existing surrounding development and already built Harveston community as the residential overlay is located directly adjacent to the existing Harveston community which contains single family, multi family, commercial, and mixed use development. Section 3. Approval of Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13). The City Council of the City of Temecula hereby approves that certain Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) in substantially the form attached hereto as Exhibit "A". PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this 1st day of December, 2020. Mary Ann Edwards, Mayor Pro Tempore ATTEST: Randi Johl, City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Randi Johl, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 2020- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the Pt day of December, 2020 by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Randi Johl, City Clerk Harveston Specific Plan Lennar Communities Prepared For: City of Temecula Planning Department 41000 Main Street Temecula, CA 92590 Originally Prepared By: EDAW, Inc. 17875 Von Karman Avenue, Suite 400 Irvine, CA 92614 with William Hezmalhalch Architects, Inc. and RBF Consulting SEPTEMBER 1999 REVISED JANUARY 2001 ADOPTED AUGUST 2001 AMENDED AUGUST 2003 REVISED JUNE/JULY 2006 (Figures Only — Text Not Revised) VERSION SUBMITTED — OCTOBER 2020 WHA Inc. [ This page intentionally left blank ] HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 SUMMARY.................................................................................................................................1-1 1.1 Purpose............................................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Organization.................................................................................................................... 1-1 2.0 INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................................... 2-1 2.1 Purpose and Intent.......................................................................................................... 2-1 2.2 Scope of the Specific Plan.............................................................................................. 2-1 2.3 Specific Plan Modifications............................................................................................ 2-2 2.4 Project Location and Setting........................................................................................... 2-2 2.5 General Plan Consistency............................................................................................... 2-3 3.0 LAND USE PLAN..................................................................................................................... 3-1 3.1 Specific Land Use Plan Description............................................................................... 3-1 3.1.1 Residential.........................................................................................................3-1 3.1.2 Service Commercial........................................................................................... 3-5 3.1.3 Greenbelt/Paseos and Landscape Development Zones ...................................... 3-6 3.1.4 Mixed Use Overlay............................................................................................ 3-6 3.1.5 School................................................................................................................3-6 3.1.6 Parks.................................................................................................................. 3-6 3.1.7 Roads..................................................................................................................3-7 3.2 Specific Plan Design Objectives..................................................................................... 3-7 3.3 Specific Land Use Plan General Development Standards ............................................. 3-8 4.0 CIRCULATION PLAN............................................................................................................. 4-1 4.1 Circulation Plan Description........................................................................................... 4-1 4.1.1 Bicycle Plan....................................................................................................... 4-1 4.2 Circulation Plan General Development Standards.......................................................... 4-1 5.0 INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN.................................................................................................... 5-1 5.1 Drainage..........................................................................................................................5-1 5.1.1 Drainage Plan Description................................................................................. 5-1 5.1.2 Drainage General Development Standards........................................................ 5-1 5.2 Water ...........................................................................................................................5-3 5.2.1 Water Plan Description...................................................................................... 5-3 5.2.2 Water Plan General Development Standards..................................................... 5-3 5.3 Sewer ...........................................................................................................................5-7 5.3.1 Sewer Plan Description...................................................................................... 5-7 5.3.2 Sewer Plan General Development Standards .................................................... 5-7 6.0 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN........................................................................... 6-1 6.1 Open Space and Recreation Plan Description................................................................. 6-1 6.1.1 Park and Recreation Opportunities................................................................... 6-1 6.2 Open Space and Recreation Plan General Development Standards ............................... 6-9 Harveston Specific Plan i Revised August 2003 October 2020 HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 7.0 UTILITIES PLAN AND PUBLIC SERVICES................................................................... 7.1 Utilities...................................................................................................................... 7.1.1 Electricity....................................................................................................... 7.1.2 Natural Gas.................................................................................................... 7.2 Public Services............................................................................................................ 7.2.1 Police Protection............................................................................................ 7.2.2 Fire Protection............................................................................................... 7.2.3 Schools........................................................................................................... 7.2.4 Libraries......................................................................................................... 7.2.5 Public Transit................................................................................................. 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-5 7-5 7-5 7-6 7-6 8.0 GRADING PLAN...................................................................................................................... 8-1 8.1 Grading Plan Description................................................................................................ 8-1 8.2 Grading Plan General Development Standards.............................................................. 8-1 9.0 LANDSCAPING PLAN............................................................................................................ 9-1 9.1 Landscaping Plan Description........................................................................................ 9-1 9.2 Landscape Plan General Development Standards.......................................................... 9-1 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES......................................................................................................... 10-1 10.1 Landscaping Design Guidelines....................................................................................10-1 10.1.1 Introduction.......................................................................................................10-1 10.1.2 Major Community Streetscenes........................................................................10-3 10.1.3 Minor Community Streetscenes and Internal Neighborhood Edge Conditions........................................................10-14 10.1.4 Community Edge Conditions and Boundaries................................................10-19 10.2 Plant Material Guidelines............................................................................................10-25 10.2.1 Introduction.....................................................................................................10-25 10.2.2 Plant Palette....................................................................................................10-25 10.2.3 Planting Schedule...........................................................................................10-37 10.2.4 Landscape Requirements for Slopes..............................................................10-38 10.2.5 Climate Constraints.........................................................................................10-38 10.2.6 Horticultural Soils Test Requirements............................................................10-39 10.2.7 Irrigation.........................................................................................................10-39 10.3 Community Elements..................................................................................................10-40 10.3.1 Community Entry Monumentation.................................................................10-40 10.3.2 Fences and Walls............................................................................................10-46 10.3.3 Landscape Requirements................................................................................10-57 10.3.4 Parks and Recreation Amenities..................................................................10-61.2 10.3.5 Maintenance Responsibility............................................................................10-65 10.3.6 Outdoor Lighting............................................................................................10-65 10.4 Residential Architectural Guidelines...........................................................................10-67 10.4.1 Purpose...........................................................................................................10-67 10.4.2 Design Intent and Elements of a "Great Neighborhood"................................10-67 10.4.3 Architectural Forward Standards...................................................................10-68 10.4.4 Architectural Styles.........................................................................................10-68 Harveston Specific Plan ii Revised August 2003 October 2020 HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 10.5 Principle Design Criteria.............................................................................................10-80 10.5.1 Plotting, Massing and General Neighborhood Criteria...................................10-81 10.5.2 Garage Placement...........................................................................................10-84 10.5.3 Building Elevations.........................................................................................10-86 10.5.4 Secondary Exterior Elements..........................................................................10-87 10.6 Service Commercial Architectural Guidelines............................................................10-89 10.6.1 Siting and Orientation.....................................................................................10-89 10.6.2 Form, Scale and Massing................................................................................10-90 10.6.3 Architectural Features and Details..................................................................10-90 10.6.4 Exterior Materials and Colors.........................................................................10-91 10.6.5 Roof Forms and Materials..............................................................................10-92 10.6.6 Walls and Fences............................................................................................10-94 10.6.7 Accessory Structures and Services.................................................................10-95 10.6.8 Street/Plaza Furniture and Bus Shelters..........................................................10-95 10.6.9 Lighting...........................................................................................................10-95 10.6.10 Mechanical Equipment...................................................................................10-96 10.7 Mixed -Use "Village Center" Architectural Guidelines...............................................10-96 10.8 Residential Overlay Architectural Guidelines............................................................10-97 10.8.1 Purpose...........................................................................................................10-97 10.8.2 Design Intent...................................................................................................10-97 10.8.3 Pedestrian -Scaled Design...............................................................................10-97 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS........................................................................................... 11-1 11.1 Introduction................................................................................................................... 11-1 11.2 Planning Objectives...................................................................................................... 11-1 11.3 Planning Area Development Standards........................................................................ 11-3 11.3.1 Planning Area 1 — Low Medium Density Residential and Community Park Description.......................................................................... 11-3 11.3.2 Planning Area 2 — Medium 1 Density Residential Description ....................... 11-5 11.3.3 Planning Area 3 — Medium 2 Density Residential, Lake, Lake Park, Paseo Park, Village Green and Mixed Use Overlay Zone Description ........................ 11-7 11.3.4 Planning Area 4 — Low Medium Density Residential, School, and Mixed Use Overlay Zone Description...................................................... 11-9 11.3.5 Planning Area 5 — Medium 2 Density Residential Description ..................... 11-11 11.3.6 Planning Area 6 — High Density Residential and Mixed Use Overlay Zone Description.............................................................................. 11-13 11.3.7 Planning Area 7 — Low Medium Density Residential Description ................ 11-15 11.3.8 Planning Area 8 — Medium 1 Density Residential Description ..................... 11-17 11.3.9 Planning Area 9 — Medium 2 Density Residential and Arroyo Park Description......................................................................... 11-19 11.3.10 Planning Area 10 — Low Medium Density Residential Description .............. 11-21 11.3.11 Planning Area I I — Medium 2 Density Residential Description ................... 11-23 11.3.12 Planning Area 12 — Service Commercial Description ................................... 11-25 11.3.13 Planning Area 12: Residential Overlay Description .................................... I1-27.1 Harveston Specific Plan in Revised August 2003 October 2020 HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 11.4 Zoning Ordinance....................................................................................................... 11-28 11.4.1 Low Medium (LM) Density Residential Zone (3-5 du per acre) ................... 11-28 11.4.2 Medium 1 (M1) Density Residential Zone (5-7 du per acre) ........................ 11-33 11.4.3 Medium 2 (M2) Density Residential Zone (7-13 du per acre) ...................... 11-37 11.4.4 High (H) Density Residential Zone (13-20 du per acre) ................................ 11-41 11.4.5 Mixed Use Overlay Zone............................................................................... 11-46 11.4.6 Service Commercial....................................................................................... 11-59 11.4.7 Signage...........................................................................................................11-68 11.4.8 Residential Overlay.........................................................................................11-77 11.5 Exceptions to Development Standards....................................................................... 11-83 11.6 Product Approval.........................................................................................................11-83 12.0 IMPLEMENTATION AND ADMINISTRATION.............................................................. 12-1 12.1 Introduction................................................................................................................... 12-1 12.2 Phasing Plan.................................................................................................................. 12-1 12.2.1 Phasing Plan General Development Standards ................................................ 12-1 12.3 Financing Mechanism.................................................................................................. 12-6 12.4 Maintenance.................................................................................................................. 12-6 12.4.1 Master Homeowners Association.................................................................... 12-6 12.4.2 Residential Neighborhood Associations.......................................................... 12-8 12.4.3 Commercial and Business Park Areas............................................................. 12-8 12.4.4 Open Space and Parks...................................................................................... 12-8 12.4.5 Project Roadways............................................................................................ 12-8 12.4.6 School Site....................................................................................................... 12-8 12.5 Public Facilities Site Phasing Plan................................................................................ 12-8 12.5.1 Public Facilities Phasing Description.............................................................. 12-8 12.5.2 Public Facilities Phasing Schedule.................................................................. 12-8 12.6 Specific Plan Modifications........................................................................................ 12-10 12.6.1 Acreage.......................................................................................................... 12-10 12.6.2 Conceptual Dwelling Prototypes................................................................... 12-10 12.6.3 Roadways and Trails...................................................................................... 12-10 12.6.4 Lot Size and Configuration............................................................................ 12-10 12.7 Future Development Proposals................................................................................... 12-11 12.8 Severability................................................................................................................. 12-12 APPENDICES A. GENERAL PLAN CONSISTENCY Harveston Specific Plan iv Revised August 2003 October 2020 SECTION 1.0 SUMMARY LIST OF FIGURES 2.1 Regional Location Map......................................................................................................... 2-4 2.2 Local Vicinity/Surrounding Land Uses (aerial map) "Revised October 2020" ................ 2-5 2.3 General Plan Map - "Revised October 2020...................................................................... 2-6 3.1 Conceptual Land Use Plan - "Revised October 2020"..................................................... 3-2 4.1 Circulation Plan - "Revised October 2020"...................................................................... 4-4 4.2 Roadway Cross Sections...................................................................................................... 4-5 4.3 Roadway Cross Sections...................................................................................................... 4-6 4.4 Roadway Cross Sections...................................................................................................... 4-7 4.5 Roadway Cross Sections...................................................................................................... 4-8 4.6 Roadway Cross Sections...................................................................................................... 4-9 4.6a Roadway Cross Sections "Revised October 2020".......................................................... 4-10 4.6b Roadway Cross Sections "Revised October 2020".......................................................... 4-11 4.6c Roadway Cross Sections "Revised October 2020".........................................................4-12 4.7 Bicycle Plan - "Revised October 2020".......................................................................... 4-13 5.1 Drainage Plan - "Revised October 2020".......................................................................... 5-2 5.2 Water Plan - "Revised October 2020"............................................................................... 5-6 5.3 Sewer Plan - "Revised October 2020................................................................................. 5-9 6.1 Open Space and Recreation Plan - "Revised October 2020"............................................ 6-2 6.2 Conceptual Mini Park Detail................................................................................................. 6-5 6.3 Conceptual Community Park Plan........................................................................................ 6-6 6.4 Conceptual Lake/Lake Park/Village Green Detail.................................................................6-7 6.5 Conceptual Pasco Park Detail................................................................................................6-8 7.1 Typical Utility Locations........................................................................................................7-2 7.2 Conceptual Lighting Standard Location "Revised October 2020"......................................7-3 7.3 Typical Lighting Standard Detail "Revised October 2020................................................... 7-4 7.4 Public Transit Plan - "Revised October 2020"................................................................... 7-8 8.1 Existing Topography............................................................................................................ 8-3 8.2 Conceptual Grading Plan...................................................................................................... 8-4 8.3 Grading Cross Sections........................................................................................................ 8-5 8.4 Grading Cross Sections......................................................................................................... 8-6 8.5 Grading Cross Sections.......................................................................................................... 8-7 8.6 Slope Planting....................................................................................................................... 8-8 10.1 Preliminary Landscape Plan - "Revised October 2020...................................................... 10-2 10.1-1 Date Street at Arroyo Park "Revised October 2020"........................................................ 10-4 10.1-1A Date Street "Revised October 2020.................................................................................... 10-4 10.1-1B Date Street "Revised October 2020.................................................................................... 10-5 10.1-2 Date Street at Service Commercial and Residential Overlay "Revised October 2020" .....10-5 10.1-3 Ynez Road at Service Commercial/Residential Overlay "Revised October 2020" ...........10-9 10.1-4 Margarita Road "Revised October 2020............................................................................ 10-9 10.1-5 Major Entry at Margarita Road "Revised October 2020"...............................................10-12 10.1-6 Major Entry at Date Street "Revised October 2020".......................................................10-12 10.1-7 Minor Entry at Margarita Road "Revised October 2020"...............................................10-13 10.1-8 Loop Road and Loop Road with Alternative Parking "Revised October 2020".............10-13 10.1-9 Loop Road at Village Green/Lake Edge "Revised October 2020"..................................10-16 10.1-10 Loop Road at Community Park "Revised October 2020.................................................. 10-16 10.1-11 Village Center Road..........................................................................................................10-18 10.1-12 Residential Entry - Typical "Revised October 2020........................................................ 10-18 Harveston Specific Plan v Revised August 2003 October 2020 SECTION 1.0 SUMMARY 10.1-13 Pasco Park..........................................................................................................................10-20 10.1-14 Residential Local Road at Lake Park.................................................................................10-20 10.1-15 Lake Edge/Lake Park "Revised October 2020"...............................................................10-21 10.1-16 Service Commercial Adjacent to I-15 "Revised October 2020........................................ 10-21 10.1-17 Service Commercial Park to Off Site Land Use Edge........................................................10-22 10.1-18 Residential at Santa Gertrudis Creek..................................................................................10-22 10.1-19 Residential Rear Lot Set Back............................................................................................10-24 10.1-20 Residential Rear Lot Set Back............................................................................................10-24 10.1-21 Temecula Center Drive "Revised October 2020"........................................................ 10.24. 1 10.1-22 Residential Overlay Adjacent to 1-15 "Revised October 2020...................................... 10.24.2 10.1-23 Residential Overlay Entry Statement Details "Revised October 2020.......................... 10.24.3 10.2 Major Entry Monumentation Plan "Revised October 2020.............................................. 10-42 10.3 Minor Entry Monumentation Plan "Revised October 2020"...........................................10-43 10.4 Community Fencing and Walls Plan "Revised October 2020.......................................... 10-49 10.5 Community Fencing and Wall Details...............................................................................10-50 10.6 Community Fencing and Wall Details..............................................................................10-51 10.7 Community Fencing and Wall Details...............................................................................10-52 10.8 Interior Theme Fence Typical Enlargement Plan...............................................................10-53 11.1 Planning Area Detail 1........................................................................................................ 11-4 11.2 Planning Area Detail 2........................................................................................................ 11-6 11.3 Planning Area Detail 3........................................................................................................ 11-8 11.4 Planning Area Detail 4...................................................................................................... 11-10 11.5 Planning Area Detail 5...................................................................................................... 11-12 11.6 Planning Area Detail 6...................................................................................................... 11-14 11.7 Planning Area Detail 7...................................................................................................... 11-16 11.8 Planning Area Detail 8...................................................................................................... 11-18 11.9 Planning Area Detail 9...................................................................................................... 11-20 11.10 Planning Area Detail 10 - "Revised June 2006............................................................... 11-22 11.11 Planning Area Detail 11 - "Revised June 2006............................................................... 11-24 11.12 Planning Area Detail 12"Revised October 2020"........................................................... 11-26 11.12a Planning Area Detail 12 - "Revised October 2020........................................................... 11-27 11.12b Residential Overlay Detail - "Revised October 2020".................................................11-27.3 11.12c Residential Overlay Detail - "Revised October 2020".................................................11-27.4 11.13 Conceptual Rear Access Landscaping...............................................................................11-32 11.14 Mixed Use Village Center Conceptual Plan with Building Placement and Landscape Treatment......................................................................................... 11-55 11.15 Mixed Use Village Center Pedestrian and Vehicular Circulation and Parking ................ 11-58 12.1 Development and Roadway Phasing Plan - "Revised October 2020................................. 12-2 12.2 Maintenance Plan - "Revised October 2020"................................................................... 12-7 12.3 Preliminary Public Facilities Phasing Plan - "Revised October 2020".............................12-9 Harveston Specific Plan vi Revised August 2003 October 2020 SECTION 1.0 SUMMARY LIST OF TABLES 3.1 Detailed Land Use Summary "Revised October 2020 "............................................ 5.1 Estimated Domestic Water Demands "Revised October 2020"................................. 5.2 Estimated Wastewater Flows "Revised October 2020"............................................. 11.1 Summary Development Standards for LM (Low Medium Density Res.) Zone........... 11.2 Summary Development Standards for M1 (Med. Dens. Res. 5-7 DU's/AC) Zone ..... 11.3 Summary Development Standards for M2 (Med. Dens. Res. 7-13 DU's/AC) Zone ... 11.4 Summary Development Standards for H (High Dens. Res. 13-20 DU's/AC) Zone .... 11.5 Development Standards — Service Commercial for Development on a Separate Lot.. 11.6 Summary Development Standards Residential Overlay "Revised October 2020" .... 12.1 Development Phasing................................................................................................... 12.2 Public Facilities Phasing.............................................................................................. Harveston Specific Plan vii Revised August 2003 October 2020 [ This page intentionally left blank ] SECTION 1.0 SUMMARY 1.1 PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to comply with Government Code Section 65451, which requires that a Specific Plan include "all detailed regulations, conditions, programs, and proposed legislation that may be necessary or convenient for the systematic implementation" of each of the seven requirements of the General Plan. The Harveston Specific Plan has been prepared to meet these requirements of the City of Temecula General Plan, and provides a cohesive and comprehensive working document, which describes guidelines and standards for implementation of the development. This document has been prepared to assist the City of Temecula in the implementation of a comprehensive master plan, consistent with all regulatory standards in accordance with the Temecula General Plan. The Harveston Specific Plan provides a detailed description of proposed land uses and infrastructure requirements. Design and development standards have been prepared to assist in creating an architectural theme and community character symbiotic to the surrounding community, while providing criteria for each planning area within Harveston. 1.2 ORGANIZATION The Harveston Specific Plan is divided into twelve sequential sections. Section 1.0 presents a brief overview of the Specific Plan. Section 2.0 is intended to establish the purpose, scope, location and setting of the Specific Plan. Section 3.0 provides an extensive description of the development Land Use Plan. Sections 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0 present discussions of transportation/circulation, infrastructure, open space and recreation, public services and utilities, grading, and landscaping as they relate to the Land Use Plan. Section 10.0 and 11.0 present a detailed description of the design guidelines and development standards, which are necessary to guide and control new development and carry out the goals and policies of the Specific Plan and the City's General Plan. Section 12.0 outlines the measures and programs necessary to implement and administer the development proposed by the Harveston Specific Plan. Appendix A includes an analysis of the Specific Plan's consistency with the City of Temecula General Plan. The Harveston Specific Plan document has been organized in a manner so as to distinguish clearly between policy statements, guidelines, and zoning regulations. The sections containing policy statements and guidelines would be adopted by resolution. The Harveston zoning regulations and design standards would be adopted by ordinance. Harveston Specific Plan 1-1 Revised August 2003 [ This page intentionally left blank ] 1-2 SECTION 2.0 INTRODUCTION 2.1 PURPOSE AND INTENT The Specific Plan is intended to serve the following purposes: • Promote quality development consistent with the goals and policies of the City of Temecula General Plan. • Provide for comprehensive planning thsat assures the orderly development of the site in relation to the surrounding community. • Assure appropriate phasing and financing for community facilities, including circulation improvements, domestic water, urban runoff and flood control facilities, sewage disposal facilities, educational facilities and parks. • Establish development regulations permitting a variety of residential products. • Develop a plan that is economically feasible and capable of being implemented based on existing and anticipated future economic conditions such that no economic burden to the City would occur. 2.2 SCOPE OF THE SPECIFIC PLAN The Specific Plan document for Harveston has been written consistent with the framework established by the State of California Government Code as specified in Article 8, Section 65450 et. seq. The following is a brief analysis of the Specific Plan legal requirements and Harveston consistency with the respective criteria. According to Section 65451 of the California Government Code, the content of a Specific Plan shall include the following narrative and graphic descriptions. The text provided in italics is the actual Government Code requirements. The text below each requirement states where the requirement is met within the Specific Plan document. The distribution, location, and extent of the uses of land, including open space, within the area covered by the plan. Section 3.0 of this Specific Plan includes the location of various land uses including residential, open space/recreation, circulation, and public/institutional. Section 6.0 provides a detailed discussion of open space, parks, and recreation. The proposed distribution, location, extent, and intensity of major components of public and private transportation, sewage, water, drainage, solid waste disposal, energy, and other essential facilities proposed to be located within the area covered by the plan and needed to support the land uses described in the plan. Section 4.0 of this Specific Plan addresses these issues by providing a circulation plan, which delineates the arterial and collector streets within the Specific Plan, as well as the necessary off -site connections. Sections 5.0 and 7.0 of the Specific Plan outline the essential infrastructure and services for the community. Standards and criteria by which development would proceed, and standards for the conservation, development, and utilization of natural resources, where applicable. Section 3.0 of the Specific Plan includes the Land Use Plan, which addresses the provisions for the identification and conservation of natural resources of the site. Section 10.0 Design Guidelines and Section 11.0 Development Regulations, which will be adopted by ordinance, address the development of regulations that define the criteria by which development would proceed. Harveston Specific Plan 2-1 SECTION 2.0 INTRODUCTION A program of implementation measures including regulations, programs, public works projects, and financing measures necessary to carry out the preceding paragraphs. The Specific Plan includes implementation measures, (Sections 12.0, Implementation and Administration), which address phasing, financing, permits, maps, plans, and agreements that would guide the future development. 2.3 SPECIFIC PLAN MODIFICATIONS Modifications have been made to the Specific Plan document. The modifications to the Specific Plan include, 1) the alteration of Specific Plan road alignments (i.e., Ynez Road and Date/Cherry Street) and adjacent planning area configurations based upon the approved Caltrans Project Study Report (PSR) and 2) the inclusion of 3.8 acres of out -parcels into the Specific Plan (adjacent roadway and planning areas) pursuant to Lennar's acquisition of these out -parcels and the City approval of a Zone Change (Ordinance 03-10) and Specific Plan Amendment (Resolution 03-110). The PSR approval has triggered modifications to the text and figures of this document pursuant to Specific Plan Condition of Approval #7, as presented below: "Once the Project Study Report (PSR) conducted by Caltrans is completed, the road alignments affecting the individual planning areas (i.e., Ynez Road and Cherry/Date Street) may be altered or modified to implement the PSR. The alteration or modification of the roads will not require a Specific Plan Amendment; however, all applicable text, sections, figures and exhibits in the Specific Plan shall be modified to reflect the actual roadway alignments as determined in the PSR subject to the approval of the Director of Planning and Public Works Director. " Due to the acquisition of out -parcels by Lennar and their inclusion in the Specific Plan area, any references to the out -parcels are deleted from this document. Additionally, because of the modifications pertaining to Caltrans' approved PSR, Figure 3.2, Cherry Street Connection Land Use Plan became Figure 3. 1 Conceptual Land Use Plan; and Figures 4.1 Circulation Plan; 11.12, Planning Area Detail 12; and 12.1, Development and Roadway Phasing Plan, showing the Date Street alignment connecting to the I-15, are hereby removed from this Specific Plan document as they are no longer applicable to the Harveston Specific Plan. The text and figure pages which have been modified due to the changes outlines above include "Revised August 2003" notation in the lower corner of the page. In 2020, a Residential Overlay was added to the Specific Plan over portions of Planning Area 12. Text and exhibits were updated. The text and figure pages which have been modified for this change include "Revised October 2020" in the lower corner of the page. 2.4 PROJECT LOCATION AND SETTING The Harveston Specific Plan project site is located adjacent to and east of Interstate 15 Freeway (I-15) in the City of Temecula, California, in southwest Riverside County, south of the City of Los Angeles and north of the City of San Diego. The location of the Harveston Specific Plan in relation to the local and regional setting is displayed in Figures 2.1 and 2.2, regional and local vicinity maps. Figure 2.2 provides an aerial perspective of the site. I-15 and its connecting arterials provide the Temecula Valley with convenient links to San Diego, Orange and Los Angeles Counties. Temecula Valley is centrally located, bordered by the eastern portion of Orange Harveston Specific Plan 2-2 Revised October 2020 SECTION 2.0 INTRODUCTION County to the west, the northern portion of San Diego County to the southwest, and Riverside County to the north and east. From the I-15, direct access to the project site is provided by Winchester Road (Highway 79 North) and Ynez Road, both located near the southern boundary of the site, and Margarita Road, which runs along the eastern boundary of the site. Winchester Road runs near the southern edge of the project site and continues north adjacent to Chaparral High School. The area's expanding employment base, and a variety of local amenities, including Murrieta Hot Springs, the Temecula Wine Country, Old Town Temecula, Temecula Valley Promenade, the Cleveland National Forest, schools, and several golf courses make the Harveston location attractive and competitive. The project's close proximity to these markets, yet its relatively exclusive location, places Harveston in a superior market. 2.5 GENERAL PLAN CONSISTENCY The Harveston Specific Plan serves as a planning guide to implement the intent of the City's General Plan. The Specific Plan development concept has been prepared to be consistent with all applicable goals and programs contained within the General Plan and to effectively implement the policies of the General Plan, and the applicable Zoning requirements and guidelines. The issues and goals identified within each element of the General Plan have been evaluated, and a statement of compliance with the General Plan has been included as Appendix A. The General Plan land use designations provide the policy direction and authority for this Specific Plan. Figure 2.3 graphically illustrates the existing City of Temecula General Plan Designations for the Specific Plan area. The portions of the Specific Plan proposed for development are all within the following General Plan land use designations: The proposed Harveston Specific Plan land use densities and intensities fall within the existing density and intensity levels of the City of Temecula General Plan. The densities intended under the existing General Plan have not been increased with the current General Plan Amendment. Other proposed Specific Plan land uses (i.e., park, recreation, and school) are also consistent with the General Plan. Harveston Specific Plan 2-3 Revised August 2003 Harveston Specific Plan Lennar Communities In Figure 2.1 t . N.TS. February 2001 2-4 Regional Location Map 41;15 x I x I L1 LLG [` OilLLI � 000 F Q it .. •. ;40 ftAft IV,•v 2 O 2-5 r A � W a C c x 4 m in Oo N Q C J %A m Q LL a m 3 w a CL ~ Q IQ U) = � - a Ann ❑ I LU E2HJI Zn i' Im SECTION 3.0 LAND USE PLAN 3.1 SPECIFIC LAND USE PLAN DESCRIPTION Harveston is envisioned as a high quality, master -planned community. Through strong cohesive community design, the Harveston Specific Plan will offer a diverse, convenient living environment for its residents. The Harveston property will be a highly amenitized community offering certain elements not found among many standard master -planned communities, such as a centrally located lake/park complex. This central lake/park facility, "the heart" of Harveston will offer a wide variety of recreational opportunities to fulfill the needs of its residents who reside within the specific plan area, as well as Temecula residents outside the specific plan community. Additional amenities include an expansive, landscaped parkway and trail system located adjacent to local, collector, major, and arterial roadways. In addition, a paseo system will provide recreational opportunities and alternative modes of transportation (pedestrian, bicycle) through the site. An elementary school and parks will provide facilities for organized and passive forms of recreation. Another significant feature of the proposed plan is the "Village Center." Located central to the Harveston community, the Village Center is where residents can come together for recreation or social events, as well as daily service and shopping needs. The Village Center is proposed to include a variety of uses such as retail, restaurant, office, daycare, worship, and a private club facility (Village Club) and fitness center. Additionally, uses such as recreation, education and residential dwellings will be provided adjacent to or within the Village Center. The Harveston property will be identified and unified through design elements such as architecture, signage, landscaping, color, walls, fencing and entry treatments. Variability of design will be allowed so individual development enclaves and neighborhoods within the overall community will be able to establish their own individual design character, yet maintain compatibility. The proposed Land Use Plan is illustrated in Figure 3.1, Conceptual Land Use Plan, and is summarized in Table 3.1, Statistical Summary. As depicted in Figure 3.1, the Land Use Plan has been divided into twelve (12) distinctive Planning Areas. The boundaries of the Planning Areas were dictated by different types of land uses to be developed within the Harveston Specific Plan. For specific information regarding each of the (12) individual Planning Areas, please refer to Section 10.0 and 11.0, Design Guidelines and Development Standards. The proposed land uses within the Specific Plan include: 3.1.1 Residential A variety of residential areas are proposed throughout the site, reflecting a combination of low —medium, medium 1, medium 2, and high density residential, with an average of 7.4 units per net residential acre. The overall project density is 5.3 units per acre. It is the intent of the Master Developer to allow for a variety of product types within each development phase (Please refer to Section 12.1, Phasing). Generally, the lower density residential units are located outside the proposed Loop Road, while the higher density units are located inside the Loop Road, with the exception of proposed multi -family units which are adjacent to the mixed -use "Village Center" area. Higher density units are also allowed in the Residential Overlay in Planning Area I Harveston Specific Plan 3-1 Revised October 2020 r W w � .Wj � U ca x C!3 � w I I � _LLx W C 2 � o � E � a o• ds c 3-2 f1, a � NMO\O�--i,�l OOOV'�M�NOOO N N A �l0oc tt O0\O � � Mr—o� 00 O knMM'O N V F cn cn W A 01�10O00ONr M��0O �O00 0�M i F W c W a W A rd \O W-) e,4 rn "C tt 00 OR !R M G] --4 -- M kn �OMM W � rn V'1 rf) z M t,: 00 M N00 Mkr"0 �O /a A CC O Z •-- N a d F > cu Qj 7s W A I I N I I F y C� eC e� CC t7 W A M M ll MA y� a W `r? A � O d' W W W Az W N Wz ' Z V O M* 0 01 0 01 N 01 N �n � M � CIA F� Q 0 C, , O F� c) U�� U `� H U 0U�� "a a^CUopa.U3•bA ti O CX 4110.11 � a � O ^ o� ayi Q � U O eq 01 O � O ct E 5 O O ou m O ^ M ci O it i u y y � O u cye O U Op 4. O x CL 0.•^" U C U O C =.� � U O ON v U bA ,O 9 a O U �i U U mct o O sy. w vU cn O U O a� N ?n ,a +Ici 4y a y 0 � nn N 0 U O U "V ^� N ` cd v .� cn N yC U cd U U zCn O O 0 � Cj N O '� 'C SECTION 3.0 LAND USE PLAN • Low -Medium Density (ranging from 3 to 5 du/ac., with a target density of 3.8 du/ac) - Residential areas include approximately 591 dwelling units on 156.2 acres of land located throughout the site, in Planning Areas 1, 4, 7, and 10. It is anticipated that these residential homes will be located on average 5,000 square foot lots (at various configurations) and will be targeted for a variety of single family detached products. • Medium Density I (ranging from 5 to 7 du/ac., with a target density of 6.1 du/ac) - Residential areas include approximately 448 dwelling units on 73.4 acres of land located in Planning Areas 2 and 8. It is anticipated that these residential homes will be located on average 3,500 square foot lots and will be targeted for a variety of single family small -lot detached (i.e., rear access, patio homes, clustered) products. • Medium Density 2 (ranging from 7 to 13 du/ac., with a target density of 9.6 du/ac) - Residential areas include approximately 582 dwelling units on 60.4 acres of land located in Planning Areas 3, 5, 9 and 11. It is anticipated that these residential homes will be located on average 2,500 square foot lots and will be targeted for small -lot single family detached (i.e., rear access patio homes, clustered) and a variety of small -lot single family attached (townhomes) products. • High Density (ranging from 13 to 20 du/ac., with a target density of 17.8 du/ac) - Residential areas include approximately 300 dwelling units on 16.8 acres of land located adjacent to the main entrance to the community off of Margarita Road, in Planning Area 6. It should be noted the City's General Plan allows a density bonus for senior housing projects. Where high -density housing types are planned, private recreation facilities and common open space shall be provided to supplement community open space uses. Private recreational areas and complexes may include facilities such as pools, spas, or barbecue areas. The exact design and layout of these facilities will be accomplished in conjunction with detailed Development Plan review. Residential Overlay in a portion of Planning Area 12—includes up to 1,000 dwelling units on approximately 87.5 acres of land. 3.1.2 Service Commercial The Harveston site will contain a service commercial center on approximately 110.4 acres. This acreage excludes the 110 foot right-of-way (ROW) for Date Street and 78 foot ROW for the Industrial Collector. It also excludes the full ROW and landscape development zone (LDZ) for Ynez Road (110 foot ROW plus 13 feet remaining LDZ on each side). The commercial uses proposed would be service and community commercial uses for onsite and offsite residents. Commercial development will consist of a mixture of "big box" commercial, office/professional uses, and support service uses that could serve the adjacent business park developments. This area could also accommodate the expansion of existing adjacent Business Park uses. It is anticipated that the commercial development will ultimately serve the needs of and provide employment opportunities to the Harveston community. This development will also assist in meeting the regional employment needs. The service commercial site is located in Planning Area 12, west of Ynez Road and adjacent to the I-15 freeway. The Service Commercial designation is intended to provide for intensive commercial uses, selected light manufacturing uses that typically require extensive floor area, and limited business park uses south of Date Street to provide a transition from existing business park uses to the south. Warehousing and light manufacturing may be permitted as supporting uses for a business that is consistent with the Service Commercial designation. Typical commercial uses include mid -rise office buildings, home improvements stores, discount retail stores, furniture stores and auto service and repair. Harveston Specific Plan 3-5 Revised October 2020 SECTION 3.0 LAND USE PLAN Business park uses shall be allowed south of Date Street to include administrative office, research, and development laboratories, custom made product manufacturing, processing, assembling, packaging, and fabrication of goods, such as jewelry, furniture, art objects, clothing, on -site wholesale of goods produced, and labor intensive manufacturing and assembly. A Residential Overlay within a portion of Planning Area 12 will allow up to 1,000 dwelling units. 3.1.3 Greenbelt/Paseos and Landscape Development Zones The proposed project will include a system of greenbelt/paseos, roadway paseos, slopes, and Landscape Development Zones (LDZs). These paseos serve several functions which link the community's neighborhoods to each other while providing alternative modes of travel (pedestrian, bicycle, etc.) to major destination points (schools, recreation facilities and commercial facilities) within the community. A paseo following the Loop Road will provide Harveston residents the opportunity to walk and jog around the entire community within a "park -like" setting (refer to Figures 10.1-8 and 10.1-10 in section 10.0 of this document). With the exception of the "loop road" paseo, the other large paseos (i.e., Arroyo Park and Paseo Park) generally follow drainage courses; however, the majority of off and on -site water will be carried through an underground system of pipes. (Refer to Section 5.1, Drainage). Some major roadways shown on the Specific Plan will also have greenbelt/paseos (parkways) expanded from the standard right-of-way. (Refer to Section 10.0, Design Guidelines). The greenbelt/paseo system will provide a major aesthetic and unifying amenity for the entire project. 3.1.4 Mixed -Use Overlay The proposed plan allows for a 13-acre mixed -use zone overlaying area designated as the "Village Center." The development concept for this area allows for a mix of potential uses such as, retail, restaurant, office, daycare, worship, and private clubhouse (Village Club). Additional uses such as recreation (i.e., Village Green or private recreation within multi -family residential), education (i.e., elementary school in Planning Area 4), and residential (i.e., multi -family residential) will be provided adjacent to or within the Village Center. A maximum of 20,000 square feet of commercial/retail, which may include residential, recreation and education uses, is permitted in this zone along with future office uses and a 2.0-acre Village Club. 3.1.5 School Twelve (12) acres will be set aside for an elementary school site. The elementary school site is located in Planning Area 4, adjacent to the Mixed -Use Overlay zone. The community Loop Road will provide access with secondary access off Margarita Road. 3.1.6 Parks A 19.5-acre community park is planned in Planning Area I to serve residents of the community as well as the City of Temecula. This park would include recreational facilities and related uses, such as sports fields (baseball, softball, and soccer), outdoor barbecue, picnic areas, a tot lot, a concession stand, an equipment storage building, public restrooms, and required parking facilities. The park will provide ball field lighting for night use and team sports activities. Mini parks are planned in Planning Areas 1, 7 and 10. These mini parks totaling a minimum of 1.5 acres will be provided for the benefit of Harveston neighborhoods. These parks shall contain recreational amenities, which may include tot lots, shade structures, picnic areas, benches or ornamental gardens. The location and size of mini parks is conceptual. In addition, it is anticipated that further recreational facilities may occur within the high -density residential area. The proposed plan also includes three linear type parks: 1) Arroyo Park is located in Planning Area 9 and includes an adjacent walking trail and possible public parking and interpretive kiosk; 2) Paseo Park also includes a paseo/trail. The Paseo Park connects the Community Park to the central Lake Park; and 3) the central Lake Park, which provides a variety of recreational opportunities for Harveston as well as the Harveston Specific Plan 3-6 Revised October 2020 SECTION 3.0 LAND USE PLAN residents of the City of Temecula. (Refer to Figure 6.1, Open Space and Recreation Plan in Section 6.0 of this document). Class II bike lanes will be provided along the project entry roads, the proposed Loop Road, Date Street, Margarita Road and other roadways. (Refer to Figure 4.7, Bicycle Plan in Section 4.0 of this document). 3.1.7 Roads Major roadways will be implemented in conjunction with the proposed project. The City of Temecula Circulation Element, as proposed, will adequately serve future traffic volumes for both the site and region. On -site traffic will be handled by a hierarchical roadway system consisting of arterial, major, collector and local roadways. A Loop Collector Roadway will provide interior traffic to higher traffic carrying major and arterial roadways. (Refer to Figures 4.1 and 4.2 through 4.6, Circulation Plan and Roadway Cross -Sections in Section 4.0 of this document.) Additionally, it should be noted that in the immediate vicinity of the Harveston project, the Draft Proposed Circulation Plan differs from the existing City of Temecula Circulation Plan, and build -out model assumptions, in the following ways: • The General Plan Circulation Element Map shows a conceptual location of an interchange with I-15 connecting to an east -west roadway between Ynez Road and Jefferson Street. The final location as shown on Figure 3.1 reflects Caltrans' approved location based upon the Project Study Report (PSR); • A new grade separation of Date Street and Murrieta Hot Springs is proposed along with the re - designation of State Route 79 from Winchester Road to Date Street; and, • The Western Bypass turns east and assumes an alignment along Cherry Street. 3.2 SPECIFIC PLAN DESIGN OBJECTIVES Throughout the planning of Harveston, the underlying design philosophy has been to create a community character and quality that reflects the context of the region, the site's topography, and its surrounding community. The integration of site planning, architecture and landscape principles into neighborhood design (see Section 10.0) is a fundamental goal for Harveston. Section 10.5 of this document includes a detailed discussion of the Design Criteria for Harveston. Neighborhood Design Objectives include the following: 1. Create a high standard in neighborhood design and implement it consistently over an entire new community. 2. Provide small scale intimate neighborhoods. Create attractive and comfortable street scenes and street space. 4. Provide "local" open space where neighbors can meet and children can play. Reduce the appearance of "mass production" in housing. 6. Create neighborhood designs that integrate architecture, site planning and landscape. 7. Implement the goals of the General Plan and the Growth Management Plan. Harveston Specific Plan 3-7 Revised October 2020 SECTION 3.0 LAND USE PLAN 3.3 SPECIFIC LAND USE PLAN GENERAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS The Harveston Specific Plan project is a combination of residential, commercial, open space, and community uses, and an extension of existing and planned development occurring in the Temecula area. The specific land uses described will require infrastructure, public services and facilities, and special techniques or mitigations in each Planning Area to accommodate the uses proposed and provide adequate transportation to neighboring uses. Project -wide development standards have been prepared to manage implementation of general or unique conditions in each Planning Area. General standards are listed below. For specific Planning Area standards, see Section 11.0, Development Standards. The total Specific Plan shall be developed to a maximum of 2,921 dwelling units on 549.5 acres (306.8 acres of residential and related uses, 110.4 acres of Service Commercial, 63.19 acres of major streets and slopes), as illustrated on Figure 3.1, Conceptual Land Use Plan. Generally, the uses permitted shall include residential, service commercial, business park, recreation, school, open space and circulation. The plan will also include a Mixed -Use Overlay zone that will have a variety of uses such as retail, restaurant, office, daycare, congregate care, worship, private club house, recreation, educational and residential. A Residential Overlay allows up to 1,000 residential units to be developed in Planning Area 12. No more than 2,921 units are permitted, not including any density bonus for senior housing as allowed pursuant to the City of Temecula General Plan. 2. Uses and development standards shall be in accordance with the zoning regulations established for this Specific Plan as well as the Planning Area Development Standards (Section 11.0), and shall be defined by Specific Plan objectives, future detailed tract maps, development plans and potential conditional use permits as appropriate. 3. The development of the property shall be in accordance with the mandatory requirements of all City of Temecula and state laws and shall conform substantially with the approved Specific Plan as filed in the office of the City of Temecula Planning Department, unless otherwise amended. 4. Any development standard not addressed in the Specific Plan shall be subject to the Development Code and Citywide Design Guidelines. 5. An environmental assessment, pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), may be required for each tract, development plan, Specific Plan Amendment or any other discretionary permit required to implement the Specific Plan. At a minimum, the environmental assessment shall utilize the evaluation of impacts addressed in the EIR and SEIR prepared for this Specific Plan. 6. Tentative maps prepared shall be in conformance with the Development Standards contained in this Specific Plan. 7. A Specific Plan Amendment, may be required, as determined by the Planning Department with a subsequent development application, if the proposed use varies substantially from the use(s) provided for by the zoning standards established by this Specific Plan. 8. Design features, such as special architectural treatments, perimeter and interior landscaping, and buffering of parking lot/loading zone areas shall be incorporated into project design to minimize any potential conflict between business park/commercial uses and any abutting residential enclaves 9. The proposed school development has been reviewed and approved through other concurrent actions with the Temecula Valley Unified School District (TVUSD) as the lead agency (not the City of Temecula) for the environmental and entitlement processes. Therefore, an additional review and approval through the Specific Plan process will not be required. Harveston Specific Plan 3-8 Revised October 2020 SECTION 3.0 LAND USE PLAN 10. Future residential lotting shall employ the following passive solar heating techniques, whenever possible. Passive systems involve orienting buildings properly (i.e., north/south lot orientation), planting trees to take advantage of the sun, seeing that roof overhangs are adequate, making sure that walls are properly insulated, and simple heat storage systems, including such elements as dual - paned windows. 11. Final development densities for each Planning Area shall be determined through the appropriate development application up to the maximum density identified based upon, but not limited to the following: a. Adequate availability of service. b. Adequate access and circulation. C. Innovation in housing types, design, conservation or opportunities. d. Sensitivity to neighborhood design through appropriate lot and street layouts. 12. All plans for proposed City of Temecula maintenance areas including public park facilities shall be reviewed and approved by the Director of Community Services prior to approval of the respective final map. 13. The City of Temecula only considers the acceptance of perimeter slopes adjacent to single family residential development for maintenance purposes along roadways with a 66' ROW or larger. All other areas must be privately maintained. In addition, the City of Temecula does not accept fee title ownership of perimeter landscape or open space maintenance areas. (Said responsibilities are typically offered to the City of Temecula as a maintenance easement on the final map - ownership remains with the homeowner's association or underlying property owner). However, the City (not the City of Temecula) accepts the dedication of public park facilities pursuant to City Council acceptance of a grant deed. 14. For the security and safety of future residents and users, the applicant and/or developer shall incorporate the following design concepts into site plans for individual planning areas: a. Circulation for pedestrians, vehicles and police patrols. b. Lighting of streets, walkways, bikeways, commercial and industrial areas and safety lighting within the various park facilities (public and private). C. Visibility of doors and windows from the street and between buildings. d. Fencing heights and materials, including landscaping that serves security needs Harveston Specific Plan 3-9 Revised October 2020 SECTION 3.0 LAND USE PLAN 15. Maintenance associations, if formed, shall be established as follows: The master property owners' association, commercial property owners' association, office professional owners' association and the business park owners' association shall be charged with the unqualified right to assess their own individual owners who own individual units for reasonable maintenance and management costs which shall be established and continuously maintained. Each property owners' association shall be responsible for private roads, parking, open space areas, signing, landscaping, irrigation, common areas and other responsibilities as necessary. 16. The Harveston Specific Plan is located within thirty (30) miles of Mount Palomar Observatory. Light and glare may adversely impact operations at the Observatory. Outdoor lighting shall be from low pressure sodium lamps that are oriented and shielded to prevent direct illumination above the horizontal plane passing through the lummare. 17. Overall project density shall not be exceeded. 18. The project shall comply with all City of Temecula curb -side recycling programs. 19. A separate noise study shall be done (at Final Map phase) to determine appropriate noise attenuation devices such as fence types and construction materials to mitigate noise from the surrounding roads/freeway to ensure the development is in compliance with the General Plan residential noise standards at buildout conditions. Harveston Specific Plan 3-10 Revised August 2003 SECTION 4.0 CIRCULATION PLAN 4.1 CIRCULATION PLAN DESCRIPTION Figure 4.1, Circulation Plan, illustrates the project roadway concept, based on the City's Circulation Element, input from the City Traffic Engineering Division and Wilbur Smith and Associates, the project's traffic consultant, and Figure 4.1 shows Date Street Overcrossing/Interchange alternative. The Traffic Study was prepared by Wilbur Smith and Associates on March 24, 2000 and revised on July 19, 2000. The main objective of the Circulation Plan is to provide direct and convenient access to individual residential enclaves, employment and service land uses through a safe and efficient network including Arterial, Secondary, Collector, and Local Roadways, and a pedestrian trail/sidewalk system. Typical roadway cross - sections are shown on Figures 4.2 through 4.6. 4.1.1 Bicycle Plan Figure 4.7 (Bicycle Plan) of the Specific Plan depicts the projects' proposed bike lanes. Class II bike lanes are proposed along Margarita Road, Ynez Road, Date Street, the major and minor project entries and on both sides of the Loop Road. A ten -foot wide multi -use trail has been provided that circles the Lake Park. This multi -use trail connects to an 8-foot paseo through the Paseo Park, then continues through the Community Park and connects to the Class II bicycle path on Ynez Road. The Class II bike lanes provided on Date Street and Ynez Road connect to other portions of the Cities of Temecula and Murrieta, as well as portions of Riverside County. The Class II bicycle lane on Margarita Road also connects into the Santa Gertrudis Creek Class I bicycle lane. The Santa Gertrudis Class I bicycle path is anticipated to ultimately connect into other Class I facilities within the area. It is also anticipated that the community facilities within the project will serve to attract area -wide residents and visitors to the project. The project proposes a comprehensive and cohesive bicycle path system that will provide the residents of the community as well as area -wide residents the opportunity to cycle to the recreational amenities within the Harveston Specific Plan area. 4.2 CIRCULATION PLAN GENERAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS The proposed project includes an efficient and safe circulation design that shall accommodate traffic from land uses as well as public safety, security and public transportation needs. The Master Circulation Plan outlined in the project Traffic Analysis (EIR and SEIR Technical Appendices) shall serve as the composite circulation analysis for the Harveston Specific Plan. All onsite roadway improvements illustrated shall be phased in accordance with the Infrastructure Phasing Plan. 2. Heavy through traffic shall be eliminated from residential neighborhoods. Major roadways (Margarita Road, Ynez Road and Date Street) shall be implemented as non -access roadways, with residential neighborhoods served by smaller residential collectors. Provisions shall be made for a safe and efficient paseo, urban trail and sidewalk network, providing pedestrian and bicycle circulation in conjunction with the roadway network. A sidewalk system shall be developed along Date Street, Margarita Road, Ynez Road, collector Streets and along most of the other project roadways. Pedestrian traffic shall be separated from vehicular traffic, particularly in commercial and high density areas. Harveston Specific Plan 4-1 Revised October 2020 SECTION 4.0 CIRCULATION PLAN 4. Bicycle paths shall be located along interior and exterior streets where they will be safe and effective in serving local residents' needs. (Refer to Figure 4.7, Bicycle Plan). 5. All subdivisions shall comply with the street improvement recommendations/mitigations outlined in the project Traffic Analysis and as determined by the Director of Public Works. (See EIR and SEIR Technical Appendices). 6. In selected locations, raised planters may be used as local street medians to provide a higher level of street character and visual interest. Specific locations will be identified at the tentative tract map stage. 7. All residential local streets may have curb -separated sidewalks creating continuous street tree planting strips between curb and sidewalk. 8. Specific roads (shown in Figures 4.1 and 4.2 through 4.6) shall be constructed as: a. (Section 1) Urban Arterial (134') - Date Street (from Margarita Road through Planning Area 12). b. (Section 2) Collector (63') - Village Center (end of Loop Road terminating with roundabout at school site). C. (Section 3) Arterial (110') - Ynez Road (adjacent to Planning Area 12). d. (Section 4) Arterial (half ROW 55' and full ROW 110') - Margarita Road (from Date Street to Planning Area 1 boundary, passed Major Entry). e. (Section 5) Entry Collector (106') - Major Entry at Margarita Road without parking. f. (Section 6) Entry Collector (100') - Major Entry at Date Street. g. (Section 7) Entry Collector (82') - Minor Entry at Margarita Road. h. (Section 8) Residential Collector (66') - Loop Road. i. (Section 9) Residential Entry (66') - Residential Entry from Loop Road. j. (Section 10) Residential Local (56') - Internal neighborhood street. k. (Section 11) Residential Local (60') - Internal neighborhood street. 1. (Section 12) Industrial Collector (78') - Service Commercial. Harveston Specific Plan 4-2 SECTION 4.0 CIRCULATION PLAN 9. Landscaping requirements shall be determined based on street width. (Refer to Figures 10.1.1 - 10.1.20, Typical Landscape Sections, in Section 10.0). 10. Unless changed through this Specific Plan, roads shall be constructed to ultimate City standards as a requirement of the implementing subdivisions for the Specific Plan, subject to approval by the City of Temecula. 11. The project proponent shall participate in the City's Development Impact Fees -Street System Improvement component as approved by the City Council. 12. The project shall comply with the conditions and requirements set forth by the City of Temecula. 13. Bus turnouts and shelters shall be provided as required by the Riverside Transit Authority (RTA) and approved by the Department of Public Works. 14. The developer shall install all traffic signals within the Specific Plan area as required by the Department of Public Works. Harveston Specific Plan 4-3 W a c 4 � u� eid er O w W �. D —' Ce C ❑ z -i ;u rt p ❑ 72 72 ucs 14 O Q 8 D G)(D O G C7 e D U () I 4-4 Raised Landscape Median 14' Median 12' 14' ICC 14' 134' n Urban Arterial Date Street City of Temecula 5' 7' 10' 12' Walk rkway Class ll Bike Lane R/W Harves ton Specific Plan Lennar Communities 12' 12' L 10' I 7' L 5' Class 11 -, ParkwayI Walk Bike Lane R/W County of Riverside - By Others I Raised Landscape Median I I 14' ian 5' 7' 10. 12' 12' 14' rC 14' 12' Walk rkway Class 11 Bike Lane 134' R/W n Urban Arterial "' Date Street 12' 12' L 10' L 6'4 Cl� Walk P w Bike Lane 10' 9' 1 8' 5' 12' Turn Lane 12' 5' B' L, 9' L 10' Village planter . parallel I I Drive Alslel 1 Drive Aisle Parallel Tplanter Village Center Walk Parking Class II Class II parking B Center Walk Bike I Bike Lane I Lane R/W 63' R/W r� Collector ` Village Center Road R/W Figure 4.2 o a Roadway Cross Sections 4 0° 1�ek�ruary 2001 4-5 ,. CON9r1 LTlND 1 Harveston Specific Plan Lennar Communities Raised Landscape Median 5' 7' 10, 12' 14' W Median 14' 12' 10, 7' 1 5' Walk Parkway Class Il 1 Class II Parkway Walk 12' Bike Lane Bike Lane 12' 110, R/W n Arterial R/W Ynez Road Raised Landscape Median 5' 7' 10' 12' 14' 7' Walk Parkway Class 11 l Bike Lane 55' l� R/W R/W Arterial (Half R/W) Y Margarita Road Raised Landscape Median 20' Medlan 5' 7' 5' 12' 14' 10' 10' 14' 12' 5' 7' 5' Walk Parkway Class if Class II Parkway Walk Bike Lane Bike Lane Ir R/W 106' R/W Entry Collector 5 Major Entry at Margarita Road without Parking Figure 4.3 0 oa. Roadway Cross Sections 4 o February 2001 4-6 CON$U�TING - Specific Plan Lennar Communities Raised Landscape Median 5' L 7' 5' 12' 14' 14' Median 14' 12' 5' 1 7' 1 5' Walk Parkway Class Il Class II Parkway Walk Bike Lane l Bike Lane R/W 100' R/W Entry Collector 6 Major Entry at Date Street 5' 7' 5' 12' 12' 12' 12' 5' 7' 5' Walk Parkway Class III Bike Lane Class 1 Bike Lane Parkway Walk 82' n Entry Collector Minor Entry at Margarita Road ©4 0°February 2001 4-7 . coNsuLTING R1W Figure 4.4 Roadway Cross Sections 6' S' 12' Walk Glass Il Drive Aisle * * Bike Lane R/W * * See Figure 10.1-9 for alternative walk location at Lake Park and Village Green 12' Turn Lane 12' 5' I Drive Aisle 9CIass II Bike Lane 66' Residential Collector ° Loop Road Ha.rveston► Specific Plan Lennar Communities Paseo 6' Min. 8' Pa rkway * 14' R/W * See Figure 10.1-8 for alternative with parking bay 5' 8' _ 20' 20' 8' 5' Walk Parkway Parkway 'Walk R/W Rlllll Residential Entry Residential Entry from Loop Road Figure 4.5 �4ao°. Feruary b 2001 4-8 Roadway Cross Sections CPNKULTINO Harvesio n Specific Plan Lennar Communities 5' S' 18' 18' 5' 5' Walk Parkway I Parkway Welk R/W 56' F Alternate Street Section-S' curb Residential Local adjacent walk. 10 Internal Neighborhood Street 1 5' 5' 20' rt 20' 5' 5' Walk Parkway I Parkway Walk R/W 60F R/W * Alternate Street Section-5' curb n Residential Local _ adjacent walk. lnternal Neighborhood Street 5' 6' S' 6' 28' 28' Walk Parkway I Parkway Walk 11 r 56' 11' W 781 lI R/W n Industrial Collector ' ?,'Service Commercial _ d4 0°Revised August 14, 2001 4-9 . CONSULTING Figure 4.6 Cross Sections RIBBON CURB CONC. RIBBON DRIVEWAY — RIBBON CUF COMC. RIBBON N.T.S. Revised October 2020 �* T Harv+eston Specific Plan JO' MIN BUILDING FACE TO BUILDING FACE 24' ESMT. 12' PL 12' i. 10' P 10' I 2' MIA 2.0% 2.0% CURB Private Alley Detached Single Family (Alleys A, U-X, Y, Z, AA -AL) 26' MIN BUILDING FACE TO BUILDING FACE 24' ESMT. 12' PL 12' 10' 10' 1I MIN. 12� MIN DRIVEWAY fAM-0111=8i1l a J Private Alley Attached Townhomes (Alleys B-T) Figure 4.6a 4-10 Roadway Cross Sections R/W 9' TC 5' 4' SOWK N.T.S. Revised October 2020 58' w►�j 20' CL 20' 6" CURB 6" CURB & GUTTER & GUTTER Residential Local Interior Neighborhood Street •r Harve,s ton Specific Plan R%W TC go ¢, 5, L/SOWK Figure 4.6b 4-11 Roadway Cross Sections 4,� Harveston Specific Plan PL 58' PL 9' TC 40' TC 9' 5' 4' 20' CL 6' 14' 4, 5' DWK DWK Private Street PL 60, PL 10' TC 40' TC 10' 5' 5' 20' CL 20, 5, 5' SDWK 8' 8' DWK PARKING i PARKING SPACE 7.0% I 7.0% SPACE OX 6" CURB 6" CURB & GUTTER Private Street & GUTTER PL 60, PL 10' TC 40' TC 10' 5• 5• 20' CL 6' 74' 5' 5' SDWK1 DWK 6" CURB i 6" CURB I � &GUTTER 2.0� z 0� I L&:GUTTER o% I 2. 0% 2. Private Street Figure 4.6c N.T.S. Revised October 2020 4-12 Roadway Cross Sections r 8,4 N a S f �I a S f �I O & 77 -.. 24-2 p � t S { _ I � rr^} �waz Pa mri 4-13 [ This page intentionally left blank ] 4-14 SECTION 5.0 CIRCULATION PLAN 5.1 DRAINAGE 5.1.1 Drainage Plan Description There are five subbasins contributing runoff to the project site from the east. At the north portion of the project site are four separate subbasins. Santa Gertrudis basin, a master -planned basin within the Murrieta Creek Drainage Plan (RCFC and WCD, 1986), is also tributary to the project site from northeast. Also, there are two smaller basins tributary to southwest of the project site. The site is under the jurisdiction of the City of Temecula and the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (RCFC & WCD). The applicant has developed a Master Drainage Plan for the site, in order to protect the proposed project site from I00-year flood potential. (Refer to Figure 5.1, Drainage Plan). The proposed drainage plan utilizes the project streets and storm drains to carry storm water to the existing natural drainage courses and to the drainage facilities under the I-15 freeway. A storm drain system is proposed to carry storm water that exceeds surface street capacity. Please refer to Figure 5.1, Drainage Plan for the size and location of all storm drain facilities. 5.1.2 Drainage General Development Standards Drainage and flood control facilities and improvements shall be provided in accordance with the City of Temecula and the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District requirements. It is anticipated that the major backbone drainage/flood control facilities will be maintained by the City of Temecula and/or the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District. Local drainage devices will be maintained by the City of Temecula or a similar public/private entity. All projects proposing construction activities including: clearing, grubbing or excavation shall obtain the appropriate State general permit for National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits and pay the appropriate fees. All development within the Specific Plan boundaries shall be subject to future requirements adopted by the City to implement the NPDES program. Mitigation measures may include, but not be limited to: onsite retention; covered storage of all outside storage facilities; vegetated swales; and monitoring programs. Please refer to the Harveston Specific Plan EIR and SEIR for a more detailed discussion. A Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) will be prepared in accordance with the California State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) Order No. 92-08-DWQ, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) General Permit No. CAS000002. This SWPPP complies with Best Available Technology Economically achievable (BAT) and Best Conventional Pollutant Control Technology (BCT) to reduce or eliminate stormwater pollution from areas of a construction activity. The SWPPP document will be certified in accordance with the signatory requirements of Standard Provisions C.9 in the State General Construction Stormwater Permit (Permit). Harveston Specific Plan 5-1 r 'z7ZA w o 'e � �ii �trC H Z p+ r I <! � h 1 a" c� q �U 3, � C [9 �'"�r U a. a 510 5-2 4.� y i� w a Q7 ti SECTION 5.0 CIRCULATION PLAN The objectives of the SWPPP are to (1) identify the sources of sediment and other pollutants from the construction site that affect the quality of storm water discharges and (2) to describe the practices to reduce sediment and other pollutants in storm water discharges generated from the construction site. 5.2 WATER 5.2.1 Water Plan Description The proposed Harveston Specific Plan area is located within the Rancho California Water District (RCWD) water service area. The proposed onsite domestic water distribution system is shown on Figure 5.2, Water Plan. The proposed water plan consists of 12-inch and 16-inch backbone pipelines for domestic and fire service to the proposed commercial, residential, and park land uses. The estimated average and maximum water demand for the proposed Harveston development is estimated at 1.76 million gallons per day (MGD) and 3,054 gallons per minute (gpm), respectively, as outlined in Table 5.1, Estimated Domestic Water Demands. This includes irrigation demand for the parks and estimated lake replenishment supply. RCWD operates a District -wide recycled water distribution system and it may be feasible to extend the recycled system to supply the lake and irrigation demands of Harveston. However, according to J. Harlan Glenn Engineers, typical recycled effluent contains fairly high levels of nutrients such as phosphates and nitrates which can cause explosive "blooms" of algae or other aquatic plant growth. If irrigation water is withdrawn from the lake, the total loading of nutrients to the lake could be extremely detrimental to the aquatic community in the lake. If the only addition of water to the lake is make-up to cover evaporation and any residual seepage, the effect is less severe, but it does increase the maintenance cost and the water quality may not be aesthetically acceptable to the lake users. Full body contact sports (i.e., swimming) are not planned activities for the lake, and are almost universally banned in most man- made lakes. Incidental contact with the water, such as falling out of a boat or someone wading into the lake is not considered full body contact. Additionally, in drought conditions, water has never been denied to a lake with a live aquatic ecosystem such as the proposed lake within the Specific Plan area. Therefore, the lake would not be impacted during drought conditions and would keep its viability. The RCWD water facilities master plan (September 1997) includes future regional water supply facilities to serve Harveston. These proposed regional facilities include transmission pipeline and reservoir capacity. RCWD has completed construction of the first 1380 Zone Winchester Reservoir and the 1380 Zone Winchester Pump Station. The RCWD Water Facilities Master Plan includes a proposed second reservoir for the ultimate master plan 1380 zone and a transmission pipeline in or near the future alignment of Date Street between Margarita Road and Winchester Road. Based on discussions with RCWD, the transmission pipeline will be constructed for the initial phase of the Harveston development. RCWD will evaluate the need to construct the second reservoir and/or additional regional pumping capacity prior to ultimate development of Harveston Specific Plan area. 5.2.2 Water Plan General Development Standards All lines shall be designed per Rancho California Water District requirements. 2. Water facilities shall be installed in accordance with the requirements and specifications of the Rancho California Water District. Harveston Specific Plan 5-3 SECTION 5.0 CIRCULATION PLAN Assurance for provision of adequate water service is required prior to approval of a subdivision map, and/or Plot Plan for commercial and/or industrial uses in accordance with the State Subdivision Map Act. 4. The project shall comply with Title 20, California Administrative Code Section 1604 (f) (Appliance Efficiency Standards), which establishes efficiency standards that set the maximum flow rate of all new showerheads, lavatory faucets, as well as Health and Safety Code Section 17621.3 which requires low -flush toilets and urinals in virtually all buildings. Harveston Specific Plan 5-4 �oy^ a W A W ''Y \c 00 M M \c Vl M M 01 r- V) V N 00 py 00 Vl — 't — — o x ---i N 01 N N M M N N N �--� M� --i �--i u00 �..i H W O A W 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N N O eq N0 r a0 C 0 M C 00 N ON 10� \O M l^ N rl Q QeeeeeQeeeQQe������ � ODUCJCJCJoUCJCJooCJ�Qw���� O F p 0 0 0 0 0 p O 0 0 p p Okr) Q Q Q Q Q Q Q dtrt) d d A A Q Q Q Q Q d d d d Q N O Mkr) O O l M �c [� M' O oc to N N N \O M oo r- O O GD O 00 [r- --� N M cn �--� N N O� aA N 0-0 Nr" a a -a -a "" Q ° o �4 3 a x a a4 044 u > E�-� E-. 0 ICI b' v Oc a A. 0 SECTION 5.0 CIRCULATION PLAN 5.3 SEWER 5.3.1 Sewer Plan Description Harveston Specific Plan area is located within the sewer service boundaries of Eastern Municipal Water District (EMWD). However, the wastewater flows are proposed to be treated at the Santa Rosa Water Reclamation Plant, which is owned and operated by the Rancho California Water District. The plant is located at Elm Street and Washington Avenue. The estimated average and peak wastewater flow from Harveston is 1.11 MGD and 2.3 gpm, respectively, as outlined in Table 5.2, Estimated Wastewater Flow. Tables 5.3 and 5.4 describe estimated wastewater flows by reach and by reach and regional sewer. The proposed onsite collection system is shown on Figure 5.3, Sewer Plan. Sewer from the proposed project area will be directed to the EMWD sewer system along Santa Gertrudis Creek at two locations: one from the existing 15-inch sewer in Margarita Road, and one from the existing 12-inch sewer in Ynez Road. This scenario would require increased capacity in the Ynez Road sewer system to serve the project. Excess capacity would have to be determined in the Margarita and Santa Gertrudis sewers, which are regional facilities serving other developments. A parallel 15-inch sewer line is planned in Ynez Road as part of the Harveston development. 5.3.2 Sewer Plan General Development Standards All lines shall be designed per Eastern Municipal Water District (EMWD) requirements. 2. Sewage disposal facilities shall be installed in accordance with the requirements and specifications of the Riverside County Health Department. Assurance for provision of adequate sewer service is required prior to approval of a subdivision map, and/or Plot Plan for commercial and/or industrial uses in accordance with the State Subdivision Map Act. 4. The project shall comply with Title 20, California Administrative Code Section 1604 (f) (Appliance Efficiency Standards), which establishes efficiency standards that set the maximum flow rate of all new showerheads, lavatory faucets, as well as Health and Safety Code Section 17621.3 which requires low -flush toilets and urinals in virtually all buildings. Harveston Specific Plan 5-7 Revised August 2003 "� O�O�N�O�ON,_,�000[�MO00000��0 01 M G1 � �" wo�oN°M°o��`�°oo°noNo�0000000Noo a o Q' 'ry, �000 ONO FWD O O � OO��CCCOCOCC O C7 „� v�N�O�ON��n�l �nl co00000000 � � �OM[�N�O�ON�OM�n[�OOOOOOI N �o N o0 ;� �+ (� �OO�OO�Oo00hM��00000N00 O �COCC'—'CO�OOMM00000�00 O „y „y ,"�y A C7 �yA OOOOOOOOOOO'-- �� o�nO�n�nOO�n�n0000 O'-- O v% p O � W '�' OONOoO�n�n�O�MO00O 000 ,.y y���0o0N�[�M�nNv�NO�0000000�0� M �„� � A N N N N N N N N N N N N N � A O � 00 r- 00 --i 00 N M N N z00000000000 0 0 � a F� FaQQQQQQmCQMMM"Q¢Q¢QQQ° wt ° cqO�O�QOO[�M00 W) C)0 C4 a N � � z W O� x z-o � o ,x � a �U� t rp.,Of UU N N 4t I� ~ � O ; U O U � � O � U 9 ��+ O ' CIS O w O O O N Q N rq ` a�° Q °�°tD 0 00 tj) aj O O c� + bA c C U 00 ° �Qis o Er U 'n O 9. �UU rmZwaQ» _ U oc V) a CAI '� -• � _� N ns � N W 14 r PA Va W p 10�1 11 - -- cq ....... . . eM3�gj r� ti -r �ti�QZ •`: LC�2 i rn bn w adz 5-9 [ This page intentionally left blank ] 5-10 SECTION 6.0 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN 6.1 Open Space and Recreation Plan Description A major feature of the Harveston Specific Plan is the system of parks and landscaped parkways with paseos, which link the lake complex, school facilities and the community park in the Open Space and Recreation Program. The Program is extensive and provides a vast array of recreational opportunities in which all members of the community can participate. Further, the program incorporates many diverse elements in a coordinated, cohesive plan that interrelates with and links the various neighborhoods of the community with each other and to certain destination points, such as the lake, school, parks and mixed -use village. Recreational opportunities vary from active (i.e., community park), with potentially structured recreational programs to passive (i.e., Arroyo Park). Varying types of activities will be available that will provide residents the opportunity to, 1) take quiet "walks in the park"; 2) participate in community meetings and social gatherings; 3) participate in active outdoor informal recreational activities; and 4) participate in potentially structured professionally organized and instructed sporting events. The project proposes a total of 74.1 acres of open space/recreation. A detailed discussion of uses, which comprise the 55.8-acre Harveston park program is provided below. The various recreational facilities are linked to each other and other elements of the community with an extensive parkway/greenbelt system. The parkway/greenbelt system will be landscaped as shown in the Design Guidelines (Section 10.0) and will, at a minimum, contain one or more sidewalks that are oversized and referred to as "paseos". A circular paseo, which follows the project's loop road will provide Harveston residents the opportunity to walk, jog, etc. around the entire community within a "park -like setting". This paseo (8-foot wide) is intended to accommodate pedestrian travel. Bicycle lanes (Class II) will be provided as shown on Figure 4.7, Bicycle Plan, in Section 4.0, Circulation Plan of this document. Additionally, a I0-foot multi -use trail will be provided around the Lake Park, and an 8-foot paseo will be provided through paseo park. The overall Harveston Recreation and Open Space concept is depicted in Figure 6.1, Open Space and Recreation Plan. The various elements of the Program are discussed below. 6.1.1 Park and Recreational Opportunities Recreational opportunities are those opportunities, which are available for the use and enjoyment of members of the Harveston community and City of Temecula. They are segmented and discussed as follows: I. Lake 2. Lake Park 3. Mini Parks (1.5 acres) 4. Community Park 5. Paseo Park 6. Village Club* 7. Village Green 8. Arroyo Park 9. Winchester Creek Park (existing and outside Specific Plan boundary) 10. Elementary School (not included in park acreage above) 11. Parkway Greenbelt System (not included in park acreage above) 12. Private Recreation Areas (condominiums and/or apartments) (not included in park acreage above)* * These facilities will only be available for use of Harveston residents. Residents in the Residential Overlay portion of Planning Area 12 are excluded. Harveston Specific Plan 6-1 Revised October 2020 u ''AK • ` r • i m 4 C r � u J Rai eq y y a. O � r¢' a ,,tom• � x �a ca r m 1 de¢n_ d � i o IL o t - r � �r� r I E5 .�♦ �¢ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ti 6-2 SECTION 6.0 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN Lake: The centerpiece of the Harveston community is the 8.4-acre public lake, which will provide a visual as well as a recreational value to the community. The general public may enjoy fishing from the lake shore with the payment of a use fee. Sailing and boating activities will be available to residents of Harveston through the boating facilities at the private village club. The general public may utilize the boating facilities with the payment of a use fee. An extensive trail system and public roads will link the neighborhoods to the lake. 2. Lake Park: Adjacent to the lake are amenities contained within the public park around the lake. The 6.9 acre public lake park may provide for recreational activities such as picnicking, walking, jogging, rollerblading, kite flying, frisbee, and volleyball. Cart vendors may be permitted within this area. The lake park will be connected to the different neighborhoods via an extensive trail system and public roads (Please refer to Figure 6.4 Conceptual Lake/Lake Park/Village Green Detail). Mini Parks: These mini parks totaling a minimum of 1.5 acres will be provided for the benefit of Harveston neighborhoods. These parks shall contain recreational amenities, which may include tot lots, shade structures, picnic areas, benches or ornamental gardens. Design of subdivisions and parks shall strongly encourage homes fronting on the parks. (Please refer to Figure 6.2, Conceptual Mini Park Detail). 4. Community Park: A 19.5-acre community park is planned in Planning Area 1. The original Conceptual Community Park Plan, was developed in response to suggestions and input from the City of Temecula and the City of Temecula Planning Department (refer to Figure 6.3A). The park facility criteria provided by the City of Temecula includes the following: • Two lighted 300' baseball / softball fields and two full size soccer fields; • 100 parking spaces within the park off Equity Drive; • 25 parking spaces within the park off the Loop Road; • Large snack bar / restroom facility (1,800 square feet); • Small restroom adjacent to tot lot and picnic areas; and • Ball field and park lighting to be approved by the City. Paseo Park: The primary trail linkage to the Community Park is a 2.0-acre greenbelt paseo, which will intercept Planning Areas 2 and 3, connecting to the Lake Park in Planning Area 3. It will contain an 8-foot paseo/trail to facilitate access between residential areas and the commercial, school and park uses (Please refer to Figure 6.5, Conceptual Paseo Park Detail). Minor changes in the trail alignments are allowed as a result of more precise design and engineering, as well as changes in land use patterns. 6. Village Club: The 2.0-acre Village Club is the place where Harveston residents can congregate to enjoy a swimming pool, fitness facilities, picnic areas, and community meeting facilities. Harveston Specific Plan 6-3 Revised October 2020 SECTION 6.0 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN 7. Village Green: The Village Green is a 1.8-acre entry to the Harveston community. Additionally, an informal amphitheater, built into the natural contours of the land, will provide the opportunity for community plays, concerts, or wedding ceremonies. This area will be utilized as an informal recreation area and a gathering place. It will also provide the opportunity for community activities, such as farmer's markets, art shows, concerts, etc. Cart vendors may be permitted within this area. 8. Arroyo Park: The Arroyo Park is a unique opportunity to recapture the more natural California landscape in a re-creation of a riparian environment. Although currently there are no natural open space areas, the proposed arroyo park will create such an area. This 13.8-acre park will offer the residents and the general community a different recreation experience. California native species will be used to replant the Arroyo Park to create a natural open space area, as currently there is no natural open space on the site. The park will include an adjacent walking trail and possible public parking and interpretive kiosk. 9. Winchester Creek Park: This is an existing 4.5-acre park, located on Margarita Road, across from the Harveston site. This park is not part of the Harveston Specific Plan area, however, it was dedicated to the City of Temecula, and through a prior agreement has been utilized as park credit towards fulfilling the Quimby dedication requirement. 10. Elementary School: An elementary school will be located on 12.0 acres in Planning Area 4, adjacent to the Mixed -Use Overlay Zone area. Associated with and on the school grounds will be recreational equipment and fields for school children. Typical recreational equipment and sports fields will include playground equipment, basketball courts, and multi -purpose fields. It is also anticipated that residents of Harveston and the City of Temecula will have access to these facilities during off school hours. 11. Parkway Greenbelt System: An expanded parkway greenbelt system will be located adjacent to collector and higher volume roadways. The greenbelt system will be landscaped with turf, trees, and various additional plant materials. Community "theme" walls will be located adjacent to the parkways. The landscaped greenbelt area will vary in width. Some of the parkways will meander, thus creating interesting viewpoints for users of the greenbelt. Sidewalks will be provided on the greenbelt on both sides of the street throughout the development. Class II bicycle lanes will also be included on selected roadways (please refer to Figure 4.7, Bicycle Plan). 12. Private Recreation Areas (Condominiums, townhomes and/or Apartments): Planning areas designated Medium 2 and High may provide for private recreation areas. These areas may include pools, tennis courts, barbecue pits and sand volleyball courts. 13. Private Recreation Areas for PA-12: Each Planning Area in the Residential Overlay shall provide private recreation areas. These areas may include, but are not limited to amenities such as pools, tot lots, barbecue pits and sport courts. Recreation areas shall be sized appropriately for the amount of residents in the individual residential development. Harveston Specific Plan 6-4 Revised October 2020 y � a 6-5 4 Lighted Socccr Field _ (22S' x 365') Ligbted S Field / / Lighted Baseball Field 121' x MY (90' bases) 1 ri. U 32p O p 6. C 8 Q C -Playground Pi"ic Shelters & Plaza Connection to PiSeO Community Room Building h o_ `to-0 Gad arvesf®n Specific Plan Lennar Communities a Field Access \\ Gates Covercd Dugovl Lighted $aseball Field • (50' bases) O Bleachers NO �eIP ' Pgaity n,iv< g. Restroom-C VOcessiOn- Maintcnance Building view Fcnce O� c G` c� as Ga Park Signage Park Road Figure 6.3 6-6 Conceptual Community Park Plan ow Ilk) v R+ � , _ • � � toIt) bo lu �q o r kl -- C I� as C a U SECTION 6.0 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN 6.2 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN GENERAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS A minimum of three (3) private mini parks, totaling 1.5 acres, will be provided for the benefit of the residents of the Harveston Neighborhoods. The parks shall contain, at a minimum, the following facilities/equipment: open play turf area and tot lots, shade structures, benches, or ornamental gardens. The locations of the mini parks shall be determined during the residential lotting process. The uses proposed or identified in these private parks shall be conducive to the residential neighborhoods that they are serving. Designs of subdivisions and parks shall strongly encourage homes fronting on parks. 2. A public Community Park will be provided for the benefit of all residents within the community as well as the general public. The park shall contain, at a minimum, the following facilities/equipment: four lighted 300' baseball / softball fields with 2 full-size soccer field overlays; 100 parking spaces within the park off Equity drive; 25 parking spaces within the park of the Loop Road; large snackbar / restroom facility (1,800 sq. ft. minimum); block walls where adjacent to residential development and a small restroom adjacent to tot lot and picnic areas. The park will include ballfield and park lighting, to be approved by the City (Refer to Figures 6.3, Community Park Plan). • The Community Park boundaries and configurations are approximate and subject to adjustment with more detailed site planning and design. The boundaries may be modified or relocated entirely within the same general area, subject to the approval of the City of Temecula Director and Director of Planning, without requiring an amendment to the Specific Plan. However, at no time will the park total less than 19.5 acres. • All Community Park improvements shall provide for pedestrian circulation and handicap accessibility. • The City shall approve all lighting design, fixture location(s) and lighting types within the parks. The ball field lighting shall be on a timer controlled system with the times of operation set from dusk until 10:00 p.m. seven (7) days per week or as otherwise set by the City. The pathway and parking area lights shall be controlled by a photo electric cell with the times of operation set from dusk until dawn, seven days per week. • All lighting within the Community Park shall be provided with glare screens as may be needed to direct light away from the adjacent residential areas and to reduce the impact of the lighting on them. Where appropriate, every effort is to be made to reduce the amount of light that is not directly needed for the safe use of the facilities. This is to be accomplished by the height of the fixtures, the placement of fixtures away from residential areas, as well as the type and design of fixtures used. The project will be granted credit toward the park component of the City's Development Impact Fee for the Development of the Community Park (Planning Area 1). The developers obligation in terms of cost should be equivalent to the City's Development Impact Fee multiplied by the number of dwelling units built within Harveston. The total fee credits provided shall be equivalent to the cost of constructing this park. Harveston Specific Plan 6-9 Revised October 2020 SECTION 6.0 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN Where the Community Park abuts Ynez Road and Equity Drive, a block wall / combination view fence shall be provided. Said wall/view fence shall be maintained as part of the park improvements. The more "urban" open spaces such as areas within the Village Club and Mixed -Use Overlay Zone shall contain plazas with enhanced paving, benches, bike racks, lighting and street furnishings, including trash receptacles, guard rails / hand rails and drinking fountains. Specific design and type will be determined at the development plan level. 4. When constructed, the elementary school will contain such recreational equipment and sports fields as: playground equipment, basketball courts, softball field(s), soccer field(s), and more. A Lake/Lake Park, Paseo Park, and Village Green (refer to Figures 6.4 and 6.5) will be provided for the benefit of the residents within the community as well as the residents of the City of Temecula. The Lake Park and Paseo Park will contain a 10' multi purpose trail and 8' paseo, respectively, for activities such as jogging, biking, rollerblading, etc. These facilities will provide opportunities for picnicking, kite flying, and more. Additional amenities will include benches, bike racks, tot lots, trellises, park horses, etc. The lake will be utilized for fishing and boating activities, and the general public can enjoy these activities with payment of a use fee. The Village Green shall be utilized for informal recreational activities and public gatherings. (Refer to Figures 10.1-9,10.1- 13, 10.1-14, 10.1-15 for Section of Village Green, Paseo Park, and Lake and Lake Park). 6. An Arroyo Park will be provided for the enjoyment of the residents of Harveston and the City of Temecula. The Arroyo Park will include an adjacent walking trail and possible public parking and interpretive kiosk. 7. All recreational and open space areas (with the exception of the Arroyo Park) shall be landscaped and contain permanent irrigation systems. 8. All recreational facilities shall provide parking in accordance to the City of Temecula standards. 9. Landscaping within recreation and open space areas shall be further governed by the General Development Standards in the Landscaping Plan section of this Specific Plan (Section 9.0) and the specific standards in Development Standards and Design Guidelines sections (Sections 10.0 and 11.0) of this Specific Plan. 10. Recreation acreage calculations for residential development shall be based upon a minimum of five (5) acres per 1,000 residents. The City's applicable population calculations are 2.43 persons/multi- family unit and 2.85 persons/single-family unit. 11. The design of the Community Park will require approval of the Community Services Director. Harveston Specific Plan 6-10 Revised August 2003 SECTION 7.0 UTILITIES PLAN AND PUBLIC SERVICES 7.1 UTILITIES It is anticipated that utilities will be provided by the existing public utility companies, Southern California Edison (SCE) and Southern California Gas Company (SCG) or other service providers allowed to enter the market place under Assembly Bill 1890 (please refer to the Harveston Specific Plan EIR for a detailed impact analysis discussion related to utilities). For typical utility locations, conceptual lighting standard location and details, please refer to Figure 7.1, 7.2 and 7.3. Please note that the Harveston Specific Plan is proposing "residential" lighting standards that deviate from the City of Temecula standards. The focus of the Specific Plan proposal for residential lighting is to provide lighting at intersections and other key decision points. The goal is to ensure vehicular and pedestrian safe streets, while promoting energy conservation. More detailed lighting studies will be prepared at the Tentative Map stage. 7.1.1 Electricity Electrical service is currently provided in the area by Southern California Edison Company (SCE). All new lines installed in the City are required to be underground, and the City is currently working with SCE to achieve the undergrounding of existing lines. Adequate electric power supply can be provided. SCE does not anticipate any significant problems in providing the project site with electrical power. SCE stands ready to install distribution facilities for the project site. It should be noted that Assembly Bill 1890, commonly referred to as the "Public Utilities Act", has allowed for the deregulation of public utilities in California. Based on this Act, a number of other service providers are able to enter the marketplace. Consequently, there may be additional utility service providers in the near future providing the same services that SCE currently provides to southern California and the proposed project site. 7.1.2 Natural Gas Natural gas service is currently provided by Southern California Gas Company. Existing facilities in the area include existing lines located along Ynez Road and Margarita Road. SCG indicates that gas service could be provided to the Specific Plan area in accordance with the Company's policies and extension rules on file with the California Public Utilities Commission at the time contractual arrangements are made. It should be noted that Assembly Bill 1890, commonly referred to as the "Public Utilities Act", has allowed for the deregulation of public utilities in California. Based on this Act, a number of other service providers are able to enter the marketplace. Consequently, there may be additional utility service providers in the near future providing the same services that SCG currently provides to southern California and the proposed project site. 7.2 PUBLIC SERVICES Public Services are considered and planned as part of the overall Specific Plan Development Concept. Future residents will be able to live, shop, go to school, and relax all within the Project Area boundaries. Public Services include police protection, fire protection, schools, libraries and public transit. Please refer to the Harveston Specific Plan EIR and SEIR for a detailed impact analysis discussion related to these services. A discussion of public services shall follow: Harveston Specific Plan 7-1 1. Location of Light Standard as shown unless approved by the City of Temecula to be placed in median 2. Light Standard to be determined at Street Improvement Plan Stage 7' L 7 1, 7' M9 Storm train 7' 10, 12' rkv Class 11 ke Lane lilies Easement Street Light Base Harves ton Specific Plan .Lennar Communities 6' I Gases® min m t Q. Sewer 14' 14' Median 14' 110, Arterial 1 Ynez Road 1. Light Standards to be located at vehicular decision points (i.e. intersections, knuckles and cul-de-sacs) (Refer to Figure 7.2) 2. Light Standard to be determined at Street Improvement Plan Stage I I l Gas — Water m I E in I Storm Drain (j)- Sewer Joint Allities Trench 12' L10' 7' 15' Class II Parkway Walk Bike Lane 12' Public Utilities Easement 6' 18" Street Light Base 2.6 min Street Light Base AT A 6 5' 18' rC 18, 5' 5' Parkway Walk I Walk 1Parkwaj Public Utilities 3' Public Utilities Easement 3�i Easement R/W 56' R/W Residential Local A ic,neCUla STD. No.607 2 xation of Underground Utilities. Internal Neighborhood Street Utilities vary and will be. ed with utility purveyors. Figure 7.1 Febtuaty2001 Typical Utility Locations 7-2 3� Y Harveston Specific Plan . Lennar Communities LIGHTING LEGEND 0 Post Top Light -Light Pole Height 12' - Optic Height 14' -Loop Road, Village Center Road, Major and Minor Entnes, Village Green, Lake Park and Pasco Park (lncludesSecurity Lighting Where Not Adjacent to a Street). High Pressure Sodium 0 Arterial Lighting -Light Pole Height 30'- Optic Height 32' -Light Pole Spacing 200' On Center Average -Per City of Temecula Standard 800 NOTE: -Ill Lighting Standards shall comply with the Mt. Palomar Observatory Figure 7.2 Conceptual Lighting Standard Location 7-3 i Harvestvn Specific Plan NOTE: FINAL LIGHT STANDARD WILL BE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON AND CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVED. Figure 7.3 N.T.S. Revised October 2020 7.4 Typical Lighting Standard Detail SECTION 7.0 UTILITIES PLAN AND PUBLIC SERVICES 7.2.1 Police Protection The City of Temecula contracts with the Riverside County Sheriffs Department for services. The Police Department uses both, City of Temecula Police Department and Riverside County Sheriffs Department, as its name. Riverside County Sheriff officers patrol in vehicles, which read City of Temecula Police Department. They are currently responsible for response to 911 police calls, traffic collisions, medical and other types of emergencies. Additional services provided include crime prevention, investigation, and enforcement of the law, providing police support to the area with patrol responses, reporting, and investigative support to the adjacent areas. The department currently provides off road vehicle code enforcement services to the project site. 7.2.2 Fire Protection Fire protection and emergency response services for the project area are provided by the Riverside County Fire Department. Three (3) stations will serve the site. These stations provide wild land and structural fire protection, and response to 911 medical aid calls, traffic accidents, and hazardous materials. According to the Riverside County Fire Department, future development of the project site will not create a need for expansion of facilities or addition of staff nor will it adversely effect the level of service presently provided. Because the proposed project is located within City limits; the Fire Department fees are included in the City's Development Impact Fees (DIF). 7.2.3 Schools Public elementary, middle school and high school education in the Project Area are currently provided by the Temecula Valley Unified School District. The Temecula Valley Unified School District anticipates the need to build 18 additional school sites, and numerous expansions to existing sites over the next 15-20 years. The Nicolas Valley Elementary School along with the proposed Harveston Elementary School in Planning Area 4 will serve the site for the elementary school (grades K-5). James L. Day Middle School is the middle school facility that would serve the site. Chaparral High School is the high school facility that would serve the site. With the addition of the Residential Overlay, built out to its maximum, it is estimated that up to 909 elementary school students, 454 middle school students, and 542 high school students could be generated by the project. There will be a need to expand school facilities at all levels to accommodate students from the proposed project. The District anticipates funding the school facilities for the proposed project from the fees collected through an agreement, with half of the cost being funded by the State, so long as those funds are available. The proposed project designates a 12.0-acre school site in Planning Area 4. The District has acquired and begun construction on the elementary school site. The school facility will be completed when the first homes within the Specific Plan are occupied. The elementary school will be sufficient to meet the needs of the residents of Harveston. In addition, the middle school and high school, with expansion, have adequate capacity to meet the needs of the Harveston residents. Harveston Specific Plan 7-5 Revised October 2020 SECTION 7.0 UTILITIES PLAN AND PUBLIC SERVICES 7.2.4 Libraries The City of Temecula participates in the Riverside County Library System (RCLS) and does not provide library services directly. The City does augment the Temecula Library budget by providing staff funding to keep the library open additional hours, and by funding a part-time library volunteer coordinator. The Temecula Library would serve the project area. A new City library is located at 30600Pauba Road, located above the Rancho California Sports Park. The facility is approximately 33,000 sq. ft. Development of the project will generate additional patrons and will ultimately create a need for additional staff and space for additional resources. The project will pay library fees, which are included in the City's Development Impact Fees (DIF) to offset the project's effect on library services. 7.2.5 Public Transit The Riverside Transit Authority (RTA) currently provides fixed route bus and dial -a -ride services to the project vicinity. RTA Fixed Routes 23 and 24 currently operate along County Center Drive, Equity Drive, Ynez Road and Margarita Road. The project site is also served by the current Murrieta/Temecula Dial -a - Ride (DAR) which provides curb service to seniors and persons with disabilities. RTA Route 23 and 24 use three (3) 17-passenger mini -buses operating 6:00 AM to 7:00 PM Monday through Friday and from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM on Saturdays. Murrieta/Temecula DAR uses three (3) 14- passenger vans and operates from 6:30 AM to 6:30 PM on weekdays and from 10:00 AM-5:30 PM on Saturdays. The proposed project is anticipated to result in an increased demand for extended service to cover the project site. Bus turnouts and shelters to serve future Specific Plan residents shall be provided as required by the Riverside Transit Authority (RTA) and approved by the Department of Public Works. Transit Plan The transit plan has been developed with input provided from the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). The project proposes 1,921 dwelling units on 549.5 acres, for a project density of 3.48 dwelling units per acre. The Village Center, High -density residential (20 dwelling units/acre) and the M2 (Medium -density residential 7-13 dwelling units/acre) are located at the "core" of the project to provide the critical density needed to support public transit. The comprehensive and cohesive sidewalk/trails system provided within the project provides excellent pedestrian access to the potential transit stops. Harveston Specific Plan 7-6 SECTION 7.0 UTILITIES PLAN AND PUBLIC SERVICES Figure 7.4 (Potential Transit Routes & Stops) has been developed for current and future transit needs, with input from RTA. A transit station is planned within the Village Center and will be integrated into the design of the streetscape. The approximate location for the transit station is depicted on Figure 7.4 and will be installed when adjacent development occurs, in accordance with the requirements of the RTA. It is anticipated that the buses will initially make a small loop through the project, entering the site from the minor entry off Margarita Road, passing by the Elementary School, Lake and Lake Park, Village Green and Village Center and exiting the site via Margarita Road. As depicted on Figure 7.4, future transit stops will be provided within the project, along the Loop Road. It is anticipated that the RTA will provide one-way service on the Loop Road. Access to these transit stops will be provided from the sidewalk/paseo system along the Loop Road, as well as from the neighborhoods via open-ended cul-de-sacs (refer to Figure 7.4). RTA will utilize these transit stops as a future need develops. Transit stops are also proposed on the perimeter of the project, along Date Street, Ynez Road and Margarita Road. Pedestrians will be able to access the transit stops via the two major and one minor project entries. In addition, transit stops will be provided in key locations within the Service Commercial portion of the project. All of the transit stops are anticipated to connect to the current and future major transit hubs within the area, including the Promenade Mall. In addition, shuttle arrangements for transporting students to and from the project site may be made with the RTA and the Temecula Valley Unified School District (TVUSD) as well as San Jacinto Community College (Menifee Campus). All transit stops will conform to the requirements the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Harveston Specific Plan 7-7 i i i -b SECTION 8.0 GRADING PLAN 8.1 GRADING PLAN DESCRIPTION The proposed grading plan will be sensitive to the natural topography of the site and will conform to the existing natural landforms in order to create a development where different residential, commercial and recreational areas are distinguished and separated by topographic features (refer to Figures 8.1, Existing Topography and 8.2, Conceptual Grading Plan and 8.3 and 8.4, Grading Cross Sections). Additional conditions which dictate the proposed grading plan will include: 1) existing perimeter conditions, 2) existing street grades, 3) ability to gravity sewer, and 4) no diversion of storm flows on adjacent properties. According to an earthwork quantity take -off conducted by the project engineer the project site will balance onsite and will not require import or export of earth materials. However, the proposed lake in Planning Area 3 may require the import of approximately 12,000 cubic yards of clay material to construct the lake "liner bottom." The details of this proposed import are discussed in the EIR and SEIR for the project. 8.2 GRADING PLAN GENERAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS All grading activities shall be in substantial conformance with the overall Conceptual Grading Plan (Figure 8.2), and shall implement any grading -related mitigation measures outlined in the Preliminary Geotechnical Investigations (EIR and SEIR Technical Appendices). Grading for the site shall balance on -site. 2. Prior to any grading permit process, a soils report and geotechnical study shall be performed that further analyze onsite soil conditions and slope stability and include appropriate measures to control erosion and dust. 3. For erosion control purposes, slopes exceeding ten (10') feet in vertical height shall be hydromulched, prior to final acceptance and prior to the beginning of the rainy season (October - March). 4. All grading shall be accomplished in accordance with City of Temecula standards. 5. The applicant shall be responsible for maintenance and upkeep of all planting and irrigation systems until those operations become the responsibility of other parties. 6. Graded slopes shall be oriented to minimize visual impacts (i.e., inclusion of complimentary slope plants) to surrounding areas. (Refer to Figures 8.3, 8.4 and 8.5 Grading Cross Sections, and 8.6, Slope Planting). 7. Graded, but undeveloped land shall be maintained weed -free and planted with interim landscaping, such as hydroseed, and temporary irrigation within ninety (90) days of completion of grading, unless building permits are obtained. 8. Unless otherwise approved by the City of Temecula, all cut and fill slopes shall be constructed at inclinations of no steeper than two (2) horizontal feet to one (1) vertical foot. The Grading Plan shall reflect a contouring and landscaping program intended to control slope erosion. Harveston Specific Plan 8-1 Revised October 2020 SECTION 8.0 GRADING PLAN 9. Slopes shall not be steeper than 2:1 and higher than ten feet (10') unless approved by Planning and Public Works Departments and considered safe in a slope stability report prepared by a soils engineer or an engineering geologist. Slopes proposed to be maintained by the City of Temecula shall not be steeper than 2:1. The slope stability report shall also contain recommendations for landscaping and erosion control. Please refer to Section 10.2.4, Landscape Requirements for Slopes. 10. Prior to commencing any grading, including clearing and grubbing, a grading permit shall be obtained from the City of Temecula. 11. Inspection personnel shall monitor grading, including excavated soil stockpiles for evidence of paleontological, archaeological, or historical artifacts. A qualified archaeologist shall be consulted to ascertain the significance of any historic or prehistoric remains that may be found. 12. Soil stabilizers shall be used to control dust as required by SCAQMD Rule 403. 13. A project biologist/restoration specialist shall be under contract and present onsite during grading to occur in Planning Area 9. 14. Grading shall comply with the mitigation measures, pursuant to the Harveston Specific Plan EIR and SEIR. Harveston Specific Plan 8-2 Revised October 2020 O � s U � � � r Gi J a 0 0 �H W E Pi M., 2 M � 1ƒ j 9 0 4 i833 op O u as u61x Harveston Specific Plan Lennar Communities I- LU LLJ 1125 -r EXISTING PRGPOSED EXISTING 110r 40 80 FEET '120 150 200 SECTION "I -I" Horizontal Scale: 1" = 40' Vertical Scale: 1" - 25' Figure 8.5 FWWOMA Februan, 2001 8_7 Grading Cross Sections Low growing plant material fl which reinforces rigid slope form Typical Slope Planting Not Encouraged Typical Slope Planting Encouraged NOTE: Slopes to be planted per the City of Temecula Development Code 3� Harveston Specific Plate. Lennar Communities Plant Material of varying roan and density to soften and vary slope plane r-_,., _ Figure 8.6 February 2001 8-8 Slope Planting SECTION 9.0 LANDSCAPING PLAN 9.1 LANDSCAPING PLAN DESCRIPTION As illustrated on Figure 10.1, Conceptual Landscape Plan, in Section 10.0 project landscaping will play an important role in maintaining project design themes, while emphasizing community continuity. It should be noted that this Section, Landscaping Plan, is general in scope and detail. Detailed landscaping concepts and plans are included within the Design Guidelines portion of this text (Section 10.0, Landscape Guidelines). Entry monumentation will provide initial definition for the site, and will be viewed when approaching the site from Date Street, Margarita Road and Ynez Road, north of Date Street. Monumentation will be developed in a hierarchical format from major community entries, to neighborhood entries. This will provide initial identification for each residential planning area. Landscaping within the project site will characterize community design elements in the mixed -use Village Center area, business parks, and recreation areas. Individual neighborhoods and residential development enclaves will also be distinguished by varied planting themes. Special treatments, including land use transition areas, will be provided between certain planning areas identified in Planning Area Development Standards (Section 11.0). The project frontage along Interstate 15 (Planning Area 12) will be treated with a 50' scenic highway landscape setback (Refer to Figure 10.1 — 16). This will buffer the site from highway traffic and enhance the project's visual image from Interstate 15. In addition, a channel buffer (Planning Area 1) will be installed along Santa Gertrudis Creek and will be maintained by the Homeowners Association. Landscaping will be used to identify the hierarchy of the street system, from major access roads to interior residential streets, creating definite landscaped corridors. This will be accomplished through careful consideration of landscape, materials, size, color, and character. Specific arrangement of plant materials will create a feeling of character, reinforcing community identity. (Refer to Figures 10.2-10.6, Typical Landscape Sections in Section 10.0 of this document). Plant materials utilized along the roadways have been selected to enhance the image of the community. The species chosen, as identified in Section 10.0, will adapt well to the environment of the City of Temecula. 9.2 LANDSCAPE PLAN GENERAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS All detailed landscaping programs for planning areas and roadways will be prepared by a licensed landscape architect for review and approval by the City of Temecula, Planning and Public Works Departments, as applicable. Project entry statements will be designed with landscaping and architectural treatments that project a high quality image for the entire development (refer to Figures 10.1-5 to 10.1-7 and Figures 10.2 and 10.3). Special landscape treatment buffer areas will be developed along Interstate 15 to establish and reinforce the project image. (Refer to Figure 10.1 - 16 in Section 10.0) Harveston Specific Plan 9-1 Revised October 2020 SECTION 9.0 LANDSCAPING PLAN 4. Special treatment areas will be designed to provide definition to certain Planning Areas as identified in Section 10.0. Major entrance roads into the Harveston Specific Plan area will have planted medians and landscaped parkways to establish the community's design concept. The introductory landscape theme will include elements such as tree clustering of variety of species and thematic hardscape to reinforce the project theme and character (refer to Figure 10.2). 6. Planted raised medians (according to Ordinance 461 Standard No. 112) may be established within any road way right-of-way as long as access and safety criteria can be met. 7. Developments surrounded by walls or fences extending more than 100 feet along a public thoroughfare shall screen those walls or fences with plantings consistent with the streetscene requirements, contained in Figures 10.1-1 through 10.1-20. Fencing and wall design will be closely controlled and will be complemented with landscaping. All walls shall be appropriately screened as approved by the City of Temecula (refer to Figures 10.4 through 10.7). 8. Improvement plans for the non -City of Temecula landscaped areas shall be submitted to the Planning Department prior to issuance of building permits and with the appropriate filing fee. The improvement plans shall include, but will not be limited to, the following: a. Final grading plan. b. Irrigation plans. C. A landscaping plan with seed mixes for mulching and staking methods; locations, type, size and quantity of plantings. d. A hardscaping plan with location and type and quantity of potential recreational amenities/facilities (in high density areas). e. Fence treatment plans. f. Special treatment/buffer area treatment plans. 9. Improvement plans for City of Temecula maintained areas are to be submitted to the City of Temecula Community Services Department for review and approval, prior to recordation of a final map. The improvement plans shall include, but will not be limited to, the following: a. Final grading plan. b. Irrigation plans. C. A landscaping plan with seed mixes for mulching and staking methods; locations, type, size and quantity of plantings. 10. At the time of recordation of any final subdivision map which contains common greenbelts or open space areas, the subdivision shall have those common areas conveyed to the property owners association or appropriate public maintenance agency (either in fee title or as an easement). The City of Temecula shall accept maintenance easements over those parkways it accepts into service Level C (perimeter slope and landscape maintenance). 11. The City of Temecula shall provide maintenance for all landscape medians and perimeter parkways adjacent to single family residential development on right-of-ways that are 66' or larger. The City of Temecula will not maintain the perimeter landscape adjacent to the school unless there is a reimbursement agreement with the Temecula Valley Unified School District (TVUSD) or other entity. All other landscape areas, entry monumentation, signage, pedestrian portals, bus shelters, walls and fences shall be maintained by the HOA, private maintenance associations or property Harveston Specific Plan 9-2 Revised October 2020 SECTION 9.0 LANDSCAPING PLAN owners. 12. All slope plantings to be maintained by the City of Temecula shall meet City of Temecula requirements. The applicant and/or master developer shall be responsible for maintenance and upkeep of all slope planting, common landscaped areas and irrigation systems until such time as these facilities are the responsibility of other parties. 13. All landscaping shall meet the City of Temecula Water Efficient Ordinance, Chapter 17.32 of the City of Temecula Development Code. 14. Street tree plantings shall meet City of Temecula standards, be compatible with adjacent Margarita Road plantings, and be consistent with the preferred tree species identified in the arterial parkway design matrix contained within Chapter 8 of the City-wide Design Guidelines. 15. All loading/service and/or parking areas shall be screened with appropriate greenwalls and/or shrubs at the discretion of the City of Temecula. 16. The applicant and/or master developer shall be responsible for the bonding of all landscape improvements to the satisfaction of the Director of Planning. 17. The minimum sizes for trees, shrubs and groundcover shall meet City Code requirements. 18. All parking lot landscaping shall be consistent with the City of Temecula Development Code requirements. 19. Slope banks 5' or greater in vertical height with slopes greater than or equal to 3:1 shall be landscaped at a minimum with an appropriate ground cover, one 15-gallon or larger size tree per 600 square feet of slope area, and one gallon or larger shrub for each 100 square feet of slope area. Slope banks in excess of 8' in vertical height with slopes greater or equal to 2:1 shall also be provided with one 5-gallon or larger tree per 1,000 square feet of slope area in addition to the above requirements. 20. Typical residential front yard requirements shall be in conformance with City of Temecula Development Code. Smaller lots and reduced front yard setbacks will have modified landscape standards, approved by the Director of Planning. 21. All utilities shall be screened with appropriate greenwalls and/or shrubs at the discretion of the City of Temecula. 22. Graded/disturbed areas not to be developed within six months shall be temporarily planted and irrigated to provide dust and erosion control. 23. Developers of each property shall ensure that mature plantings will not interfere with utility lines and traffic sight lines. Harveston Specific Plan 9-3 Revised October 2020 [ This page intentionally left blank ] 9-4 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.1 LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.1.1 Introduction The first part of the landscape concept consists of a generous Landscape Development Zone (LDZ) provided along all community roads with 66-foot ROW's or larger. The landscape treatment will compliment surrounding landscape treatments. Where the residential adjoins the major roadways, the landscape treatment will be informal and will provide an adequate buffer screen. Within the Service Commercial, the landscape treatment will be more formal and enhance the retail component. The expanded LDZ allows for an increase in planting, reinforcing the community character. The LDZ will incorporate both meandering and street parallel walks with undulating slopes that will enhance the pedestrian experience. The LDZ facilitates pedestrian access to key community elements: Community Park, Paseo Park, Lake/Lake Park, Arroyo Park, Village Green, Village Center and elementary school. This linkage helps unify the community elements while providing a buffer/screen and sequence of arrival to each element. Hrdscape elements, also a part of the LDZ, will further enhance the community character. Community thematic walls and entry monumentation will provide an essential element to the community landscape treatment. Entry Monumentation is further addressed through hierarchy, location and various landscape treatments. Community recreation also plays a key roll in the overall character. Various recreational opportunities have been incorporated into the community facilities. A combination of passive and active parks, along with community gathering places are incorporated into the Harveston Conceptual Land Use Plan. Please refer to Section 6.0 of this document for a detailed discussion of the various community recreational facilities. The Landscape Design Guidelines addressed in the following pages will present the landscape development concept for the entire community. This section will address the treatment of major and minor community roads, parks, open space, and residential neighborhoods within the development and community perimeter edges (Refer to Figure 10.1, Preliminary Landscape Plan). The Plant Material Guidelines (Section 10.2) present, in summary, the overall community plant material palette. General information relative to seasonal planting constraints, climate constraints, and horticultural soils test requirements are presented as an aid to successful implementation. General requirements relative to planting installation, irrigation installation, and landscape maintenance are also contained herein. The Community Elements (Section 10.3) portion of these guidelines consists of written summaries and exhibits which address the conceptual design of project entry monumentation, community walls and fences, and park and recreation amenities which all help to define the Harveston community concept. Additionally, the Community Elements section of the guidelines also includes landscape requirements for single family, multi -family, service commercial, and retail commercial land uses. Harveston Specific Plan 10-1 W awa Q y J A g� i¢ c3�py W I W a cWos � — SJ w VIN 1 1 1 10-2 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES The Landscape Design Guidelines, Plant Material Guidelines, and Community Elements are intended to compliment the Residential Architectural Guidelines (Section 10.4). Together, these guidelines will define the character of the Harveston community. 10.1.2 Major Community Streetscenes Date Street between Ynez Road and Margarita Road, east side of Ynez Road. (Refer to Figures 10.1-1, 10.1-1A and 10.1-113) The landscape development associated with the major community streetscene along Date Street (between Ynez Road and Margarita Road) consists of- 0 Evergreen or deciduous formal street trees at an average of thirty-foot (30') on center with a maximum of forty -foot (40') spacing (not including the Arroyo Park). • Evergreen or deciduous informal backdrop grove trees at an average of thirty-foot (30') on center with a maximum of forty -foot (40') spacing. • Community Fencing and Wall Plan - (per Figure 10.4). • Horizontal and vertical grade change, five-foot (5') sidewalk parallel to street (not including the Arroyo Park). • Horizontal and vertical grade change, five-foot (5') meandering walk only at Arroyo Park varying width turf parkway at this condition. • Seven -foot (7') standard width turf parkway (not including the Arroyo Park). • Fourteen -foot (14') median island. • Class II Bicycle Lanes. • All planting and irrigation within City of Temecula areas are to be designed to meet City of Temecula requirements. • Slope plantings are to meet current City of Temecula code requirements. a. Landscape Development Zone (LDZ): The streetscene planting concept consists of formally spaced evergreen or deciduous street trees at an average of 30' with a maximum of 40' of spacing on center and informal backdrop deciduous or evergreen grove trees planted within the LDZ. Within the major community streetscenes, the LDZ is defined as the planting area from the curb face to the street right-of-way (twelve -foot (12') minimum in ROW), plus an additional thirteen feet (I3') minimum beyond the ROW, for a total twenty -five-foot (25') minimum distance width from the streetscene curb face to the back edge of LDZ which could be defined by a wall, fence, v-ditch, or other defining element. If the LDZ exceeds the minimum condition, the City of Temecula has agreed to maintain up to the defining element. The LDZ will be maintained by the HOA or Private Entity adjacent to single family residential. All LDZs which are located outside of public roadway right-of-way will be numbered lots. Community walls and fences shall be maintained by the individual Homeowner or a Homeowners Association. The City of Temecula will not maintain community walls, fences, entry monumentation, signage, pedestrian portals or bus shelters. Harveston Specific Plan 10-3 Revised October 2020 N o P. tj �n oo- Q 4Q ��wa 0r 03NIV1NIVW Al31VA18d t� 03NIV1NIVW V1003W31 U W / 30 AiD 4 z (n 14 _px. K Q Gl OD Nd' Or a C Ov) w � p 02 6p C U Y U Y � � Q S w O w O m o Oo p LEQ w � m C S F i 03NIV1NIVW V1MEIIAI 130 ALIO ow zo � w� wz a w� 03 w 0 U p W w to ZpZ� ie a � U O WE, tL� .T ' cd W U NZZg F= O _ rNii g K e o a, Q O w >d (� W w�>3 � x p VOW03NIV1NIVW 83NM03W0H 03NIV1NIVW V1f103W3130 ABO 4 i. ti b 6 E 03NIV1NIVW VlNO3W31 JO ALIO VOH/03NIV1NIVW 83NM03WOI z 0 w U- o � a �Z Z N 4 z 1Q4 5 U O r � U C wWf u aµµK� aoisa�Na dohAW1;10 03NItl1NIVW tl1003W31 d0 ABO NGHN3MVINIYW kpHM1l{L 6 qng o � a 03Nk1HtlNAEltlhlad s 03NItl1NItlW t� AlRVANdl V 0 H m 0 r U ¢a 03NItl1NItlW Al31tlNNdltlOH GNRIHWI4 A131VAIM z gg �s cg�u cgqyo5 i� 10-5 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 1) Level and Downslope Conditions (Figures 10.1-1, 10.1-1A and 101-113): The twenty -five-foot (25') LDZ reflects a seven -foot (7') minimum parkway distance away from curb with a five-foot (5') concrete sidewalk, plus a thirteen - foot (13') minimum distance away from the back of walk to the back edge of the LDZ. There is a two -foot (2') minimum distance away from the back edge of the LDZ to allow for maintenance access. The LDZ from curb to community wall or back edge of LDZ will be maintained by the HOA or Private Entity (not including community walls). Refer to Plant Material Guidelines for shrub and tree varieties, size and spacing. The sidewalk parallel to street may also change grade horizontally and vertically. 2) Upslope Conditions (Figures 10.1-1, 10.1-1A and 10.1-113): When 2:1 manufactured slopes are adjacent to the streetscene LDZ, the twenty- five -foot (25') wide LDZ will increase to include the 2:1 slope from toe of slope to the community wall or other defining element at top of slope. This streetscene condition reflects a seven -foot (7') minimum parkway distance away from curb with a five-foot (5') concrete sidewalk. The 2:1 slope may encroach into the LDZ with the toe of slope being no closer than fourteen -feet (14') to curb face. The LDZ from curb to community wall or back edge of the LDZ will be maintained by the HOA or Private Entity (not including community walls). There shall be a two -foot (2') wide relatively flat area at the top of slope to allow maintenance access. 3) Ground Treatment (Figures 10.1-1, 10.1-1A and 10.1-113): The ground treatment for this streetscene consists of a turf parkway between the sidewalk and curb face. At level conditions, a thirteen -foot (13') minimum width landscape buffer will be planted with shrubs and groundcover from back of sidewalk to the community wall/fence. There shall be a two -foot (2') wide relatively flat area at the community wall/fence or the top of slope to allow for maintenance access. 4) Trees (Figures 10.1-1, 10.1-1A and 10.1-113): Street trees occur in formally spaced rows at an average of thirty-foot (30') on center with a maximum of forty -foot (40') spacing. The evergreen or deciduous informal grove trees create a backdrop to the formally spaced street trees. Street trees in the median and parkway areas are formally spaced (not at the Arroyo Park). All street trees shall be a minimum of twenty four -inch (24") box. Harveston Specific Plan 10-6 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 5) Arroyo Park Condition (Figures 10.1-1): The streetscene planting concept includes informal deciduous or evergreen street tree groupings, intermixed with the informal native trees at the Arroyo Park site. The streetscene LDZ is defined as the planting area from the curb face to the street right-of-way, the remaining open space transitions to become part of Arroyo Park lands. The twenty five-foot (25) LDZ contains a five-foot (5') concrete meandering sidewalk with a seven -foot (T) minimum parkway setback. The remaining LDZ consists of informal grove trees placed to frame views into the Arroyo Park site and to buffer views into the residential site. These trees are informally spaced at an average of thirty-foot (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing of street frontage. 6) Median Island (Figures 10.1-1, 10.1-1A and 10.1-113): A fourteen -foot (14') wide median island occurs on Date Street between 1-15 and Margarita Road. The median island will be planted with a combination of accent shrubs, low maintenance groundcover and a formal row of deciduous or evergreen street trees at an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing. All median island trees shall be a minimum of 24' box in size and shall be planted in City approved root barriers. The median island will be maintained by the City of Temecula. (The median at the City's boundary will be maintained by the City of Temecula, if there is a maintenance agreement with the County.) All landscape shall be per City of Temecula standards. 2. Date Street at Service Commercial Land Use and Residential Overlay Edge. (Refer to Figure 10.1- 2) The landscape development zone associated with the Service Commercial streetscenes along Date Street consists of - Formally spaced evergreen or deciduous street trees at an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing. • All street trees shall be a minimum of 24" box size. • Sidewalks paralleling the street. • Seven -foot (7') standard width turf parkway. • Median island with shrubs and groundcover. • Class II Bicycle Lane. • Areas along service / loading zones are to be screened with walls and landscaping. a. LDZ and Ground Treatment: This Service Commercial or Residential Overlay streetscene LDZ is twenty-five feet (25') minimum from curb face to the back edge of the LDZ. Harveston Specific Plan 10-7 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES The twenty -five-foot (25') LDZ reflects a five-foot (5') concrete sidewalk seven feet (7) away from the curb face paralleling the street. This seven -foot (7') parkway is planted with turf. On the other side of the sidewalk, there is a thirteen -foot (13') planting area. The area is a combination of shrub and groundcover planting, that finishes off the LDZ. The LDZ will be maintained by the Service Commercial or Residential Overlay property owners with the median island being maintained by the City of Temecula. Refer to Plant Material Guidelines for tree and shrub varieties, size and spacing. 1) Trees (Figure 10.1-2): Street trees occur in formally spaced rows at an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing. Street trees in the median and parkway areas are formally spaced with informal background trees. All street trees shall be a minimum of 24" box in size. 2) Median Island (Figure 10.1-2): The median island contains all the common landscaped features as described for Section 1 above. Ynez Road at Service Commercial and Residential. (Refer to Figure 10.1-3) The landscape development associated with Ynez Road at Service Commercial and Residential consists of: • Formally spaced evergreen or deciduous street trees at an average thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing. • All street trees shall be a minimum of 24" box size. • Sidewalks paralleling the street. • Seven -foot (7') standard width turf parkway. • Median island with shrubs and groundcover. • Plantings and street trees will be compatible with adjacent Ynez Road plantings to provide street scene continuity. • Areas along service/loading zones are to be screened with walls and landscaping. a. LDZ and Ground Treatment: This Service Commercial and Residential Overlay streetscene LDZ is twenty-five feet (25') minimum from curb face to the back edge of the LDZ. Harveston Specific Plan 10-8 Revised October 2020 __m maez ABO k ®2 ¥ a \; �2± : )(\ \ $ \\\ )k\ B \ f : © ` :• / , M §a»Q zs ° \\ )\ - \& ; kk ___ mmeJo Ailo / _m__MOM ] ) � \ �) 6 ■ � SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES The twenty -five-foot (25') LDZ reflects a five-foot (5') concrete sidewalk seven feet (7') away from the curb face paralleling the street. This seven -foot (7') parkway is planted with turf. On the other side of the sidewalk, there is a thirteen - foot (13') planting area. The area is a combination of shrub and groundcover planting that finishes off the LDZ. The LDZ adjacent to single family residential will be maintained by the HOA or Private Entity, and the LDZ adjacent to the Service Commercial will be maintained by the Service Commercial property owners association, with the median island being maintained by the City of Temecula. Refer to Plant Material Guidelines for tree and shrub varieties, size and spacing. 1) Trees (Figure 10.1-3): Street trees occur in formally spaced rows at an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing. Street trees in the median and parkway areas are formally spaced with informal background trees. All street trees shall be a minimum of 24" box in size. 2) Median Island (Figure 10.1-3): The median island contains all the common landscaped features as described for Section 1 above. 4. Margarita Road. (Refer to Figure 10.1-4) The landscape treatment for this Section is proposed to be consistent with the treatment for Date Street between Margarita Road and Ynez Road. Please refer to the descriptions under 10.1.2 - Section 1. Community Entry Roads off Margarita and Date. (Refer to Figures 10.1-5, 10.1-6, and 10.1-7 for the entry without a median) These streets are the main access streets to the Harveston residential areas. The landscape development associated with the community streetscenes along the entry roads consists of: • Formally spaced evergreen or deciduous street trees at an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing. Street trees shall be a minimum of 24" box size. • Street trees in the median and parkway areas are background trees. • Five-foot (5') sidewalk paralleling the street. • Seven -foot (7') standard width turf parkway. • 4:1 maximum turf parkway. • Consistency with community fencing and wall mixed use overlay district. Harveston Specific Plan 10-10 Revised October 2020 formally spaced with informal plan (Figure 10.4) - no wall at SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Median island with shrubs and groundcover (no median in minor entry at Margarita Road). Landscape buffer at level conditions. Class II Bicycle Lane. a. LDZ and Ground Treatment: The streetscene planting concept features formally spaced evergreen or deciduous trees at an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -feet (40') maximum spacing. The LDZ is the planting area from the curb face to the street right of way, a twelve -foot (12') minimum distance plus an additional thirteen -foot (13') for a total of twenty-five feet (25') minimum. The LDZ incorporates a five-foot (5') concrete sidewalk, seven -feet (7') away from curb face, paralleling the street for both level and slope conditions. Where there is a 2:1 slope condition adjacent to the LDZ, the slope may encroach into the LDZ with the toe of slope being no closer than fourteen -feet (14') to the curb face. The LDZ adjacent to single family residential will be maintained by the City of Temecula. Community walls and fencing will be maintained by the individual Homeowner or Homeowners Association. Refer to plant material guidelines for tree and shrub varieties, size and spacing. 1) Trees (Figure 10.1-5, 10.1-6 and 10.1-7): Street trees are formally spaced at an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing. Street trees in median and parkways are formally spaced with informal background trees. The street trees shall be centered in the turf parkways and shall be a minimum of 24" box in size. 2) Median Island (Figure 10.1-5 and 10.1-6): The fourteen -foot (14') minimum median islands in Figures 10.1-5 and 10.1-6 will be maintained by the City of Temecula. The median islands will be planted with the same landscape features as described in the medians for Section 1 above with the following addition that annual and perennial color may be added to enhance these main project entries. The approval of the City of Temecula will be required to plant perennial or annual color in the median islands. Harveston Specific Plan 10-11 Revised October 2020 F ui 0 0�� o w c°i 03NIV1NItlW 83NMO A.L83dOHd 03NItl1NItlW A131tlARld (VO'H z " �n M.0.8 ^ z o— 4 H ow � w� y O w K Z_ yO O O a � Z< w w LL W o O w a E h o 03NItl1NItlW ONM03WOH 03NItl1NIVW tl1fl33W31 d0 AM =7 z_ � w hy M-Old ^1 o= 4i 03NItl1NIVW V1633W31 d0 Ailo 034IV1NIVW HgNM03WOH z i U p E � a H �a HER 03NItl1NIVW tl1003W3130 ABO •µ•p•y u¢� o H ice+ _ k 51 03WiHPM 3i WMBNON 03NItl1NItlW tl1003W3130 A110 �3 NO =rr��aa J — 03NItl1NItlW tl1003WRI UIO t 5 03fib'1NItlW >331FNA3WGH 0. F V Y�Y 6 LLL333 � bf aLL � � ¢S 2. DR m §I a � W 03NItl1NIVW tl1003W3130 kilO 03NAINIVW LGNM03 P u"7 1-13 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.1.3 Minor Community Streetscenes and Internal Neighborhood Edge Conditions 1. Loop Road at Residential with and without Parking. (Refer to Figure 10.1-8) The landscape development associated with the minor community streetscene along the Loop Road at residential and school land use edges, consists of • Informal evergreen or deciduous street tree groupings at an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing on one side of road. • Informal evergreen or deciduous background grove trees on the Loop Road. • Street trees shall be a minimum of 24" box in size. • Consistency with community fencing and wall plan (Figure 10.4). • Horizontal and vertical grade change, an eight -foot (8') meandering paseo on one side of the Loop Road, and a six-foot (6') curb adjacent sidewalk on the other side of the road. • Six-foot (6') minimum width turf parkway, on one side of the Loop Road. • Class II Bicycle Lane. • Thirty one -foot (31') minimum LDZ on the outside of the Loop Road. • Nineteen -foot (19') minimum LDZ on the inside of the Loop Road without parking and thirty one -foot (3 F) minimum LDZ with parking. Loop Road Lake Edge at Village Green/Lake Park. (Refer to Figure 10.1-9) While the overall landscape development concept at this condition includes the items discussed above in Figure 10.1-8, the following outlines the difference in the LDZ at this condition. The streetscene planting concept for the Loop Road Lake Edge at Village Green reflects a 31' minimum LDZ (outside of the Loop Road). On the inside portion of the roadway, the minimum LDZ at the Village Green/Lake Park is modified to 16', which includes a 10' parkway and a 6' walk. The Village Green/Lake Park is proposed to extend up to the ROW edge at this condition. The landscape development associated with the minor community streetscene along the Loop Road at the Village Green/Lake Park consists o£ • Formal evergreen or deciduous street tree groupings at an average of thirty feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing on both sides of the Loop Road at these conditions. • Informal evergreen or deciduous background grove trees on the Loop Road and at the Village Green and Lake Park. • Street trees shall be a minimum of 24" box in size. • Ten -foot (10') turf parkway adjacent to a six-foot (6') curb parallel sidewalk on the inside of the Loop Road at the Village Green. • Ten -foot (10') turf parkway adjacent to an eight -foot (8') curb parallel paseo on the outside of the Loop Road at the Village Green. • Ten -foot (10') turf parkway adjacent to a six-foot (6') curb parallel sidewalk at the northern edge of the Lake Park inside of the Loop Road. • Six-foot (6) minimum turf parkway with an eight -foot (8') meandering paseo at the northern edge of the Lake Park outside the Loop Road. • Class II Bicycle Lane. Harveston Specific Plan 10-14 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Loop Road at Community Park. (Refer to Figure 10.1-10) While the overall landscape development concept at this condition includes the items discussed above in Figure 10.1-8, the following outlines the difference in the LDZ at this condition. The streetscene planting concept for the Loop Road at the Community Park remains the same in Figure 10.1-8 for the inside condition (i.e., 19' minimum LDZ). The outside LDZ is reduced from the 31' minimum (adjacent to residential) to a 14' minimum which is the landscape parkway and paseo within the road ROW. The Community Park is proposed to transition up to the 14' minimum LDZ edge. a. Landscape Development Zones (LDZ): The streetscape-planting concept consists of informally spaced street trees, deciduous accent trees or evergreen grove trees planted within the (LDZ). The Loop Road streetscene LDZ is defined as the area from the curb face to the back edge of the LDZ, which could be defined by a wall, fence, v-ditch or other defining element. A minimum 14' LDZ is proposed for the outer side of the Loop Road adjacent to the Community Park. It contains an 8' paseo, which is part of the 14' parkway included in the ROW. However, the 8' paseo may meander into the Community Park, and therefore would occur outside of the ROW. A minimum 19' LDZ is proposed for the inside portion of the Loop Road adjacent to residential uses. Included in this area is a 6' fixed curb adjacent sidewalk. The remaining 13' of LDZ occurs outside the ROW and will be a numbered landscape lot. These LDZ minimums are for areas adjacent to residential. The LDZ adjacent to single family residential and the Community Park will be maintained by the City of Temecula. The community wall will be maintained by the homeowners association and not the City of Temecula. Harveston Specific Plan 10-15 Revised October 2020 a /A� o i4 w U o w (1 0 9 o x� o 6oy c'�d QW O4 oS p 03NItl1NIVW i13NM0 ALZJ3d021d 0 t,9 o Z ,,03NIV1NIMA131YAMI-YO'H r w rr a p pdo�u E59 J Z § ,,y -oHO M.o.a 9�ao U LL a s vW] a a3NIViNIVW tll03W31 n33W31 30 A110 'M'0'N - 4 03NItl1NIVW tllHO3W31 _ 0 30 A110??� �w w5 of �a ow^ oar ^�Qj z pg ¢ G, c1 w0 5w �i z O w a o § � +o s Y1 o Od o b_ 1 � _ I"N 3NItl1ItlW Nam' tllH03W31 � 3 30 A1I01tlOH _zo u a i z a °o a W z z k Q U W Q W h t,= s .03NItl1NIVW Vlf103W31 30AlIOItlOH Y1H03W3130 AM I VOH AO 0 03NIV1NIVN 3NVl 10-16 M'0'll V ril 0-K � o g y E3 03NItl1NIVW Y1H03W31 JO A1IO O O G I O O- S b U Cy Qq� O ry N � N .O W b zx v� H z SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 4. Village Center Road. (Refer to Figure 10.1-11) The Landscape Development Zone associated with the Village Center street scene along the Loop Road consists of: • Ten -foot (10') Village Center walk, a (9) parkway planting area and eight -feet (8) of parallel parking along the Village Center Road. • Single row of parallel formal street tree groupings at an average thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing. All street trees shall be a minimum of 24" box in size. • Street trees will be planted in the (9) planter area adjacent to the parallel parking. • Appropriate landscaped sidewalk access will be provided between the (9') parkway planting. • Class II bicycle lane. • Bike racks will also be located within the village to encourage people to use alternate modes of travel. a. Landscape Development Zones (LDZ): The streetscape-planting concept consists of formally spaced deciduous accent trees planted within the (LDZ). The Village Center Road streetscene LDZ is defined as the area from the curb face to the outer edge of the Village Center walk, a minimum of nineteen - feet (19'). The LDZ will contain the minimum ten -foot (10') urban sidewalk with nine - foot (9') planter area. The sidewalk will reflect the community character through hardscape and urban planting techniques. The community view fence at community facilities will be the back of the LDZ with a minimum condition of nineteen -feet (19') from face of curb. The LDZ along the Village Center Road will be maintained by private property owners association. The community wall will be maintained by the homeowners association, or the property owners, but not the City of Temecula. 1) Trees (Figure 10.1-11): The street trees will be in 9' x 10' planters or nine -foot (9) parkways. All street trees shall be a minimum of 24" box in size. Harveston Specific Plan 10-17 Revised October 2020 kNH .�zw .. oo� z.5 �,n w 0 > 3 w i�Qzd 14 Cq u o H� ci u U u w � W 5 a b z � (V u z W o U W cn c4 m Za .. . CD 9 0 .-. Z < w w ZUZ K LL N N = Z 03NItl1NIVW b3NM03NOH 03NItl1NItlW 4 tllNO3W31IV11 M'OTI �4 4 jT z m w, >np wo it NZN o U3NItl1NIVW tllN MRJOAM + ❑� p0 Uz`� 6 � Z �N OO 0 ¢z O N Z O n O Jo N r a aj p O U 0 b N N �i O N A u w N F z 10-18 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Typical Residential Entry, Paseo Park, Local Road at Lake Park, and Lake Edge, Lake Park (refer to Figures 10.1-12—10.1-15). The landscape concepts as depicted in the above referenced figures will serve a primary role in defining the internal neighborhood edge conditions for the Harveston community. The streetscape planting concept for the two sections which identify residential roadways (10.1-12 and 10.1-14 are consistent with Section 10.3.3 item 1 (Residential Neighborhood Streetscene Landscape Requirements). The "vision" for the Paseo Park and Lake/Lake Park as well as the individual recreational elements proposed are discussed in detail within Section 10.3.4 Park and Recreation Amenities. The Plant Palette identifies the proposed tree and shrub varieties. The proposed maintenance of these recreation facilities is discussed in Section 12.4 of this document. 10.1.4 Community Edge Conditions and Boundaries Service Commercial at Caltrans Land Use Edge (Refer to Figure 10.1-16): The landscape development paralleling Interstate 15 Freeway is of primary importance. Not only does this landscape delineate the community boundary, but it acts as a sound attenuation element. A sound attenuation report will be prepared for all land uses at the time the specific types of uses are proposed. This report will dictate the location and heights of sound attenuation walls. If dictated by the report, a variable height solid masonry wall will be constructed along the property line for sound attenuation purposes. At all locations along the Caltrans edge boundary there is a 2:1 manufactured slope which serves as a landscape buffer. The slope (landscape buffer) shall be a minimum of fifty feet (50') wide from the I-15 Freeway ROW to the Service Commercial site. The landscape buffer on private property will be maintained by the Service Commercial Association and will be planted with low maintenance, drought tolerant shrubs, groundcover and trees per the City of Temecula standards. Refer to Slope Plant Material Guidelines, and Paseo Plant Palette, for tree and shrub varieties, size and spacing. 2. Service Commercial to Off -Site Business Park Land Use Edge (Refer to Figure 10.1-17): The Service Commercial to off -site Business Park Edge interface will consist of a landscape buffer zone which varies based on topography conditions. This landscape buffer will be planted with evergreen grove trees at an average thirty-foot (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing 24" box in size and will be maintained by the parcel owner. At downslope conditions, the variable height 2:1 manufactured slope serves as the landscape buffer. The 2:1 slope will be planted with low maintenance, drought tolerant shrubs, trees and groundcover. Refer to Slope Plant Material Guidelines, and Paseo Plant Palette, for tree and shrub varieties, size and spacing. Harveston Specific Plan 10-19 Revised October 2020 w 3a O� O Z^ 03NItl1NIVH TJ3NM03WOH w b a O H � Y z �1 b 3 03NM1N{tlW o H3NM03WOH ht z� g _ml � a, o aU 5 03NId1NlYn m b3NM03NOH 0 0-20 5 w �I 0 U O 2 [] 2 f T �Mi o 0MMNIVW L tl10o3W31 JO AM/VOH »03NItl1NItlW tllH03W3130A1IO/VOH Q�MVWM HMIM WOH 3 ilf � C 6o g � /LIL O3NIY1NFVAA- LVA1bV MNR'1NFMAl3LVANd LL Al -011 I y 7j y y Q0 0 W 10-21 N O U 05 f7, Q k, w I� CIO i J A 1i z cs lug W n ;� OQ4fJ Ili A o H �ro �S O a O asa [i HIM ! fS� F O 2 Q NIYINM4 Li3WA.03YaH ��„ ca W o 1 i Fi 0-22 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Residential Slope Edge Condition at Santa Gertrudis Creek Land Use Edge (Refer to Figure 10.1- 18): The Santa Gertrudis Creek has an earth bottom with concrete lined sides. A maintenance road and chain link fence travel along both sides of the creek forming the Community Boundary and maintenance separation. A 2:1 manufactured slope borders the Santa Gertrudis Creek boundary along the residential edge. The 2:1 manufactured slope will be of varying width and height and when the slope daylights at Margarita Road a minimum twenty-five foot (25') wide landscape buffer will be installed between the residential site and Santa Gertrudis Creek service road. The 2:1 slope and buffer area will be planted with low maintenance, drought tolerant shrubs, trees and groundcover and will be maintained by the HOA. Trees will be clustered at property lines and shrubs planted sufficiently down the slope so as to preserve and enhance view opportunities. Refer to Plant Material Guidelines (Section 10.2) and Paseo/Lake Edge/Arroyo Park Plant Palette within Section 10.2, for tree and shrub varieties, size and spacing. 4. Residential to Off -Site Residential Land Use Edge Condition (Refer to Figure 10.1-19): The LDZ along the on -site single family residential to off -site single family residential has three conditions. They are an on -site residential upslope condition, on -site residential downslope (only near Ynez Road) and an at -grade condition. On -site upslope and downslope conditions will be created by a 2:1 manufactured slope along the northern residential edge boundary. The manufactured slope will be of varying width and height. All slopes will have evergreen or deciduous informal grove trees, and will also be landscaped with drought tolerant, low maintenance shrubs and groundcover. Upslopes will be maintained by the individual homeowner and all will be landscaped per the City of Temecula standards. Downslopes will be maintained by the HOA. Refer to Plant Material Guidelines (Section 10.2) and Paseo/Lake Edge/Arroyo Park Plant Palette within Section 10.2, for tree and shrub varieties, size and spacing. Residential to Off -Site Service Commercial Land Use Edge (Refer to Figure 10.1-20): The Land Use Edge along the onsite single family residential to the off -site Business Park consists of a upslope from the residential site to the Business Park. An existing wall occurs at the top of slope. The width of the slope/buffer varies based on topography, but shall be a minimum thirty- foot (30') setback between the existing wall and the proposed residential site. The 2:1 manufactured slopes will be landscaped with evergreen or deciduous informal grove trees, shrubs and groundcover per City of Temecula standards and will be maintained by the individual homeowner. Refer to Plant Material Guidelines, and Paseo Plant Palette, for tree and shrub varieties, sizes and spacing. Harveston Specific Plan 10-23 \ , (§[2 \ RH §)§M §§\ �\k E 4 (}) 2 2 ® [$i + )) 2 # §@ § #\k � \ ) _a \2 AGWIviNrm � __mama /§\ * 2 \� 10-2 � G \� Ljn / �wco k ) R ( » ;) !$E / j =m j§§\ a. f 010 co .. . ❑ IVIwm . ,RNWU63dONd, , . » 03N @mw . .. . 1VAI A» �f § ` § l « ) .§/ `® / 0tn / zkd §d] ® \ � � m�q ^ 2k\ § ~ --Ix - )§w \ ) § m « / S k y f - * } � A%(M / ) \ 10-2 J o _ �a ED w c o� O� O Z� rf 5i t' m ZW 3 ct 3�az] o m wo F� ao o0 am a� o"c� i;ao oo; Y mF� o W � W � � z K 03NItl1NIVW A'i31tlAkJd 03NIV1NIVW Al31VAPJd 4 1'V'0'H M 0'H y w q � 4 m�LL 10-24.2 PRECAST PEAKED CAP ENTRY — PILASTER W/ STONE VENEER SIGN INSET (AT ENTRY DRIVE do r STREET SIDE ONLY) -1 5' SO. -1 DETAIL I - ENTRY ICON PILASTER PRECAST TRIM PRECAST WALL CAP E 1 DETAIL 2 - MONUMENT WALL N.T.S. Revised October 2020 DECORATIVE MOULDING W/ STUCCO FINISH i. Harvestan Specific Plan BURNISHED BLOCK MONUMENT WALL PRECAST SIGN INSET INTO WALL - Figure 10.1-23 10-24.3 Residential Overlay Statement Details SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.2 PLANT MATERIAL GUIDELINES 10.2.1 Introduction It is the intent of these guidelines to provide flexibility and diversity in plant material selection, while maintaining a limited palette in order to give greater unity and thematic identity to the community. The plant material lists have been selected for their appropriateness to the project theme, climatic conditions, soil conditions and concern for maintenance. A limited selection of materials utilized in simple, significant composition complimentary to adjacent, common landscape areas while reinforcing the individual architectural and site setting is encouraged. Wherever possible, overall plant material selection for given project areas, shall have compatible drought resistant characteristics. Irrigation programming can then be designed to minimize water application for the entire landscape setting. Plants used for City of Temecula areas are to be reviewed and approved by the City of Temecula during the conceptual drawing phase prior to preparing construction drawings. Plant installation shall be provided per City of Temecula standards. 10.2.2 Plant Palette The plant material selection for common landscape areas associated with Harveston as described in the text, is contained in the following palette. Date Street Trees -Evergreen Dracaena draco Dragon Tree Eucalyptus cladocalyx - Sugar Gum Eucalyptus lehmannii - Bushy Yate Eucalyptus sideroxylon'Rosea' - Red Iron Bark Pinus eldarica - Mondel Pine Pinus halepensis - Aleppo Pine Quercus ilex - Holly Oak Schinus molle - California Pepper Tristania conferta Brisbane Box Trees -Deciduous Street Tree Platanus acerifolia'Bloodgood' - London Plane Tree Lagerstroemia hybrids `Muskogee' Crape Myrtle (Lavender) Trees -Deciduous at Arroyo Platanus racemosa - California Sycamore Palms-Accent/Skyline at Service Commercial only Washingtonia robusta - Mexican Fan Palm Shrubs Acacia redolens - Agave attenuata Arbutus unedo `Elfin King' Callistemon viminalis `LittleJohn' Cistus spp. - Cotoneaster horizontalis - Harveston Specific Plan Revised October 2020 Acacia Foxtail Agave Elfin King Strawberry Tree Dwarf Bottlebrush Rock Rose 10-25 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Shrubs (continued) Escallonia fradesii - Escallonia Leptospermum scoparium - New Zealand Tea Tree Pittosporum tobira - "Wheeler's Dwarf' Dwarf Mock Orange Prunus caroliniana - Carolina Laurel Cherry Pyracantha coccinea - Fire Thorn Rhaphiolepis indica species - Pink Indian Hawthorne Groundcovers Festuca spp. - Marathon II Lonicera japonica - Honeysuckle Myoporum parvifolium - Myoporum Trachelospermum asiaticum Asian Jasmine Vines Clytostoma callistagiodes - Violet Trumpet Vine Distictis buccinatoria - Blood Red Trumpet Vine Gelsemium sempervirens - Carolina Jasmine Pandorea jasminoides - Bower Vine Passiflora alatocaerula - Passion Vine Parthenocissus tricuspidata - Boston Ivy Ynez Street Trees -Evergreen Dracaena draco Dragon Tree Eucalyptus cladocalyx - Sugar Gum Eucalyptus lehmannii - Bushy Yate Eucalyptus sideroxylon'Rosea' - Red Iron Bark Pinus eldarica - Mondel Pine Pinus halepensis - Aleppo Pine Quercus ilex - Holly Oak Schinus molle - California Pepper Tristania conferta Brisbane Box Trees -Deciduous Street Tree Chitalpa tashkentensis 'Morning Cloud Chitalpa Jacaranda mimosifola - Jacaranda Trees -Deciduous at Arroyo Platanus racemosa - California Sycamore Palms-Accent/Skyline at Service Commercial Washingtonia robusta - Mexican Fan Palm Shrubs Acacia redolens - Acacia Agave attenuata Foxtail Agave Callistemon viminalis `LittleJohn' Dwarf Bottlebrush Carissa grandiflora `Green Carpet' Natal Plum Cistus spp. - Rock Rose Harveston Specific Plan 10-26 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Shrubs (continued) Cotoneaster horizontalis - Rock Cotoneaster Dianella tasmanica `Silver Streak' Silver Streak Flax Lily Escallonia fradesii - Escallonia Lantana hybrids `New Gold' New Gold Lantana Leptospermum scoparium - New Zealand Tea Tree Moraea bicolor Fortnight Lily Pittosporum tobira - "Wheeler's Dwarf Dwarf Mock Orange Prunus caroliniana - Carolina Laurel Cherry Pyracantha coccinea - Fire Thorn Rhaphiolepis indica species - Pink Indian Hawthorne Groundcovers Festuca spp. - Marathon II Lonicera japonica - Honeysuckle Myoporum parvifolium - Myoporum Rosa `Flower Carpet var. Noatraum' Pink Carpet Rose Trachelospermum asiaticum Asian Jasmine Vines Clytostoma callistagiodes - Violet Trumpet Vine Distictis buccinatoria - Blood Red Trumpet Vine Gelsemium sempervirens - Carolina Jasmine Pandorea jasminoides - Bower Vine Parthenocissus tricuspidata - Boston Ivy Passiflora alatocaerula - Passion Vine Marearita Road Trees -Evergreen Eucalyptus cladocalyx - Sugar Gum Eucalyptus lehmannii - Bushy Yate Eucalyptus sideroxylon'Rosea' - Red Iron Bark Pinus halapensis - Alleppo Pine Quercus ilex - Holly Oak Schinus molle - California Pepper Trees -Deciduous Street Trees Ulmus parvifolia `Drake' - Evergreen Elm Shrubs Acacia redolens - Acacia Cistus spp. - Rock Rose Cotoneaster horizontalis - Rock Cotoneaster Escallonia fradesii - Escallonia Leptospermum scoparium - New Zealand Tea Tree Pittosporum tobira -'Wheeler's Dwarf Dwarf Mock Orange Prunus carolimana - Carolina Laurel Cherry Pyracantha coccinea - Fire Thorn Rhaphiolepis indica species - Pink Indian Hawthorne Xylosma congestum - Xylosma Harveston Specific Plan 10-27 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Groundcovers Festuca spp. - Marathon II Lonicera japonica - Honeysuckle Myoporum parvifolium - Myoporum Vines Clytostoma callistagiodes - Violet Trumpet Vine Distictis buccinatoria - Blood Red Trumpet Vine Gelsemium sempervirens - Carolina Jasmine Pandorea jasminoides - Bower Vine Parthenocissus tricuspidata - Boston Ivy Passiflora alatocaerula - Passion Vine Loop Road & Temecula Center Drive Trees -Evergreen Dracaena draco Dragon Tree Eucalyptus cladocalyx - Sugar Gum Eucalyptus lehmannii - Bushy Yate Eucalyptus sideroxylon'Rosea' - Red Iron Bark Pinus eldarica - Monde Pine Pinus halepensis Aleppo Pine Quercus ilex - Holly Oak Schinus molle - California Pepper Trees -Deciduous Street Trees Lagerstroemia hybrids `Muskogee' Crape Myrtle (Lavender) Platanus acerifolia'Bloodgood' - London Plane Tree Pyrus calleryana "Chanticleer" Flowering Pear Shrubs Acacia redolens - Acacia Agapanthus africanus Lily -of -the -Nile Callistemon viminalis `LittleJohn' Dwarf Bottlebrush Cistus spp. - Rock Rose Cotoneaster horizontalis - Escallonia fradesii - Escallonia Lantana hybrids `New Gold' New Gold Lantana Leptospermum scoparium - New Zealand Tea Tree Pittosporum tobira - "Wheeler's Dwarf' Dwarf Mock Orange Prunus caroliniana - Carolina Laurel Cherry Pyracantha coccinea - Fire Thorn Rhaphiolepis indica species - Pink Indian Hawthorne Viburnum tinus species - Viburnum Xylosma congestum - Xylosma Harveston Specific Plan 10-28 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Groundcovers Festuca spp. - Marathon II Lonicera japonica - Honeysuckle Myoporum parvifolium - Myoporum Vinca major - Periwinkle Proiect Entry Drives Trees -Evergreen Pinus halepensis - Alleppo Pine Podocarpus gracilior Fern Pine Schinus molle - California Pepper Trees- Deciduous Street Trees Liquidambar styraciflua - Sweet Gum Tabebuia ipe Pink Trumpet Tree Palms/Accent Phoenix dactylifera Date Palm Shrubs Acacia redolens - Acacia Callistemon viminalis `LittleJohn' Dwarf Bottlebrush Carissa grandiflora `Green Carpet' Natal Plum Cistus spp. - Rock Rose Cotoneaster horizontalis - Escallonia fradesii - Escallonia Leptospermum scoparium - New Zealand Tea Tree Prunus caroliniana - Carolina Laurel Cherry Pyracantha coccinea - Fire Thorn Rhaphiolepis indica species - Pink Indian Hawthorne Rosa f. 'Ice Berg' White Shrub Rose Strelizia reginae Bird -of -Paradise Groundcovers Festuca spp. - Marathon II Lonicera japonica - Honeysuckle Myoporum parvifolium - Myoporum Rosa `Flower Carpet var. Noatraum' Pink Carpet Rose Senecio mandraliscae Blue Chalk Sticks Trachelospermum asiaticum Asian Jasmine Vines Clytostoma callistagiodes - Violet Trumpet Vine Distictis buccinatoria - Blood Red Trumpet Vine Gelsemium sempervirens - Carolina Jasmine Pandorea jasminoides - Bower Vine Parthenocissus tricuspidata - Boston Ivy Passiflora alatocaerula - Passion Vine Harveston Specific Plan 10-29 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Village Center Trees -Evergreen Cinnamomum camphora - Camphor Tree Podocarpus gracilior - Fern Pine Quercus ilex - Holly Oak Schinus molle - California Pepper Ulmus parvifolia'Drake' - Evergreen Elm Trees -Deciduous Street Tree Platanus acerifolia `Bloodgood' - London Plane Tree Trees -Deciduous Gleditsia triacanthos inerimis - Thornless Honey Locust Jacaranda mimosifolia - Jacaranda Koelreuteria bipinnata - Chinese Flame Tree Koelreuteria panniculata - Golden Rain Tree Liquidambar styraciflua - Sweet Gum Platanus acerifolia'Bloodgood' - London Plane Tree Prunus cerasifera - Purple Leaf Plum Prunus s. 'Kwanzan' - Japanese Flowering Cherry Pyrus calleriana - Ornamental Pear Robinia ambigisa `Idahoensis' - Idaho Locust Palms-Accent/Skyline Washingtonia robusta - Mexican Fan Palm Shrubs Cistus spp. - Rock Rose Cotoneaster horizontalis - Escallonia fradesii - Escallonia Leptospermum scoparium - New Zealand Tea Tree Ligustrum japonicum - Japanese Privet Liriope muscari - Big Blue Lily Turf Moraea bicolor - Fortnight Lily Pittosporum tobira -'Wheeler's Dwarf Dwarf Mock Orange Podocarpus macrophyllus - Yew Pine Prunus carolimana - Carolina Laurel Cherry Pyracantha coccinea - Fire Thorn Rhaphiolepis indica species - Pink Indian Hawthorne Viburnum tinus species - Viburnum Groundcovers Festuca spp. - Marathon II Hedera helix - English Ivy Lonicera japonica - Honeysuckle Vinca major - Periwinkle Harveston Specific Plan 10-30 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Vines Clytostoma callistagiodes - Violet Trumpet Vine Distictis buccinatoria - Blood Red Trumpet Vine Gelsemium sempervirens - Carolina Jasmine Pandorea jasminoides - Bower Vine Parthenocissus tricuspidata - Boston Ivy Passiflora alatocaerula - Passion Vine Residential Trees -Evergreen Arbutus `Marina' Strawberry Tree Brachychiton populneus- Bottle Tree Callistemon viminalis - Weeping Bottlebrush Cedrus deodara - Deodar Cedar Citrus smensis Orange Trees Eriobotrya deflexa `Coppertone' Bronze Loquat Eucalyptus sideroxylon `Rosea'- Red Iron Bark Jumperus scopulorum `Skyrocket' Sky Rocket Magnolia grandiflora `D.D. Blanchard' Magnolia Magnolia grandiflora `Little Gem' Southern Magnolia Olea europaea Olive Podocarpus gracilior - Fern Pine Quercus agrifolia Coast Live Oak Quercus ilex - Holly Oak Rhus lancea African Sumac Schinus molle - California Pepper Tristania conferta Red Iron Bark Ulmus parvifolia'Drake' - Evergreen Elm Trees -Deciduous Chitalpa tashkentensis'Moming Cloud' Chitalpa Gleditsia triacanthos inerimis - Thornless Honey Locust Jacaranda mimosifolia - Jacaranda Koelreuteria bipinnata - Chinese Flame Tree Koelreuteria panniculata - Golden Rain Tree Lagerstroemia hybrids `Muskogee' Crape Myrtle (Lavender) Liquidambar styraciflua - Sweet Gum Magnolia soulangiana Saucer Magnolia Pistacia chinensis - Chinese Pistache Platanus acerifolia'Bloodgood' - London Plane Tree Platanus racemosa - California Sycamore Prunus cerasifera - Purple Leaf Plum Prunus s. 'Kwanzan' - Japanese Flowering Cherry Pyrus calleriana - Ornamental Pear Robinia ambigisa `Idahoensis' - Idaho Locust Tabebuia ipe Pink Trumpet Tree Harveston Specific Plan 10-31 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Palms/Accent Chamaerops humilis Mediteranean Fan Palm Dracaena draco Dragon Tree Trachycarpus fortuneii Windmill Palm Shrubs Agapanthus africanus Lily -of -the -Nile Aloe arborescens Tree Aloe Anigozanthos hybrids `Bush Gold' Dwarf Kangaroo Paw Arbutus unedo `Elfin King' Elfin King Strawberry Tree Buxus microphylla japonica Japanese Boxwood Callistemon viminalis `LittleJohn' Dwarf Bottlebrush Cistus spp. - Rock Rose Cotoneaster horizontalis - Dianella revoluta `DR5000' Little Rev Flax Lily Dianella tasmanica `Silver Streak' Silver Streak Flax Lily Elaeagnus pungens Silverberry Escallonia fradesii - Escalloma Feijoa sellowiana Pineapple Guava Grewia caffra - Lavendar Star Vine Hemerocallis species - Day Lily Lantana hybrids `New Gold' New Gold Lantana Leptospermum scoparium - New Zealand Tea Tree Ligustrum japonicum - Japanese Privet Liriope muscari - Big Blue Lily Turf Lomandra longifolia `LM300' Breeze Dwarf Mat Rush Moraea bicolor - Fortnight Lily Philodendron x `Xanadu' Dwarf Philodendron Phormium spp. - Flax Pittosporum tobira - 'Wheeler's Dwarf Dwarf Mock Orange Podocarpus elongatus `Monmal' Icee Blue Yellow -Wood Podocarpus macrophyllus - Yew Pine Prunus caroliniana - Carolina Laurel Cherry Punica granatum `nana' Dwarf Pomegranate Punica granatum Pomegranate Pyracantha coccinea - Fire Thorn Rhaphiolepis indica species - Pink Indian Hawthorne Rosa `Flower Carpet var. Noatraum' Pink Carpet Rose Rosa £ 'Ice Berg' White Shrub Rose Rosmarmus officinalis `Tuscan Blue' Tuscan Blue Rosemary Strelizia reginae Bird -of -Paradise Viburnum tinus species - Viburnum Groundcovers Carissa grandiflora `Green Carpet' Natal Plum Festuca spp. - Marathon II Hedera helix - English Ivy Lonicera japonica - Honeysuckle Rosmarmus officianalis `Huntington Carpet' Huntington Rosemary Carpet Harveston Specific Plan 10-32 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Goundcovers (continued) Senecio mandraliscae Blue Chalk Sticks Trachelospermum asiaticum Asian Jasmine Vinca major - Periwinkle Vines Clytostoma callistagiodes - Violet Trumpet Vine Distictis buccinatoria - Blood Red Trumpet Vine Gelsemium sempervirens - Carolina Jasmine Pandorea jasminoides - Bower Vine Parthenocissus tricuspidata - Boston Ivy Passiflora alatocaerula - Passion Vine Vitis `Niabell' Niabell Grape Vine Wisteria sinensis Chinese Wisteria Paseo/Lake Edee/Arroyo Park Trees -Evergreen Eucalyptus cladocalyx - Sugar Gum Eucalyptus lehmannii - Bushy Yate Eucalyptus sideroxylon'Rosea' - Red Iron Bark Geijera parviflora - Australian Willow Pinus eldarica Mondel Pine Pinus halapensis - Aleppo Pine Quercus ilex - Holly Oak Schinus molle - California Pepper Trees -Deciduous Plantanus acerifolia'Bloodgood' - London Plane Tree Platanus racemosa - California Sycamore Populus nigra italica - Lombardy Poplar Salix babylonica - Willow Arroyo Park Riparian Trees Platanus racemosa - Sycamore Populus fremontii - Cottonwood Salix goodingii - Gooding's Willow Salix hindsiana - Sandbar Willow Salix lasiolepis - Arroyo Willow Sambucus mexicana - Elderberry Arroyo Park Wetland Anemopsis claifornica - Apiastrum angustifolium - Artemesia douglassianna - Artemesia dracunculus- French Tarragon Baccharis salisfolia - Carex spissa- Sedge Juncus acutus- Rush Typha latifolia - Harveston Specific Plan 10-33 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Arroyo Park Riparian Shrub Anemopsis californica - Apiastrum angustifolium - Baccharis salisifolia - Oenothera hookeri - Evening Primrose Populus fremontii - Western Cottonwood Salix lasiolepis - Sambucas mexicana - Blue Elderberry Zauschneria californica - California Fuchsia Coastal Sage Shrub Artemisia californica - California Sagebrush Collinsia heterophylla - Chinese Houses Encelia californica - Eridycton crassifolius - Eriogonum fasciculatum - California Buckwheat Eriophyllum confertiflorum - Eschscholzia californica - California Poppy Lasthenia glabrata - Lotus scoparius - Lupinus succulentus - Mimulus puniceus - Monkey Flower Oenothera cheiranthifolia - Evening Primrose Plantago insularis - Salvia apiana - Sage Salvia mellifera - Sisyrinchium bellum - Blue-eyed Grass Shrubs Acacia ongerup - Acacia redolens - Agave spp. - Ceanothus 'Ray Hartman'- Wild Lilac Cistus spp. - Rock Rose Moraea bicolor - Fortnight Lily Muhlenbergia rigens - Deer Grass Prunus caroliniana - Carolina Laurel Cherry Groundcovers Festuca spp. - Marathon II Hedera helix - English Ivy Lonicera japonica - Honeysuckle Vinca major - Periwinkle Harveston Specific Plan 10-34 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES School and Parks Trees -Evergreen Brachychiton populneus - Bottle Tree Callistemon viminalis - Weeping Bottlebrush Cedrus deodara - Deodar Cedar Cinnamomum camphora - Camphor Tree Eucalyptus cladocalyx - Sugar Gum Eucalyptus sideroxylon `Rosea' - Red Iron Bank Pinus canariensis - Canary Island Pine Pinus eldarica - Mondel Pine Pinus halepensis - Aleppo Pine Pinus pinea - Italian Stone Pine Schinus molle - California Pepper Ulmus parrifolia `Drake' Evergreen Elm Trees -Deciduous Gleditsia triacanthos inerimis - Thornless Honey Locust Jacaranda mimosifolia - Jacaranda Koelreuteria bipinnata - Chinese Flame Tree Koelreuteria panniculata - Golden Rain Tree Liquidambar styraciflua - Sweet Gum Pistacia chinensis - Chinese Pistache Platanus acerifolia'Bloodgood' - London Plane Tree Platanus racemosa - California Sycamore Prunus cerasifera - Purple Leaf Plum Prunus s. 'Kwanzan' - Japanese Flowering Cherry Pyrus calleriana - Ornamental Pear Robima ambigisa `Idahoensis' - Idaho Locust Ulmus parvifolia `Drake' - Evergreen Elm Palm s-Accent/Skyline Washingtonia robusta - Mexican Fan Palm Shrubs Acacia redolens - Acacia Cistus spp. - Rock Rose Cotoneaster horizontalis - Rock Cotoneaster Escallonia fradesii - Escallonia Hemerocallis species - Day Lily Ilex species - Holly Leptospermum scoparium - New Zealand Tea Tree Ligustrum japonicum - Japanese Privet Melaleuca nesophila - Pink Melaleuca Muhlenbergia rigens - Deer Grass Phormium spp. - Flax Pittosporum tobira - 'Wheeler's Dwarf Dwarf Mock Orange Prunus caroliniana - Carolina Laurel Cherry Pyracantha coccinea - Fire Thorn Harveston Specific Plan 10-35 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Shrubs (continued) Rhaphiolepis indica species - Pink Indian Hawthorne Viburnum tinus species - Viburnum Xylosma congestum - Xylosma Groundcovers Festuca spp. - Marathon II Hedera helix - English Ivy Lonicera japonica - Honeysuckle Myoporum parvifolium - Myoporum Vinca major - Periwinkle Vines Clytostoma callistagiodes - Violet Trumpet Vine Distictis buccinatoria - Blood Red Trumpet Vine Gelsemium sempervirens - Carolina Jasmine Pandorea jasmmoides - Bower Vine Parthenocissus tricuspidata - Boston Ivy Passiflora alatocaerula - Passion Vine Commercial and Service Commercial Trees -Evergreen Brachychiton populneus- Bottle Tree Cinnamomum camphora - Camphor Tree Pinus canariensis - Canary Island Pine Pinus halepensis - Aleppo Podocarpus gracilior - Fern Pine Quercus ilex - Holly Oak Schinus molle - California Pepper Ulmus parvifolia'Drake' - Evergreen Elm Trees -Deciduous Gleditsia triacanthos ierimis - Thornless Honey Locust Jacaranda mimosifolia Jacaranda Liquidambar styraciflua - Sweet Gum Platanus acerifolia'Bloodgood' - London Plane Tree Prunus cerasifera - Purple Leaf Plum Palms -Canopy Phoenix canariensis- Canary Island Date Palm Phoenix dactylifera - Date Palm Palm s-Accent/Skyline Washingtonia robusta - Mexican Fan Palm Shrubs Escallonia fradesii - Escallonia Ligustrum J. 'Texanum' - Texas Privet Harveston Specific Plan 10-36 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Shrubs (continued) Pittosporum tobira -'Wheeler's Dwarf DwarfMock Orange Pyracantha coccinea - Fire Thorn Rhaphiolepis indica species - Pink Indian Hawthorne Groundcovers Festuca spp. - Marathon II Hedera helix - English Ivy Lonicera japonica - Honeysuckle Vinca major - Periwinkle Annuals - Color Perennials - Color Vines Clytostoma callistagiodes - Violet Trumpet Vine Distictis buccinatoria - Blood Red Trumpet Vine Gelsemium sempervirens - Carolina Jasmine Pandorea jasminoides - Bower Vine Passiflora alatocaerula - Passion Vine Parthenocissus tricuspidata - Boston Ivy The planting time will vary for these types, as Bermuda grass should not be planted during its dormant season. Species should be chosen for their ability to reinforce not only the village character, but also the architectural theme where its presence has an influence. Diversity through color and planting schemes will help develop a sense of individuality for each zone. The minimum sizes for trees and ground cover shall meet present City code requirements. 10.2.3 Planting Schedule Due to the climate extremes of the Harveston area, the installation of plant materials during the coldest winter months (December through March) and the hottest summer/fall months (July through September) can be difficult and should be avoided to the extent feasible. Container plant materials not acclimated to the area can easily suffer from damage or sun/heat exposure resulting in partial or entire foliage loss -even though such materials are perfectly suited to the temperature ranges once established. Harveston Specific Plan 10-37 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.2.4 Landscape Requirements for Slopes All areas required to be landscaped shall be planted with turf, groundcover, shrub or tree materials selected from the plant palette contained in these guidelines. Planting on slopes shall commence as soon as the slopes are completed on any portion of the site and shall provide for rapid short term coverage of the slope as well as long-term establishment cover per City of Temecula standards. The developer shall provide a landscape bond to the City at the time that the landscape plan is approved. The bond is to guarantee the installation of interim erosion control planting in the event that the grading operation is performed and building construction does not commence within one year. The owners of parcels which require landscape development shall assess any existing common landscape areas adjoining their property. Where feasible, landscape development shall reinforce or be compatible with such existing common area setting. According to the City of Temecula code requirements, slope banks 5' or greater in vertical height with slopes greater than or equal to 3:1 will be landscaped at a minimum with an appropriate ground cover, one 15 gallon or larger size tree per 600 square feet of slope area, and one gallon or larger shrub for each 100 square feet of slope area. Slope banks in excess of 8' in vertical height with slopes greater or equal to 2:1 will also be provided with one 5-gallon or larger tree per 1,000 square feet of slope area in addition to the above requirement. 10.2.5 Climate Constraints Plant material palettes for Harveston contained herein are compatible with the climatic setting of the area. The utilization of some materials, depending upon their site location, exposure and relationship to other influential factors may not be appropriate. Temperature: Generally, the extreme summer temperature is 110 to 115 degrees Fahrenheit and generally the minimum winter temperature is 10 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit. The average summer daytime temperature is 90 degrees Fahrenheit with the average nighttime temperature being 58-1/2 degrees Fahrenheit. The average winter daytime temperature is 65 degrees Fahrenheit with an average nighttime temperature of 38 degrees Fahrenheit. 2. Wind: The prevailing summer wind direction is northwest at an average mean of five knots and an extreme mean of 43 knots. The prevailing winter wind direction is northwest at an average mean of four knots and an extreme mean of 49 knots. Extreme seasonal wind velocities may exceed 50 knots at peak gust periods. Harveston Specific Plan 10-38 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Rain: Average annual rainfall ranges from 12 to 18 inches per year. 10.2.6 Horticultural Soils Test Requirements Soil characteristics within the Harveston project may be variable. The owners of parcels which require landscape development shall procure a horticultural soils report in order to determine proper planting and maintenance requirements for proposed plant materials. Such a soils test shall be performed by a qualified agricultural laboratory and shall include a soil fertility and agricultural suitability analysis with pre -planting and post -planting recommendations. 10.2.7 Irrigation The irrigation systems shall be designed to conform to Section 17.32.090 Irrigation System Design Requirements of the Temecula Municipal Code. Irrigation shall be installed per City of Temecula standards for City of Temecula maintained areas. All landscaped areas shall be watered with a permanent underground irrigation system. Irrigation systems which adjoin a separate maintenance responsibility area shall be designed in a manner to insure complete water coverage between the areas. Proper consideration of irrigation system design and installation in the climate extremes of the Harveston area is critical to the success of the landscape investment. In particular, the combined summer elements of heat and wind must be carefully considered in proper irrigation design and equipment selection. Also, City of Temecula maintained areas and HOA maintained area irrigation systems shall be designed so as to be convertible to treated water where applicable, when treated water becomes available. Treated water irrigation systems shall be per Rancho California Water District standards. Water saving irrigation equipment may include flow sensors, moisture sensors, and irrigation program utilizing CIMIS (California Irrigation Management Information System) data. Harveston Specific Plan 10-39 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.3 COMMUNITY ELEMENTS 10.3.1 Community Entry Monumentation Major community entries, minor community entries, neighborhood entries and service commercial entries consist of a thematic blend of construction features, signage and specialty lighting that provides strong landmarks and reinforces the distinctiveness of Harveston. All entry monumentation will be privately maintained and located outside of all City of Temecula maintenance areas and the public right of way. A hierarchy of community theme entries has been developed and consists of the following: • Major Community Entry Monuments • Minor Community Entry Monuments • Neighborhood Entry Monuments • Service Commercial Entry Monuments Please refer to the text below for specific locations. Major Community Entry Monumentation (Figure 10.2): Harveston Major Community Entry Monuments occur at the corners of the northern entry road and Date Street and the southern entry road and Margarita Road. The thematic planting and hardscape are described below. These elements are subject to refinement during the final design process. a. The eighty -foot (80') minimum corner cut-off landscape lot is measured from face of curb to the privacy fence/wall. b. Privacy fence/wall to be five-foot (5') minimum, six-foot (6') maximum height. Wall to be vinyl or block wall construction. Community privacy fence/wall to be selected by Owner. c. Stone pilasters (two pilasters minimum per corner) with precast concrete cap located at turns in the perimeter privacy fence/wall. Community stone to be selected by owner. d. Continuous stone retaining wall, six-foot (6') maximum height containing stone pilasters at edges that follow the City of Temecula vehicular sight line standards. The stone sign wall setback from face of curb is to be thirty -feet (30') minimum. The wall will conform to the City of Temecula's vehicular sight line standards and occur outside of the City's right of way. f. Stone pilasters (two pilasters minimum per corner) 24"x 24"x 12" above wall height with precast concrete cap located at both ends of the sign wall monument. Community stone to be selected by Owner. Harveston Specific Plan 10-40 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES g. Sign text size is to follow city standards guidelines. Signs should be pin -mounted metal construction with uplights or back lighting illumination per owner's selection. h. Five-foot (5') walk separated from curb with a seven -foot (7') minimum parkway. i. Informal corner planting of evergreen specimen entry trees at an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing, 36" box minimum canopy trees. Street trees will still be 24" box minimum. j. Entries shall consist of 25% shrub area, 25% groundcover/ or annual color and 50% turf. 2. Minor Community Entry Monumentation (Figure 10.3): Minor community entry monumentations are proposed to duplicate the major community entry monument features, except as listed below. a. Sixty -foot (60') forty-five degree from entry road corner cut-off. b. The formal foreground Flowering Accent Trees will be omitted. Harveston Minor Community Entry Monuments occur at the corners of the eastern entry road and Margarita Road. The thematic planting and hardscape are described below. These elements are subject to refinement during the final design process. a. The sixty -foot (60') minimum corner cut-off landscape lot is measured from face of curb to the privacy fence/wall. b. Privacy fence/wall to be five-foot (5') minimum, six-foot (6') maximum height. Wall to be vinyl or block wall construction. Community privacy fence/wall to be selected by Owner. c. Stone pilasters (two pilasters minimum per corner) with precast concrete cap located at turns in the perimeter privacy fence/wall. Community stone to be selected by owner. d. Continuous stone retaining wall, four -foot (4') maximum height containing stone pilasters at edges that follow the City of Temecula vehicular sight line standards. e. The stone sign wall setback from face of curb is to be thirty -feet (30') minimum. The wall will conform to the City of Temecula's vehicular sight line standards and occur outside of the City's right of way. f. Stone pilasters (two pilasters minimum per corner) 24"x 24"x 12" above wall height with precast concrete cap located at both ends of the sign wall monument. Community stone to be selected by owner. g. Sign text size is to follow city standards guidelines. Signs should be pin -mounted metal construction with uplights or back lighting illumination per owner's selection. h. Five-foot (5') walk separated from curb with a seven -foot (7') minimum parkway. i. Informal corner planting of evergreen specimen entry trees at an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing, 36" box minimum canopy trees. Street trees will still be 24" box minimum. j . Entries shall consist of 25% shrub area, 25% groundcover/ or annual color and 50% turf. Harveston Specific Plan 10-41 � @ \ 3 g \ � $ ®$ Ga / ek ƒƒ 2 r S � 10-4 0!+ y — — ( � lu 7 ©tq \.. / ƒ . . . ƒ a . I 10- 3 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 3. Neighborhood Entry Statements: Harveston Residential Neighborhood Entries occur at neighborhood entry intersections. The entries should retain the overall community thematic features as listed below. These elements are subject to refinement during the final design process. a. The forty -foot (40') minimum corner cut-off landscape lot is measured from face of curb to the fence/wall. b. Stone pilasters or decorative vinyl fence posts (two pilasters or posts minimum per corner) with precast concrete or vinyl caps will be located at turns in the perimeter fence/wall. Community stone veneer or vinyl fence style to be selected by Owner. c. Fence/wall to be three-foot (3') minimum, six-foot (6) maximum height. Wall to be vinyl or block wall construction. Community fence/wall to be selected by Owner. d. Eight -foot (8) minimum landscape lot from back of sidewalk to neighborhood fence/wall. e. The formal parkway tree planting at the neighborhood entry will be deciduous with an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing, 24" box minimum size. The backdrop trees will be evergreen, 24" box minimum size. f. Parkways will have turf and from the back of the walk to the neighborhood fence/wall will be 50% shrubs and 50% groundcover. g. Optional individual neighborhood identification graphics shall conform to the overall community thematic identity. If an HOA is not created by the developer, then the developer will be responsible for removing the signage/entry monumentation and revegetating the area with turf or other compatible groundcover(s). 4. Service Commercial Entry Monument: Harveston Service Commercial Entry Monuments occur at five (5) total locations. Three (3) entries occur on Ynez Road and two (2) on Date Street at the entries to the Service Commercial. These entries reinforce the overall landscape concept of Harveston, yet they are complementary of the similar off -site Winchester Highlands Service Commercial entries. The Service Commercial proposed entry monument features are listed below. These elements are subject to refinement during the final design process. a. The sixty -foot (60') minimum corner cut-off landscape lot is measured from the face of curb to the privacy fence/ wall. b. Freestanding entry stone sign wall monumentation, three-foot (3) maximum height containing signage of commercial vendors and stone pilasters at edges that follow the City of Temecula vehicular sight line standards. c. The stone sign wall setback from face of curb is to be thirty -feet (30) minimum. The wall will conform to the City of Temecula's vehicular sight line standards. Harveston Specific Plan 10-44 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES d. Stone pilasters (two pilasters minimum per corner) 24"x 24"x 4' tall with precast concrete cap located at both ends of the sign wall monument. Community stone to be selected by owner. e. Sign text size is to follow city standards guidelines. Signs should be uplighted or internally illuminated per owner's selection. f. Five-foot (5') walk separated from curb with a seven -foot (7') minimum parkway. g. Formal corner planting of service commercial entry trees will be evergreen or deciduous with an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing, 36" box minimum canopy trees. Accent palms, Washingtonia robusta at 20' clear brown trunk at 20' on center will accent corners. h. Entries shall consist of 25% shrub area, 25% groundcover/ or annual color and 50% turf. Residential Overlay Entry Statement (Refer to Figure 10.1-23) There are two (2) types of monumentation options for the Residential Overlay: Residential Overlay Corner Monuments and Residential Overlay Entry Icon Monuments. Either one or both of these monument features may be included in the Planning Area parcels as appropriate for the design and context of the subject parcel. a. Residential Overlay Corner Monuments: • The Forty -foot (40) minimum corner cut-off landscape lot is measured from face of curb. This Forty -foot (40) dimension occurs at Ynez Road/Temecula Center Drive, Date Street/Ynez Road and Date Street/Temecula Center Drive. • The stone pilasters accent each side of the monument wall. • The monument sign is inset into the perimeter wall. b. Residential Overlay Entry Icon Monuments: • The Thirty-foot (30') minimum corner cut-off landscape lot is measured from face of curb. • The twenty -foot (20') minimum setback for landscape is measured from face of curb. • The stone icon pilasters accent each side of the monument wall of the entry. • The monument sign is inset into the stone icon pilasters. The optional graphics shall conform to the overall community thematic identity. If an home owners' association is not created by the developer, then the developer will be responsible for removing, if necessary, the signage/entry monumentation and revegetating the area with compatible shrubs and groundcover(s). Harveston Specific Plan 10-45 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.3.2 Fences and Walls Figure 10.4 illustrates the proposed Community Fencing and Wall Plan for the proposed Harveston community. The following is a description of the construction methods and materials to be used in the construction of the perimeter and interior fences, walls, pilasters and entry monuments for this community. The essential aspects of the fences, walls, pilasters and caps, and their finished dimensions, exterior colors and exterior finishes are discussed below. Perimeter Fences/Walls a. Low Stone Theme Wall 1) The low stone theme wall will be a continuous stone retaining wall, six-foot (6') maximum height containing stone pilasters at edges (Refer to Detail 1/Figure 10.5). 2) Stone pilasters (two pilasters minimum per corner) with precast concrete cap. b. Privacy Fence 1) The privacy fence will be five-foot (5') minimum, six-foot (6') maximum height, constructed of posts, post caps, rails and planks. (Refer to Detail 2 and 2B/Figure 10.5 and Figure 10.8). C. Privacy Fence Slope Transition 1) Fence to be perpendicular to slope with five-foot (5') minimum, six-foot (6') maximum height. (Refer to Detail 2A and 2C/Figure 10.5) d. Privacy Block/Green Wall 1) The block wall will be constructed of precision, medium weight CMU block. The finish will be natural. The block shall be integral color. (Refer to Detail 2B/Figure 10.5 and Figure 10.8) 2) Joints -tooled flush to match adjacent block color. 3) Wall expansion joints occur at both sides of stone pilasters and at wall steps. Joints to occur at twenty -foot (20') on center intervals or as recommended by the project structural engineer. 4) Wall to be built using a conventional block wall system. 5) Wall caps constructed of precast concrete. 6) Joints of wall caps tooled flush to match adjacent block color. Harveston Specific Plan 10-46 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 7) Vines to be used to create a green wall. Vine species to be selected by project landscape architect and by owner. e. Privacy Block Wall Slope Transition 1) Wall to be perpendicular to slope with five-foot (5') minimum, six-foot (6) maximum height. (Refer to Detail 2C/Figure 10.5) f. Product Privacy Fence & Slope Transition 1) Product privacy fence and product privacy fence slope transition to reflect 92 and 93 above (Refer to Detail 2, 2A/Figure 10.5 and Figure 10.8). a) 2. Interior Fence a. Privacy Fence with Lattice 1) The privacy fence with lattice will be five-foot (5') minimum, six-foot (6) maximum height, constructed of posts, post caps, rails, lattice and planks. (Refer to Detail 3/ Figure 10.6 and Figure 10.8) b. Privacy Fence with Lattice Slope Transition 1) Fence to be perpendicular to slope with a five-foot (5') minimum, six-foot (6') maximum height. (Refer to Detail 3A/Figure 10.6 and Figure 10.8) C. View Fence 1) The view fence will be five-foot (5') minimum, six-foot (6') height, constructed of posts, post caps, rails and pickets. (Refer to Detail 4/Figure 10.6). d. View Fence Slope Transition 1) Fence to be perpendicular to slope with a five-foot (5') minimum, six-foot (6) maximum height. (Refer to Detail 4A/Figure 10.6) e. Product View Fence and Slope Transition 1) Product view fence and view fence slope transition to reflect 93 and 94 above. (Refer to Detail 4, 4A/Figure 10.6) f. Low Theme Picket Fence 1) The low theme picket fence is to be a three-foot (3') minimum height, constructed of posts, post caps, rails and pickets (Refer to Detail 5/Figure 10.6). Harveston Specific Plan 10-47 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES g. Low Hedge 1) The low hedge will be three-foot (3) maximum height, five-foot (5') maximum width. Hedge to be selected by project landscape architect and Owner (Refer to Detail 6/Figure 10.6). h. Low Theme Picket Fence at Loop Road 1) The low theme picket fence is to be a three-foot (3) minimum height constructed of posts, post caps, rails and pickets. There are three alternatives for these theme picket fences, which include an arbor and trellis. The third alternative is a trellis constructed on top of two stone pilasters. These alternatives will occur at cul-de- sac locations along the loop road. Refer to Detail 7/Figure 10.7) i. Stone Pilasters 1) Stone pilasters will be six-foot (6') minimum, seven -foot (7') maximum height constructed of precision, medium weight CMU block. 2) Joints tooled flush to match adjacent block color. 3) Pilaster Caps to be precast concrete caps. Integral or natural color. 4) Stone veneer cladding to be constructed to pilasters. 5) Stone pilasters to be located at turns in the perimeter and interior privacy fences or walls and located at both ends of the sign wall monuments. Community stone to be selected by owner. 6) Signs should be pin -mounted metal construction with uplights or back lighting illumination per owner's selection. Harveston Specific Plan 10-48 a WLrj CC C u a LL s W I C. _ 10-49 �i 4 s'•V - 1 , A + ff ° f■a - a 93 f �� a � • e°s r f � f , w.• a sy t �� a a r aN a •d.4'a. ,�,1�' . Eby i t f .. ./ ••�"+®e^,a°kr-°.—s F d _r. • e. lip d °•yrf• f a !• A i.��.. . •� f .:. •a o • P.b • 7 F , ° •r a i r.aff * Y sea i J°aZ, a a fi t/ a a 0 3 fat • '. . • 0 rf �* as t 1� .. .•`� ? ;.* %. far - tiar eta. taM1f��,�, iri f a� Ca 10 a �� 6 f • .ram 3Jk�. M roa f° oA �✓ k6 a. C' ,� �Q p i DSO a• el' 7 r, F W A ti T—V=--, a N w A 10-50 a F W A a H w A Lq 0 I v 4 "g a H w A 10-51 N w A Ln a H w A a F I Harvesfon Specific Plan Lennar Communities I—. P1hv--1r— ALTERNATIVE 1 - Colonial/Cape Cod/East Coast Traditional/Cottage Style . t—"PK6W� G�7r /Wrf e-weg-k— V/WO5 ALTERNATIVE 2 - Cottage/American Farmhouse/Prairie/Craftsman Style ALTERNATIVE 3 - Monterey/Spanish Colonial/ Italianate/Craftsman Style DETAIL 7 - Low Theme Picket Fence at Loop Road Figure 10.7 N.T.S Rbruary2001 10-52 Community Fencing and Wall Details G" 10-53 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Neighborhood Walls and Fences: a. Introduction: Neighborhood fences and walls shall be designed as integral components and extensions of building designs and surrounding landscapes. Periphery fences and walls may be integrated into adjacent structures and extended into the landscape areas to help integrate buildings into their environments. Fences and walls shall be constructed of materials, colors, and textures that are similar and harmonious with the architecture. Particular importance shall be given to railing and cap details. Fences and walls may be offset occasionally to avoid visual monotony. Variety of materials in design and height is encouraged. Fencing and walls shall be used to define the limits of property ownership, as well as for the creation of exterior privacy. The following regulations shall apply to all fences and walls, and permanent screening structures in the Harveston project area. All fences and walls will be maintained by the property owner, private maintenance association or HOA and shall be located outside all City of Temecula maintenance areas and the public right-of-way. b. Potential Fence and Wall Locations: Fences or walls may be constructed in the following areas provided that no fence or wall shall be constructed within the setback from curb face to back edge of LDZ. 1) Interior Neighborhood Streetscene Fences and Walls: a) Community theme fences and walls are encouraged to be used along traditional single family neighborhoods bordering community streetscenes. b) Patio homes, cluster homes, courtyard homes or housing fences and walls adjoining any interior neighborhood streetscene shall have a perimeter streetscene fence or wall treatment. c) A uniform fence or wall designed to reinforce the architectural setting while remaining compatible with the previously described Community Fencing and Wall Plan should be utilized at all residential corner lot side yards which parallel or are viewed from public streets. The visual integrity of the overall community and neighborhood streetscene will, therefore, be protected. d) Where interior lot view opportunities exist without a privacy conflict, an open view fence or wall may be appropriate. Such a view fence shall be compatible with the architectural setting. e) Wood fencing is permitted within the individual neighborhood provided the fencing is not readily visible from the community streetscenes. Harveston Specific Plan 10-54 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 2) Residential and Institutional Uses: Fences and walls are permitted in any rear or side yard, and in the front yard between houses to enclose the side and rear yards. Front yard fencing higher than thirty inch (30") shall not extend into the front yard beyond the front elevation of the house. Architecturally compatible garden walls or courtyard walls no higher than thirty inches (30") tall may be used in front yards, but may not be erected within street right-of-way. Exception: Fences and walls may not be erected within the street side yard setback area of a corner lot. 3) Commercial and Other Uses: Screen and security fences and walls are encouraged only in rear or side yards. Trash deposit areas shall be enclosed within a minimum five-foot (5') high gated trash enclosure. C. Fence and Wall Heights: 1) Residential and Institutional Uses: The following fence or wall heights are permitted provided that no fence or wall shall exceed six-foot (6') in height. 2) Privacy fences or walls should be a maximum of six feet (6') in height. a) Whenever fencing is visible to public view, the finished side shall be exposed to the public view. 3) Service Commercial Uses: a) Front and Streetside: Fences and walls in the front setback and streetside setback areas shall be no higher than two and one half feet (2'-1/2") above grade. However, security fencing may be approved if there is a demonstrated need for security. The maximum height of this fencing shall be six feet (6') above grade, and shall be compatible with architecture. b) All trash enclosure walls shall have wall vines planted on 3 sides of the trash enclosure. Trash enclosures are to be located so as to be screened from view. c) Side yard and rear service yard use areas should be screened with a five- foot six inch (5'-6") wall and with a dense landscape buffer. 4) Pool Code: All fencing shall conform to the applicable State of California or City of Temecula pool code fencing requirements, whichever is more stringent. d. Fence and Wall Materials and Colors: All fences and walls shall be designed and constructed as part of the overall architectural and site design. All materials shall be durable and finished in textures and colors complimentary of the overall architectural design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-55 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 1) Neighborhood Streetscene: a) Permitted Wall Materials: Stone veneer, masonry, brick, block and wrought iron combination are acceptable. b) Permitted Wood Fence Materials: Wood fence materials must be of sufficient quality to accent semi -transparent stains. c) Permitted Vinyl Fence Materials: Vinyl fencing is permitted. d) Conditionally Acceptable Wall and Fence Materials: Glass and/or heavy break -resistant plastic are acceptable for use in fences and walls when necessary to preserve views while providing protection against winds, etc., if used in conjunction with another material such as wood, brick, masonry, or stucco. e) Color and Special Fence and Wall Treatments: Walls may be left natural or covered with stucco, except plain concrete block must be covered with stucco or vine/green planting. Brick or precision block walls may be painted or covered with stucco, if desired. Stone surfaces shall remain natural and unpainted. Vinyl fencing can be used for all perimeter and interior conditions. All wooden fences shall be treated with stain to help prevent rotting and weathering. Transparent stains are acceptable. Walls shall be painted and fences stained. Materials, colors, texture, and alignment of fences and walls shall be varied to relieve visual monotony. High contrast materials should be used only in select areas as accents. f) Prohibited Fence and Wall Materials: Barbed wire, wire, electrically charged fences, plain exposed concrete block without vine planting, corrugated metal, chain link and grapestake fencing are prohibited. Harveston Specific Plan 10-56 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES g) Open View Application Fence: Where interior lot view opportunities exist without a privacy conflict, an open view fence or wall may be appropriate. Such a view fence shall be compatible with the architectural setting. Special Wall and Fence Regulations: 1) All fences and walls shall be designed as an integral part of the overall architectural design theme. 2) All fences and walls connecting two (2) separate residential dwelling units shall be constructed of the same color and material and shall be compatible with the color and material of the architecture. 3) Long walls should be broken -up with landscaping - particularly vines and espaliered trees. An eighteen inch (18") minimum space should always be left between paved areas and fences and walls to allow for landscaping with the final width of the planter as approved by Community Development. 4) All fencing in commercial areas shall be planted with vines or screened by dense shrubbery as specified in these design guidelines. 10.3.3 Landscape Requirements Residential Neighborhood Streetscene Landscape Requirements: Smaller lots and reduced front yard setbacks will have modified landscape standards, approved by the Director of Planning. a. Residential Lot Street Trees: Per City of Temecula ordinance, each residential lot shall receive a minimum of one (1) fifteen (15) gallon size street tree planted in the right-of-way. Corner lots shall receive a minimum of two (2), fifteen (15) gallon size street trees also planted in the right-of-way. Residential street tree spacing to be an average thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty -feet (40') maximum spacing. Tree variety shall be chosen from the Harveston Plant Palette contained herein. Trees are clustered near property lines periodically to maximize their growing effect and streetscene impact. One (1) species of tree shall be selected and approved for each residential street to maximize visual neighborhood identity. Deciduous or flowering evergreen accent trees which contrast with the chosen street tree are encouraged at cul-de-sacs, knuckles and intersections to provide seasonal emphasis and interest. b. Residential Front Yard Requirements: The general front yard landscape concept is to provide a basic front yard planting allowing the future homeowner the opportunity for individualization of their front yard landscape. Seeded or sodded turf, shrub planting and an automatic irrigation system shall be installed by the builder/developer in the front yard of each residential lot. The turf shall be installed to a logical stopping point from the curb face to the front of house and side yards. The turf may be held back four feet (4') to eight feet (8') from the edge of the house Harveston Specific Plan 10-57 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES and from side yard property lines allowing for foundation shrub planting. Accent shrubs should also be planted to highlight individual house entries. Slope banks 5' or greater in vertical height with slopes greater than or equal to 3:1 shall be landscaped at a minimum with an appropriate ground cover, one 15-gallon or larger size tree per 600 square feet of slope area, and one 1-gallon or larger shrub for each 100 square feet of slope area. Slope banks in excess of 8' in vertical height with slopes greater or equal to 2:1 shall also be provided with one 5-gallon or larger tree per 1,000 square feet of slope area in addition to the above requirements. Low slopes may be graded out to a less than 3:1 surface gradient and planted with turf. A minimum of one (1), fifteen (15) gallon size tree shall be planted in the front yards of each residential lot. The trees may match the street trees planted in the right-of-way and be located in proximity to said street trees in order to create a grove effect. The trees may also contrast with the street tree and form backdrop tree clusters. Overall, the front yard treatment shall create a streetscene appearance of tree grove clusters meandering through the project and across streets. Smaller lots and reduced front yard setbacks will have modified landscape standards, approved by the Director of Planning. C. Interior Slope Landscape: All interior slopes occurring within the LDZ envelope shall be landscaped and irrigated per the City of Temecula landscape standards. The builder/developer shall install all required slopes not designed as common area. Each builder should confirm the erosion control standards with the City. d. Low Medium (LM) and Medium (Ml and M2) Density Residential Landscape Requirements: 1) All applicable general residential landscape requirements shall apply. 2) Plant material whenever possible shall shade western sides of buildings, especially windows to reduce heat gain inside homes. 3) Plant material should form a smooth transition between neighborhood and streetscene landscaping. 4) Pedestrian and vehicular circulation should be clearly defined by a landscape treatment with accent trees and parking lot grove trees. 5) When parking is located adjacent to a public street, a combination of landscaped berms and/or planting totaling three feet (3') high should be used to screen cars. Harveston Specific Plan 10-58 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES e. High (H) Density Residential Landscape Requirements: Landscaping is a critical element in achieving an overall quality of life in multi -family density housing. The following criteria shall apply: 1) Pedestrian and vehicular circulation shall be clearly defined with a landscape treatment. 2) Carports and parking stalls shall be screened and softened with landscape planters. 3) Project entry drives should be designed to provide an overview of the landscape and recreational facilities. 4) Trash bins should be fully enclosed with six-foot (6') fences or walls. Landscape buffers or wall vine plantings shall occur on three sides of trash enclosures. 5) Trash bin locations should be conveniently located for ease of maintenance and trash location. Recommended locations include inside parking courts or at the end of parking bays. They shall be screened from off -site views. 6) Community streetscene criteria shall be implemented along major or minor community streetscenes. 7) Shrub / ground cover areas need to be maximized to lower water use. The use of turf should be limited to where it serves a functional use. 8) Conform to City of Temecula Landscape standards. 9) All applicable general residential neighborhood streetscene requirements shall apply. 10) When parking is located adjacent to a public street, a combination of landscaped berms and/or planting should be used to screen cars. 11) Wherever possible, canopy trees should be utilized to shade and mitigate the summer heat. 12) Meandering or jogging sidewalks are encouraged. 13) All street frontages containing row garages should have a seven -foot (7') planting pocket located along the streetside and sides of the garages. Allowance should be made for tree clearance of building overhangs. Harveston Specific Plan 10-59 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Commercial and Service Commercial Use Landscape Requirements a. Street Tree Requirements: 1) Informally spaced street tree groupings or formally spaced street trees will be required along Commercial and Service Commercial street frontages, 24" box minimum per Harveston street tree list. 2) On -site evergreen background grove trees shall be used to integrate the Commercial site into the overall community setting. These trees must be located outside the right-of-way and be a minimum of (15) gallon in size. 3) Visual windows into the Commercial and Service Commercial projects are created in the formal streetscene by an average of thirty -feet (30') on center with a forty - foot (40') maximum spacing. In the informal streetscene street tree grouping allow for windows between groupings created by massing grove trees on community streetscenes. 4) Side yard and rear service yard use areas should be screened with a minimum five- foot (5') green wall, which would serve to screen side and rear of buildings where storage, service, loading, etc. would occur. 5) The Specimen Canopy Tree entry planting should be incorporated at the Commercial and Service Commercial sites vehicular access points. The trees shall be 36" box minimum and may be selected from the Harveston major and minor community monument tree list. 6) All trash enclosure walls shall have wall vines planted on 3 sides of the trash enclosure. Trash enclosures are to be located so as to be screened from view. b. Minimum Landscape Requirements: 1) Builder/Developer shall refer to City of Temecula standards for the percentage required of the gross commercial site acreage that shall be landscaped and for City parking lot shading requirements. The landscaping in the landscape development zone which will be owned by the commercial site will count against the required percentage for landscaping of the site. 2) All areas of the site not occupied by buildings or otherwise utilized shall be landscaped with groundcover, turf or tree materials from the community plant list. C. Parking Areas: 1) Parking area landscaping is required for the screening of large parking areas to limit their visual impact. 2) Landscaped islands shall be provided at the ends of interior stall rows to break up parking areas. These islands are to provide an inside width of five-foot (5') minimum landscaped width to allow planting and mounding, consistent with the Harveston Specific Plan 10-60 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES City's Development Code. Creation of large planting islands (tree groves) is encouraged as opposed to small pockets of individual trees. 3) The use of islands to create a series of smaller parking pockets with the total parking area is required. 4) When parking is located adjacent to a public street, a combination of landscaped berms and/or planting totaling three feet (3') high shall be used to screen views of parked cars. 5) Concrete tree well and planting edge curbs should be used in lieu of wheel stops. 6) Pedestrian traffic should be separated from vehicular traffic by sidewalks. The parking lot may have crosswalks or shall be highlighted with decorative which varied texture paving. Service Commercial and Residential Overlay Landscape a. Temecula Center Drive at Service Commercial Land Use and Residential Overlay 1) The landscape development zone associated with the Service Commercial and Residential Overlay streetscenes along Temecula Center Drive consist o£ • Formally spaced evergreen or deciduous street trees at an average of thirty- five feet (35') on center with forty -foot (40') maximum spacing. • All street trees shall be a minimum 24" box size. • Sidewalks paralleling the streets. • Six -foot (6') standard width parkway. 2) LDZ and Ground Treatment This Service Commercial and Residential Overlay LDZ is twenty -feet (20') from curb face to the back edge of the LDZ on the Residential Overlay side and sixteen - feet (16') from curb face to the back edge of the LDZ on the Service Commercial side. The nineteen -foot (19') Residential Overlay LDZ reflects a five-foot (5') concrete sidewalk six -feet (6') away from the curb face paralleling the street. This six-foot (6') parkway is planted with a combination of shrub and groundcover planting. On the other side of the walk is a nine -foot (9') planting area. This area is a combination of shrub and groundcover planting that finishes off the LDZ. The sixteen -foot (16') Service Commercial LDZ reflects a five-foot (5') concrete sidewalk six -feet (6') away from the curb face paralleling the street. This six-foot (6') parkway is planted with a combination of shrub and groundcover planting. On Harveston Specific Plan 10-61 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES the other side of the walk is a five-foot (5') planting area. This area is a combination of shrub and groundcover planting that finishes off this LDZ. The LDZ adjacent to the Residential Overlay shall be maintained by the home owners' association and the Service Commercial will be maintained by the Service Commercial property owners' association. Refer to Plant Material Guidelines for tree and shrub varieties, size and spacing. 3) Trees (Refer to Figure 10.1-21) Street trees occur in formally spaced rows at an average of thirty -five -feet (35') on center with a forty -foot (40') maximum spacing, Street trees in the parkway are formally spaced with informal background trees on the Residential Overlay side only. All street trees shall be a minimum of 24" box in size. b. Community Edge at Caltrans Land Use Edge (Refer to Figure 10.1-22) 1) The landscape development paralleling Interstate 15 Freeway is of primary importance. This landscape delineates the community boundary. 2) A sound attenuation report will be prepared for all off site land uses at the time the specific types of uses are proposed. This report will dictate the location and heights of sound attenuation walls. If dictated by the report, a variable height solid masonry wall will be constructed along the property line for sound attenuation purposes. Landscaping may also be planted as a means of sound attenuation or a combination of both solid wall and landscaping. 3) At all locations along the Caltrans edge boundary there shall be a minimum of fifty feet (50') wide from the I-15 Freeway ROW to the Residential Overlay site. The landscape buffer on private property will be maintained either by the property owner or homeowner association and will be planted with low maintenance, drought tolerant shrubs, groundcover and trees per the City of Temecula standards. Refer to the Paseo Plant Palette for tree and shrub varieties, size and spacing. C. Landscape Requirements for Internal Streets 1) An irregular pattern of street trees spaced at and average of thirty -five -feet on center shall be provided along the entire residential street. All street trees shall be a minimum of 24-inch box in size. There shall be informally spaced background trees behind sidewalk as space allows. No individual front yards will be allowed. This area shall be maintained by the home owners' association. Harveston Specific Plan 10-61.1 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.3.4 Parks and Recreation Amenities 1. Community Recreational Opportunities Community recreational opportunities are those opportunities, which are available for the use and enjoyment of members of the Harveston community and residents of the City of Temecula. They are segmented and discussed as follows: • Lake • Lake Park • Paseo Park • Village Green • Village Club* • Mini Parks • Community Park • Arroyo Park • Winchester Creek Park (existing and outside Specific Plan boundary) • Elementary School • Parkway Greenbelt System • Bicycle Trail System • Private Recreation Areas (condominiums and/or apartments)* * These facilities will only be available for use of Harveston residents. Residents in the Residential Overlay portion of Planning Area 12 are excluded. a. Lake: The centerpiece of the Harveston community is the 8.4-acre public lake, which will provide visual as well as a recreational value to the community. The general public may enjoy fishing from the lake shore with payment of a use fee. The sailing and boating activities will be available to residents of Harveston through the boating facilities at the private village club. The general public may utilize the boating facilities with the payment of a use fee. The lake is proposed to contain the following recreational elements: • 8.4-acre body of water • Out -cropping for fishing and passive recreation • Special lake edge treatments The lake also serves as a key element in the community character. An extensive trail system will link the neighborhoods to the lake. Harveston Specific Plan 10-61.2 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES b. Lake Park: Attached to the lake are amenities contained within the park around the lake. The public Lake Park will serve as a linkage between the lake and the surrounding development. The park will be connected to the different neighborhoods via an extensive trail system. This trail system will connect the entire core of the community. The facilities of the Lake Park are composed of three main elements: the Lake Park itself, the Paseo Park and the Village Green. The Lake Park Elements may include the following: • Lighted (10') Class I/multi-use trail • Thematic and buffer landscape treatments • Passive turf areas • Family picnic facilities • Group shade arbors associated with the amphitheater C. Paseo Park: Linking the Community Park to the Lake Park is a 2.0-acre greenbelt Paseo Park, which will intercept Planning Areas 2 and 3, connecting to the lake in Planning Area 3. It will contain an 8-foot paseo to facilitate access between residential areas and the commercial, school and park uses. Program elements may include the following: Paseo path jogging trail Passive open space Special landscape buffer for adjacent residential d. Village Green: The public Village Green is a 1.8-acre entry feature to the Harveston community. This area can be utilized as an informal recreation area and a gathering place. It will also provide the opportunity for community activities, such as farmer's markets, art shows, concerts, etc. The Program Elements may include the following: • Community amphitheater that may host community forums, plays, concerts, and weddings • Bandstand/ gazebo with electrical outlets • Elevated lawn for concert seating • Formal paseo • Passive formal lawn and landscaping with lawn seating opportunities • Special landscape treatment Village Club: The Village Club is the place where residents can congregate to enjoy a variety of active and passive recreations. The club will be a private club for the local residents of Harveston. The facility will be maintained and owned by the Harveston HOA. The Program for the Village Club may include the following: Great hall for special events and community meetings Harveston Specific Plan 10-62 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES • Community/special event planning offices • Restroom facilities • Exercise room • Locker facilities • Junior Olympic Swimming Pool • Whirlpool spa • Youth activity pool • Lake equipment/storage facilities • Group picnic and barbecue area • Community garden/courtyard • Onsite parking • Special urban landscape treatment f. Mini Parks: A minimum of three mini parks, for a total of 1.5 acres are planned. The final location of the mini parks will be approved at the tentative map stage. These parks are intended for private use of the residents of Harveston neighborhoods. Program Elements may include the following (refer to Figure 6.2, Conceptual Mini Park Detail): • Tot -lot meeting ADA requirements • Open play area • Shade structures • Paseo path • Landscape buffer treatment for surrounding residential • Benches • Picnic areas • Barbecues g. Community Park: A 19.5-acre community park is planned in Planning Area 1. Program Elements may include the following (refer to Figure 6.3, Community Park Plan): • Two lighted 300' baseball/softball field with two full size soccer fields • 100 parking spaces within the park off Equity Drive • 25 parking spaces within the park of the Loop Road • Large snack bar/restroom facility (1,800 square feet) • Small restroom adjacent to tot lot and picnic areas • Ball field and park lighting to be approved by the City Harveston Specific Plan 10-63 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES h. Arroyo Park: The Arroyo Park is a unique opportunity to recapture the more naturalistic California landscape in a re-creation of a riparian environment. This 13.9-acre park will offer the residents a different recreation experience. Instead of the manicured park, the Arroyo Park will provide a naturalistic setting. If a parking lot is provided, it shall meet the current requirements for parking lot landscaping. The Program Elements may include the following: • Trail adjacent to the park • Possible on site parking/staging area • Special landscape buffer for adjacent residential • Native plant species landscaping i. Winchester Creek Park: This is an existing 4.5-acre park, located on Margarita Road, across from the Harveston site. This park is not part of the Harveston Specific Plan area, however, it was dedicated to the City of Temecula and through a prior agreement has been utilized as park credit towards fulfilling the Quimby dedication requirement. J. Elementary School: A 12-acre elementary school is proposed within Planning Area 4 adjacent to the mixed -use village center and residential. The school will include active recreation opportunities (i.e., ball fields) typical of this use. k. Parkway Greenbelt System: An expanded parkway greenbelt system will be located adjacent to the Loop Road and higher volume roadways. The greenbelt system will be landscaped with turf, trees, and various additional plant materials. The landscaped greenbelt area will vary in width. Some of the parkways will meander, thus creating interesting viewpoints for users of the greenbelt. Sidewalks or paseos will be provided on the greenbelt on both sides of the street throughout the development. 1. Bicycle Trail System: A bicycle Trail System completes the active recreational amenities planned for Harveston. A Class II bicycle lane is proposed on both sides of the Loop Road, one side of Margarita Road, both sides of Date Street and both sides of all of the Entry Roads into the project. A 10' wide multi -use trail is proposed within the Lake Park and the Community Park. (Refer to Figure 4.7 Bicycle Plan). in. Private Recreation Area (Condominiums and/or Apartments): Planning Areas 3, 5 and 6 may provide for private recreation areas. These areas may include pools, tennis courts, barbecue pits, sand volleyball courts, and restroom facilities. n. Private Recreation Area (Residential Overlay): Each Planning Area in the Residential Overlay provide private recreation areas. These areas may include amenities such as pools, tot lots, barbecue pits and sport courts. Recreation areas shall be sized appropriately for the amount of residents in the individual residential development. Harveston Specific Plan 10-64 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.3.5 Maintenance Responsibility Please refer to Section 12.4 Maintenance and Figure 12.2 Maintenance Plan for a detailed discussion of Maintenance Responsibilities. 10.3.6 Outdoor Lighting All streets and commercial developments in Harveston shall have uniform lighting standards with regard to style, materials, and colors in order to ensure consistent design. The proposed standards will deviate from the City of Temecula standards. Each residential development may develop its own lighting standards, provided that the selected lighting fixture style is used consistently throughout the residential development and is approved by Southern California Edison and the City of Temecula. Lighting fixtures shall be well integrated into the visual environment and the appropriate architectural theme. All lighting fixtures in the Harveston project area shall comply with the following regulations and provisions: 1. The level of on -site lighting as well as lighting fixtures, shall comply with any and all applicable requirements and policies of the City of Temecula and Mount Palomar Observatory. Energy conservation, safety, and security should be emphasized when designating any lighting system. 2. All outdoor lighting, including spotlights, floodlights, electrical reflectors and other means of illumination for signs, structures, landscaping, parking, loading, unloading, and similar areas shall be focused, directed, and arranged to prevent glare and illumination on streets or adjoining property. Low-pressure sodium, low intensity, energy conserving night lighting is preferred. 3. All exterior lights should be shielded and focused to minimize spill light into the night sky or adjacent properties per Mount Palomar and City of Temecula Land Use Ordinances regulating light pollution. 4. Lights shall be of unbreakable plastic, recessed, or otherwise designed to reduce the problems associated with damage and replacement of fixtures. Fixtures shall be vandal resistant, yet should not look institutional. Neon and similar types of lighting are prohibited in all areas of Harveston per Mount Palomar Lighting Ordinance. 6. All exterior lighting designs should develop a sense of hierarchy by varying fixtures and illumination levels. Proper lighting helps to define the organization of streets and plazas; and also distinguishes vehicular and pedestrian circulation patterns. Entry areas (both pedestrian and vehicular), public plazas, community facilities, and highly used recreation areas shall be creatively lit to develop a sense of place and arrival. 7. All exterior lighting designs shall address the issue of security. Parking lots, pedestrian walkways, and building entrances shall be well lighted for security reasons. 8. No freestanding residential lighting fixtures shall exceed twenty-five feet (25') in height; parking lot light standards shall not exceed twenty-five feet (25'). In no case shall overwash occur beyond the property lines. The light fixture heights and locations need to comply with the conceptual designs shown in Figures 7.1 and 7.2. Playing field lighting fixtures may exceed these standards. Harveston Specific Plan 10-65 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 9. Service area lighting shall be contained within the service yard boundaries and enclosure walls. No light spillover should occur outside the service area. The light source is not to be visible from the street. 10. The lighting concept of the entry monumentation features is to illuminate the sign graphics and to gently wash the walls and pilasters with light. Trees and other landscape features will be illuminated by ambient light bounding off the entrance walls. 11. All electrical meter pedestals and light switch/control equipment shall be located with minimum public visibility or shall be screened with appropriate plant materials. 12. All lighting design, fixture location (s) and lighting types within the 19.5-acre Community Park shall be approved by the City to allow for night use of active sports fields. Harveston Specific Plan 10-66 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.4 RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL GUIDELINES 10.4.1 Purpose The purpose of the residential architectural guidelines is to provide general design criteria and guidance for the development of the various neighborhoods at Harveston. The goal is to promote both visual compatibility and variety in a community setting achieved by utilizing a number of compatible traditional and contemporary styles, and through quality architectural innovation. No architectural style shall constitute more than 20% of all of the single family residences constructed within the Harveston Specific Plan (excluding the high density development). 10.4.2 Design Intent and Elements of a "Great Neighborhood" The principal design criteria and architectural styles are not intended to be restrictive, but are meant to assist in the design, processing, and implementation of a higher level of design direction and quality. The following are intended as parameters for concept designs: • Specific use and selection of details that correlate well with the designed floor plan. • Specific interpretation of styles within constraints and consistency of site planning, landscape, and architecture. The following parameters are to be avoided in concept design: • Harsh contrasts of materials and/or colors. • Inappropriate sensitivity to scale. • Poor selection and execution of details. • Extreme interpretations of the characteristics for each style. • Lack of window treatments, which result in flat, blank walls specifically on the rear elevations and side elevations, facing streets or other public spaces. The interweaving of two concepts; Innovative Architectural Concepts and Successful Site Design Techniques produce great neighborhoods. The important elements of a great neighborhood as listed in two groupings below are strongly encouraged throughout the community of Harveston. These elements are discussed in more detail in Sections 10.5.1, 10.5.2, and 10.5.3. INNOVATIVE ARCHITECTURAL CONCEPTS SUCCESSFUL SITE DESIGN TECHNIQUES Architecture forward Shortened streets Varied garage placement Curb separated sidewalks Eclectic variety of compatible architectural styles Street trees program Wrap around architecture Limited number of homes per neighborhood Varied roof heights and pitches create a custom Pedestrian connections home feel Variable lot setbacks Color pallettes selected per styles — over time, the addition and deletion of color schemes create a unique feel It should be noted that the above elements are not designed to create a rigid framework. All of the elements are described in more detail in the following Sections 10.4.3, 10.4.4, 10.5.1, 10.5.2 and 10.5.3. Additionally, there may be some overlap in describing these elements in the following five sections. Harveston Specific Plan 10-67 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.4.3 Architectural Forward Standards "Architecture forward" as defined in this Specific Plan is expressed as follows: 1. Advancing the architecture of the living spaces forward on the lot, while concurrently, the garage is held in place; or in some instances, the garage may be further recessed. 2. Planning the living spaces of the home in front of the garages such that the predominant features of the home fronting the street are the windows and the front door. 3. Providing articulation on two-story homes facing streets and other areas exposed to public view, single -story elements, such as covered front porches and covered side entries. 4. Incorporating a variety of garage layout solutions to mitigate the negative impact of garages on the fronts of the homes, such as garage wall plane furrouts, screened garage door elements, shallow mid, and deep -recessed garages, porte-cocheres, tandem garages, split garages (including swing - in), and side -on garages. The above outlines general guidelines for designing homes in Harveston. For more detail, please refer to Section 10.5.1 Plotting, Massing and General Neighborhood Criteria, 10.5.2 Garage Placement, and 10.5.3 Building Elevations and Section 11.0 Development Standards. 10.4.4 Architectural Styles The closely associated architectural styles, which have been chosen for the proposed Harveston Specific Plan, have evolved in California since the turn of the century. Their inherent attractiveness, informality, and sense of elegance have enabled these styles to remain popular over a long period. The proposed architectural styles, for both single family and multifamily include, but are not limited to the following: • American Farmhouse • East Coast Traditional • Cape Cod 0 Italianate • Colonial • Monterey • Cottage • Prairie • Craftsman 0 Spanish Colonial • New Traditional Prairie (shall only be used in multifamily products within the Residential Overlay portion of Planning Area 12, as shaded on the Key Map on pg. 10-79) It should be noted that the photographs illustrated on the following pages are representative of concepts envisioned for the Harveston Specific Plan. The intention is to incorporate many of these design features into the proposed Harveston community. However, it must be acknowledged that these concepts may be subject to future refinements based upon economic, marketing, detailed engineering and other factors. Therefore, the photographs shown are not intended to be exact duplicates of the future product types for Harveston Specific Plan, but samples of quality design elements. The following style elements for each of the I architectural styles proposed (see following pages) are strongly encouraged and appropriate for the various Harveston neighborhoods. Harveston Specific Plan 10-68 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES AMERICAN FARMHOUSE . n.'ar red. � `�..-' �"� .— ._ _'—'_. --.- -.. �_? • - - _ - - - T. ..'? �=. � 'f-� - -� �:d.:i•�._ I E 4 _ .�..�. if _-J,�Fs�,�. •r r,�..�.•a�r.-. Ti,.. _.:sir'_.. ',v'.'�i-r'e.. :'�Y--`: .. �!-'�t.c�✓.x':.its:T..-._.rig,".3:�-.[:,r',:/��.wr�.-:-:r ,,4^^r._�::.� .i:� - �.... V-J:'ks-.r�k�' .. :;:au. INSPIRATION PHOTO: APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Simple plan form massing and simple roof design ■ Porches with simple wood columns ■ Porches with wood railings ■ 6:12 to 9:12 roof pitch ■ Front to back main gable roof ■ 12" overhangs ■ Architectural quality wood or asphalt shingles or smooth flat concrete tiles ■ Light to medium sand finish stucco or blended siding and stucco ■ Vertical multi -paned windows at front elevations and in high visibility public view areas ■ Single paned windows on sides and rear elevations ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ White vinyl wrapped aluminum windows ■ Stucco finish or horizontal siding wrapped chimney ■ Garage door patterns complimentary to style ■ Minimum 2x4 wood window and door trim ■ Whites or dark stucco body colors ■ Light earth tone bodies with contrasting cool or warm trims ■ White or dark color accent trims Note: The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-69 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES CAPE COD -- r INSPIRATION PHOTO: f4 APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ 2 story simple "salt box" massing ■ 5:12 to 7:12 roof pitch ■ 12" to 18" overhang ■ Simple hip or gable roof with one forward facing intersecting gable roof ■ Architectural quality wood or asphalt shingles or smooth flat concrete tiles ■ Blended siding and stucco ■ Light to medium sand finish or light lace finish stucco ■ Vertically hung mullioned windows at front elevation and in high visibility areas ■ Often ganged in pairs ■ Single paned windows on sides and rears ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Porches with wood columns and railings ■ 2x4 wood window trim surrounds ■ Garage door patterns complimentary to style ■ White to mid value body colors ■ White vinyl wrap aluminum windows Note: The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-70 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES COLONIAL INSPIRATION PHOTO: APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Simple plan form massing and simple roof design ■ 6:12 to 12:12 roof pitch ■ 0" to 12" overhangs ■ Front to back dominant gable roof with one intersecting gable roof ■ Architectural quality wood or asphalt shingles or smooth flat concrete tiles ■ Fine to light sand finish or light lace finish stucco or blended siding and stucco ■ Vertical multi -paned windows at front elevations and in high visibility public view areas ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Single paned windows on sides and rear elevations ■ Minimum 2x4 wood window and door trim ■ White vinyl wrapped aluminum windows ■ Entry porches with simply trimmed wood columns ■ Stucco finish or horizontal siding wrapped chimney ■ Garage door patterns complimentary to style ■ Round attic vents ■ Brick accents ■ Shutters ■ Pastels to cool colors with white trims ■ Dark color shutters ■ White trim / fascias Note: The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-71 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES COTTAGE INSPIRATION PHOTO: APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Rectangular plan form massing with some recessed 2nd floor area ■ Main roof hip or gable with intersecting gable roofs ■ 6:12 to 12:12 roof pitch ■ 0" to 12" overhangs ■ Architectural quality wood or asphalt shingles or smooth flat concrete tiles ■ Light to medium sand finish or light lace finish stucco Single paned windows on sides and rear ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Vertical shaped windows with mullions and simple wood 2x trim at front elevation and at high visibility areas ■ Entry accents with real or faux stone ■ Entry porches with stucco columns and wood railings ■ Garage door patterns to compliments style ■ Shutters ■ Whites and earth tones ■ Dark color accents / trim (shutters) ■ White vinyl wrapped aluminum windows ■ Stucco over foam window and door trim Note: The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-72 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES CRAFTSMAN 'Z 4� INSPIRATION PHOTO: ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Windows are often ganged in pairs ■ Single paned windows at sides and rears ■ White vinyl wrap aluminum windows ■ Arts and crafts style lighting fixtures ■ Shaped wood header trim at windows and doors ■ Simple knee brace ■ Outlooker ■ Light earth tone colors ■ Playful / dark accent 'rV APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Simple 2 story boxed massing with vertical and horizontal breaks ■ Entry porches with heavy square columns or posts on stone piers ■ 3'/z 12 to 4%z 12 roof pitch ■ 18" to 24" overhangs ■ Architectural quality asphalt shingles or shingles texture flat concrete tiles ■ Basic gable roof side to side or front to back with cross gables ■ Blended siding and stucco ■ Light to medium sand finish or California Monterey Finish ■ Vertically hung upper mullioned windows at front elevation and in high visibility areas Note: The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-73 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES INSPIRATION PHOTO: EAST COAST TRADITIONAL APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Plan form massing with a vertical and an horizontal break ■ 6:12 to 12:12 roof pitch ■ 18" to 24" overhangs ■ Concrete roof tile with shingle look ■ Front to back gable or hip roof with intersecting hip or gable roofs ■ Blended stucco and siding ■ Single paned windows at sides and rears ■ White vinyl wrap aluminum windows ■ Decorative accent windows ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Full wood porches and or wood balconies ■ Simplified versions of Colonial cornice trim at gable ends ■ 2x6 wood windows and door trim ■ Garage door patterns complimentary to style ■ White detailing trims Note: The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-74 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES ITALIANATE INSPIRATION PHOTO: APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ 2 story massing with one vertical and one horizontal break ■ Main hip roof with minor intersecting hip roofs ■ 3'/z 12 to 4%z 12 roof pitch ■ 24" overhangs, stucco soffits ■ "S" shaped concrete tiles ■ Fine to light sand finish or light lace finish stucco ■ Vertically hung 9 and 12 paned windows at front elevation and in high visibility areas ■ Often ganged in pairs ■ Single paned windows at sides and rears ■ White vinyl wrap aluminum windows ■ Arched top accent windows ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Tapered round or square simple stucco columns ■ Shutters ■ Entry porch ■ Belt course trim ■ Mid value saturated colors Note: The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-75 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES MONTEREY INSPIRATION PHOTO: APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Simple box plan form ■ Main hip or front to back gable roof front to back at 4:12 to 7:12 and shed roof break over balcony at 3'/z to 4%z 12 roof pitch ■ 12" to 24" overhangs ■ Barrel or "S" the roofs ■ Fine sand to California Monterey stucco finish ■ Vertical siding accents at gable ends and 2nd floor balcony ■ Simplified colonial style window and door trim ■ Single paned windows at sides and rears ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ White vinyl wrap aluminum windows ■ Wood balcony and railing ■ Ornate chimney top trim ■ Round tile attic vents ■ Garage door patterns complimentary to style ■ Shutters ■ Whites, painted brick ■ White or dark brown trims, balconies Note: The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-76 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES INSPIRATION PHOTO: PRAIRIE APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ 2 story massing with horizontal design elements with one story elements ■ Hip roof design with boxed stucco soffits ■ 3% 12 to 4% 12 roof pitch ■ 24" overhangs, stucco soffits ■ Smooth flat concrete tiles ■ Fine to light sand finish or light lace finish stucco ■ Vertical windows at first floor and accent horizontal windows at 2nd floor along belt course ■ White vinyl wrap aluminum windows. ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Broad flat chimney with brick cap detail ■ Covered entry with stucco or wood columns on stone base ■ Wide range of light earth tones and contrasting trim ■ White vinyl wrap aluminum windows Note: The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-77 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES SPANISH COLONIAL 41, 1. Ili. � � .. . � � � . I,: ,,i .Ia•1: � iil ^tea INSPIRATION PHOTO: APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ 2 story massing with strong one story element ■ 4:12 to 5:12 roof pitch ■ 12" to 18" overhang ■ Simple hip or gable roof with one intersecting gable roof ■ Barrel or "S" shape concrete tiles ■ Fine to light sand finish or light lace finish stucco ■ Vertically hung 9 and 12 paned windows at front elevation and in high visibility areas ■ Often ganged in pairs ■ Single paned windows at sides and rears ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ White vinyl wrap aluminum windows ■ Stucco over foam window and door trim ■ Arched stucco column porches ■ Garage door patterns complimentary to style ■ White tone body with bright accent trim ■ Dark brown trims Note: The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Harveston Specific Plan 10-78 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES NEW TRADITIONAL PRAIRIE INSPIRATION PHOTO: APPROPRIATE STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Low pitch, full hip roof with ridge ■ Wide eave overhang, boxed ■ Board and batten (wood or simulated wood product) ■ Multiple wall materials (commonly stone, brick, stucco, and painted or imitation wood) ■ Sliding windows resembling casement with mullions ADDITIONAL STYLE ELEMENTS: ■ Simulated stone veneer on the elevation of the lower floor for visual stability and material hierarchy ■ Exterior cement plaster with smooth finish (either troweled or blown application) ■ Use of neutral colors with textured elements and natural light ■ Vinyl sliding or swing patio doors and windows with either cream, white or dark bronze color ■ Overhang at building entry door * New Traditional Prairie architectural style permitted only on multifamily products and where shaded on this key map. A77t, The photographs and drawings used to demonstrate a style are meant to be inspirational and not to be construed as a rigid formula for design. Key Map: Harveston Specific Plan 10-79 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.5 PRINCIPAL DESIGN CRITERIA The architectural design guidelines described within this Specific Plan document have been created to direct the developmental outcome of the community of Harveston. It is a goal of the design guidelines to create a unique community, yet reminiscent of the heritage of the area, within the City of Temecula. The architecture of Harveston is to be historically accurate in its use of materials and forms. Each aspect of every project is viewed as a significant element in reinforcing the neighborhood concepts for the community of Harveston. MAP It should be noted that the design guidelines and the standards they contain will be followed in the design of the community. Through the review of plans by the master developer and the official design review by the City of Temecula, these guidelines will be enforced and implemented. One important goal of these guidelines is to create a street scene possessing both functional and visual variety. Plotting and massing garage placement and building elevation criteria are intended to provide this variety in appearance, as well as a sense of individuality for each detached home. Projects where nearly identical buildings line streets without variation in placement and architectural form are prohibited. The following sections (10.5.1, 10.5.2, and 10.5.3) list plotting and massing garage placement and building elevation techniques which will aid in the creation of a "successful street scene." Although, the majority of the Harveston neighborhoods will be single family detached product, these techniques would also apply to multi family or attached product, as appropriate. While it is not necessary that every method be utilized, selective and appropriate use shall greatly contribute to achieving the desired results. Harveston Specific Plan 10-80 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.5.1 Plotting, Massing and General Neighborhood Criteria The required characteristics listed below summarize the desired community setting and streetscene for the neighborhoods of Harveston: • Limiting the number of homes per neighborhood (i.e. +50 homes per neighborhood). • Shortening streets and providing curb separated sidewalks 1 Plotting, Massing and General Neighborhood Criteria • Minimizing the visual impact of the garage • Giving attention to composition of building mass • Stepping back second stories and varying roof planes • Incorporating single story elements into two story buildings • Providing innovative plans and avoiding repetitious plans and footprints • Varying setbacks at porches, living, and garage areas • Opening corner lots through selective plan form and single story architectural elements Plotting, Massing and General Neighborhood Criteria Harveston Specific Plan 10-81 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Architecture Forward / Recessed Garages Homesites shall be dimensioned to allow the "living" portions of the house to be pulled forward on the lot so that active, articulated architecture can visually dominate the street scene. House designs are encouraged to place entries, windows, front porches, and living areas directly adjacent to the ;; = street on most plan variations. Deep Recessed Garages Architecture Forward Harveston Specific Plan 10-82 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Setbacks A varied setback is encouraged along the street frontage. Strict compliance to the minimum garage setback is discouraged so as not to contribute to a repetitious and monotonous appearance along the street. Variable Front Yard Setbacks House forms and plans that result in a variation of front yard setbacks are encouraged to create more interesting neighborhood streetscene Variable Lot Sizes Where possible and appropriate, variable lot sizes may be used to increase buyer selection and variety in house and lot size combinations. Variations in lot widths may be matched to floor plans so long as the average lot size specified for the product type is maintained. Neighborhood Edge Treatments In order to avoid a continuous "walled" character along residential collector streets, special treatments will be required in selected locations. These may entail open cul-de-sacs, view fencing, hedges, shrubs, neighborhood street tree programs, trail connections, and variable wall alignments and treatments. These treatments will be consistent with Figure 10.4 Community Fencing and Wall Plan and will be determined at the Tentative Tract Map stage. Pedestrian Trail Connections and Linkage All neighborhoods shall be laid out in a manner which provide connections into the community trail/paseo system. ction > Street Harveston Specific Plan 10-83 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.5.2 Garage Placement The home and the yard, rather than the garage should be the primary emphasis of the elevation as seen from the street. Each planning area should incorporate a variety of the garage placement solutions discussed below. Minimum driveway length from garage door shall be 18 feet from back of sidewalk. Shallow Recessed Garages Setting the garage back a minimum of 3 feet in relationship to the front of the house strives to reduce the overall visual mass of the garage. Mid to Deen Recessed Garaees Corner Lot Solution Setting the garage back to the middle or rear of the lot. This design treatment strives to expose more habitable architecture toward the street, and pushes the innovation of the plan. Rear Access The use of rear accessways relocates garages off neighborhood streets and creates a more traditional streetscenes, without garages dominating the front of the homes. Side Entry Garage The use of side entry garages on lots at least 52 feet wide will break the continuous view of garage doors along the street. This design treatment allows for a formal motorcourt entrance which differentiates this type of home from those on narrower lots. This garage condition also allows for a reduction in the required front setback, which in turn provides for greater variation in the streetscene. Please note, lots providing less than 28 feet of back up maneuvering room are subject to City approval of the alternative design standards. Harveston Specific Plan 10-84 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Tandem Garage This garage layout de-emphasizes the third garage by concealing it behind a standard two car garage condition. The tandem space is located such that it may option into living space while still only showing the original two car garage to the street. The two car tandem garage, with a third car option is typically either shallow or mid recessed into the lot so as to be incorporated into the architecture of the home. Corner Lot Garage with Wrap Around Architecture A corner lot garage plan will have an entry door on the front elevation while the garage doors will be found on the side elevation (see plan diagram below). This plan form creates the opportunity for architectural enhancements that wrap around the home from front to side elevation (see sketch elevation below). Wrap Around Porch V 'esses ;t Corner Plotting Corner Lot Solution Harveston Specific Plan 10-85 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.5.3 Building Elevations Building elevations may be formulated to reflect interior uses, to create a positive relationship with the specific plotting, and to reflect the architectural style. Exterior mass and form shall be manipulated to improve the streetscape by controlling the impact of the homes as they relate to the street, setbacks, adjacent lots, and corner plotting conditions. Single Story Elements A key technique in creating a sense of variety within a streetscene is to vary the heights and profiles with single story elements. Whether by utilizing a porch or reduced height living area, the single story element introduces the transition element that is necessary for undulation and variation in front and side elevations. Recessed Front Second Story ro' !Z� d' 1 ALL Front Porch as Single Story Elements Stepping of second story mass may be used to improve the streetscene. As an example, the second story can be set back in relation to the garage face below it. f 'I Recessed Front 2°d Story Single Story Elements Harveston Specific Plan 10-86 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES Roof Form Rows of homes seen from a distance or along arterial roads are perceived by their contrast against the skyline or background. The dominant impact is the shape of the building and roof line. Articulate the rear elevation and roof plane to minimize the visual impact of repetitious flat planes, similar building silhouettes and similar ridge heights. Provide varied rear elevation forms when those forms are exposed to public view. Corner Plotting Provide plans that when plotted on corner lots have the flexibility to reposition the entry and garage to the exterior side yard. 10.5.4 Secondary Exterior Elements Roof Form — Varied Ridge Heights 4 The list below represents additional character elements to be reviewed for consistency with the architectural theme. These elements typically go unnoticed as part of the architectural background in neighborhoods. Appurtenant Structures Any detached structure to be used as living space shall conform to the design standards of the existing dwelling on the lot. Stairs and Steps Exterior stairs that are designed for access to second story living areas shall be designed to be incorporated and articulated into the theme of the home. Gutters & Downspouts Exposed gutters will be colored to match the roof or wall material. Exposed downspouts will be colored to match the surfaces to which they are attached. Mailboxes The type of box shall be integrated into the architecture and approved by the U.S. Postmaster. Meters Both gas and electric meters, and cable panels shall be screened from view and integrated into the architecture. Mechanical Equipment Harveston Specific Plan 10-87 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES All air conditioning/heating equipment, soft water tanks, pool and spa equipment, and electric self -timer boxes for sprinklers or exterior landscape/lighting shall be screened from public view. Patio Structures/Gazebos The use of patio structures is encouraged. They shall be integrated into the building form to add articulation to otherwise large unbroken wall masses. Roof Flashing & Vents All flashing and vents shall be colored to match the material to which it is attached. Sky Liehts Skylights shall be designed as an integral part of the roof. The glazing shall be clear or solar bronze; white glazing is prohibited. The framing materials shall be colored to match or blend with the roof. Trash Containers Space shall be provided in an adjacent sideyard or interior portion of garage to handle the size of at least three waste containers. Harveston Specific Plan 10-88 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.6 SERVICE COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURAL GUIDELINES Service Commercial developments present certain architectural opportunities and limitations due to building massing, parking requirements, pedestrian and service access, lighting, etc. To ensure the integrated development of Planning Area 12, the areas north and south of Date Street shall be master planned prior to any land subdivision or development. The objective is to create an attractive Service Commercial environment, sympathetic in scale and aesthetic to the entire development. Following is a list of additional criteria, which apply to this land use area. It should be noted that site design and architectural standards not specified within this section shall be subject to the City's Design Guidelines and Performance Standards. 10.6.1 Siting and Orientation Appropriate a. Buildings should be designed using simple contemporary forms organized around a single element or group of elements (that is, major space or spaces, landscape elements, etc.). The objective is for these areas to be positively differentiated as quality Service Commercial and Business Park environments. b. All designs shall incorporate the combination of compatible architecture and landscape forms to insure that this development achieves an image that is distinctive, clearly understandable, and unified. C. All designs shall appear as an integrated part of an overall site design concept. d. To unify the site, use common site design elements such as lighting and signage, enriched paving, and landscape treatments. Site design shall incorporate variations in elevations. Buildings should be arranged to create and enclose a variety of outdoor spaces: plazas, squares, eating areas, usable open space, etc. Open areas must be large enough to be usable, but not so large as to appear empty; 15 to 50 feet in width is generally appropriate. f. Building units should vary in orientation and be clustered to create zones of similar activities. Such clusters should be dispersed throughout the site to reduce the impact of development on neighboring residential areas. g. Parking: Guest or visitor parking should be located in close proximity to main entrances. Employee parking and loading zones should be located to the side or rear of the buildings and attractively screened from public streets with landscaping or other site design elements. Street parking shall not be permitted. h. Vehicular and pedestrian circulation routes should be well separated and defined by landscape and site design elements. Harveston Specific Plan 10-89 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 2. Inappropnate/Prohibited a. Massive concentration of buildings in any single area of the site, surrounded by an uninterrupted expanse of parking. 10.6.2 Form, Scale and Massing 1. Appropriate a. Buildings should be designed with well articulated elevations and with openings and entries that are clearly defined. b. Scale, particularly for large industrial structures, should be given careful consideration. Long, uninterrupted expanses of walls shall not be allowed. C. Interconnection and lapping of building forms and heights to break up long expanses of blank walls help relieve monotony and are desirable. d. All building sides should be considered equally; the architectural concept must be consistent on all sides. Buildings may not have a special treatment only on the facade facing the street. e. Development of a special design character at building entrances is required. 10.6.3 Architectural Features and Details 1. Appropriate a. All buildings and structures shall comply with the applicable provisions of the City-wide Design Guidelines. In addition, all elevations facing the freeway shall include substantially similar architectural treatments that are located on the building front elevations. b. Fixtures and finishes should be selected for their contribution to the overall theme of the development. C. Medium or high performance glass, and either bronze or black anodized window frames, are preferred. d. Reflective glass shall not be "mirrored". Reflective glass and glass curtain walls are acceptable only when used in combination with an integrated landscape design concept. (The intent of this requirement is to allow the "glass box" concept only in combination with substantial berming and landscape planting). Harveston Specific Plan 10-90 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 2. Inappropriate/Prohibited a. Important themes and/or styles that are not compatible with or sympathetic in scale and aesthetic to the contemporary theme of the entire Service Commercial development. b. Buildings of mobile construction are prohibited. c. Pre-engineered metal buildings from any public view. 10.6.4 Exterior Materials and Colors 1. Appropriate a. Materials are to be durable, relatively maintenance free, and sympathetic in scale and aesthetic to the overall Service Commercial/Business Park environment. b. Concrete: Textured forms or sandblasting should be utilized for tilt up concrete panels, smooth concrete uses should be either integral color or painted. C. Masonry: Brick is acceptable. Harveston Specific Plan 10-91 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES d. Stucco: Textures are limited to machine spraying and light handtrowel/float finishes. e. Finishes should be non -reflective. Light colors should predominate, with dark or light colors used for accent purposes. Likewise, the use of bright colors or black shall be limited to building accents. f. Finishes should match or coordinate with stucco or masonry wall finishes. Textured surfaces should be limited primarily to vertical surfaces. 2. Inappropriate/Prohibited a. Used brick or used brick appearance is not acceptable. Standard concrete block is not permitted as a finish material. b. Metal panel wall systems which are finished to an unaesthetic or nonconforming color or texture. C. Corrugated metal siding. d. Exposed standard concrete block. e. Exposed plywood sheathing. f. Bold application of color such as accent strips or super graphics. 10.6.5 Roof Forms and Materials 1. Appropriate a. Flat clay or concrete tile. b. Barrel clay or concrete tile when used sparingly as accent features. C. Colored or prefinished standing seam metal roofs. d. Flat roof designs, when visible from adjacent properties, shall be crushed rock or mineral surfaced cap sheet resulting in a similar uniform coverage treatment. Roof surfacing is to be an earthtone color. e. Flat roofs shall make-up no more than 75% of total roof area for any single unit or building composite. This treatment creates natural material with textural look which coordinates with Mediterranean environment of earthtone wall finishes. Harveston Specific Plan 10-92 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 2. Inappropriate/Prohibited a. False facades and mansard roofs when unrelated to the style of the building. b. Asphalt shingles, wood shake, and/or shingle roofing. Barrel clay or concrete tile when used extensively. Barrel tiles should be limited to accent features such as towers, hipped roofs, etc. Harveston Specific Plan 10-93 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.6.6 Walls and Fences Appropriate a. Decorative walls and/or walls screening yards, parking lot or enclosures shall be designed to integrate with the architecture of the building, as well as the landscape design. This can be accomplished by gradually building up the massing of the walls as they attach to a building or creating openings for entry gates (see sketches below). Harveston Specific Plan 10-94 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.6.7 Accessory Structures and Services 1. Appropriate Any accessory buildings and/or enclosures, whether attached to the main building or not, shall be of similar design and materials. 10.6.8 Street/Plaza Furniture and Bus Shelters Street, bus and plaza furniture and bus shelters within Service Commercial developments on -site shall be designed to coordinate in design, style and color with the principal architectural themes and/or architectural details of the primary structure(s) and building(s) in the development. 10.6.9 Lighting 1. Appropriate a. Low, shielded walkway lighting. b. Screen site lighting from direct view by adjacent residential neighborhoods. C. All lighting on -site must conform with applicable Mount Palomar lighting restricted zone requirements. The illumination shall not spill over and adversely affect adjacent properties. 2. Inappropriate/Prohibited a. Flashing, moving, high -intensity or exposed light source type of luminaries. Harveston Specific Plan 10-95 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.6.10 Mechanical Equipment Appropriate a. Parapets or other architectural elements which are fully integrated into the overall building design and massing are encouraged. b. All roof mounted mechanical equipment shall be screened from the ground level view to a minimum sight distance of 1,320 feet and shall not be visible from public view. If the architectural parapets do not screen the roof mounted equipment additional screening shall be incorporated. C. No exposed electrical, mechanical or service equipment of any type shall be allowed. d. Downspouts or roof access ladders are not to be visible from any street. Use screening materials which are similar or complementary to the external materials used in the building architecture. Inappropriate/Prohibited a. The final surface of screening materials shall not include plywood and/or open trellis. 10.7 MIXED USE "VILLAGE CENTER" ARCHITECTURAL GUIDELINES Because the uses which will occur under the mixed use overlay will be tied to the underlying residential neighborhood character, the architecture for the future uses within the overlay shall be consistent with that described in sections 10.4 and 10.5. Additionally, the architecture shall conform to the applicable site planning guidelines included as part of section 11.4.7. Harveston Specific Plan 10-96 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES 10.8 RESIDENTIAL OVERLAY ARCHITECTURAL GUIDELINES 10.8.1 Purpose The purpose of the Residential Overlay architectural guidelines is to provide general design criteria and guidance for these more urban neighborhoods at Harveston. The goal is to promote both visual compatibility and variety by utilizing a number of compatible abstracted traditional and contemporary styles, and through quality architectural innovation. 10.8.2 Design Intent Higher -density, urban -styled communities are primarily defined by the streetscape experience; how the building massing frames the street creates an engaging built form and sense of place. Buildings that generate active and inviting urban streets are typically large volume buildings of two and three stories. The scale of higher -density buildings including singe family detached clusters, duplexes and townhomes shall be designed for visual interest, creating rhythm and scale to the street. Composition of massing, interlocking volumes, and addition of stylized details will achieve engaged streetscapes. This may mean subtle massing offsets or bolder forms with more pronounced massing variation and simple to sparse detail. The design approach shall be tailored to the architectural style and context of the primary pedestrian street. Each neighborhood shall include a collection of varied but complementary forms that create a streetscene that is clear to navigate physically and visually. 10.8.3. Pedestrian -Scaled Design Buildings should incorporate design and construction methods that add human -scale to the building massing and three-dimensional detailing that casts shadows and creates visual interest on the facade. • Building forms shall be designed and well-proportioned resulting in a balanced composition of elements along public streets. • The overall design aesthetic (composition of massing, scale, material, color, and detail) is more important than the level of articulation. • All elevations shall have building facades articulated through the offset massing elements or volumes, complementary colors or materials, variations in building setbacks, or attractive window fenestrations. • When a three-story elevation generally exceeds 100 feet in length, the elevation shall visually step at a minimum of three locations by at least 1-foot along alleys and at least 2-feet along streets, entry courtyards, and other publicly visible elevations. • When a single wall plane generally exceeds fifty (50) feet in length without a horizontal or vertical wall plane offset, provide an offset of at least one (1) foot in depth applying to one or more stories. • Prominent vertical or horizontal building features may be used to accentuate key elements and provide variation in wall planes. • Enhanced garage doors that match architectural style. Harveston Specific Plan 10-97 Revised October 2020 SECTION 10.0 DESIGN GUIDELINES • Pedestrian -scaled massing elements, such as courtyards, patios, and entry elements, should be provided. • Pedestrian -scaled elements may also include subtle details incorporated into the building's "base." • Projections, overhangs, and recesses should be used to enhance shadow, articulation, and scale of primary edges. • Massing offsets may consist of one or more of the following: • Building pop -outs and recesses (wall planes, massing features, or balconies) • Bay window or corner -wrapping window • Prominent entry • Accent roof • Volume space creating height variation • Single -story element, such as a shallow entry porch, balcony, or courtyard • Other similar features which enhance and provide massing articulation • Massing offsets shall not encroach into the required horizontal or clear space of a fire access lane and turning radii. • Entry vestibules or stoops and architectural design features that provide articulation shall qualify as offsets. Architectural elements that create shadow, relief, and sheltered pedestrian areas, such as balconies, trellises, recesses, overhangs, awnings, stoops, and porches are encouraged. The main building entry, if applicable, shall be clearly identifiable and distinguished from the rest of the building, preferably a focal point along the elevation in a manner that is consistent with the style of building. Minimize building "ends" and blank, singular planes oriented toward public views. Provide four- sided architecture where visible from community amenities and streets. Consider intended styles in conjunction with the development of building plans, massing forms, elements, details, and color. Carefully consider the building massing, details, and color, in developing an appropriate architectural character for the project. • Design buildings to define outdoor spaces, with floor plans that have a logical and functional relationship between indoor spaces and outdoor spaces. Harveston Specific Plan 10-98 Revised October 2020 [ This page intentionally left blank ] 10-99 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.1 INTRODUCTION This section is broken down into the 12 Planning Areas proposed as part of the Harveston planned development. Development Standards pertaining to each Planning Area are listed under the appropriate Area. The following is a general description of planning objectives, which pertain to the proposed development. 11.2 PLANNING OBJECTIVES This Specific Land Use Plan is being prepared within the framework of a detailed and comprehensive multi- disciplinary planning program. In addition to considering issues such as engineering feasibility, market acceptance, economic viability, City General Plan goals and objectives, development phasing and local community goals, certain planning objectives were targeted to assure the environmental compatibility, aesthetic satisfaction and functional integrity of the Specific Plan as a whole. With these goals and objectives in mind, the Harveston Specific Plan: • Considers topographic, geologic and hydrologic environmental opportunities and constraints to create a design that generally conforms to the character of the land. The project will require the alteration of existing landforms and the cut/fill of slopes. • Reflects anticipated marketing needs and public demand by providing a range of housing types, which will be marketable within the developing economic profile of the City of Temecula area, as well as the County of Riverside generally. • Provides residential development, adequate support facilities (commercial, business park use, community uses, schools, open space and recreation) and circulation in a convenient and efficient manner. • Provides planning provisions for a safe and efficient circulation system composed of a network of planned local roadways designed for appropriate traffic and user needs. • Establishes a unique open space environment utilizing a greenbelt/paseo system and expanded parkways to link the Lake Park, Community Park, neighborhood mini parks, recreation areas, school, and mixed - use Village Center. • Constructs all required on -site and off -site infrastructure improvements in order to provide a coordinated development schedule consistent with surrounding land uses and in accordance with requirements and needs of the City's local utility and service districts. • Encourages architectural forward residential building design, incorporating innovative architectural styles along with successful site planning techniques, which together bring about unique streetscenes. • Allows transfer of residential units within the Specific Plan area as follows: Residential Unit Transfer Between Planning Areas Figure 3.1, Conceptual Land Use Plan and Table 3.1, Detailed Land Use Summary set forth the land use designation, planning area identification, total acreage, density range, target density and total targeted Harveston Specific Plan 11-1 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS dwelling units planned for each residential Planning Area. Residential unit transfer shall mean the redistribution of residential units from one planning area to another. For example, if the number of units developed within a planning area is below the designated target, then the remainder of those units may be transferred to another planning area. The Director of Planning shall approve a change in the designated target for a Planning Area upon a determination that the transfer meets all of the following conditions: a. The total number of approved residential units and the total number of projected future residential units, when combined, shall not exceed the allowed maximum of 1,921 dwelling units, exclusive of congregate care units. b. The developer may transfer unused residential units from a previously approved Planning Area (or Planning Areas) to a proposed Planning Area(s), if the developer has previously declared the residential units in the previously approved Planning Area(s) as unused residential units and eligible for residential unit transfer. When a development application is submitted to the City for a Planning Area(s), the developer must submit, concurrently with the application, a Project Residential Unit Reconciliation Report that identifies the total number of residential units previously approved, the total number of residential units previously declared eligible for residential unit transfer, and the total number of projected future residential units remaining to be developed in the balance of the project. C. The number of excess residential units identified for transfer to a Planning Area(s) may not exceed 20% of the total target residential units (or the high end of density range) in the receiving planning area, as identified in Table 3.1, whichever is less. It should be noted that the City's General Plan allows a density bonus for senior housing projects. d. There would be no significant adverse effect on projected demands on parks, schools, infrastructure, and community facilities. Grading and landform alteration would substantially comply with that previously approved for the Specific Plan. No new significant environmental impacts would result. Planning Area Intensity Variations The Specific Plan envisions variations in intensity within individual planning areas. For example, an M1 Planning Area may be targeted for 185 residential units (with a target density of 6 residential units per acre). The Planning Area could have one neighborhood with 4 residential units per acre and one neighborhood with 8 residential units per acre, however the average would still be 6 residential units per acre and the total number of residential units would not exceed the designated target of 185. Harveston Specific Plan 11-2 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3 PLANNING AREA DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.1 Planning Area 1: Low Medium Density Residential and Community Park Description Planning Area 1, as depicted in Figure 11.1, Planning Area Detail 1, provides for 41.1 acres of Low Medium density residential uses. A total of 164 dwelling units are planned at a target density of 4.0 du/ac (Density Range 3-5 du/ac). Additionally, a 19.5-acre community park is planned within Planning Area 1. A mini park is also proposed within the residential portion of the Planning Area. The proposed product types for this planning area includes single family detached and possibly duplex or cluster development. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (see Section 11.4). Planning Standards Access into Planning Area 1 shall be provided from the Loop Road with internal access through Planning Area 5. Specific location of the access points shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figure 10.1-12). 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design. Special landscape treatment shall be provided along the edge of the Planning Area boundary and Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). 4. A community paseo and a Class II bike lane shall be provided along the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1- 8). The Community Park shall contain lighted sports fields, picnic area, tot lot, and more (refer to Figure 6- 3). 6. A parking area shall be provided for the Community Park (refer to Figure 6-3). 7. Roadway landscape buffer treatment shall be provided along the outer boundary of the Community Park (refer to Figure 6-3). 8. Special Community Park landscape buffer treatment shall be provided along the Community Park boundary adjacent to the residential neighborhoods (refer to Figure 6-3). 9. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-3 Revised August 2003 00 a� U o U I y o U I a 'Coe G�Fo OU o❑z�❑ Oa�W 11-4 U �5o =0 oN x a ro SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.2 Planning Area 2: Medium 1 Density Residential Description Planning Area 2, as depicted in Figure 11.2, Planning Area Detail 2, provides for 40.1 acres of Medium 1 density residential uses. A total of 241 dwelling units are planned at a target density of 6.0 du/ac (Density Range 5-7 du/ac). This planning area also includes a portion of the 2.0-acre Pasco Park, which connects the Lake Park to the Community Park. The proposed product types for this planning area include, small lot single family detached, attached and cluster development. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (refer to Section 11-4). Planning Standards Access into Planning Area 2 shall be provided from the Loop Road at a minimum of two entry points with internal access through Planning Area 3. Specific location of the access points shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figures 10.1-10.1-12). 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design. Special landscaping treatment shall be provided along the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). 4. A community paseo and a Class II bike lane shall be provided along the Loop Road. The paseo shall be located along the outer edge of the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). A 2.0-acre paseo park shall be provided in Planning Area 2, which will intercept Planning Area 3, connecting to the Lake Park (refer to Figures 6.5 and 10.1-13). 6. A paseo edge landscape treatment shall be provided along the edges of the paseo park (refer to Figures 6.5 and 10.1-13). 7. An 8' paseo trail shall be provided in the paseo park (refer to Figures 6.5 and 10.1-13). 8. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-5 REVISED 8/14/01 ® �3,�D Revised August 2003 11-6 Harveston Specific Plan Lennar Communiiies U� I / 1 I I I 1 4 Figure 11.2 Planning Area Detail 2 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.3 Planning Area 3: Medium 2 Density Residential, Lake, Lake Park, Paseo Park, Village Green and Mixed Use Overlay Zone Description Planning Area 3, as depicted in Figure 11.3, Planning Area Detail 3, provides for 35.4 acres of Medium 2 density residential uses. A total of 330 dwelling units are planned at a target density of 9.3 du/ac (Density Range 7-13 du/ac). Additionally, a 17.3-acre lake/lake park is planned within Planning Area 3, which also includes the Village Club. There is also a 2.0-acre Pasco park proposed which intercepts Planning Area 2 and connects to the Community Park. There is also a 1.8-acre Village Green within this Planning Area. Planning Area 3 proposes a Mixed -Use Overlay zone, which will extend beyond this Planning Area, into Planning Areas 4 and 6. This zone will have a variety of uses such as retail, restaurant, and more. The proposed product types for this planning area include small lot single family detached, attached and cluster development. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (see Section 11-4). Planning Standards Access into Planning Area 3 shall be provided from the Village Center Collector, with internal access through Planning Areas 2 and 4. Specific location of the access points shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figure 10.1-12). 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design. An 8.4-acre lake shall be provided in Planning Area 3, surrounded by a lake park (refer to Figure 6.4). 4. Landscape treatment shall be provided along the edge of the Planning Area boundary and Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). Special landscaping buffer shall be provided between the Lake/Lake Park and the residential uses (refer to Figures 10.1-14 and 10.1-15). 6. The 2.0-acre Paseo Park shall connect the Community Park in Planning Area 1 to the Lake Park (refer to Figures 6.5 and 10.1-13). 7. A paseo edge landscape treatment shall be provided along the edges of the paseo park (refer to Figures 6.5 and 10.1-13). 8. A lake park trail shall be provided around the lake (continuation of the paseo park trail) (refer to Figures 6.4 and 6.5). 9. A Class II bike lane shall be provided along the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). 10. A community paseo shall be provided along the outer edge of the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). 11. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-7 Revised August 2003 a E 0 N SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.4 Planning Area 4: Low Medium Density Residential, School, and Mixed -Use Overlay Zone Description Planning Area 4, as depicted in Figure 11.4, Planning Area Detail 4, provides for 24.5 acres of Low Medium density residential uses. A total of 83 dwelling units are planned at a target density of 3.4 du/ac (Density Range 3-5 du/ac). Additionally, a 12.0-acre elementary school is planned within Planning Area 4. Planning Area 4 also contains a portion of the 20,000 square -foot Mixed -Use Overlay zone on the south side. This zone will extend beyond this Planning Area, into Planning Areas 3 and 6. This zone will have a variety of uses such as retail, restaurant, and more. The proposed product types for this planning area include, small lot single family detached, attached and cluster development. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (see Section 11.4). Plannine Standards Access into Planning Area 4 will be provided from the Loop Road (residential collector), with internal access through Planning Area 3. The school shall be accessed through two entries from the Loop Road. Specific location of the access points shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figure 10.1- 12). 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design criteria. 3. A roundabout shall be provided at the school entry from the Village Center. This feature shall serve as a major focal point and will include one of the following options: art, statue, specimen tree, monument tower, or town clock (refer to Figure 11.14). The required focal point element shall be submitted to the Planning Commission for approval. 4. Special landscaping treatment shall be provided along the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). 5. A Class II bike lane shall be provided along the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). 6. A community paseo shall be provided along the outer edge of the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). 7. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-9 REVISED 8/14/01 LOOP ROAD LANDSCAPE LOW MEDIUM TREATNaNT SEE FIG. 10.1.8 24.5 AC 83 UNITS CONRAUNITY- PASEO SEE FIG. 10. 1-8 CLASS B - BME TRAIL SCHOOL 12.0 AC. MIXED USE LOOP ROAD — O LANDSCAPE TREATMENT \ I I SEE FIG. 10.1-8 \ NEIG14BORHOOD ACCESS SEE FIG. 10.1-12 Key Map: Harveston Specific Plan Lennar Communities f � 1' 1 I If I �f � �r IIaa�7aay'y'-e oFORMAL ENTRY �aIIa�� . to SCIi0OLJLOOP ROAD iid M �a•�`r f�SEE FIG. 10.1-7 lf EDGE TREATMENT'i NEIGHBORHOOD ACCESS SEE FIG.10.1-12 1 COMMUNrFY ENTRY SEE FIG. 10.3 �JL _ CLASS 13 BME TRAIL ALONG MARAGARITA SEE FIG. 10.14 EXTERNAL ROADWAY LANDSCAPE TREATMFNI SEE FIG. 10.14 It Figure 11.4 ®�D�� - _ Planning Area Detail 4 Revised August 2003 11-10 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.5 Planning Area 5: Medium 2 Density Residential Description Planning Area 5, as depicted in Figure 11.5, Planning Area Detail 5, provides for 7.0 acres of Medium 2 density residential uses. A total of 75 dwelling units are planned at a target density of 11.0 du/ac (Density Range 7-13 du/ac). The proposed product types for this planning area include, small lot single family detached, attached and cluster development. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this section of the Specific Plan (see Section 11.4). Planning Standards Access into Planning Area 5 will be provided from the Loop Road, with right-in/right-out access from the Village Green and internal access through Planning Area 1. Specific location of the access points shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figure 10.1-12). 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design. External roadway landscape treatment shall be provided along Margarita Road (refer to Figure 10.1-4). 4. Special landscape treatment shall be provided along the Loop Road (refer to Figure10.1-8). Formal entry landscaping shall be provided along the outer edge of Planning Area 5 and the Village Green (refer to Figure 6.4). 6. Major Entry monumentation and treatment shall be provided at Margarita Road (refer to Figure 10.2). 7. A Class II bike lane shall be provided along Margarita Road, through Major Project Entry and Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). 8. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-11 Revised August 2003 \ VILLAGE CLUB COMML"TY \ PASEO EE FIG. 10.1 .•gu•:- v .• Op• ti. • • IGHBORHOOD ACCESS SEE FIG 10.I-12 EXTERNAL ROADWAY LANDSCAPE TREATMENT SEE FIG 10.1-4 Key Map: ® ��]D Q�% Revised August 2003 i VILLAGE GREEN 1.8 AC FORMAL ENTRY — LANDSCAPING SEE FIG 10.1-5 i MEDIUM 2 7.0 AC 75 UNITS 11-12 9x�ta Mrs CLASS II BIKE TRAIT. SEE FIG 10.1-4 Harvesion Specific Plan Lennar co", nitier COMMUNITY ENTRY SEE FIG. 10.2 Figure 11.5 Planning Area Detail SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.6 Planning Area 6: High Density Residential and Mixed -Use Overlay Zone Description Planning Area 6, as depicted in Figure 11.6, Planning Area Detail 6, provides for 16.8 acres of High density residential uses. A total of 300 multi -family (apartments) are planned at a target density of 17.8 du/ac (Density Range 13-20 du/ac). Planning Area 6 also contains a portion of the 20,000 square -foot of the Mixed -Use Overlay zone on the north side. This zone will extend beyond this Planning Area, into Planning Areas 3 and 4. This zone will have a variety of uses such as retail, restaurant, and more. The proposed product types for this planning area include attached residential including apartments, condominiums, townhomes and residential over commercial. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (see 11.4). Planning Standards 1. Access into Planning Area 6 will be provided from the Village Center Road and the Loop Road. Internal access between Planning Area 6 and Planning Area 4 will be provided. Specific location of the access points shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figure 10.1-12). 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design. 3. A community paseo shall be provided along the Major Entry (refer to Figures 6.4 and 10.1-5). 4. The Major Entry monumentation and treatment shall be provided at Margarita Road and Major Entry (refer to Figure 10.2). 5. Formal entry landscaping shall be provided along the outer edge of Planning Area 6 (refer to Figures 6.4 and 10.1-5). 6. Urban landscape and walking treatment shall be provided along the Village Center (refer to Figures 10.1- 11 and 11.15). 7. Parallel parking shall be provided along the Village Center (refer to Figures 10.1-11 and 11.15). 8. External roadway landscape treatment shall be provided along Margarita Road (refer to Figure 10.1-4). 9. A Class II bike lane shall be provided along Margarita Road (refer to Figure 10.1-4). 10. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-13 REVISED 8/14/01 URBAN LANDSCAPE TREATMENT SEE FIG. 10.1-11 •. • P LEL ••' PA LING VILLAGE CENTER \ •� ••�• URBAN WALK ' SEE FIG. 10.1-14 •' VILLAGE GREEN 1.8 AC i HIGH 16.8 AC 300 UNITS FORMALpa, , LANDSCAPING SEE FIG d,. 1 : Crg' A AM M �M_ s NEIGHBORHOOD ACCESS SEE FIG. 10.1-12 COMMUNITY PASEO SEE FIG. 10.1-5A, B, C Hawes ion Specific Plan I.ennur Communities - ACCESS n 'DRIVEWAY, 00 0 0 (( Figure 11.6 ® ��D /�j� Revised August 2003 PlanniIIg 1�rea Detail G 11-14 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.7 Planning Area 7: Low Medium Density Residential Description Planning Area 7, as depicted in Figure 11.7, Planning Area Detail 7, provides for 39.1 acres of Low Medium density residential uses. A total of 140 dwelling units are planned at a target density of 3.6 du/ac (Density Range 3-5 du/ac). Additionally, there will be mini parks within this Planning Area to serve the Harveston residents. The proposed product types for this planning area include single family detached and possibly small lot single family detached. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section the Specific Plan (see Section 11.4). Planning Standards Access into Planning Area 7 will be provided from the Loop Road. Internal access will be provided between neighborhoods within Planning Area 7. Specific location of the access points shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figure 10.1-12). 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design. A Mini park shall be designated in Planning Area 7 (refer to Figure 6.2). 4. A community paseo shall be provided along the outer edge of the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). A Class II bike lane shall be provided along Date Street and Margarita Road (refer to Figures 10.1-1 and 10.1-4). 6. A community walk shall be provided along Margarita Road and Date Street (refer to Figures 10.1-1 and 10.1-4). 7. Formal entry landscaping shall be provided along the Loop Road connections to Margarita Road and Date Street (refer to Figures 10.2, 10.3, 10.1-6 and 10.1-7). 8. Major community entry monumentation and landscaping shall be provided at the Major Community Entry at Date Street (refer to Figures 10.2). 9. External roadway landscape treatment shall be provided along Date Street and Margarita Road (refer to Figures 10.1-113 and 10.1-4). 10. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-15 REVISED 8/14/01 a�- r 11-16 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.8 Planning Area 8: Medium 1 Density Residential Description Planning Area 8, as depicted in Figure 11.8, Planning Area Detail 8, provides for 33.3 acres of Medium 1 density residential uses. A total of 207 dwelling units are planned at a target density of 6.2 du/ac (Density Range 5-7 du/ac). The proposed product types for this planning area include, small lot single family detached, attached and cluster development. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (see Section 11.4). Planning Standards Access into Planning Area 8 will be provided from the Loop Road. Specific location of the access points shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figures10.1-12). 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design. Special landscape treatment shall be provide between the residential uses and the Community Park (refer to Figures 6.3A through 6.31)). 4. External roadway landscape treatment shall be provided along Date Street and Ynez Road (refer to Figures 10.1-1 and 10.1-3). Special landscaping shall be provided along the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). 6. A community paseo shall be provided along the outer edge of the Loop Road (refer to Figure 10.1-8). 7. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-17 Revised August 2003 L 11-18 00 Q P. 10" SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.9 Planning Area 9: Medium 2 Density Residential and Arroyo Park Description Planning Area 9, as depicted in Figure 11.9, Planning Area Detail 9, provides for 8.6 acres of Medium 2 density residential uses. A total of 83 dwelling units are planned at a target density of 9.6 du/ac (Density Range 7-13 du/ac). Additionally, there will be a 13.8-acre Arroyo Park within this Planning Area, which runs the entire length of Planning Area 9. The proposed product types for this planning area include, small lot single family detached, attached and cluster development. Additionally, religious institutions and community facilities may be allowed in this Planning Area. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (see Section 11.4). Planning Standards 1. Access into Planning Area 9 will be provided from Date Street. Specific location of the access point shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figure 10.1-1A). The right-in/right-out access from Date Street shall meet City standards; details shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage. 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design. 3. A 13.9-acre Arroyo Park shall be provided with an adjacent trail and possible parking area (refer to Figure 10.1-1). Implementation and use of the Arroyo Park shall be in compliance with the appropriate environmental permit requirements and in accordance with Harveston Specific Plan EIR mitigation measures / mitigation monitoring program. 4. A community walk shall be provided along Date Street (refer to Figures 10.1-1 and 10.1-1A). 5. Arroyo edge landscape treatment shall be provided between the residential use and the Arroyo Park. 6. Special landscape buffer treatment shall be provided along project boundary. 7. External roadway landscape treatment shall be provided along Date Street (refer to Figure 10.1-1A). 8. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-19 Revised August 2003 11-20 AN W a M O O N SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.10 Planning Area 10: Low Medium Density Residential Description Planning Area 10, as depicted in Figure 11.10, Planning Area Detail 10, provides for 51.0 acres of Low Medium density residential uses. A total of 206 dwelling units are planned at a target density of 4.0 du/ac (Density Range 3-5 du/ac). Additionally, a mini park is proposed within this Planning Area. The proposed product types for this planning area include, single family detached, small lot single family detached and attached development. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (see Section 11.4). Plannine Standards Access into Planning Area 10 will be provided from Ynez Road, with secondary access from the existing project to the east located in the County of Riverside. Specific location of the access points shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figure 10.1-12). 2. One minimum 0.5 acre mini park shall be provided in Planning Area 10, which shall include a tot lot and open turf (refer to Figure 6.2). Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design criteria. 4. Arroyo edge landscape treatment shall be provided between residential use and the Arroyo Park. Special landscape buffer treatment shall be provided along project boundary. 6. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan £ Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-21 Revised August 2003 � s 0 Ii 4 CO 0o1 �ee ee I ee c 0 oU0 xU ¢ C7 W 47 2. y Cj OK C c 11-22 0 0 �Q Qj u.Qj SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.11 Planning Area 11: Medium 2 Density Residential Description Planning Area 11, as depicted in Figure 11. 11, Planning Area Detail 11, provides for 9.4 acres of Medium 2 density residential uses. A total of 80 dwelling units are planned at a target density of 10.0 du/ac (Density Range 7-13 du/ac). The proposed product types for this planning area include, small lot single family detached, attached and cluster development. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (see Section 11.4). Planning Standards Access into Planning Area 11 will be provided from the Industrial Collector. Specific location of the access points shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage (refer to Figure 10.1-12). 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design criteria. Special landscape buffer treatment shall be provided along Planning Area boundary (refer to Figure 10.1- 19). 4. External roadway landscape treatment shall be provided along Ynez Road (refer to Figure 10.1-3). A community walk shall be provided along Ynez Road (refer to Figure 10.1-3). 6. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-23 Revised August 2003 Key Map: . �*Z-P Harves ion Specific Plan Lennar Communities PRO. F,C'T INTERFACE SEE FIG. 10.1-19 Figure 11.11 Revised dune 2006 11-24 Planning Area Detail 11 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.12 Planning Area 12: Service Commercial Description Planning Area 12, as depicted in Figure 11.12, Planning Area Detail 12, provides for 110.4 acres of service commercial uses with some business park or light manufacturing uses south of Date Street. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (see Section 11.4). Plannine Standards Access points into Planning Area 12 will be provided from Ynez Road and Date Street (refer to Figures 11.12 and 11.12a), including at a minimum once the freeway overcrossing is constructed, eastbound from the freeway left -in onto Temecula Center Drive, right -in vehicular access from Date Street onto Temecula Center Drive and right -out vehicular access from Temecula Center Drive onto Date Street. Prior to the installation of the freeway overcrossing, a right -in from Date Street onto Temecula Center Drive and the interim conditions of a left -out from Temecula Center Drive onto Date Street and a U-turn on Date Street shall be permitted (refer to Figure 11.12a). Specific locations for access points for streets and driveways off Ynez Road, Date Street and Temecula Center Drive shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage. 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design criteria. Freeway buffer landscape treatment shall be provided along Interstate 15 (refer to Figure 10.1-16). 4. External roadway landscape treatment shall be provided along Ynez Road (refer to Figure 10.1-3). A community walk shall be provided along Ynez Road (refer to Figure 10.1-3). 6. Special landscape buffer treatment shall be provided along Planning Area boundary (see 10.1-3 and 10.1- 16 and 10.1-17). 7. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan c. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan Harveston Specific Plan 11-25 Revised October 2020 - Key Map: -- Y p EXTERNAL j ROADWAY LANDSr APE TREATMENT ALONG F"tN' BiftF6Af YNEZROAD LALdpSCAFE � .^ r SEIyFiO.10.1-3 TRFarl�iAFE � sib t•Tc, 10.1-I6 � q �t + t r a i CCQ-04UNrry r v r WALK ! SEE FIG. I0.1-3 r �=r f � r r � r • I � � 1 l HSx' ves toll Specific Plan Proposed Traffic Signal PIke,� r r LEGEND ■ ■ Specific Plan Boundary Traffic Signal Location Figure 11.12 11 Revised August 2003 October 2020 11-26 Planning Area Detail 12 ki V SERVICE • COMMBRCLA L. 110.4 AC COI�.wkcIAL� are, �.� ` ifr •r � � Arr .fr � ,f C f r .f �r ♦r rr f /r it t WFFA IAL TAMSCAPE BUFFER TREATMENT SA£ FIG. 10.1-7 Key Map: SERVICE — M&T--RCIAL EIN'TRY APPROXIMATE LOCATIM OF L%7ERSELMON FREEWAY BUk'FM LANWSWE TR A7! (wr SEEM. 10A-15 COMMUNITY- .. WALK SEE FIG.103-3 — 5 �3 Har vestvn Specific Plan t 1 r r ROADW, r I.AKDSC; TREATMENT. YNIZ RG r SEC FRi. 1i r r r r r � ,r ti �\ r � 1 � S' 7Rvlc.L f]OMMERCIAI, AIRY LEGEND ■ ■ Specific Plan Boundary rVehicular Circulation Direction rInterim Vehicular Circulation Direction Figure 11.12a Revised August 2003 October 2020 11-27 Planning Area Detail 12 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.3.13 Planning Area 12: Residential Overlay Description The Residential Overlay, as depicted in Figure 11.12b and 11.12c, Residential Overlay Detail, allows up to 70.44 acres of Planning Area 12 to be developed for residential use. Land Use Development Standards Please refer to Zoning Ordinance in this Section of the Specific Plan (see Section 11.4). Planning Standards 1. Access points into the Residential Overlay will be provided from Ynez Road and Date Street (refer to Figures 11.12b and 11.12c), including at a minimum once the freeway overcrossing is constructed, eastbound from the freeway left -in onto Temecula Center Drive, right -in vehicular access from Date Street onto Temecula Center Drive and right -out vehicular access from Temecula Center Drive onto Date Street. Prior to the installation of the freeway overcrossing, a right -in from Date Street onto Temecula Center Drive and the interim conditions of a left -out from Temecula Center Drive onto Date Street and a U-turn on Date Street shall be permitted (refer to Figure 11.12c). Specific locations for access points for streets and driveways off Ynez Road, Date Street and Temecula Center Drive shall be determined at the Tentative Map stage. 2. Please refer to Section 10.0 for specific Design Guidelines and other related design criteria. Freeway buffer landscape treatment shall be provided along Interstate 15 (refer to Figure 10.1-16). 4. External roadway landscape treatment shall be provided along Ynez Road (refer to Figure 10.1-3). A community walk shall be provided along Ynez Road (refer to Figure 10.1-3). 6. Special landscape buffer treatment shall be provided along Planning Area boundary (see 10.1-3 and 10.1- 16 and 10.1-17). 7. Please refer to the following sections for General Development Standards that apply site -wide: a. Land Use Plan b. Circulation Plan C. Infrastructure Plan d. Open Space and Recreation Plan e. Grading Plan f. Landscaping Plan 8. All residential projects are required to: a. Prepare a Fiscal Impact Analysis that evaluates the recurring General Fund revenues and expenditures generated by the project by estimating the fiscal impact on the General Fund resulting from the development of the proposed project over a 20-year time period. The City estimates that the increased cost to the City of providing public safety and other municipal services to the project area will substantially exceed the municipal revenue from the project ("City Services Deficit") . If the Fiscal Impact Analysis determines that the project will create a City Services Deficit, the project shall be conditioned to require the payment of funds to the City for negative impact on the General Fund, that is, the project shall be conditioned to pay the City the loss to General Fund revenues Harveston Specific Plan 11-27.1 Revised October 2020 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS b. created by the project as determined by the Fiscal Impact Analysis. The owners, and their successors to the property within the project, may fulfill this obligation through the levy of an annual special tax of a community facilities district established by the City pursuant to the Mello - Roos Community Facilities District Act of 1982, Government Code Section 5331 et seq.; provided, however, the obligation of each owner and their successors to pay the City Services Deficit payment under this obligation remains an obligation of the owners and their successors regardless of the financing mechanism used to pay it and regardless of whether there is a financing mechanism to pay it. c. Each project shall provide Community -wide public benefit that provides substantial added value to the entire community and citizens of Temecula commensurate with the scope of the project in order to fulfill the requirements of the City's Growth Management Plan and the Growth Management Handout and maintain consistency with the General Plan and the Specific Plan. d. Provide an applicable Noise Analysis if required by the City of Temecula and implement any noise mitigation necessary to ensure that the noise levels are below the applicable sound level standards set forth in Chapter 9.20 of the Temecula Municipal Code. Harveston Specific Plan 11-27.2 Revised October 2020 - .[fey Map: Harvestvn Specific Plan LEGEND ■ ■ Specific Plan Boundary I r r Traffic Signal Location . RESIDENTIAL OVERLAY Figure 11.12b Revised October 2020 11-27.3 Residential Overlay Detail SPECIAL F ANASCAPE BLUFFER 'MFAThff-Wf SAE FIG. 1€1.1 7 Key Map: nRevised October 2020 11-27.4 3 he Harveston Specific Plan Figure 11.12c Residential Overlay Detail SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.4 ZONING ORDINANCE 11.4.1 Low Medium (LM) Density Residential Zone (3-5 dwelling units per acre) Planning Areas 1, 4, 7, and 10 The following regulations shall apply in the Low Medium Density Residential: Permitted / Conditionally Permitted Uses Matrix Low Medium Residential All types of non-commercial horticulture P Churches, synagogues and other similar religious structures and facilities including incidental uses such as assembly, work rooms, living quarters of a priest, minister or family, and day care and educational facilities. C Congregate care residential facilities for the elderly P Day care centers C Family day care homes — large, as defined by State law. C Family day care homes — small — 6 or fewer P Group care facilities and residential retirement homes, 6 or less people P Guest house or granny flat P Home occupations, provided such occupations are customarily conducted as an accessory use entirely within a building containing a residential use or attached garage. No outdoor storage or uses shall be permitted. P Public and private recreational facilities including, but not limited to: country clubs, tennis and swim clubs, golf courses, lakes, parks, racquetball and handball. Limited commercial uses which are commonly associated and directly related to the primary uses are permitted. P Public parks and public playgrounds P Residential care facilities for the elderly six or fewer P Secondary dwelling units/granny flats/guest house P Single family detached, single family attached P Telecommunication towers P Temporary real estate tract offices located within a subdivision, to be used only for and during the original sale of the subdivision, provided a development plan is approved to City Ordinance. P -pursuant Trails P Other Uses: Any use that is not specifically listed above may be considered a permitted use provided that the Director of Planning finds that the proposed use is substantially the same in character and intensity as those listed in the designated subsections. Such a use is subject to the permit process, which governs the category in which it falls. Harveston Specific Plan 11-28 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Development Standards The following development standards shall apply in the Low Medium Density Residential Zone of Planning Areas 1, 4, 7, and 10. Table 11.1 provides a graphic summary of the following Low Medium (LM) development standards at the end of this section. Building height shall not exceed two (2) stories, with a maximum height of thirty five feet (35'). 2. A minimum of 50% of Low Medium units shall incorporate architectural forward designs. Minimum residential lot area shall be not less than four thousand (4,000) square feet and the average residential lot area shall be not less than five thousand (5,000) square feet. 4. Land acreage located within Landscape Development Zones (LDZ's) shall not be included in area calculations for meeting minimum lot size requirements. The minimum lot width at the front property line shall be thirty feet (30'), with an average lot width of forty five (45') and a minimum lot depth of eighty (80'). Lots at the end of cul-de-sacs and knuckles may vary from the minimum depth requirement provided a lot provides an adequate area for development. 6. The minimum lot width for a flag lot, cul-de-sac, or knuckle at front property line shall be twenty feet (20'). 7. The minimum lot width at required front setback area shall be forty feet (40'). 8. Minimum yard requirements are as follows: a. Minimum front yard - Variable Front Yard Setback: In order to allow for a more interesting visual image and more flexible site planning, variable setbacks shall be used in the LM planning areas in accordance with Section 10.5 (Principal Design Criteria). Front yard setbacks from garage doors shall be a minimum of 18 feet to back of sidewalk. Other portions of a structure (including garages with entrances not facing the street) shall be setback a minimum of 10 feet from the property line. Building setbacks shall be measured from the property line. b. Minimum interior side yard - Variable Side Yard Setbacks: Variable side yard setbacks may be permitted provided the sum of the side yard setbacks is not less than 10 feet and the distance between adjacent structures is not less than 10 feet. For front loaded conditions a minimum of five-foot setback area, free of architectural encroachments shall be maintained on at least one side. C. Variable rear yard setback: 1) Garage forward and front loaded: the minimum rear yard setback shall be 20 feet. 2) Recessed garage: the minimum rear yard setback to the garage shall be 5 feet and the main structure setback shall be 20' (ground floor) and 7' for second story elements over the garage. 3) Rear vehicle access: the minimum rear yard setback to the garage shall be 3 feet and the main structure setback shall be 20' (ground floor) and a 3' minimum with a 5' average setback for second story elements over the garage. At the rear of each lot, a minimum of 16 square feet of landscaping shall be provided per lot (refer to Figure 11.13). d. The corner side yard shall not be less than ten feet (10'). Harveston Specific Plan 11-29 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 9. The Planning Commission may approve modifications to these standards up to 15% for innovative and quality designs that meet the intent of the provisions for this Specific Plan. 10. Parking. A minimum of two (2) enclosed spaces shall be provided per unit/lot. Enclosures shall comply with all yard requirements. For second units, one additional enclosed parking space shall be provided. 11. Fences and Walls. Fences and walls shall be permitted within the front, side, and rear yard set back areas, except as provided for below: a. Fences may not be erected within either public or private street rights -of -way. b. Wherever fencing is visible from public view, the finished side of the fencing shall be exposed to public view. C. No fence or wall shall exceed six feet (6') in height, unless a higher wall is specifically required for sound attenuation purposes. The height of the fence or wall shall be measured from the highest ground level immediately adjacent to the base of the wall. d. Privacy walls, if provided in side and rear yards, shall be a minimum of five feet (5') in height. In front yard set back areas, solid fences and walls shall not exceed thirty inches (30") in height; provided, however, that fences and walls up to six feet (6') in height are permitted in front yards if the area above thirty inches (30") is no more than thirty percent (30%) solid. All pool enclosure fencing shall conform to applicable State of California or City of Temecula pool code fencing requirements, whichever is more stringent. Harveston Specific Plan 11-30 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS TABLE 11.1 SUMMARY DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS FOR LM (Low MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL) ZONE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 1) LM Minimum Lot Area Per Dwelling Unit 4,000 Average Lot Area Per Dwelling Unit 5,000 Dwelling Units Per Net Acre 3-5 LOT DIMENSIONS Minimum Lot Width at Front Property Line 30 Minimum Lot Width for a Flag Lot, cul-de-sac, or knuckle at Front Property Line 20 Minimum Lot Width at Required Front Setback Area 40 Average Lot Width 45 Minimum Lot Depth 80 SETBACKS Minimum Front Yard Variable* Minimum Comer Side Yard 10 Minimum Interior Side Yard Variable* Minimum Rear Yard Variable* MAXIMUM HEIGHT 35 *Refer to Page 11-29 for specific setback requirements. FRONT LOADED 5' MINIMUM ­ " SETBACK I � ------------------- FOR PATIO I COVERS 1 N 20' MINIMUM " REARYARD " " ISETBACK I 1 1 " IBUILDING FOOTPRINT " I5 1 5' 1 W MIN. GARAGE DOOR SETBACK (20' AVG.) k SIDF"ALKII PARKWAY STREET " " V MINIMUM SETBACK, FOR DEEP RECESSED( GARAGE15 " 10' MINIMUM BUILDING SETBACK " INCLUDING "PORCHESAND PROJECTIONS " (12' AVERAGE) — 4 DEEP RECESSED a4A ,E 20' MINIMUM REAR YARD SETBACKFOR 1 IN 1 STRUCTURE I 1 BUILDING I FOOTPRINT 1 1 Z LU Uz lux U ¢�ZU Nw Harveston Specific Plan 11-31 SIDEWALK(( PARKWAY STREET 10'MINIMUM (BUILDING SETBACK 1 INCLUDING 1 PORCHES AND PROJECTIONS (12' AVERAGE) 1 REAR ACCESS1L -_--c'—i 1 20'MIN.REAR' YARD SETBACK ( 1 FOR MAIN I~ " STRUCTURE, 1 Dw MIN. FOR 1 u� I3' REAR ACCESS w GARAGE GPF4GE I xp BUILDING FOOTPRINT ¢z 1 NW i I 1 1 1 L5 1 � 10' MINIMUM 5' 1 BUILDING 1 SETBACK " " I INCLUDING i PORCHESAND I 1 PROJECTIONS 1 (12-AVERAGE) " 1 IPO"iCH 1 I " " I o 1 PROPERTY LI E I " —� SIDIFW K F PARKWAY STREET MW 11-32 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.4.2 Medium 1 (MI) Density Residential Zone (5-7 dwelling units per acre) Plannine Areas 2 and 8 The following regulations shall apply in the Medium 1 Density Residential: Permitted / Conditionally Permitted Uses Matrix Medium 1 All types of non commercial horticulture P Churches, synagogues and other similar religious structures and facilities including incidental uses such as assembly, work rooms, living quarters of a priest, minister or family, and day care and educational facilities. C Congregate care residential facilities for the elderly P Day care centers C Family day care homes — large, as defined by State law. C Family day care homes — small — 6 or fewer P Group care facilities and residential retirement homes, 6 or less people P Guest house or granny flat P Home occupations, provided such occupations are customarily conducted as an accessory use entirely within a building containing a residential use or attached garage. No outdoor storage or uses shall be permitted. P Public and private recreational facilities including„ but not limited to: country clubs, tennis and swim clubs, golf courses, lakes, parks, racquetball and handball. Limited commercial uses which are commonly associated and directly related to the primary uses are permitted. P Public parks and public playgrounds P Rear access P Residential care facilities for the elderly (six or fewer) P Secondary dwelling units/granny flats/guest house P Single family detached, small lot single family detached, single family attached, cluster P Temporary real estate tract offices located within a subdivision, to be used only for and during the original sale of the subdivision, provided a development plan is approved pursuant to City Ordinance. P Trails P Other Uses: Any use that is not specifically listed above may be considered a permitted use provided that the Director of Planning finds that the proposed use is substantially the same in character and intensity as those listed in the designated subsections. Such a use is subject to the permit process, which governs the category in which it falls. Harveston Specific Plan 11-33 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Development Standards The following development standards shall apply in the Medium 1 Density Residential Zone of Planning Areas 2 and 8. Table 11.2 provides a graphic summary of the following Medium 1 (M1) development standards at the end of this section. For cluster projects within the M1, M2 and High density zoning districts, the development standards for lot sizes and setbacks may be varied by the Director of Planning as long as the cluster project falls within the allowed density ranges of the appropriate zone district. The purpose of this provision is to allow for innovative and alternative housing types around courtyards and common areas. Building height shall not exceed two (2) stories, with a maximum height of thirty five feet (35). 2. A minimum of 50% of Medium 1 units shall incorporate architecture forward designs. Minimum residential lot area shall be not less than three thousand (3,000) square feet and the average residential lot area shall be not less than three thousand five hundred (3,500) square feet. 4. Airspace condominiums are exempt from the minimum lot size requirements provided that the overall density is consistent with the planning area requirements. Land acreage located within Landscape Development Zones (LDZ's) shall not be included in area calculations for meeting minimum lot size requirements. 6. The minimum lot width at the front property line shall be twenty five feet (25'), with an average lot width of forty feet (40') and a minimum lot depth of seventy feet (70'). Lots at the end of cul- de-sacs and knuckles may vary from the minimum depth requirement provided a lot provides an adequate area for development. 7. The minimum lot width for a flag lot, cul-de-sac, or knuckle at front property line shall be twenty feet (20'). 8. The minimum lot width at required front setback area shall be thirty five feet (35'). 9. Minimum yard requirements are as follows: a. Minimum front yard - Variable Front Yard Setback: In order to allow for a more interesting visual image and more flexible site planning, variable setbacks shall be used in the M1 planning area in accordance with Section 10.5 (Principal Design Criteria). Front yard setbacks from garage doors to back of sidewalk shall be a minimum of 18 feet. The main building structure setback shall be 10 feet from the property line. Other portions of a structure (including patios, porches and entrances) may be setback a minimum of 7 feet. Building setbacks shall be measured from the property line. b. Minimum interior side yard - Variable Side Yard Setbacks: Variable side yard setbacks may be permitted provided the sum of the side yard setbacks is not less than 8 feet and the distance between adjacent structures is not less than 8 feet. For front loaded Harveston Specific Plan 11-34 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS conditions a minimum of four -foot setback area, free of architectural encroachments shall be maintained on at least one side. C. Variable rear yard setback: 1) Garage forward and front loaded: a 10-foot minimum rear yard setback is permitted in the M-1 district, provided an average setback of 15 feet shall be maintained. 2) Rear vehicle access: the minimum rear yard setback to the garage shall be 3 feet and the main structure setback shall be 15' (ground floor) and a 3' minimum with a 5' average setback for second story elements over the garage. At the rear of each lots, a minimum of 14 square feet of landscaping shall be provided (refer to Figure 11.13). d. The corner side yard shall not be less than ten feet (10') 10. The Planning Commission may approve modifications to these standards up to 15% for innovative and quality designs that meet the intent of the provisions for this Specific Plan (refer to Section 11.5 of this document). 11. Parking. A minimum of two (2) enclosed spaces shall be provided per unit/lot. Enclosures shall comply with all yard requirements. 12. Fences and Walls. Fences and walls shall be permitted within front, side, and rear yard set back areas except as provided for below: a. Fences may not be erected within either public or private street rights -of -way. b. Wherever fencing is visible from public view, the finished side of the fencing shall be exposed to public view. C. No fence or wall shall exceed six feet (6') in height, unless a higher wall is specifically required for sound attenuation purposes. The height of the wall or fence shall be measured from the highest ground level immediately adjacent to the base of the wall. d. Privacy walls, if provided in side and rear yards, shall be a minimum of five feet (5') in height. In front yard set back areas, solid fences and walls shall not exceed thirty inches (30") in height; provided, however, that fences and walls up to six feet (6') in height are permitted in front yards if the area above thirty inches (30") is no more than thirty percent (30%) solid. All pool enclosure fencing shall conform to applicable State of California or City of Temecula pool code fencing requirements, whichever is more stringent. Harveston Specific Plan 11-35 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS TABLE 11.2 SUMMARY DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS FOR MI (MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL, 5-7 DU's / AC) ZONE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS M-1 Minimum Lot Area Per Dwelling Unit 3,000 Average Lot Area Per Dwelling Unit 3,500 Dwelling Units Per Net Acre 5-7 LOT DIMENSIONS Minimum Lot Width at Front Property Line 25 Minimum Lot Width for a Flag Lot, cul-de-sac, or knuckle at Front Property Line 20 Minimum Lot Width at Required Front Setback Area 35 Average Lot Width 40 Minimum Lot Depth 70 SETBACKS Minimum Front Yard Variable* Minimum Comer Side Yard 10 Minimum Interior Side Yard Variable* Minimum Rear Yard Variable* MAXIMUM HEIGHT 35 *Refer to Page 11-34 for specific setback requirements. 5' MINIMUM SETBACK FOR PATIO 1 COVERSi i FRONT LOADED 10' MINIMUM p REAR YARD SETBACK J (iS'AVERAGE) I 4'1 �W 2 �a z BUILDING i V� FOOTPRINT ¢Z 1 Nw GARAGE 1 1 10- MINIMUM 18' MINIMUM I SETBACK GARAGE DOOR 1 FOR MAIN BUILDING SETBACK (20' AVERAGE) i ENTRn. 1 T 1 O IvancFcrry i iNF PARKWAY STREET 1 1 1 i T MINIMUM SETBACK FOR IPATIOS, PORCHES ANDENTRANCES �L Harveston Specific Plan 11-36 REAR ACCESS ch 1 REAR GARAGE 15' MINIMUM REAR YARD 1 1 SETBACK MAY 1 BE REDUCED SETBACK I FOR MAIN In I T03' MINIMUM STRUCTUREI FOR REAR 1 1 v v VEHICLE ACCESS J¢� I w 1 GARAGE �j M I BUILDING FOOTPRINT w�1 r 1 1 F Q 1 4 I1 4� � ¢ U Nw 1 fV 1 1 I I 1 1 1 7' MINIMUM I PORCH 1 SET13ACKFORI 1 1 PATIOS, PORCHES 1 O AND ENTRANCES f� _ �PR_OPERT_Y LINE Ti 1 FIDE 4LK �' PARKWAY STREET SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.4.3 Medium 2 (M2) Density Residential Zone (7-13 dwelling units per acre) Plannine Areas 3, 5, 9 and 11 The following regulations shall apply in the Medium 2 Density Residential: Permitted /Conditionally Permitted Uses Matrix Medium 2 All types of non-commercial horticulture P Churches, synagogues and other similar religious structures and facilities including incidental uses such as assembly, work rooms, living quarters of a priest, minister or family, and day care and educational facilities. C Condominiums P Congregate care residential facilities for the elderly P Day care centers C Duplex (two-family dwellings) P Family day care homes — large, as defined by State law. C Family day care homes — small — 6 or fewer P Group care facilities and residential retirement homes, 6 or less people P Home occupations, provided such occupations are customarily conducted as an accessory use entirely within a building containing a residential use or attached garage. No outdoor storage or uses shall be permitted. P Public facilities(Planning Area 9 only) P Public and private recreational facilities including, but not limited to: country clubs, tennis and swim clubs, golf courses, lakes, parks, racquetball and handball. Limited commercial uses which are commonly associated and directly related to the primary uses are permitted. P Public parks and public playgrounds P Rear access P Residential care facilities for the elderly six or fewer P Secondary dwelling units/granny flats/guest house P Single family attached P Single family detached (small lots, clustered) P Temporary real estate tract offices located within a subdivision, to be used only for and during the original sale of the subdivision, provided a development plan is approved pursuant to City Ordinance. P Trails P Other Uses: Any use that is not specifically listed above may be considered a permitted use provided that the Director of Planning finds that the proposed use is substantially the same in character and intensity as those listed in the designated subsections. Such a use is subject to the permit process, which governs the category in which it falls. Harveston Specific Plan 11-37 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Development Standards The following standards of development shall apply in the Medium 2 Density Residential Zone of Planning Areas 3, 5, 9 and 11. Table 11.3 provides a graphic summary of the following Medium 2 (M2) development standards at the end of this section. For cluster projects within the M1, M2 and High density zoning districts, the development standards for lot sizes and setbacks may be varied by the Director of Planning as long as the cluster project falls within the allowed density ranges of the appropriate zone district. The purpose of this provision is to allow for innovative and alternative housing types around courtyards and common areas. Building height shall not exceed three (3) stories, with a maximum height of forty feet (40'). 2. Minimum residential lot area shall be not less than two thousand (2,000) square feet and the average residential lot area shall be not less than two thousand five hundred (2,500) square feet. Airspace condominiums are exempt from the minimum lot size requirements provided that the overall density is consistent with the planning area requirements. 4. Land acreage located within Landscape Development Zones (LDZ's) shall not be included in area calculations for meeting minimum lot size requirements. The minimum lot width at the front property line shall be twenty five feet (25'), with an average lot width of thirty feet (30') and a minimum lot depth of sixty feet (60'). Lots at the end of cul-de- sacs and knuckles may vary from the minimum depth requirement provided a lot provides an adequate area for development. 6. The minimum lot width for a flag lot, cul-de-sac, or knuckle at front property line shall be twenty feet (20'). 7. The minimum lot width at required front setback area shall be thirty feet (30') 8. Minimum yard requirements are as follows: a. Minimum front yard - The main building structure setback shall be 10 feet from the property line. Other portions of a structure including patios, porches and courtyards may be setback a minimum of 3 feet. Front yard setbacks from garage doors to back of sidewalk shall be a minimum of 18 feet. Building setbacks shall be measured from the property line. b. Minimum interior side yard - Variable Side Yard Setbacks: Variable side yard setbacks may be permitted provided the sum of the side yard setbacks is not less than 6 feet and the distance between adjacent structures is not less than 6 feet. For attached units, interior side yard setback shall be reduced to zero feet. C. Variable rear yard setbacks: Harveston Specific Plan 11-38 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 1) Front loaded: an 8-foot minimum rear setback is permitted in the M-2 district, provided an average setback of 10 feet shall be maintained. 2) Rear vehicle access: the minimum rear yard setbacks to the garage shall be 3 feet and the main structure setback shall be 10' (ground floor) and a 3' minimum with a 5' average setback for second story elements over the garage. At the rear of each lot, a minimum of 12 square feet of landscaping shall be provided (refer to Figure 11.13). d. The corner side yard shall not be less than ten feet (10') Minimum yard requirements in the Mixed Use Overlay zone may be waived or altered by the Director of Planning in order to achieve the mix of uses, building scale and design elements, as described in Section 11.4.5. The of Planning Commission may approve modifications to these standards up to 15% for innovative and quality designs that meet the intent of the provisions for this Specific Plan (refer to Section 11.5 of this document). 10. Parking. A minimum of two (2) enclosed spaces shall be provided per unit/lot. Enclosures shall comply with all yard requirements. 11. Fences and Walls. Fences and walls shall be permitted within front, side, and rear yard set back areas except as provided for below: a. Fences may not be erected within either public or private street rights -of -way. b. Wherever fencing is visible from public view, the finished side of the fencing shall be exposed to public view. C. No fence or wall shall exceed six feet (6) in height, unless a higher wall is specifically required for sound attenuation purposes. The height of the fence or wall shall be measured from the highest ground level immediately adjacent to the base of the wall. d. Privacy walls, if provided in side and rear yards, shall be a minimum of five feet (5') in height. In front yard set back areas, solid fences and walls shall not exceed thirty inches (30") in height; provided, however, that fences and walls up to six feet (6') in height are permitted in front yards if the area above thirty inches (30") is no more than thirty percent (30%) solid. All pool enclosure fencing shall conform to applicable State of California or City of Temecula pool code fencing requirements, whichever is more stringent. 12. For religious institutions and community facilities in Planning Area 9 supplemental landscaping, screening and buffering shall be required adjacent to residential uses. The Director of Planning shall determine the adequacy of this requirement. Harveston Specific Plan 11-39 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS TABLE 11.3 SUMMARY DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS FOR M2 (MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL, 7-13 DU' S / AC) — ZONE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS M-2 Minimum Lot Area Per Dwelling Unit 2,000 Average Lot Area Per Dwelling Unit 2,500 Dwelling Units Per Net Acre 7 — 13 LOT DIMENSIONS Minimum Lot Width at Front Property Line 25 Minimum Lot Width for a Flag Lot, cul-de-sac, or knuckle at Front Property Line 20 Minimum Lot Width at Required Front Setback Area 30 Average Lot Width 30 Minimum Lot Depth 60 SETBACKS Minimum Front Yard Variable* Minimum Comer Side Yard Variable* Minimum Interior Side Yard Variable* Minimum Rear Yard Variable* MAXIMUM HEIGHT 40 *Refer to Page 11-38 for specific setback requirements. FRONT LOADED 8' MINIMUM (REAR YARD SETBACK (10'AVERAGE) � I BUILDING FOOTPRINT i _j I I 1E~ ENTRY I ULU = DARAdE Q � Cc A s' _I I i PARKWAY STREET 18' MIN. GARAGE DOOR SETBACK 10' MINIMUM SETBACK FOR o MAIN BUILDING T Harveston Specific Plan 11-40 REVISED 8/14/01 REAR ACCESS i-------cL_ REAR SETBACK MAY BE REDUCED TO & MINIMUM FOR REAR VEHICLE ACCESS CAMAGEv v LLI I I I I� z L� F BUILDING CC �CC FOOTPRINT I V Z Flu eNTav 9' MINIMUM I SETBACK FOR PATIOS AND PATIO COURTYARDS 8' MINIMUM SETBACK FOR PROPERrY vNE i PORCHES PARKWAY STREET SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.4.4 High (H) Density Residential Zone (13- 20 dwelling units per acre) PlanninE Area 6 The following regulations shall apply in the High Density Residential: Permitted / Conditionally Permitted Uses Matrix High Density Residential All types of horticulture P Attached residential units (apartments, condominiums, duplex, etc. P Churches, synagogues and other similar religious structures and facilities including incidental uses such as assembly, work rooms, living quarters of a priest, minister or family, and day care and educational facilities. C Congregate care residential facilities for the elderly P Day care centers P Family day care homes — large C Family day care homes — small P Group care facilities and residential retirement homes, 6 or less people P Home occupations, provided such occupations are customarily conducted as an accessory use entirely within a building containing a residential use or attached garage. No outdoor storage or uses shall be permitted. P Nursery schools for preschool day care P Public and private recreational facilities P Public parks and public playgrounds P Residential care facilities for the elderly (six or fewer) P Secondary dwelling units/granny flats/guest house P Temporary real estate tract offices located within a subdivision, to be used only for and during the original sale of the subdivision, provided a development plan is approved pursuant to City Ordinance. P Trails P Other Uses: Any use that is not specifically listed above may be considered a permitted use provided that the Director of Planning finds that the proposed use is substantially the same in character and intensity as those listed in the designated subsections. Such a use is subject to the permit process, which governs the category in which it falls. Harveston Specific Plan 11-41 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Development Standards The following standards of development shall apply in the High Density Residential Zone of Planning Area 6. Table 11.4 provides a graphic summary of the following High (H) development standards at the end of this section. For cluster projects within the M1, M2 and High density zoning districts, the development standards for lot sizes and setbacks may be varied by the Director of Planning as long as the cluster project falls within the allowed density ranges of the appropriate zone district. The purpose of this provision is to allow for innovative and alternative housing types around courtyards and common areas. Building height shall not exceed three (3) stories, with a maximum height of fifty feet (50'). 2. Minimum residential lot area shall be not less than five thousand (5,000) square feet. Land acreage located within Landscape Development Zones (LDZ's) shall not be included in area calculations for meeting minimum lot size requirements. 4. The minimum lot width at the front property line shall be thirty feet (30'), with an average lot width of fifty feet (50') and a minimum lot depth of one hundred feet (100'). Lots at the end of cul-de- sacs and knuckles may vary from the minimum depth requirement provided a lot provides an adequate area for development. The minimum lot width at required front setback area shall be thirty feet (30'). 6. Minimum yard requirements are as follows: a. Variable Development Perimeter Setback: In order to allow for a more interesting visual image and more flexible site planning, variable setbacks may be permitted in the high density planning area. Development Perimeter Setbacks for the main structure shall be a minimum of 6'. Patios, porches, and entrances may be setback a minimum of 3'. Where the property abuts a minimum 25' parkway (which may include a sidewalk), the setback for patios, porches, and entrances may be reduced to 0'. Setbacks shall be measured from the property line. b. Minimum interior lot setback. The minimum interior lot setback shall be 5 feet. C. Variable Building Separation: Building separation setbacks shall have a minimum of 20 feet with an average of at least 25 feet. 7. The Planning Commission may approve modification to these standards up to 15% for innovative designs and quality that meet the intent of the provisions for this Specific Plan (refer to Section 11.5 of this document). 8. Multi -family residential development abutting a side property line to a single-family development shall not exceed the height of the adjacent single-family residential by more than one story in height. Harveston Specific Plan 11-42 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 9. Parking. Automobile storage space shall be provided as follows for multiple -family residences: a. Duplex, triplexes: 2 covered spaces/unit, plus 1 guest space / 2 units. b. Multiple family residential — 3 or fewer bedrooms: 2 covered spaces/unit, plus 1 guest space / 2 units. C. Multiple family residential — 4 or more bedrooms: 2 covered spaces/unit for first 3 bedrooms, then 1 space/bedroom for each additional bedroom. 10. Open space shall be provided as follows for multiple family residences. For ground -level units, a minimum of seventy-five (75) square feet of private outdoor open space in the form of a patio or fenced yard shall be provided per unit with a minimum width of eight feet (8'). All other dwelling units shall be provided with a minimum of fifty (50) square feet of private outdoor space in the form of a balcony, with a minimum width of six feet (6). 11. Recreational Area. A minimum of two hundred (200) square feet per dwelling unit shall be provided as common passive and active recreational space. This common open space/recreational space shall exclude all parking areas. 12. Walls and Fences. Walls and fences shall be permitted within front, side, and rear yard set back areas except as provided for below: a. Fences may not be erected within either public or private street rights -of -way. b. Two-sided fencing shall be used wherever visible from a public or private street. C. No fence or wall shall exceed six feet (6') in height, unless a higher wall is specifically required for sound attenuation purposes. The height of the wall or fence shall be measured from the highest ground level immediately adjacent to the base of the wall. d. Privacy walls, if provided in side and rear yards, shall be a minimum of five feet (5') in height. In front yard set back areas, solid fences and walls shall not exceed thirty inches (30") in height; provided, however, that fences and walls up to six feet (6') in height are permitted in front yards if the area above thirty inches (30") is no more than thirty percent (30%) solid. f. All pool enclosure walls and fencing shall conform to applicable State of California or City of Temecula pool code fencing requirements, whichever is more stringent. 12. Refuse Collection Areas: a. All refuse collection areas and structures shall be designed and provided in accordance with applicable City of Temecula guidelines and policies. Harveston Specific Plan 11-43 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS b. Storage and trash collection structures shall not be located within any required setback area, including front, side, and rear yard setbacks. C. Refuse collection areas and structures shall be conveniently accessible to the units/buildings they are designed to serve. d. Structures which are used for storage or trash collection shall be screened by landscaping, solid walls/fencing, or combination thereof, in such a manner as not to be visible from a public street or from any adjacent residential area. e. Walls and fences used to screen storage or trash collection areas shall be solid and shall not exceed six feet (6') in height from the highest grade. f. Recycling processing facilities shall not be permitted; however, recycling collection facilities are specifically permitted uses subject to the conditions of this section. Harveston Specific Plan 11-44 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS TABLE 11.4 SUMMARY DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS FOR H (HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL, 13-20 DTJ's / AC) —ZONE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS H Minimum Lot Area 5,000 Dwelling Units Per Net Acre 13 — 20 LOT DIMENSIONS Minimum Lot Width at Front Property Line 30 Minimum Lot Width for a Flag Lot, cul-de-sac, or knuckle at Front Property Line LA Minimum Lot Width at Required Front Setback Area 30 Average Lot Width 50 Minimum Lot Depth 100 SETBACKS Minimum Development Perimeter Variable* Minimum Interior Lot Setback 5 Minimum Building Separation Variable* MAXIMUM HEIGHT 50 *Refer to Page 11-42 for specific setback requirements. INTERIOR LOT LINE MULTI -FAMILY INTERIOR LOT LINE I I FROM PATIO, PORCH OR ENTRANCE TO PERIMETER LOT LINE AT VILLAGE CENTER PERIMETER LOT LINE �--- PARKWAY---' PARKWAY Harveston Specific Plan 11-45 3' MINIMUM SETBACK FROM PATIO, PORCH OR ENTRANCE TO PERIMETER LOT LINE 8' 16' MINIMUM SETBACK FROM BUILDING TO PERIMETER LOT LINE 5' MINIMUM SETBACK FROM INTERIOR LOT LINE 20' MNIMUM BUILDING SEPARATION (25' AVERAGE) iELIxETivaTuoL _ _ _ �—• PARKWAY PARKWAY SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.4.5 Mixed -Use Overlay Zone Plannine Areas 3, 4, and 6 The following regulations shall apply in the Mixed -Use Overlay zone: Permitted / Conditionally Uses Matrix Mixed -Use Overlay Zone Adult education programs P Adult exercise, health and fitness center P Antique shops P Apparel and accessory shops P Art supply shops and studios P Athletic courts tennis/basketball P Bakery shops retail P Bandstand P Banks/credit union ATM's P Barber and beauty shops P Bars and cocktail lounges when associated with live entertainment C Bicycle (sales, rentals, services) without outside storage P Bicycle sales and rentals with outside storage C Blueprint, reprographics and duplicating services P Bookstores with library/coffee shop) P Boys and girls club P Cable TV office P Camera shop P Candy/confectioneryCandy/confectionery sales P Catering services P Clothing stores P Clubhouse with meeting rooms for uses such as homeowners associations, clubs, physician/nurse training, university extension courses, vocational training classrooms, etc. P Coffee shop P Coin shop P Community playground P Computer and copy center P Computer and typewriter sales and rental, including incidental repairs P Congregate care (does not count against the 1,921 units) P Cultural arts facility P Dance halls C Day care centers P Delicatessens P Drug stores and pharmacies P Dry cleaners P Dry goods stores P Harveston Specific Plan 11-46 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Permitted / Conditionally Uses Matrix Mixed -Use Overlay Zone Employment agencies P Financial, insurance real estate offices P Fire and police stations P Florists shops P Fortune telling, spiritualism or similar activity P Gift shops P Hardware stores, not including outside storage P Healthcare facility P Historic interpretive center P Hobby shops P Household goods sales, including but not limited to, new and used appliances, furniture, carpets, draperies, lamps, radios and television sets, including repair thereof P Ice cream shops P Interior decorating shops P Jewelry stores, including incidental repairs P Library (school/city or county) P Liquor stores C Locksmith shops P Mail order businesses P Markets, including but not limited to food, wholesale, produce, fruit, vegetable, fish, and poultry and meat markets, but not including slaughtering. P Medical equipment sales/rental P Music stores P Neighborhood coffee house P News stores P Notions or novelty stores P Offices, including but not limited to business, law, medical, dental, chiropractic, architectural, engineering, community planning and real estate. P Outdoor venders refer to "Outdoor Vendors" in this section P Paint and wallpaper stores, not including paint contractors P Parcel delivery services P Performing arts facility/theater P Personal service shops P Pet shops and pet supply shops P Photography shops and studios and photo engraving P Picnic areas P Post office and other federal/state functions P Pottery store P Printers or publishers P Private utility facilities P Religious institutions, without a daycare or private school C Religious institutions, with a private school C Religious institutions, with a daycare C Residential P Harveston Specific Plan 11-47 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Permitted / Conditionally Uses Matrix Mixed -Use Overlay Zone Restaurants and other eating establishments, not including drive-in and drive-thru restaurants or restaurants with bars/cocktail lounges that offer live entertainment. P Restaurants or other eating establishments with bars that offer live entertainment C Schools, business and professional, including but not limited to art, barber, beauty, dance, drama, music and swimming. P Senior center P Senior citizen housing P Shared parking area P Sporting oods stores P Stationer stores P Tailor shops P Telecommuting center P Telephone exchanges P Theaters, not including drive-ins C Tobacco shops P Tourist information centers P Toy shops P Travel agencies P Visitor/sales information center P Watch repair shops P Other Uses: Any use that is not specifically listed above may be considered a permitted use provided that the Director of Planning finds that the proposed use is substantially the same in character and intensity as those listed in the designated subsections. Such a use is subject to the permit process, which governs the category in which it falls and is compatible with the overall community character within the Harveston Specific Plan area. Use of the Village Green: This is a unique urban space designed to provide for gathering places and entertainment uses that are compatible with the surrounding uses. Outdoor entertainment uses are also permitted in this area. Temporary uses are permitted in the Mixed -Use Overlay Zone of Planning Areas 3, 4, and 6 provided a temporary use permit has been granted pursuant to Section 17.040.020 of Temecula Development Code. Harveston Specific Plan 11-48 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Development Standards The following lists the development standards for the Mixed -Use Overlay Zone. Any development standard that is not referenced in this section will revert back to the underlying zoning for the Mixed Use Overlay Zone, which is residential. The following standards of development are required in the Mixed -Use Overlay zone of Planning Areas 3, 4, and 6. Lot Area. There is no minimum lot area requirement; however, no subdivision of the Mixed -Use Overlay zone shall be permitted without an approved development plan, which shall occur at an administrative level, provided the plan is consistent with the "Site Planning Guidelines" in the proceeding pages. A minimum of 10,000 sq. ft. of retail development is required. Within the Village Center no minimum size is required for individual development. 2. Setbacks. a. Where the front, side or rear yard adjoins a street, the setback shall be (0) from the LDZ (please refer to Figure 10.1-11). b. Where the side or rear yard adjoins a lot zoned for single family detached residential use, the minimum setback shall be ten feet (10) from the property line. C. Setback areas may be used for driveways, parking and landscaping. Height Requirements. All buildings and structures shall not exceed fifty feet (50') in height. 4. Landscaping. a. There shall be no landscape requirements for retail and office uses. For all other uses, a minimum of fifteen percent (15%) of the site proposed for development shall be landscaped and irrigated. b. Parking lot landscaping and shading shall conform to applicable City of Temecula Development Code. Parking. Automobile storage space shall generally be five (5) spaces for every one thousand (1,000) square feet of gross leasable floor area. Specific parking requirements for future uses shall be addressed at the site plan review phase when the type of use is known. 6. Mechanical Equipment. All roof mounted mechanical equipment shall be screened from the ground elevation view to a minimum sight distance of one thousand three hundred twenty feet (1,320'). Screening shall be incorporated into the architecture with similar materials and finishes. 7. Refuse Collection Areas: a. All refuse collection areas and structures shall be designed and provided in accordance with applicable City of Temecula rules and policies. Harveston Specific Plan 11-49 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS b. Storage and trash collection structures shall not be located within any required setback area, including front, side, and rear yard setbacks. C. Refuse collection areas and structures shall be conveniently accessible to the buildings they are designed to serve. d. Structures which are used for storage or trash collection shall be screened by landscaping, solid walls/fencing, architectural features, or combination thereof, in such a manner as not to be visible from a public street or from any adjacent residential area. Walls and fences used to screen storage or trash collection areas shall be solid and shall not exceed six feet (6) in height from the highest grade. 8. Lighting a. All lighting fixtures, including spot lights, electrical reflectors and other means of illumination for signs, structures, landscaping, parking, loading, unloading, and similar areas shall be focused, directed and arranged to prevent glare or direct illumination on streets or adjoining property. b. The level of on -site lighting, as well as the type of lighting fixtures, shall comply with all applicable requirements of the City of Temecula and Mount Palomar Observatory. High pressure sodium lights may be used as street lighting in the pedestrian areas of the Village Center. C. The maximum height for parking lighting fixtures shall not exceed twenty feet (20'). Outdoor Vendors Purpose Outdoor vending on private property promotes public interest by contributing to an active pedestrian environment. However, reasonable regulation of outdoor vending is necessary to protect the public health, safety and welfare. 2. Definitions For purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply: "Stand" means a pushcart, wagon or any other wheeled vehicle or device which may be moved without the assistance of a motor and is used for the displaying, storing or transporting of articles offered for sale by a vendor. "Vending" means the sale of food or merchandise from a stand operating on private property within the Specific Plan area (Mixed -Use Village Center). Harveston Specific Plan 11-50 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Vendors License Required It shall be unlawful to sell, or offer for sale, any food, beverage or merchandise on any property within the Mixed -Use Village Center area without first obtaining a Vendors License. 4. Applications The application for a Vendors License shall be signed by the applicant and shall include: a. The name, home, and business address of the applicant, and the name and address of the owner, if other than the applicant, of the vending stand to be used in the operation of the vending business. b. A description of the type of food, beverage, or merchandise to be sold. C. A description and photograph (including signage and colors) of any stand to be used in the operation of the business. Issuance Not later than 30 days after the filing of a completed application for a vendor's license, the applicant shall be notified of the decision on the issuance or denial of the license. a. Licenses to vend within the Mixed -Use Village Center area shall be reviewed and approved by the Director of Planning in conjunction with the Business License Registration Program, Building and Safety and the Public Works Department. b. There should be at least 150 square feet of useable or recognizable plaza or courtyard area for each allowed outdoor vending cart. The vending should be free of all obstructions. C. Locations for vending within the Mixed -Use Village Center area shall be approved by the Director of Planning. Vending locations shall be designated based on the ability of the site to safely accommodate the use by not interfering with pedestrian circulation and access or vehicle circulation or parking. The Director of Planning may require that the stand be removed from the location and stored out of public view when not in use. d. Vending locations may change only upon written request by an applicant and approved by the Director of Planning. All vending locations shall be on privately owned, developed, commercial property within the Mixed -Use Village Center area. Harveston Specific Plan 11-51 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 6. Term and Renewal All licenses are valid for one year unless revoked or suspended prior to expiration. An application to renew a license shall be made not later than 60 days before the expiration of the current license. License fees and renewal procedures shall be established in accordance with the Business License Registration Program procedures outlined in the Municipal Code. 7. Prohibited Conduct and Hours of Operation It shall be prohibited for any outdoor vendor to operate under any of the following conditions: a. Operate between 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. of the following day unless in conjunction with a special event. b. Leave any vending stand unattended. C. Store, park or leave any vending stand within any public right-of-way or on any undeveloped or otherwise vacant property. d. Sell food or beverages for immediate consumption unless there is a litter receptacle available nearby for public use. e. Leave any location without first picking up, removing and disposing of all trash or refuse remaining from sales made from the stand. f. Allow any items relating to the operation of the vending business to be placed anywhere other than in, on or under the stand. g. Set up, maintain or permit the use of any additional table, crate, carton, rack or any other device to increase the selling or display capacity of the stand where such additional items have not been approved by the Director of Planning. h. Solicit or conduct business with persons in motor vehicles. i. Sell anything other than that which the license permits. j. Sound or permit the sounding of any device which produces a loud and raucous noise, or use or operate any loud speaker, public address system, radio, sound amplifier, or similar device to attract the attention of the public. 8. Vending Stand Requirements a. Vendor shall be required to submit a photograph or drawing of the vending stand to be used for review during application approval process, including materials, colors and signage. b. The design and appearance of the vending cart shall be consistent in character with the design theme of the Mixed -Use Village Center. Harveston Specific Plan 11-52 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS C. No stand shall exceed four feet (4') in width, six feet (6') in length, and eight feet (8') in height. 9. Safety Requirements All stands in or from which food is prepared or sold shall comply with the following requirements: a. All equipment installed in any part of the stand shall be secured in order to prevent movement during transit and to prevent detachment in the vent of a collision or overturn. b. All utensils shall be stored in order to prevent their being hurled about in the event of a sudden stop, collision or overturn. A safety knife holder shall be provided to avoid loose storage of knives. C. Compressors, auxiliary engines, generators, batteries, battery chargers, gas fueled water heaters, and similar equipment shall be installed so as to be hidden from view to the extent possible and be easily accessible. 10. Display of License All licenses shall be displayed in a visible and conspicuous location at all times during the operation of the vending business. 11. Advertising No advertising, except the posting of prices, shall be permitted on any stand, except to identify the name of the product or the name of the vendor. 12. Denial, Suspension and Revocation Any license may be denied, suspended or revoked in accordance with the procedures in the Municipal Code for any of the following causes: a. Fraud or misrepresentation contained in the application for the license. b. Fraud or misrepresentation made in the course of carrying on the business of vending. C. Conduct of the licensed business in such manner as to create a public nuisance, or constitute a danger to the public health, safety, welfare or morals. d. Conduct which is contrary to the provision of this section. Harveston Specific Plan 11-53 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Site Plannine Guidelines As stated in Section 3.1.4, this overlay zone provides the opportunity to develop a mix of potential uses such as retail, restaurant, office uses, a daycare facility, a worship site, and private club house with fitness center (Village Club) and park, recreation, educational and residential uses. A maximum of 20,000 square feet of commercial/retail/office is permitted in this zone along with the 15,000 square feet Village Club, residential, recreation and educational uses. This overlay will provide the potential for development projects which create a "live, work and play environment." For an overall, "conceptual design" of the Mixed -Use Overlay zone, please refer to Figure 11.14, Mixed - Use Village Center Conceptual Plan with Building Placement and Landscape Treatment. This design is "conceptual" subject to revisions as individual properties are developed. The plan and guidelines which follow are intended to ensure that this area is developed in a manner consistent with the intent of the Mixed - Use Overlay to create a "Village Center" at Harveston. A proposed permitted mixed -use which the Community Development Department deems to be in conformance with the following guideline principles, shall be approved administratively by the Director of Planning. The Director of Planning reserves the right to bring any project or use to the Planning Commission due to controversial or complex issues related to the use or development. Mixture of Uses 1. Integrate mixed -uses into a single structure with retail on the lower level, office and residential on upper levels. 2. Residential units should always be located above any commercial use. 3. Vertical mixed use projects (where uses are combined in a single structure) is preferred over horizontal mixed use projects (where uses are distributed in separate structures). 4. When mixed uses are combined within a single structure, the intensity of use should decrease as the floors increase. 5. Permanent barriers, which preclude pedestrian circulation through a mixed use project, are strongly discouraged. 6. Opportunities for convenient transit access from the Village Center are strongly encouraged. 7. The commercial anchors for the Village Center should be entertainment, restaurant or grocery stores, versus the suburban prototypical department store. 8. Encourage the provision of community facilities in the Mixed -Use Village Center areas. 9. Allow for residential densities at the top of the density range for those projects that offer mixed - uses. 10. Consider higher residential densities and intensities that will support mass transit options. 11. Compliment retail uses with personal service shops, office and residential uses. 12. Provide for community gathering spaces, public meeting rooms, conference rooms and exhibition areas. Harveston Specific Plan 11-54 z c� c c, �z owl uC Dc� u� so= J � 11-55 U �C� Y �y� w [5c a F o � L mW �h � Lu E�Q�z nr a F i u m MM �1! F ly u P, ■ra 3 u :+A SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Building Scale and Design 1. Buildings shall be adjacent to the street or the adjacent landscape planter area to create a pedestrian oriented streetscape within the Mixed -Use Village Center. 2. The overall design of buildings in the Mixed -Use Village Center area shall be compatible in terms of landscaping, architectural design, building materials and the relationship between buildings. The overall scale and design of buildings in a Village Center area should be compatible with one another. 3. Single story commercial structures are discouraged. 4. The first floor of any multi floor building should be oriented to the pedestrian. 5. Buildings with large landscaped setbacks are not desirable. Whenever possible, consolidate multiple landscape setback areas into usable "urban" plazas with seating, paving, and lighting accents. 6. Whenever it is impossible or undesirable to provide multiple floors, the use of mezzanines or open ceiling spaces are preferred. 7. Large landscaped buffer yards are discouraged in favor of pedestrian plazas, civic plazas, transit station facilities and other public open space options. 8. Residential units shall be at least two stories high and employ neo-traditional principles. Parking and Vehicular Circulation 1. Parking lots shall be located internally within the project area and not located only on the perimeter as with the "typical" shopping center. 2. Parking lots, garages, and other facilities should generally be located at the rear or at the side of buildings. 3. Shared parking between businesses shall be provided whenever possible. 4. Parking areas shall be well -landscaped internally as well as along the perimeter. 5. Large expanses of paving uninterrupted by landscaping shall not be permitted. One tree shall be provided for every six (6) parking stalls. 6. Parking aisles shall be separated from pedestrian access routes whenever possible. 7. Parking lot design should incorporate pedestrian pathways through the lot versus around the perimeter. 8. Separate vehicular and pedestrian circulation systems shall be provided in Mixed -use Village Center areas. (Refer to Figure 11.15, Mixed -Use Village Center Pedestrian and Vehicular Circulation and Parking). Harveston Specific Plan 11-56 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Pedestrian Circulation/Pedestrian-Oriented Design 1. Provide pedestrian and non -motorized vehicular access between the Mixed -Use Village Center area and other uses in the Harveston community. 2. Site Planning for the Mixed -Use Village Center areas shall provide pedestrian circulation areas that are linked to the Loop Road paseo system. 3. The design of the building facades shall be architecturally interesting and in scale with the pedestrian. 4. Sidewalks adjacent to shop storefronts should be at least ten feet wide to facilitate browsing, stopping to talk, or walking through. 5. Ground floor elevations shall avoid large blank walls, with windows and doorways located at frequent intervals. 6. Large wall surfaces shall be divided with offsets, projections, step -backs, and penetrations to provide distinctive shadow lines. 7. Site planning and design shall be sensitive to the need to create defensible spaces for the protection of the pedestrian. 8. Consider pedestrian circulation patterns, sunlight conditions, wind pattern, and the selection of building and landscape materials, when locating a pedestrian open space. 9. Landscape treatment throughout the Mixed -Use Village Center shall have a unifying theme emphasizing the more urban -like environment, yet blends with the adjoining residential neighborhoods. Transit Connection 1. Provide facilities for future connections to regional bus systems. (Refer to Figure 11.15, Mixed Use Village Center Pedestrian and Vehicular Circulation and Parking). Harveston Specific Plan 11-57 11-58 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.4.6 Service Commercial Planning Area 12 The following regulations shall apply in the service commercial zone: Permitted / Conditionally Permitted Uses Matrix Commercial South (S) or NorService Daatete Street Aerobics/dance/ mnastics/jazzercise/martial arts studios P S&N Alcohol and drug treatment (outpatient) C S&N Alcoholic beverage sales C S&N Alcoholism or drug treatment facilities C S&N Ambulance services P S&N Animal hospital/shelter P S&N Antique restoration C S&N Antique shops P S&N Apparel and accessory shops P S&N Appliance stores, household (glass and mirror retail services) P S&N Arcades (pinball and videogames) C S&N Art supply shops and studios P S&N Auction houses P S&N Auditoriums and conference facilities C S&N Automobile painting and body shop C S&N Automobile parts and sales P S&N Automobile rental P S&N Automobile repair services no outdoor storage) P S&N Automobile sales P S&N Automobile service stations with or without an automated car wash P S&N Bakery goods distributors P S&N Bakery retail P S&N Bakery wholesale P S&N Banks and financial institutions P S&N Barber and beauty shops. P S&N Bicycle (sales, rentals, services) P S&N Billiard parlor/pool hall C S&N Binding of books and similar publications P S Blood banks P S&N Blueprinting, duplicating and copy services. P S&N Bookstores P S&N Bowling alley P S&N Building materials sales (with exterior storage/sales areas greater than 50% of total sales area) P S&N Building materials sales (with exterior storage/sales areas less than 50% of total sales area P S&N Butcher shop P S&N Cabinet shop P S&N Cabinet shops under 20,000 s . ft. — no outdoor storage P S&N Harveston Specific Plan 11-59 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Permitted / Conditionally Permitted Uses Matrix Service Commercial South (S) or North Date Street Camera shop sales/minor repairs) P S&N Candy/confectioneryCandy/confectionery sales P S&N Car wash, full service C S&N Carpet and rug cleaning P S&N Catering services P S&N Clothing stores P S&N Coins purchase and sales P S&N Communications equipment sales P S&N Community care facilities P S&N Computer sales and service P S&N Congregate care housing for the elderly P S&N Construction equipment sales, service or rental C S&N Contractor's equipment sales, service or rental C S&N Convenience market P S&N Costume rentals P S&N Cutlery P S&N Data processing equipment ands stems P S&N Day Care C S&N Delicatessens P S&N Discount/department stores P S&N Distribution facility C S&N Drug stores/pharmacystores/pharmacy P S&N Dry cleaners P S&N Dry cleaning plant C S&N Electronics sales P S&N Emergency shelters C S&N Equipment sales and rentals P S&N Equipment sales and rentals (outdoor storage) C S&N Feed and grain sales P S&N Financial, insurance real estate offices P S&N Fire and police stations P S&N Floor covering sales P S&N Florist shop P S&N Fortune telling, spiritualism, or similar activity C S&N Funeral parlors, mortuary P S&N Furniture sales (no outdoor storage or display of merchandise) P S&N * Please refer to Section 17.08 050R of the Development Code Harveston Specific Plan 11-60 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Permitted / Conditionally Permitted Uses Matrix Service Commercial South (S) or North Date Street Furniture transfer and storage C S&N Garden supplies and equipment sales and service P S&N Gas distribution, meter and control station C S&N General merchandise/retail store P S&N Government offices P S&N Grocery store, retail P S&N Grocery store, wholesale P S&N Guns and firearms sales P S&N Hardware stores P S&N Health and exercise clubs P S&N Health care facility P S Health food stores P S&N Heliports C S&N Hobby supply shops P S&N Home and business maintenance service P S&N Hospitals C S&N Hotels/motels P S&N Ice cream parlor P S&N Interior decorating shops P S&N Kennel C S&N Laboratories, film, medical, research or testing centers P S Laundromat P S&N Laundry service (commercial) P S&N Libraries, museums and galleries(private) C S&N Liquor stores C S&N Lithographic service P S&N Locksmith P S&N * Please refer to Section 17.08 050R of the Development Code Harveston Specific Plan 11-61 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Permitted / Conditionally Permitted Uses Matrix Commercial South (S) or NorService et Date Sate Strree Mail order businesses P S&N Manufacturing of products similar to, but not limited to, the following: Custom-made product, processing, assembling, packaging, and fabrication of goods within enclosed building (not outside storage), such as jewelry, furniture, art objects, clothing, labor intensive manufacturing, assembling, and repair processes which do not involve frequent truck traffic. Compounding of materials, processing, assembling, packaging, treatment or fabrication of materials and products, which require frequent truck activity or the transfer of heavy or bulky items. Wholesaling, storage, and warehousing within enclosed building, freight handling, shipping, truck services and terminals, storage and wholesaling from the premises or unrefined, raw or semi -refined products requiring further processing or manufacturing, and outside storage. P P S S Medical equipment sales/rental P S&N Membership clubs, organizations, lodges C S&N Mini -storage ormini-warehouse * S&N Mobile home sales and service P S&N Motion picture studio P S&N Motorcycle sales and service P S&N Musical and recording studio C S&N Nightclubs/taverns/bars/dance club teen club C S&N Nurseries retail P S&N Nursing homes/convalescent homes C S&N Office equipment/supplies, sales/services P S&N Office, administrative or corporate headquarters with greater than 50,000 s . ft. P S&N Offices, including but not limited to business, law, medical, dental, chiropractic, architectural, engineering, community planning and real estate. P S&N Paint and wallpaper stores P S&N Parcel delivery services P S&N Parking lots and parking structures C S&N Pawn shops P S&N Personal service shops P S&N Pest control services P S&N Pet grooming/pet shop P S&N Photographic studio P S&N Plumbing supply and enclosed or unenclosed C S&N Postal services P S&N Printing and publishing (newspapers, periodicals, books, etc. P S&N * Please refer to Section 17.40 of the Development Code Harveston Specific Plan 11-62 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Permitted / Conditionally Permitted Uses Matrix Service Commercial South (S) or Norm ed Date Strreet Private utility facilities (regulated by the public utilities commission P S&N Radio and broadcasting studio, offices P S&N Recreational vehicle sales C S&N Recreational vehicle, trailer and boat storage — exterior yard C S&N Recreational vehicle, trailer, and boat storage within an enclosed building C S&N Religious institutions C S&N Restaurant, drive-in/fast food C S&N Restaurants and other eating establishments P S&N Restaurants with lounge or live entertainment C S&N Rooming and boarding houses C S&N Schools, business and professional P S&N Scientific research and development offices and laboratories P S Sports and recreational facilities C S&N Swimming pool supplies/equipment sales P S&N Taxi or limousine services P S&N Telecommunication towers * S&N Tile sales P S&N Tobacco shop P S&N Truck sales/rentals/service C S&N TV/VCR repair P S&N Upholstery shop C S&N Vending machine sales and service P S&N Warehousing/distribution C S Watch repair P S&N Welding supply and service enclosed P S&N * Please refer to Section 17.40 of the Development Code Harveston Specific Plan 11-63 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Development Standards The following standards of development are required in the Service Commercial Zone of Planning Area 12. To ensure the integrated development of Planning Area 12, the areas north and south of Date Street shall be master planned prior to any land subdivision or development. Table 11.5, at the end of this section, provides a graphic summary of the following Service Commercial development standards. Development Standard (Planning Area 12) Lot Area. The minimum net lot area shall be thirty thousand square feet (30,000 sq. ft.) 2. Height a. The maximum height of all structures, including buildings, shall be fifty feet (50'). b. A maximum height for fence, wall or hedge shall be six feet (6'). c. A maximum height for an accessory structure shall be twelve feet (12'). Landscaping a. A minimum of twenty percent (20%) of the site shall be landscaped and automatic irrigation shall be installed. b. Parking lot landscaping and shading shall conform to applicable City Ordinance. C. A minimum of a fifty foot (50') landscaped buffer/setback area shall be provided adjacent to the Interstate 15 right-of-way. No parking or driving surfaces are allowed in this area. 4. Setbacks a. A minimum of yard area setback adjacent to a street shall be twenty five feet (25') for an arterial street; twenty feet (20') for a collector; and ten feet (10') for a local street. b. A minimum yard adjacent to residentially zoned property shall be thirty feet (30'). c. A minimum interior side yard shall be (0), except that side yards adjacent to the Freeway shall be ten feet (10'). d. A minimum rear yard shall be ten feet (10'). e. A minimum side/rear setback for an accessory structure shall be five feet (5'). f. A minimum width at required front setback area shall be one hundred feet (100'). g. A minimum depth shall be one hundred twenty feet (120'). h. A minimum frontage on a street shall be eighty feet (80'). A target floor area ratio for the uses within the Service Commercial shall be 0.40. Harveston Specific Plan 11-64 Revised October 2020 0 w 00 O M o � oNo � 4 �4 000 o,r,00�N�N o 4 0 0 0 0 U N W � ct ct Z Sr N ct Z W nlutU t O .r N79N Ln N x W C n N �O T. cr cr o Z w 00 Ln �, x WO O 2 V ;. O. = o O O 3 N W�'�. O cad" � � • � • � O � U �-1 k SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 6. A maximum floor area ratio with intensity bonus as per Section 17.08.050 of the Temecula Development Code shall be 1.5. 7. Screening. Parking, loading, trash and service areas shall be screened by structures and landscaping. They shall be located in such a manner as to minimize noise or odor nuisance. Screening shall be required at the face of buildings to break / soften long, two dimensional walls. It should be noted extensive landscaping will not be provided at the rear of buildings whose loading areas are not in the public view. This will be addressed at the development plan stage. 8. Outside Storage Areas. Outside storage shall be screened with structures and landscaping. Landscaping shall be placed in a manner adjacent to the exterior boundaries of the area so that materials stored are screened from view. If a non -screened exhibit of products is proposed, it shall be part of the Industrial Park Development Plan, and shall be setback at least ten feet (10') from the property line. 9. Refuse Collection Areas/Loading Docks a. All refuse collection areas and structures and loading docks shall be designed and provided in accordance with applicable City of Temecula rules and policies. b. Storage and trash collection structures and loading docks shall not be located within any required setback area, including front, side, and rear yard setbacks. C. Refuse collection areas and structures shall be conveniently accessible to the buildings they are designed to serve. d. Loading docks and structures, which are used for storage or trash collection, shall be screened by landscaping, solid walls/fencing, architectural features, or combination thereof, in such a manner as not to be visible from a public street or from any adjacent residential area. Walls and fences used to screen storage or trash collection areas or loading docks shall be solid and shall not exceed six feet (6') in height from the highest grade. 10. Parking. Automobile parking shall comply with Chapter 17.24 of the Temecula Development Code. 11. Utilities. All new utilities shall be underground. 12. Mechanical Equipment. All roof mounted mechanical equipment shall be screened from the ground elevation view to a minimum sight distance of one thousand three hundred twenty feet (1,320'). Screening shall be incorporate into the architecture through the use of increased parapet wall height and other building wall elements. Harveston Specific Plan 11-66 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 13. Lighting a. All lighting fixtures, including spot lights, electrical reflectors and other mean of illumination for signs, structures, landscaping, parking, loading, unloading, and similar areas shall be focused, directed and arranged to prevent glare or direct illumination on streets or adjoining property. b. The level of on -site lighting, as well as the type of lighting fixtures, shall comply with all applicable requirements of the City of Temecula and Mount Palomar Observatory. C. The maximum height for parking area lighting fixtures shall not exceed thirty feet (30'). 14. Building/Structure Design. All buildings and structures shall comply with the applicable provisions of the City-wide design guidelines. In addition, all elevations facing the freeway shall include substantially similar architectural treatments that are located on the buildings' front elevations. No freeway oriented display areas or display windows are allowed in this Planning Area. Harveston Specific Plan 11-67 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.4.7 Signage Village Center Sienaee: Guidelines and Standards Special signage guidelines and standards are required for the Village Center. Effective signage will contribute to the urban feel and the pedestrian scale of the development. Special signage requirements will also serve to identify the Village Center, while at the same time, effectively providing the necessary visibility needed by commercial development. These guidelines and standards, when combined with the building and landscape guidelines and standards will help create a "sense of place" in the Village Center. General Sian Guidelines 1. Appropriate a. Generally, small, low key signage prograin for tenant spaces. b. Building mounted signs for project identity. c. Eye level signs; window and door signs, including pedestrian oriented projecting signs. d. Signs consistent with building texture, color and architectural style. e. Uniquely shaped signs that are related to the product or service provided (i.e., barber poll). f Signs which have illumination sources consistent with Mount Palomar lighting standards and restrictions. 2. Inappropriate/Prohibited a. Typical "can" or "box" signs with entire face areas in plastic. b. Individual plastic channel letters. c. Signs mounted above building rooflines (parapet), or roof -mounted signs. d. Signs which incorporate any manner of mechanical movement, audible elements, flashing or intermittent lighting, and/or moving or otherwise animated forms. Signs which interfere with or conflict with any traffic control device, create a safety hazard by obstructing the clear view of pedestrian or vehicular traffic or interfere with efficient operations of emergency vehicles. Signs, which prevent free access to or from any fire escape, door, window or exit, or access to any standpipe. g. Landscaping or the use of annual or ornamental flowers that form a sign or message. h. Signs not in scale with the pedestrian orientation. Harveston Specific Plan 11-68 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Neon window signs. Vehicle signs. k. Signs extending above the eave or parapet and roof -mounted signs. 1. Signs painted onto building surfaces or trash bins and their enclosures. in. Signs with disproportionate, visually distracting, or reflective surfaced background or graphics. n. Signs with non -contrasting background/graphics, which render the sign illegible. o. Inflatable signs. p. Off -site signage. q. Monument signs (except a theater monument or marquee). General Sign Standards and Specifications A comprehensive sign program for the entire Village Center shall be required prior to the approval of the first Development Plan. 2. The area of a sign or logo with individual letters shall be measured by a rectangle around the outside of the lettering and/or the pictorial symbol. Planning and Building and Safety Departments review and approval is required prior to the placing, erecting, moving, or reconstructing of any sign within the Specific Plan area. 4. All permanent signs shall require a permit prior to erecting or attaching the sign. If a situation arises that is not covered by these sign regulations or the type of permit required, the Director of Planning shall provide written interpretation after consulting the City's Sign Ordinance. 6. All building -mounted signs shall meet all applicable city, state and federal codes. 7. All signs containing electrical components shall conform to the Uniform Lighting Code. 8. Signs shall be placed to be compatible with the building and accent the architectural design of the structure. 9. Sign colors should be compatible with the building's color and the building. 10. Signs and letter sizes shall be used which are complementary to the building scale. 11. Signs should have individually spaced letters. 12. Signs shall have concealed illumination source, either internal or external. Harveston Specific Plan 11-69 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Building Mounted Signs Retail and office uses shall have one (1) square foot of sign area per linear foot of business frontage, with a maximum letter height of sixteen (16") inches. Each business may use any combination of the following signs to arrive at the total allowable square footage. Awning Signs Twenty percent (20%) maximum coverage allowed of the total exterior surface of each awning. Internal illumination is prohibited. 2. Projecting Signs No more than one (1) projecting sign will be allowed per tenant. The maximum size may not exceed six (6) square feet and shall not extend more than three feet (3) from the wall surface. Projecting signs shall only be attached to buildings and shall not be illuminated. Signs may encroach into the public right-of-way a maximum of three feet (3') subject to approval of the Director of Public Works. Accessor Signs Permanent Window Signs. Store identity, graphics, typography and/or company logo may be silkscreened or etched on the tenant's window. The maximum square foot graphic area allowed per window shall not exceed fifteen percent (15%) of the total window area from the exterior of the building, whichever is greater. Signs will not be permitted on doors. 2. Hanging Signs and Under Canopy Signs No more than one (1) hanging sign shall be allowed per tenant. Signs are permitted under a canopy and parallel to the primary street; maximum size of three (3) square feet; minimum of seven feet (7') vertical clearance shall be required from walking grade to the bottom of the sign. Menu Boards. One menu board, up to four (4) square feet in area, is allowed for each restaurant or other eating establishment. Menu boards may contain only the name of the establishment and the food available inside. The menu board must be located on a wall adjacent to the main customer entrance. 4. Daily Special Signs. One display area, up to four (4) square feet in area, is allowed for each restaurant or other eating establishment. Daily Special signs may contain only the name of the menu item. The daily special sign must be located near the entrance or hostess stand. Address Numerals All building mounted address numerals are to conform with all graphic requirements for signage, herein and the requirements of the Temecula Fire Department. Harveston Specific Plan 11-70 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Directional Signag_e Shall consist of small-scale signs that are compatible with the buildings architecture and wall signs. 2. Shall have contrasting background/graphic colors. Shall have direct or indirect concealed illumination. 4. Individual directional signs shall not exceed three (3) square feet in area, or have an overall height exceeding three feet (3') above finished grade. Flags A maximum of three (3) colored flags, which contain no writing, insignia or logos may be displayed at one time. Leasing and Temporar Signs Leasing, temporary, and future facilities signage shall be permitted for any office or institutional use, provided that the maximum area does not exceed sixteen (16) square feet, nor shall the height of the sign exceed eight feet (8') above finished grade. 2. Temporary window signs shall not be illuminated, shall be limited to fifteen percent (15%) of the tenants storefront glass area, and shall be displayed for no more than fourteen (14) days. All other temporary signs shall be regulated and permitted pursuant to the City of Temecula Sign Ordinance. A -frames are permitted no more than twelve (12) days per month. Theater Marquee Permanent signage for all theaters and special event facilities shall be permitted and may be provided in the form of either theater monument signs and/or marquee signs. These signs, if provided, shall consist of a permanent portion displaying the name of the theater or special event facilities and, if desired, may also include a changeable section accommodating program information. The marquee can have a maximum sign area of forty (40) square feet and a maximum width of ten feet (10'), shall be architecturally compatible with the adjacent structures, and located outside the public right-of-way. Harveston Specific Plan 11-71 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Service Commercial Sienaee: Guidelines and Standards A single thematic sign program for the Service Commercial development areas that dictates the design of signage must be incorporated so as to blend with the master community landscape and signage theme carried throughout the Harveston community. This sign program incorporates cohesive illumination techniques, a building coverage and monument sign guidelines to support and accentuate the monument concepts within the Landscape Architectural Guidelines. General Sign Guidelines 1. Appropriate. a. Monument signs. b. Building mounted signs for project identity. c. One color for sign lettering and one color for sign background. Additional colors are acceptable only when incorporating logos. d. Generally, small, low key signage program for tenant spaces. Eye -level signs; window and door signs. f. Individual channel letters. g. Signs consistent with building texture, color and architectural style. h. Signs which have illumination sources consistent with Mount Palomar lighting standards and restrictions. 2. Inappropriate/Prohibited a. Free standing freeway -oriented signage. b. Typical "can" or "box" signs with entire face areas in plastic. c. Signs mounted above building rooflines (parapet), or roof -mounted signs. d. Signs which incorporate any manner of mechanical movement, audible elements, flashing or intermittent lighting, and/or moving or otherwise animated forms. e. Signs which interfere with or conflict with any traffic control device, create a safety hazard by obstructing the clear view of pedestrian or vehicular traffic or interfere with efficient operations of emergency vehicles. f. Signs, which prevent free access to or from any fire escape, door, window or exit, or access to any standpipe. g. Landscaping or the use of annual or ornamental flowers that form a sign or message. Harveston Specific Plan 11-72 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS h. Illumination of signage by floodlights, lighting from unconcealed sources, sources which do not conform with set design style. i. Absence of illumination. j. Neon window signs. k. Vehicle signs. 1. Signs extending above the eave or parapet, roof -mounted signs, non -projecting signs which project more than twelve inches (12") from a given building face. in. Signs painted onto building surfaces or trash bins and their enclosures. n. Signs with disproportionate, visually distracting, or reflective surfaced background or graphics. o. Signs with non -contrasting background/graphics, which render the sign illegible. p. Off -site signage. q. A -frames. General Sign Standards and Specifications 1. The area of a sign or logo with individual letters shall be measured by a rectangle around the outside of the lettering and/or the pictorial symbol. 2. Planning and Building and Safety Departments review and approval is required prior to the placing, erecting, moving, or reconstructing of any sign within the Specific Plan area. 3. All permanent signs shall require a permit prior to erecting or attaching the sign. 4. A comprehensive sign program shall be required to be reviewed and approved by the Planning Department prior to the first approval of development in the Service Commercial area. The comprehensive sign program shall precisely implement the sign standards of the Specific Plan area. 5. Signage which is not approved as part of the Development Plan process shall be approved administratively by the Director of Planning. 6. If a situation arises that is not covered by these sign regulations or the type of permit required, the Director of Planning shall provide written interpretation after consulting the City's Sign Ordinance. 7. All building -mounted signs shall meet or exceed all applicable city, state and federal codes. 8. All signs containing electrical components shall conform to the Uniform Lighting Code. Harveston Specific Plan 11-73 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Monument Signs 1. Signs shall be constructed with materials and colors that are compatible with, and serve to complement the building. 2. Not more than one (1) freestanding sign shall be permitted per lot, except that if the lot has frontage on two (2) or more streets, the project shall be permitted two (2) freestanding signs, provided that the two (2) signs are not located on the same street and are not closer than three hundred feet (300'). 3. A freestanding sign shall never be located within three hundred feet (300") of another freestanding sign. 4. Freestanding signs shall refer only to the permitted uses conducted on the premises, shall be located outside the road right-of-way, shall not exceed six feet (6') in height above grade and the maximum surface area of the sign shall not exceed thirty-two (32) square feet. 5. All monument signs shall include the address of the site. Numerals shall be no larger than ten inches (10") in height and no smaller than six inches (6") in height. 6. A minimum of one hundred (100) square feet of landscaping of low growing shrubs, groundcover and/or annual color shall surround the base of the sign. Entry Monumentation 1. Primary entry monumentation shall not exceed an area of one hundred (100) square feet; provided, however, that the sign shall not exceed six feet (6') in height above grade or twenty feet (20') in length. 2. Primary entry monumentation shall identify the name of the center and shall be landscaped consistent with Section 10.3.1 item (4) of the Specific Plan. 3. Entry monumentation letter types styles, sizes and colors shall be reviewed and approved by the City during the Development Plan review process. 4. Primary entry monumentation shall be limited to entry points for the Service Commercial Planning Area, with a maximum of five (5) signs total (see Section 10.3.1 item (4) of the Specific Plan). Building Mounted Signs 1. General. a. Signs shall be placed to be compatible with the building and accent the architectural design of the structure. b. Sign colors should be compatible with the building's color and the building. c. Signs and letter sizes shall be used which are complementary to the building scale. d. Signs should have individually spaced letters. Harveston Specific Plan 11-74 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS e. Signs shall have concealed illumination source, either internal or external. f. Maximum letter height shall not exceed forty-two inches (42") unless approved by the City during the Development Plan review process. g. All on -building fascia signage shall be coordinated with other signage within the center. 2. Wall Signs. a. The maximum number of signs shall be one per building frontage. b. The maximum area of signs shall be one (1) square foot for each sign area per lineal foot of building frontage. c. Building identification signs are only permitted if no tenant identification signs are placed on the building. Tenant Window Identification. Store identity, graphics, typography and/or company logo may be silkscreened or etched on the tenant's window. The maximum square foot graphic area allowed per window shall not exceed four (4) square feet or fifteen percent (15%) of the total window area from the exterior of the building, whichever is greater. Signs will not be permitted on doors. 4. Hanging Signs No more than one (1) hanging sign shall be allowed per tenant. Signs are permitted under a canopy and parallel to the primary street; maximum size of six (6) square feet; minimum of seven feet (7') vertical clearance shall be required from walking grade to the bottom of the sign. Letters shall be four inches (4") maximum in height. Accessory Signs 1. Menu Boards. One menu board, up to four (4) square feet in area, is allowed for each restaurant or other eating establishment. Menu boards may contain only the name of the establishment and the food available inside. The menu board must be located on a wall adjacent to the main customer entrance. 2. Daily Special Signs. One display area, up to four (4) square feet in area, is allowed for each restaurant or other eating establishment. Daily Special signs may contain only the name of the menu item. The daily special sign must be located near the entrance or hostess stand. Other. a. Any signage provided for Handicap parking, advertising, sales/leasing signage. b. Handicap parking to conform to Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) codes and requirements, as well as City requirements for appropriate graphics, color and size restrictions. Harveston Specific Plan 11-75 REVISED 8/14/01 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS C. Parking, advertising, and on -site shopping signage to be restricted per applicable City of Temecula ordinance by the Planning Department. Address Numerals All building mounted address numerals are to conform with all graphic requirements for signage, herein and the requirements of the Temecula Fire Department. Directional Signage Shall consist of small-scale versions of monument sign design and contain graphics conforming to the design for monument signs and building mounted signs. 2. Shall have contrasting background/graphic colors. Shall have direct or indirect concealed illumination. 4. Individual directional signs shall not exceed three (3) square feet in area, or have an overall height exceeding three feet (3') above finished grade. Multiple -tenant directional signs shall not exceed twelve (12) square feet in area, or have an overall height exceeding six feet (6') above finished grade. Directional signs shall be internally oriented and not located within the required street setback area. 6. Shall not contain logos. Flags A maximum of three (3) colored flags, which contain no writing, insignia or logos may be displayed at one time. Leasing and Temporary Signs Leasing, temporary, and future facilities signage shall be permitted for any office or institutional use, provided that the maximum area does not exceed thirty-two (32) square feet, nor shall the height of the sign exceed eight feet (8') above finished grade. 2. Temporary window signs shall not be illuminated, shall be limited to fifteen percent (15%) of the tenants storefront glass area, and shall be displayed for no more than fourteen (14) days. All other temporary signs shall be regulated and permitted pursuant to the City of Temecula Sign Ordinance. No A -frame signs shall be permitted in this Planning Area. Harveston Specific Plan 11-76 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Theater Marquee Permanent signage for hotels, theaters and special event facilities shall be permitted and may be provided in the form of either theater monument signs and/or marquee signs. These signs, if provided, shall consist of a permanent portion displaying the name of the hotel, theater or special event facilities and, if desired, may also include a changeable section accommodating program information. The marquee will comply with the standards for the monument sign discussed above. 11.4.8 Residential Overlay The following regulations apply if property within Planning Area 12 chooses to develop under the Residential Overlay: Permitted / Conditionally Permitted Uses Matrix Residential Overlay Accessory dwelling units (ADUs) P All types of non-commercial horticulture P Churches, synagogues and other similar religious structures and facilities including incidental uses such as assembly, work rooms, living quarters of a priest, minister or family, and day care and educational facilities. C Alley -loaded homes P Day care centers C Family day care homes — large, as defined by State law. C Family day care homes — small — 6 or fewer P Group care facilities and residential retirement homes, 6 or less people P Home occupations, provided such occupations are customarily conducted as an accessory use entirely within a building containing a residential use or attached garage. No outdoor storage or uses shall be permitted. P Multiple family (e.g. apartments) P Nursery schools for preschool day care P Private recreational facilities including, but not limited to: tennis and swim clubs, golf courses, parks, racquetball and handball. Limited commercial uses which are commonly associated and directly related to the primary uses are permitted. Recreation Centers may accommodate community leasing office with onsite staffing/management company). P Residential care facilities for the elderly six or fewer P Age -qualified housing P Single family attached(including duplex, triplex, condominiums, townhomes P Single family detached(including small lots, clustered, condominiums, townhomes P Telecommunication towers C Other Uses: Any use that is not specifically listed above may be considered a permitted use provided that the Director of Planning finds that the proposed use is substantially the same in character and intensity as those listed in the designated subsections. Such a use is subject to the permit process, which governs the category in which it falls. Harveston Specific Plan 11-77 Revised October 2020 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS Development Standards The following standards of development shall apply in the Residential Overlay. Table 11.6 provides a graphic summary of the following development standards at the end of this section. For cluster projects, the development standards for lot sizes and setbacks may be varied by the Director of Planning as long as the cluster project falls within the allowed density ranges of the Residential Overlay. The purpose of this provision is to allow for innovative and alternative housing types around courtyards and common areas. The maximum number of units within the Residential Overlay shall not exceed 1,000 units; however these units may be distributed over any of the Residential Overlay parcels so the net density of one parcel could be significantly greater than another parcel but in no case shall the total number of units exceed 1,000 within the Residential Overlay. 2. Building height shall not exceed four (4) stories, with a maximum height of fifty feet (50'). Minimum residential lot area shall be not less than two thousand (2,000) square feet and the average residential lot area shall be not less than two thousand five hundred (2,500) square feet. 4. Airspace condominiums and site condominiums are exempt from the minimum lot size requirements provided that the overall density is consistent with the Residential Overlay requirements. Land acreage located within Landscape Development Zones (LDZ's) shall not be included in area calculations for meeting minimum lot size requirements. 6. The minimum lot width shall be thirty feet (30'), and a minimum lot depth of fifty feet (50'). Lots at the end of cul-de-sacs and knuckles may vary from the minimum depth requirement provided a lot provides an adequate area for development. 7. The minimum lot width for a flag lot, cul-de-sac, or knuckle at front property line shall be twenty feet (20'). 8. Gated Entries/Gated Communities are permitted. 9. Private Streets permitted. 10. The Planning Commission may approve modifications to these standards up to 15% for innovative and quality designs that meet the intent of the provisions for this Specific Plan (refer to Section 11.5 of this document). Harveston Specific Plan 11-78 Revised October 2020 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11. Parking. Automobile parking spaces shall be provided as follows: Side -by -side two -car garages for enclosed spaces: garages shall have 20'x20' minimum clearance. Tandem two -car garages for enclosed spaces: garages shall have 10'x40' minimum clearance. All other parking space dimensions per the TMC. Single Family Detached: a. Two (2) enclosed spaces shall be provided per unit. Single Family Attached: Duplexes and Triplexes: b. 2 enclosed spaces/unit plus 0.5 uncovered spaces / unit. Townhomes and Airspace Condominiums (> 3 units/building): 2 enclosed spaces/unit plus 0.5 uncovered space / unit. Multiple Family Residential: d. 1 bedroom or less: 1 covered space / unit, plus 0.5 uncovered space / unit. 2 bedrooms: 1 covered space / unit, plus 1 uncovered space / unit. f. 3 or more bedrooms: 2 covered spaces / unit, plus 0.5 uncovered space / unit. Age -Qualified Housing: 0.5 covered space / unit plus 1 uncovered space / 5 units. 12. Private open space shall be provided as follows: Multiple family residences. For ground -level units, a minimum of one -hundred fifty (150) square feet of private outdoor open space per unit. This open space may be in the form of a patio, fenced yard or balcony (or combination thereof). The minimum width of the open space shall be ) five feet (5').Detached residences: A minimum of two hundred and fifty( 250) square feet of private outdoor space in the form of a balcony or fenced yard, with a minimum width of six feet (6). 13. Recreational Area. For Multiple family developments, a minimum of two hundred (200) square feet per dwelling unit shall be provided as common passive and active recreational space. This common open space/recreational space shall exclude all parking areas but includes the paseos between units as well as any internal walkways and informal/formal gathering areas (areas not specifically dedicated to individual units). These recreational areas are exclusive to the residents and the resident's guests, they are not public amenities. Harveston Specific Plan 11-79 Revised October 2020 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 14. Walls and Fences. Walls and fences shall be permitted within front, side, and rear yard setback areas except as provided for below: a. Fences may not be erected within either public or private street rights -of -way. b. Two-sided fencing shall be used wherever visible from a public or private street. C. No fence or wall shall exceed sifeet (6') in height, unless a higher wall is specifically required for sound attenuation purposes. The height of the wall or fence shall be measured from the highest ground level immediately adjacent to the base of the wall. d. Privacy walls, if provided in side and rear yards, shall be a minimum of five feet (5') in height. In front yard setback areas, solid fences and walls shall not exceed thirty inches (30") in height; provided, however, that fences and walls up to six feet (6') in height are permitted in front yards if the area above thirty inches (30") is no more than thirty percent (30%) solid. All pool enclosure walls and fencing shall conform to applicable State of California or City of Temecula pool code fencing requirements, whichever is more stringent. Harveston Specific Plan 11-80 Revised October 2020 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 15. Refuse Collection Areas: a. All refuse collection areas and structures shall be designed and provided in accordance with applicable City of Temecula guidelines and policies. b. Storage and trash collection structures shall not be located within any required setback area, including front, side, and rear yard setbacks. Space for trash bins may be located within garages, while still maintaining the minimum garage space requirements. C. Refuse collection areas and structures shall be conveniently accessible to the units/buildings they are designed to serve. d. Structures which are used for storage or trash collection shall be screened by landscaping, solid walls/fencing, or combination thereof, in such a manner as not to be visible from a public street or from any adjacent residential area. When an enclosure is used, a solid cover must be included as part of the enclosure structure. e. Walls and fences used to screen storage or trash collection areas shall be solid and shall not exceed eight feet (8') in height from the highest grade. f. Recycling processing facilities shall not be permitted; however, recycling and organic waste collection facilities are specifically permitted uses subject to the conditions of this section. g. Trash enclosures shall be designed to prevent dumping, vandalism, and other community issues. h. Individual home refuse and recycling containers may occupy guest parking spaces on collection day(s) only, but shall not cause non-compliance with the minimum guest parking requirement. A Waste Collection Plan must be approved by the City of Temecula Planning Department and CR&R. Harveston Specific Plan 11-81 Revised October 2020 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS TABLE 11.6 SUMMARY DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS RESIDENTIAL OVERLAY Residential Development Standards Minimum Lot Area Per Dwelling Unit 2,000 SF (Airspace and Site Condos exempt) Average Lot Area Per Dwelling Unit 2,500 SF (Airspace and Site Condos exempt) Dwelling Units Per Net Acre 7 — 20* Lot Dimensions Minimum Lot Width 30' for exce tion refer to 11.4.8 7 Minimum Lot Depth 50' Setbacks Minimum from Date Street ROW to Main Structure 18' 13' LDZ + 5' yard setback Minimum from Ynez Road ROW to Main Structure 18' 13' LDZ + 5' yard setback Minimum from Temecula Center ROW to Main Structure 14' 9' LDZ + 5' yard setback)* Minimum from Freeway ROW to Main Structure 50' Minimum from Private Street to Main Structure 5' (from back of sidewalk to main structure Minimum Interior Side Yard** 5' Minimum Building Separation SFD (on all sides): 10' Two-story townhomes and multifamily • Front to Front: 20' • Front to Side: 14' • Side to Side: 12' Three-story townhomes and multifamily • Front to Front: 25' • Front to Side: 15' • Side to Side: 12' Maximum Architectural Encroachments into Setbacks 2' (inclusive of patios, porches, entrances, architectural pop -outs and utility closets) Maximum Building Height 50' * Total number of units may be distributed over any of the parcels in the Residential Overlay, such that the Dwelling Units Per Net Acre may exceed 20 for some areas, however the total number of units shall not exceed 1,000 units within the Residential Overlay. **Zero lot line arrangements require zero setback on one side yard and ten feet on the opposite side yard. ***5' yard setback may be reduced to 0' yard setback if no perimeter wall along Temecula Center Drive. I of including a wall on Temecula Center Drive, only the 9' LDZ setback applies. Harveston Specific Plan 11-82 Revised October 2020 SECTION 11.0 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS 11.5 EXCEPTIONS TO DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS The development standards contained herein, except lot size, setbacks and height, may be waived or modified with the approval of the Planning Commission , or an appropriate hearing body, as part of the development plan or conditional use permit process if it is determined that the standard is inappropriate for the proposed use, and that waiver or modification of the standard will not be contrary to the public health and safety. The Planning Commission may delegate this approval authority to the Director of Planning. For cluster projects within the Ml, M2 and High density zoning districts and in the Residential Overlay, the development standards for lot sizes and setbacks may be varied by the Director of Planning as long as the cluster project falls within the allowed density ranges of the appropriate zone district. The purpose of this provision is to allow for innovative and alternative housing types around courtyards and common areas. 11.6 PRODUCT APPROVAL No single family residences (including the models) shall be constructed without the Planning Commission's prior approval of the architecture and elevations. The Planning Commission may delegate this approval authority to the Director of Planning. Harveston Specific Plan 11-83 Revised October 2020 SECTION 12.0 IMPLEMENTATION AND ADMINISTRATION 12.1 INTRODUCTION The City of Temecula shall administer the provisions of the Harveston Specific Plan in accordance with the State of California Government Code, Subdivision Map Act, the Temecula General Plan and Development Code. The Specific Plan development procedures, regulations, standards, and specifications shall supersede the relevant provisions of the City's Development Code, as they currently exist or may be amended in the future. Any development regulation and building requirement not addressed in the Specific Plan shall be subject to the City's adopted regulations. 12.2 PHASING PLAN It is expected that the proposed project will be phased over a 3- to 10-year period, in response to market demands and according to the logical and orderly extension of roadways, public utilities and infrastructure. Please refer to Figure 12.1, Development and Roadway Phasing Plan and Table 12.1, Development Phasing. The elementary school will be completed in the first part of Phase 1 and is currently under construction. The lake/lake park, the village green, residential developments in Planning Areas 3 (partially), 4, 6, and 7 will be completed in the later part of Phase 1 of the project. The Community Park will be constructed, including the 90-day maintenance and establishment period, and the conveyance accepted by the City Council prior to the issuance of the first Building Permit in Phase 2. However, if the completion of the Community Park is delayed for reasons beyond the control of the developer, building permits may continue to be issued for such period of delay, as may be further provided by a Park Agreement between the developer and the City of Temecula. Phase 2 of the development will complete Planning Area 5, the remainder of Planning Area 3, portions of Planning Area 1. The residential development in Planning Areas 2 and 8 and remainder of Planning Area 1 will be completed in Phase 3, along with the Paseo Park. During the last phase of development, Phase 4, residential developments in Planning Areas 9, 10, and 11 will be constructed. The phasing of the service commercial area in Planning Area 12 is consistent with the assumptions in the traffic study, dated July 19, 2000. Phasing assumptions in the traffic study are not site specific and could occur either at the northern or southern portion of the service commercial property, contingent upon availability of infrastructure to support development. Although the phasing plan in the traffic study also includes a phase 5 within planning Area 12, please note that both phase 4 and phase 5 of Planning Area 12 are assumed to be buildout by 2005. Therefore, buildout of the service commercial has been depicted on Figure 12.1 as occurring in 4 phases. For phasing of the infrastructure, please refer to Figures 5.1, 5.2, and 5.3 for phasing of drainage, water and sewer, and Figure 12.1 for phasing of the development and roadways. 12.2.1 Phasing Plan General Development Standards The proposed number of dwelling units contained in an implementing residential application may exceed the maximum expressed in said planning area by not more than 20% provided that an equal or greater number was unused or is planned to be unused within another planning area. 2. Each planning area shall include development of common open space areas as specified in the Planning Area standards and infrastructure. The phasing sequence shown is conceptual, based on current marketing demand. Certain planning areas may be developed out of the expected sequence, as long as the required infrastructure and services are provided at the time of development. 4. In order to insure timely development of public facilities, a conceptual phasing plan has been prepared for the parks and the elementary school. (Refer to Figure 12.3, Preliminary Public Facilities Phasing Plan). Harveston Specific Plan 12-1 Revised August 2003 n m -a c ,a � o e W c o O 'a v� I YLIUVSUVN `�• aq ati 11 m �Yim 0 A b,,A 334fi �'! g wt z 12-2 4 A F 3 A W � d F ti Q ct M ct M M C U 0 U r7 � M � N On CIA Z a U O N 'C vNi x Ct a x CX U5 U o � o � N � � y O U Ubl� U ram.+ O J bA ct � U C" cn C3 .--i cn O � bA U t ct 9 O O U U c cn cn U U O 0 O cn cn oc cn U bA M I O cn O M U cd cn U ul � H M N F� A W � � U U ct 03 t 00 00 t M00 00 c� N rl N N --� -� -� M kr) N N 00 a C13 C13 N Nam- N U H M •� ~~ U H ter+ 5T. U A� U I� A* U 3 ux C/i 00 3 JX, CA s a I U A H z •� Q� Q� Q Q� �� O M 00 Z Z ON1 A W � U ct Q ct M U M M U 1:11 M O -t M M 01 U kr) N ~ M a W� �i .:�,�NU �r H O N .ct CA U U un •'. H a �n N SECTION 12.0 IMPLEMENTATION AND ADMINISTRATION 12.3 FINANCING MECHANISM The following describes financing mechanisms, such as CFD 98-1, that have been used to finance public facilities in the area, as well as likely future financing mechanisms that will be available for the same purpose. The examples identified below are not exhaustive, and will not preclude the use of other strategies to finance the Specific Plan's public facility improvements. Some of the facilities identified in the Specific Plan were already financed and constructed, even without any current regulatory commitment providing assurance that the project can be developed, in accordance with the existing City General Plan. Through CFD 98-1, in conjunction with its acquisition of the property, Lennar Communities, Inc. assumed preexisting burdens to build or to fund the construction of regional public infrastructure benefiting the City and mitigating transportation, flood control and other regional impacts. The project has agreed to pay principal and interest on approximately $12,000,000 in bonds issued by the Winchester Hills Financing Authority for those purposes. Various techniques will be utilized to fund the other public facility improvements specified by the Specific Plan. The range of available financing options, which will vary depending upon the entity responsible for the facility, include: Developer/Builder Financing or Construction; Development Impact Fees; Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fees; Mello -Roos Community Facilities District proceeds; Assessment District proceeds; General Fund Revenue; Gas Taxes; Redevelopment Funds; Federal, State and Local Grant Funding; and Infrastructure Financing Districts. The City, developer and builders will cooperate so as to ensure that the public facilities are built in accordance with the requirements established in the Specific Plan. A Development Agreement, master public facility agreements, or other similar documents, together with consistent conditions of approval, may be used to facilitate this process. 12.4 MAINTENANCE Successful operation of maintenance districts and associations are important in maintaining quality in the project area. Maintenance responsibilities for parks, right of way, open space, landscape areas, street lighting and common project facilities will be divided among a Master Homeowners' Association, possible Neighborhood Associations (see below), the City of Temecula, Mello -Roos Community Facilities Districts, Landscape and Lighting Districts or similar financing mechanism. Decisions regarding this joint assessment program will be made at a future state of project design and reviewed in concert with City agencies (See Figure 12.2, Maintenance Plan). 12.4.1 Master Homeowners Association If not included within the City of Temecula or similar public maintenance mechanism, common areas identified in the Specific Plan shall be maintained by a permanent private master maintenance organization. Areas of responsibility shall include, but not limited to, the Lake, Lake Park, Arroyo Park, Paseo Park, Village Green and mini parks, and private recreation areas. Harveston Specific Plan 12-6 Revised October 2020 LJ w 2 I� �� ■ n �Z F■ F F ■ ■ w' C , � I U UT' ■ CYi d " e � L � N'I i �I a � . `c a � u ^7 o 12-/ -- r ra w s* LLp- ti �^t a z •yy • j a � 2 SECTION 12.0 IMPLEMENTATION AND ADMINISTRATION 12.4.2 Residential Neighborhood Associations In certain residential areas of the project, smaller associations may be formed to assume maintenance responsibility for common areas and facilities that benefit only residents in those areas. Potential private recreation centers, common open space areas and potential private roadways exemplify facilities that will come under the jurisdiction of a neighborhood association. 12.4.3 Commercial and Business Park Areas These planning areas shall have their own private associations. 12.4.4 Open Space and Parks All open space, park and recreation areas, which are not directly associated with a particular neighborhood, will be the responsibility of either a Master Homeowners' Association or the City of Temecula. The City of Temecula will maintain the Community Park and will continue to maintain the existing Winchester Creek Park (outside and adjacent to the Specific Plan). The City of Temecula will maintain landscape medians within arterial roadways and only those parkways adjacent to single family residential development on roadways with a 66' ROW or larger. The Department of Public Works will be responsible for public roadways. Other proposed mini parks, arroyo park, paseo park, lake park and village green, recreational areas, and the Village Club will be maintained by a Master Homeowners' Association. 12.4.5 Project Roadways All public project roadways will be designed and constructed to standards acceptable to the City and will therefore be entered into the City of Temecula's system of roads for operation and maintenance. The City of Temecula will maintain medians on arterial roadways. 12.4.6 School Site It is anticipated that the future school site will be purchased and maintained by the Temecula Valley Unified School District. Maintenance will be the responsibility of the School District. 12.5 PUBLIC FACILITIES SITE PHASING PLAN 12.5.1 Public Facility Phasing Description In order to insure timely development of public facilities, a Phasing Plan has been prepared for the Community Park (Planning Areal), the Mini Parks (Planning Areas 1, 7, and 10), the Lake/Lake Park area (Planning Area 3), the Paseo Park (Planning Area 2 and 3), the Arroyo Park (Planning Area 9), and the elementary school (Planning Area 4). (Refer to Figure 12.3, Preliminary Public Facilities Phasing Plan). 12.5.2 Public Facility Phasing Schedule Public Facility construction shall be phased as provided by the Public Facilities Phasing Table. (See Table 12.3) It should be noted that public facilities may be constructed earlier than indicated in Table 12.3 to comply with mitigation or other requirements. Harveston Specific Plan 12-8 Revised October 2020 it -1 a F¢. I v Bet! r6 q C C 8a $ 1 I .8 G n OWN 12-9 10 y P, SECTION 12.0 IMPLEMENTATION AND ADMINISTRATION 12.6 SPECIFIC PLAN MODIFICATIONS Minor modification to the approved Specific Plan will be administrative and allowed at the discretion of the Director of Planning. Modifications to the Specific Plan must be consistent with the purpose and intent of the originally approved Specific Plan. The Specific Plan incorporates the City of Temecula Development Code by reference. When provisions of the Specific Plan are ambiguous and not stated, the Development Code will prevail. However, when Specific Plan standards or provisions differ from the Development Code, the Specific Plan standards will prevail. The following modifications constitute "minor changes" to the approved Harveston Specific Plan: 12.6.1 Acreage The gross acreage of residential, commercial, and business park land use area (including trails, collector, local, and private streets) as applicable may vary from the acreage specified in the Specific Plan planning areas. Also, the specific types and acreages of uses within the Mixed -Use Overlay zone are not specified at this time. However, the total number of residential units (2,921), total square feet of mixed -use development (20,000 s£) and total "net" acreage of service commercial development (110.4 ac.) shall not exceed the density or intensity designated for, as described in the Specific Plan. 12.6.2 Conceptual Dwelling Prototypes The site designs of the various residential units (attached, detached, single family, and cluster) are conceptual prototypes and subject to change. Residential development shall be consistent with the intent of the Specific Plan. 12.6.3 Roadways and Trails Minor changes in roadway and trail alignments are allowed, provided such changes are consistent with the streetscape concept for the roads. Minor changes are also allowed as a result of more precise design and engineering, as well as changes in land use patterns. 12.6.4 Lot Size and Configuration The size and configuration of service commercial, mixed -use, and residential lots, and the dimensions and locations of improvements on those lots may be modified to accommodate third parry purchaser requirements so long as the modifications comply with the Specific Plan and the ordinances, policies, and standards in effect at the time the Tentative Tract Map/Vesting Tentative Tract Map is deemed complete. Harveston Specific Plan 12-10 Revised October 2020 SECTION 12.0 IMPLEMENTATION AND ADMINISTRATION 12.7 FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS The following administrative standards apply to the implementation of future development applications (including plot plans, tract maps, parcel maps, conditional use permits, or variances) for projects within the Specific Plan area. • Future development within the Specific Plan area shall require individual project review and analysis including General Plan and Specific Plan consistency and environmental analysis, according to the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the CEQA Guidelines. • Future tentative or parcel maps and site plan review documents shall be consistent with the Specific Plan. • Building permits for dwelling units shall be issued when a final subdivision map has been recorded. Permits may be issued for model units prior to final map recordation subject to the Subdivision Map Act and Development Code. • Specific lotting designs, and residential dwelling unit types for each Planning Area shall be determined at the time of individual implementing site design or subdivision proposals. Residential lot sizes, densities, and housing types may vary within each Planning Area so long as the overall dwelling units do not exceed the total unit count (2,921 dwelling units). • Any subsequent subdivision map and other development request that is submitted for review and approval shall be approved provided the lot design and configuration standards are met as provided for within the Tentative Tract MapNesting Tentative Map and the Specific Plan. • The proposed elementary school development in Planning Area 4 shall be reviewed and approved through other concurrent actions. The School District is the lead agency for all environmental and entitlement processes, therefore, an additional review and approval through the specific plan process shall not be required. • Transfer of residential units may occur within the Specific Plan area as follows: Residential Unit Transfer Between Planning. Figure 3.1, Conceptual Land Use Plan and Table 3.1, Detailed Land Use Summary set forth the land use designation, planning area identification, acreage, density range, target density and total targeted units planned for each residential Planning Area. Residential unit transfer shall mean the redistribution of residential units from one planning area to another. For example, if the number of units developed within a planning area is below the designated target, then the remainder of those units may be transferred to another planning area. The Director of Planning shall approve a change in the designated target for a Planning Area upon a determination that the transfer meets all of the following conditions: Harveston Specific Plan 12-11 Revised October 2020 SECTION 12.0 IMPLEMENTATION AND ADMINISTRATION a. The total number of approved residential units and the total number of projected future residential units, when combined, shall not exceed the allowed maximum of 2,921 dwelling units, exclusive of congregate care units. b. The excess residential units identified for transfer to a Planning Area(s) may not exceed 20% of the total target residential units (or the high end of density range) in the proposed Planning Area(s), as identified in Table 3.1, whichever is less. It should be noted that the City's General Plan allows a density bonus for senior housing projects. The developer may transfer unused residential units from a previously approved Planning Area (or Planning Areas) to a proposed Planning Area(s), if the developer has previously declared the residential units in the previously approved Planning Area(s) as unused residential units and eligible for residential unit transfer. When a development application is submitted to the City for a Planning Area(s), the developer must submit, concurrently with the application, a Project Residential Unit Reconciliation Report that identifies the total number of residential units previously approved, the total number of residential units previously declared eligible for residential unit transfer, and the total number of projected future residential units remaining to be developed in the balance of the project. d. There would be no significant adverse effect on projected demands on parks, schools, infrastructure, and community facilities. Grading and landform alteration would substantially comply with that previously approved for the Specific Plan. f. No new significant environmental impacts would result. Planning Area Intensity Variations The Specific Plan envisions variations in intensity within individual planning areas. For example, an MI Planning Area may be targeted for 185 residential units (with a target density of 6 residential units per acre). The Planning Area could have one neighborhood with 4 residential units per acre and one neighborhood with 8 residential units per acre, however the average would still be 6 residential units per acre and the total number of residential units would not exceed the designated target of 185. 12.8 SEVERABILITY If any section, subsection, sentence, clause, phrase, or portion of this specific plan, or any future amendments or additions hereto, is for any reason held to be invalid or unconstitutional by the decision of any court of competent jurisdiction, such decision shall not affect the validity of the remaining portions of this specific plan, or any future amendments or additions hereto. The City hereby declares that it would have adopted these requirements and each sentence, subsection, clause, phrase, or portion or any future amendments or additions thereto, irrespective of the fact that any one or more sections, subsections, clauses, phrases, portions or any future amendments or additions thereto may be declared invalid or unconstitutional. Harveston Specific Plan 12-12 Revised October 2020 ct rs U U Ct U O O 0 p C.)U O 0 O } C.)U O m C.) C.)> S U r. o O Z, yU O Vl U ct z �:- o o = � O -14 " N 0N u vOi u bl) Po a U 0 o cn o¢� o O O U O O ,M N •� O O O O O O— O O N bA O C7 Q �] C N M l� oc •� O V•1 01 01 M f� �•-I �I ,� N r-I r-I Q M f N a H Q Mct ccz a GENERAL PLAN CONSISTENCY GENERAL PLAN CONSISTENCY The Specific Plan is consistent with the General Plan and serves to implement all aspects of the General Plan relevant to the designated area. A Specific Plan is a plan adopted either by ordinance or resolution for a particular area of land. A Specific Plan may contain its own development standards (zoning), and thus provides greater flexibility in the distribution of the land uses. The Harveston Specific Plan is intended to be supportive of, and consistent with, the goals and policies of the Temecula General Plan. It has been written to implement the Specific Plan designation assigned to Harveston Specific Plan area by the General Plan, updated on November 9, 1993. The purpose of this section is to ensure that the Specific Plan is consistent with the goals and policies of the City of Temecula's General Plan as required per Government Code Section 65454. The following are the ten elements included within the Temecula General Plan: 1. Land Use Element 2. Circulation Element 3. Housing Element 4. Open Space/Conservation Element 5. Growth Management/Public Facilities Element 6. Public Safety Element 7. Noise Element 8. Air Quality Element 9. Community Design Element 10. Economic Element The goals and policies for each General Plan element have been evaluated in the following pages. Following each goal of the General Plan elements, specific policies are laid out. Following each goal and policy, a statement is made in italics, indicating how the Specific Plan is consistent with that goal and/or policy. In some cases, it is indicated that the specific goal or policy is not applicable to the Specific Plan. The following sections list the applicable goals and policies of the above elements of the General Plan. FEBRUARY 2001 1 P:�2000BNf607GPCONSfS7ENCY.DOC LAND USE ELEMENT LAND USE ELEMENT Goal 1: A complete and integrated mix of residential, commercial, industrial, recreational, public and open space land uses. Discussion: The proposed Harveston Specific Plan has been prepared in conformance with the City of Temecula General Plan and is consistent with the City of Temecula's zoning code and General plan densities and intensities. The Specific Plan Project seeks to create a community character and quality that compliments the surrounding area. The proposed plan contains a variety of housing products and designs, which would cater to different groups of home buyers/renters in the City of Temecula. Additionally, development of the service commercial component of the Specific Plan will provide opportunities for the region and Harveston area. The Plan also includes a generous amount of open space and recreational opportunities (+ 70 acres), and more than adequate public facilities and services. Policies 1.1 Review all proposed development plans for consistency with the community goals, policies and implementation programs of this General Plan. The proposed Harveston Specific Plan has been prepared in conformance with the City of Temecula General Plan and is consistent with community goals, policies, and implementation programs outlined in the General Plan. 1.2 Promote the use of innovative site planning techniques that contribute towards the development of a variety of residential product styles and designs including housing suitable to the community's labor force. The proposed plan contains a variety of housing products and innovative site planning designs (see Section 3.0, Land Use Plan and Section 10.0, Design Guidelines), which would cater to different groups of home buyers/renters in the City of Temecula. 1.3 Require the development of unified or clustered community -level and neighborhood -level commercial centers and discourage development of strip commercial uses. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes a Mixed Use Village Center, which would include uses such as retail, restaurant, office, daycare, worship, and a private club facility and fitness center. Additional commercial uses are located in the Service Commercial area of the Specific Plan. The Specific Plan does not encourage development of strip commercial uses. 1.4 Consider the impacts on surrounding land uses and infrastructure when reviewing proposals for new development. The proposed plan is consistent with the City of Temecula general plan densities and intensities and seeks to create a community character and quality that reflects the surrounding area. The Harveston EIR provides an analysis of the project's impacts on surrounding land uses and infrastructure. Infrastructure is consistent with the General Plan requirements and will be installed concurrently with development. FEBRUARY 2001 2 P.-\2000\8N1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC LAND USE ELEMENT 1.5 Support the development of light industrial, manufacturing, research and development, and office uses to diversify Temecula's economic base. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes a 112.4-acre service commercial area that includes a mixture of uses that could serve or expand upon the adjacent business park development. This service commercial component of the Specific Plan will provide employment opportunities and needs for the region and Harveston area. 1.6 Provide well-defined zoning and development standards and procedures to guide private sector planning and development. The Harveston Specific Plan creates development standards consistent with the philosophy of the City of Temecula Development Code. Detailed development standards for the Specific Plan have been prepared (see Section 11.0, Development Standards) to manage implementation of general or unique conditions in each Planning Area. 1.7 Require the preparation of specific plans as designated on the Specific Plan Overlay to achieve the comprehensive planning and phasing of development and infrastructure. The Harveston Specific Plan has been prepared in order to achieve comprehensive planning and phasing of development and infrastructure. 1.8 Consider taking the lead on preparing specific plans for areas designated on the Land Use Plan that have multiple landowners. This policy is not applicable, because it is a City directed policy. However, the subject site is designated Specific Plan on the General Plan Land Use Map. 1.9 Encourage flexible zoning techniques in appropriate locations to preserve natural features, achieve innovation site design, achieve a range of transition of densities, provide open space and recreation facilities, and to provide necessary amenities and facilities. The Harveston Specific Plan includes components that achieve many innovative site designs and a range of densities within the proposed residential development and the mixed use Village Center. The plan also provides for a variety of open space and recreation facilities including a Lake, a Lake Park, Paseo Park, Arroyo Park, and three mini park, a comprehensive trail system and bike paths. 1.10 Pursue opportunities to locate higher density housing with supporting commercial and public uses on the west side of I-15. This policy (locating higher density housing with supporting commercial and public uses on the west side of 1-15) is not the responsibility of the Harveston development. This development is located on the east side of 1-15. Although the Specific Plan area is located east of 1-IS it does include higher density housing and supporting commercial and public uses. FEBRUARY 2001 3 PA200NN160Z\GPC0NSI5TENCY.D0C LAND USE ELEMENT Goal 2: A City of diversified development character where rural and historical areas are protected and co -exist with newer urban development. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan has been designed with sensitivity to its surrounding uses and seeks to conform to the overall character of the area. However, Harveston Specific Plan area is not located within a historical or rural area of the City. Policies 2.1 Provide physical and visual buffer areas to create a transition between rural residential and agricultural areas and commercial, industrial and other higher density residential development. The proposed plan includes extensive uses of paseos and landscaping setbacks/buffers to create physical and visual buffers to create appropriate transitions within the different types of development. 2.2 Apply rural development standards to specified areas of the City to maintain the rural character of those areas. The policy is not applicable because the rural development standards do not apply to this project. The proposed project is in an area adjacent to existing development and the 1-I5 Freeway and has been designated for mixed use development by the City's General Plan. 2.3 Define the rural and historical areas of the community to be conserved, and establish a procedure for adding areas or altering boundaries as necessary. This policy is not applicable to the Harveston project. It is the responsibility of the City of Temecula to define the rural and historical areas of the community to be conserved and establishing a procedure for adding or altering the boundaries if necessary. The City has already defined rural areas within the community and assigned L (.5-2 dwelling units per acre) , VL (.2-.4 dwelling units per acre) and HR (0-.1 dwelling units per acre)residential designation on the General Plan Land Use Map. In addition, the City has adopted the Old Town Specific Plan which has defined a historical area of the community to be conserved. 2.4 Require the use of landscaped, open space buffers along roadways in -lieu of residential subdivision walls where feasible in light of noise and other constraints. The Harveston Specific Plan Design Guidelines (Section 10.0) has incorporated the use of landscape and open space buffers along the roadways in -lieu of residential subdivision walls where feasible in light of noise and other constraints. Figure 10.4 (Community Fencing and Walls Plan) presents a variety of wall and fence types within Harveston to meet the intent of this General Plan Policy. The project perimeter walls are required for noise mitigation; however, they will be planted with vines to create a green wall. The interior of the project will allow a variety of walls, fences and landscaping that will be well landscaped. FEBRUARY 2001 4 P:\2000,BN160AGPCONSfSTENCY.DOC LAND USE ELEMENT Goal 3: A land use pattern that will protect and enhance residential neighborhoods. Discussion: The design of the Harveston Specific Plan is sensitive to and compatible with the surrounding uses and takes into account existing conditions and natural features. While the plan seeks to create a distinguishable character for the Harveston Specific Plan area, it will be compatible with and will enhance the adjacent uses. Policies 3.1 Consider the compatibility of proposed projects on surrounding uses in terms of the size and configuration of buildings, use of materials and landscaping, preservation of existing vegetation and landform, the location of access routes, noise impacts, traffic impacts, and other environmental conditions. The design of the Harveston Specific Plan is sensitive to and compatible with the surrounding uses and takes into account existing conditions in terms of the size and configuration of buildings, use of materials and landscaping, the location of access routes, noise impacts, traffic impacts and other environmental conditions. Specific Plan Land Use designations are consistent with the General Plan Land Use designations. The General Plan designations were reviewed for consistency and compatibility with adjacent development. The Specific Plan land uses have been developed to be complimentary to and compatible with the surrounding uses. Residential designations have been appropriately located next to those of like intensity. The Community Park has been situated to provide a buffer to the existing light industrial uses. The Service Commercial area has been located adjacent to 1-I5 and west of Ynez Road. In addition, Design Guidelines and Development Standards within the Specific Plan assure the appropriate use of color, materials, architectural styles, landscaping, etc., to ensure compatibility with surrounding uses. 3.2 Provide infill development incentives in the residential sections of the Old Town area through the Old Town Specific Plan. The policy is not applicable because this is a City directed policy and the proposed project is not located in Old Town. 3.3 Require parcels developed for commercial or industrial uses to incorporate buffers that minimize the impacts of noise, light, visibility of activity and vehicular traffic on surrounding residential uses. Location of the service commercial uses with their lack of direct roadway access to the residential uses and special features such as landscape buffers, incorporated into the design of the service commercial, will minimize the impacts on surrounding residential uses. 3.4 Protect single-family residential areas from encroachment by commercial uses. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes a service commercial area (adjacent to the existing business park) away from existing residential and the proposed residential planning areas. Landscape buffers will provide separation between the Service Commercial and residential uses. FEBRUARY 2001 5 PA200MNI602\GPC0NSISTENCY.D0C LAND USE ELEMENT Additionally, the Specific Plan area consists of distinct planning areas with specific development standards that will prevent any encroachment by the commercial uses into residential areas. 3.5 Obtain aviation easement as required by the Comprehensive Land Use Plan for the French Valley Airport to ensure that landowners acknowledge the impacts associated with aircraft. This policy is not applicable because the Harveston Specific Plan area is not within the Comprehensive Land Use Plan for the French Valley Airport, and therefore, no aviation easement is required for the project. 3.6 Require proposed development to evaluate the incremental traffic impacts on local roads throughout the proposed project phasing in order to ensure that any adverse impacts to local roads in residential areas are avoided or adequately mitigated. A Traffic Analysis for this project was prepared by Wilbur Smith Associates (dated July 19, 2000) and reviewed and approved by the City's Traffic Engineer. According to the Analysis, impacts from the project at opening year (2002) and at project buildout (2005) result in a minimum Level of Service D at all critical intersections within the vicinity of the project provided that certain transportation improvements are made by the project. These improvements have been identified and included as mitigation measures within the project's Environmental Impact Report. The project has already paid approximately 2.5 million and 1.8 million into Assessment Districts 156 and 161 (respectively), which contributed to improvements on Ynez, Winchester and Margarita Roads. In addition, the project will pay its fair share of Development Impact Fees (DIF); implement all recommendations contained within the Traffic Analysis for traffic improvements; as well as support the City's efforts to design and secure jurisdictional approval for the construction of a new interchange at I-15 at Cherry and/or Date Street. 3.7 Require proposed development to evaluate the incremental traffic impacts on local roads throughout the proposed project phasing in order to ensure that any adverse impacts to local roads in residential areas are avoided or adequately mitigated. Goal 4: Please see consistency analysis for Policy 3.6, above. A development patterns that preserve and enhance the environmental resources of the Study Area. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan has taken into consideration the natural and man-made opportunities and constraints in determining its land use designations and their intensities. Except for the preservation and enhancement of the Arroyo Park in its natural state, there are no other natural features hazards that would affect the land use designation within the project site. FEBRUARY 2001 6 PA2000%8N160Z%GPC0NSISTENCY.D0C LAND USE ELEMENT Policies 4.1 Enforce hillside grading standards to naturalize the effects of grading, require the preservation of unique natural features and to encourage a broad range of hillside architectural and site planning solutions. The project site will be mass graded and will result in a balance of cut and fill materials on the site. The project will be graded in a manner which is similar to the other specific plans in the City of Temecula (Paloma del Sol, Margarita Village, Roripaugh Estates, Campos Verdes, Rancho Highlands) and surrounding Riverside County (Warm Springs, Vail Ranch, Red Hawk). The grading will result in modifications to the natural terrain. This type of grading is necessary to achieve the General Plan/Specific Plan land use designations for the site. Hillside grading standards are more appropriately applied in the areas designated L (.5-2 dwelling units per acre) , VL (.2-.4 dwelling units per acre) and HR (0-.1 dwelling units per acre) on the General Plan Land Use Map. 4.2 Consider the constraints of natural and man-made hazards in determining the location, type and intensities of new development. The Harveston Specific Plan takes into consideration the natural and man-made realities and constraints in determining its land use designations and their intensities. Except for preservation of the Arroyo Park in its natural state, there are no other natural features/hazards that would affect the land use designation within the project site. Man-made hazards such as existing and future roadways have been also considered. Additionally, the proposed project incorporates contour grading techniques in grading the site in order to maintain the integrity of the natural setting. 4.3 Cooperate with other agencies to develop Multi -species Habitat Conservation Plans in western Riverside and northern San Diego Counties. This policy is not applicable, because it is a City directed policy, and it is the responsibility of the City of Temecula. 4.4 Work with the utility districts to develop a trail system and enhance the natural resources along the San Diego Aqueduct, creeks, and other utility easements where feasible. The proposed Specific Plan area is not in the vicinity of the above aqueduct, however, the Specific Plan provides a comprehensive trail system with connection point to the off -site trails along Santa Gertrudis Creek. The project also proposes enhancement and preservation of a 13.8-acre Arroyo Park consistent with U.S. Army Corps and Fish and Game guidelines. The Arroyo Park includes a nature trail system. 4.5 Work with the Riverside County Flood Control District and other responsible agencies on the design of the flood control project for Murrieta Creek, Temecula Creek, Pechanga Creek, and other waterways in the City. The Specific Plan preparation has included contact with the Riverside County Flood Control and other responsible agencies on the issue of waterways and flood control in the City of Temecula. FEBRUARY 2001 7 PA200WNI602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC LAND USE ELEMENT 4.6 Consider alternative flood control methods to reduce capital and maintenance costs and provide recreational and open space opportunities. Section 5.0, Infrastructure Plan, of the Specific Plan includes the proposed drainage plan, which incorporates existing drainage courses into recreational open space areas (i.e., 10.5-acre Arroyo Park and 2.5-acre Paseo Park). 4.7 Conserve the resources of Pechanga, Temecula and Murrieta Creeks through appropriate densities of development, setbacks, landscaping, and site design of surrounding projects. Goal 5: This policy is not applicable, because it is a City directed policy. The project is however consistent with the General Plan density designations for the property. A land use pattern and intensity of development that encourages alternative modes of transportation, including transit, bicycling, and walking. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan includes a transit plan, which provides for alternative mode of transportation. The transit plan has been developed with input provided from the Riverside Transit Authority (RTA) and incorporates the service needs of the RTA. The Village Center, High - density residential (13-20 dwelling units/acre) and the M2 (Medium -density residential 7-13 dwelling units/acre) are located at the "core" of the project to provide the critical density needed to support public transit. Bus turnouts and shelters are included, as required by the RTA and approved by the Department of Public Works. Additionally, the Harveston Specific Plan includes a comprehensive paseo and trail system providing the project's residents the opportunity to walk, jog, or bike around the entire community. Bike trails and transit facilities will also be provided along the project roadways. The Specific Plan includes a Mixed Use Village Center, which consists of a mixture of compatible uses such as retail, restaurant, office, daycare, worship, and a private club facility and fitness center. The Mixed Use Village Center creates an environment where walking is encouraged. For ease of access this "core area" is connected to various residential areas within the development via walking and biking trails. Policies 5.1 Include in the Development Code and through other ordinances a package of incentives to encourage development to include: 1. Additional active parkland 2. Development of parkland and trails 3. Preservation of historic buildings or sites 4. Additional open space 5. Preservation and enhancement of natural habitat 6. Additional public or community facilities 7. Additional or improved public spaces or plazas for community use 8. Additional amenities in multifamily developments FEBRUARY 2001 8 PA200WN160?\CPCONS1MNCY.DOC LAND USE ELEMENT 9. Transit facilities and/or additional right-of-way along future transit corridors 10. Housing that meets the needs of very low and low income households. 11. Provision of cultural facilities. The Harveston Specific Plan has included many of these items. This is further discussed below. • Additional Active Parkland. The project provides 57.4 acres of parkland/recreation facilities (including the Winchester Creek Park). This figure does not include the 15.9 acres within the LDZ's, which brings the total to 73.3 acres. Development of Parkland and Trails. The parkland acreage is discussed above. The Open Space and Recreation Plan (Figure 6.1 of the Specific Plan) and Bicycle Plan (Figure 4.8 of the Specific Plan) depict the open space/recreational opportunities within the Plan, as well as comprehensive walking and bicycle network within the project. A ten foot (10') wide trail easement along the western perimeter of the project. In addition to providing opportunities within the project, these networks also tie into the existing City wide bicycle plan. Further, it is anticipated that these systems will ultimately become a component of the City's Trails Master Plan (currently under development). • Preservation of Historic Buildings or Sites. There are no known historic buildings or sites at the project location. Additional Open Space. As discussed above, the project is providing 57.4 acres of recreation facilities. Based upon the requirements of the City of Temecula Community Services Department, 26.75 acres or parkland is required. The project exceeds this amount by 30.65 acres. Preservation and Enhancement of Natural Habitat. As part of the Environmental Impact Report, a biological assessment was prepared for the project site. No sensitive or endangered species were identified on -site. The project will impact 2.86 acres of "waters of the United States. " As mitigation for this impact, the creation of 8 acres of a riparian corridor must be created on -site. The Arroyo Park has been developed to serve as this mitigation and will encompass 13.8 acres. This is greater than what was required by the United States Army Corps of Engineers for mitigation. In addition, should the Cherry Street interchange be approved for this project, this acreage may be subject to an increase. Additional Public or Community Facilities. Public and Community facilities are included within many of the recreation facilities within the project. It is anticipated that people residing within the project and those within the vicinity of the project will use those facilities. These include the elementary school, the Lake, Lake Park, Paseo Park, Village Green as well as the Community Park. In addition, private facilities will be provided to serve the Harveston residents. Additional or Improved Public Spaces or Plazas for Community Use. These have been listed above. In addition, public and quasi -public spaces will be provided within the Village Center. Also, mini parks are included within most of the residential neighborhoods. FEBRUARY 2001 9 PA2000N1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC LAND USE ELEMENT Additional Amenities in Multifamily Developments. It is anticipated that the multifamily component of the project will contain amenities, which are typically found within these types of development. The multi family development is centrally located adjacent to the Village Center and within immediate proximity of the project's recreation facilities. • Transit Facilities and/or additional right-of-way Along Future Transit Corridors. The transit plan has been developed with input provided from the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). Potential Transit Routes & Stops have been developed for current and future transit needs, with input from RTA. A transit station is planned within the Village Center and will be integrated into the design of the streetscape. The transit station will be installed when adjacent development occurs, in accordance with the requirements of the RTA. It is anticipated that the buses will initially make a small loop through the project, entering the site from Margarita Road, passing by the Elementary School, Lake and Lake Park, Village Green and Village Center and exiting the site via Margarita Road. Future transit stops will be provided within the project, along the Loop Road. Transit stops are also proposed on the perimeter of the project, along Date Street, Ynez Road and Margarita Road. In addition, transit stops will be provided in key locations within the Service Commercial portion of the project. All of the transit stops are anticipated to connect to the current and future major transit hubs within the area, including the Promenade Mall. Housing That Meets the Needs of Very Low and Low Income Households. The project includes a variety of housing types, which will provide a wide array of housing opportunities for both owners and renters. It is not anticipated that Harveston will provide housing that meets the needs of very low and low income households. • Provision of Cultural Facilities. These are discussed above in the recreation facilities. 5.2 Require the provision of pedestrian and bicycle linkages from residential areas to open space/recreation facilities, commercial and employment centers. The Harveston Specific Plan includes a comprehensive paseo and trail system providing the project's residents the opportunity to walk, jog, or bike around the entire community. Bike trails and transit facilities will also be provided along the project roadways. (See Figures 4.8, Bicycle Plan and 11.5, Mixed Use Vehicular Circulation and Parking). 5.3 Encourage variety in the design of sidewalks and trails with respect to alignment and surface materials to provide a convenient and enjoyable experience for the users. The sidewalks and paseos included in the proposed plan incorporate unique design features, landscaping, and amenities offering users a variety of different recreational experiences. Many of the proposed paseos will meander through the adjacent landscape. 5.4 Provide grade separated bike paths along major arterials where feasible. Ensure that non -grade separated bike paths are designated for safety. The proposed Specific Plan includes Class II bike lane along Margarita Road, consistent with the City of Temecula General Plan (see Figure 10.1-4, Margarita Road). FEBRUARY 2001 10 PA20 MN1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC LAND USE ELEMENT 5.5 Designate Mixed Use Village Centers on the Land Use Plan to provide areas within the community that are urban in character, contain a mixture of compatible uses, and are designed to reduce or eliminate the need for the automobile in traveling to or within Mixed Use Village Centers. The Specific Plan includes a Mixed Use Village Center, which consists of a mixture of compatible uses such as retail, restaurant, office, daycare, worship, and a private club facility and fitness center. The Mixed Use Village Center creates an environment where walking is encouraged. For ease of access this "core area" is connected to various residential areas within the development via walking and biking trails. 5.6 Encourage higher density residential, mixed use development, and supporting public and community facilities within Mixed Use Village Centers. The Mixed Use Village Center proposed within the proposed Harveston plan includes mixed use development, public and community facilities, and higher density residential uses. 5.7 Establish design guidelines, development standards, and incentive programs for uses within Mixed Use Village Centers. The proposed plan establishes guidelines, development standards, and incentive programs for Mixed Use Village Center uses. (See Section 11.4.7, Mixed Use Overlay Zone). 5.8 Develop a plan to link Mixed Use Village Centers by trails and potential transit systems including bus, shuttle and light rail. The Harveston Specific Plan includes extensive system of paseos and potential transit facilities that link the Mixed Use Village Center to the remainder of the community. (See Figure 11.15, Mixed Use Vehicular Circulation and Parking). 5.9 Ensure that architecture, landscape design, and site planning within Mixed Use Village Centers emphasizes a pedestrian scale and safe and convenient access between uses. The Mixed Use Village Center is pedestrian oriented and facilitates access between uses within the Village. Walking and biking trails are provided to connect the Mixed Use Village Center to other areas within the Specific Plan. (See Figure 11.16, Mixed Use Village Center Pedestrian Circulation). 5.10 Ensure that adequate public gathering areas or plazas are incorporated within Mixed Use Village Centers to allow for social interaction and community activities. The Mixed Use Village Center proposed within the Harveston Specific Plan allows for gathering areas and plazas. Additionally, the Village Green creates a public gathering place, which will encourage social interaction and community activities, such as concerts or farmers markets. 5.11 Discourage the development of strip commercial centers that increase automobile dependency. FEBRUARY 2001 11 P:\20OMNl60AGPCONSISTENCY.DOC LAND USE ELEMENT Goal 6: Goal 7: Goal 8: The Harveston Specific Plan does not propose the development of strip commercial uses within the Specific Plan area. Its objective is to create a pedestrian friendly environment where the use of the car is not encouraged. A plan for Old Town Temecula that enhances economic viability, preserves historic structures, addresses parking and public improvement needs, and establishes design standards to enhance and maintain the character and economic viability of Old Town. This goal is not applicable because the Specific Plan is not located within the Old Town area of the City of Temecula. This goal is not applicable because it is a City directed goal. Orderly annexation and development of unincorporated area within Temecula's Sphere of Influence. This goal is not applicable because the Harveston Specific Plan is not located within the unincorporated areas of Temecula's Sphere of Influence. A City that is compatible and coordinated with regional land use patterns. Discussion: The Specific Plan land uses have been laid out consistent with the City of Temecula General Plan, which takes into account larger regional goals and policies. Additionally, the Specific Plan was coordinated with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the State Department of Fish and Game, which take a more regional and comprehensive approach. Policies 8.1 Provide a pattern of land uses that maintain and enhance the viability of neighboring communities including the City of Murrieta, and the counties of Riverside and San Diego, through compatible uses and linkages. The compatibility between the Harveston project and the adjacent developments has been discussed in Policy 3.1. The architectural styles, design guidelines and development standards will create a development that will maintain and enhance the viability of neighboring communities including the City of Murrieta and the Counties of Riverside and San Diego. Compatible uses and linkages have been provided throughout the project. 8.2 Provide a system of open space that is coordinated with regional open space uses to comprehensively address the management and conservation of resources. The Arroyo Park open space proposed within the Harveston Specific Plan was coordinated with the United States Army Corps of Engineers and the California Department of Fish and Game as FEBRUARY 2001 12 P.-VO BN1601,GPCONSISTENCY.DOC LAND USE ELEMENT a mitigation measure to address the management and conservation of resources. The Harveston Open Space and Recreation Plan (Figure 6.1) provides a system of open space that is coordinated with the City-wide and regional system. The project will tie into the Santa Gertrudis Trail System, as well as provide a 10' wide easement along the western project boundary for regional trial systems. 8.3 Participate with the Airport Land use Commission in the planning process in the preparation of the Comprehensive Land use Plan for the French Valley Airport, to the extent feasible. The policy is not applicable because the Harveston Specific Plan is not within the Comprehensive Land Use Plan for the French Valley Airport. 8.4 Continue to participate with the Western Riverside Council of Governments in the preparation of plans and programs addressing regional issues, including the Growth Management Strategy, Comprehensive Transportation Plan, Water Resources Strategy, and School Facilities Plan. This Policy is the responsibility of the City of Temecula and not that of the Harveston project. The project will be reviewed for consistency with the City of Temecula Growth Management Program Action Plan. In addition, transportation items have been addressed above (see Policy 3.3). Water resources and project impacts have been discussed and mitigated as necessary in the project's Environmental Impact Report. An elementary school site is currently under construction on the project site and sufficient resources are available to accommodate the middle and high school students generated by the project. FEBRUARY 2001 13 P.A200WN160?\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC CIRCULATION ELEMENT CIRCULATION ELEMENT Goal 1: Strive to maintain a Level of Service "D" or better at all intersections within the City during peak hours and Level of Service "C" or better during non -peak hours. Discussion: A Traffic Analysis for this project was prepared by Wilbur Smith Associates (dated July 19, 2000) and reviewed and approved by the City's Traffic Engineer. According to the Analysis, impacts from the project at opening year (2002) and at project buildout (2005) result in a minimum Level of Service D at all critical intersections within the vicinity of the project provided that certain transportation improvements are made by the project. Ten intersections have been identified as needing improvements (2005 with 2 of the 10 requiring improvements at year 2002). These improvements are located at the following intersections: • Winchester & Ynez Roads; • Winchester Road & 1-15; • Winchester Road & Jefferson Avenue; • Winchester & Margarita Road; • Overland Drive & Margarita Road; • Overland Drive & Ynez Road; • Overland Drive & Jefferson Avenue; • Murrieta Hot Springs & Margarita Roads; • Murrieta Hot Springs & Alta Murrieta Roads; • Murrieta Hot Springs & Jefferson Avenue. Overall project impacts (percentage) to these intersections have been identified in the EIR. Mitigation measures have been included within the project's Environmental Impact Report to ensure that this Goal is met. Policies 1.1 Establish street standards and all new roadway facilities shall be constructed or upgraded to meet City standards where feasible. The proposed Specific Plan includes a Circulation Plan and standards, which will dictate construction and upgrade of the roadway facilities consistent with City standards. All roadway and intersection designs will comply with City standards providing safe and efficient traffic patterns and circulation. 1.2 Require an evaluation of potential traffic impacts associated with new development prior to project approval, and require adequate mitigation measures prior to, or concurrent with, project development. Please see consistency analysis for Goal 1, above. 1.3 Use the Circulation Element Roadway Plan to guide detailed planning and implementation of the City's roadway system. FEBRUARY 2001 14 P:\2000N8N160Z�GPCONSISTENCY.DOC CIRCULATION ELEMENT The Circulation Plan within the Harveston Specific Plan has been produced based on the City's Circulation standards. 1.4 Pursue trip reduction and transportation systems management measures to reduce and limit congestion at intersections and along streets within the City. Please see consistency analysis for Goal 1, above. Trip reduction measures include: • Transit provisions • Location of housing near employment areas • An extensive bicycle path network • An extensive walking/pedestrian network. Transportation System Management measures include (General Plan): • Adding turn lanes or restricting turning movements during peak traffic periods at congested intersections • Widening of intersection approaches to accommodate additional through movement lanes or to improve visibility • Installation of bus turnout bays • Pavement marking modifications/improvements • Completion of "missing links" in the roadway network 1.5 Update every three years, or as needed, "build -out" traffic forecasts to monitor the impact of development approvals and the adequacy of the Circulation Element Roadway Plan. Goal 2: The policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Enhance traffic safety on City streets. Discussion: The Circulation Plan within the Harveston Specific Plan minimizes traffic conflicts and promotes safe traffic circulation within the Specific Plan area. A Loop Road is included within the circulation plan for ease of access to different residential planning areas, reducing undesirable through traffic within the residential areas. The Circulation Plan encourages safety for all pedestrian traffic by separating vehicular and pedestrian traffic, especially in commercial and high -density areas. As such, the plan includes a safe and efficient paseo, urban trail and sidewalk network, providing pedestrian and bicycle circulation in conjunction with the roadway network Policies 2.1 The City shall enforce speed restrictions throughout the City. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 15 P:\-7000\8Nl60aGPCONSISTENCY.DOC CIRCULATION ELEMENT 2.2 Require that future roads and improvements to existing roads be designed to minimize traffic conflicts such as those which result from curb parking maneuvers and uncontrolled access along heavily traveled roadways. The Circulation Plan within the Harveston Specific Plan minimizes traffic conflicts and promotes safe traffic circulation within the Specific Plan area. A Loop Road is included within the circulation plan for ease of access to different residential planning areas, reducing undesirable through traffic within the residential areas. 2.3 Require that the development of new private driveways do not introduce significant traffic conflicts along major streets and primary residential collectors roads. The Harveston Specific Plan does not propose new private driveways off of the major streets or primary residential collector roads. Three project entries are proposed off the major streets (2 on Margarita Road and 1 on Date Street). Internal to the project, neighborhoods will access the Loop Road. All driveway locations are subject to review and approval of the Director of Public Works. 2.4 Require that vehicular and pedestrian traffic be separated to the maximum extent feasible. The Circulation Plan within the Harveston Specific Plan encourages safety for all pedestrian traffic by separating vehicular and pedestrian traffic, especially in commercial and high density areas. As such, the plan includes a safe and efficient paseo, urban trail and sidewalk network, providing pedestrian and bicycle circulation in conjunction with the roadway network. 2.5 Establish an ongoing maintenance program to ensure the safety of the City's roadway system. Goal 3: This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. A regional transportation system that accommodates the safe and efficient movement of people and goods to and from the community. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan includes City-wide and regional circulation roadways. The Specific Plan currently includes roadway segments, which are consistent with the City's General Plan Circulation Element (Margarita Road, Date Street, Ynez Road). In addition, a City directed alternative has been included in the Plan. With the inclusion of the project's roadway network, transit provisions, bicycle and pedestrian pathways, the project will contribute to this goal of accommodating the safe and efficient movement of people and goods to and from the community. Policies 3.1 Support the completion of the Riverside County Master Plan of Arterial Highways. The Circulation Plan within the Harveston Specific Plan includes roadway extensions and future improvements consistent with the City's existing Circulation Element Plan. FEBRUARY 2001 16 P.,\2000\8N160AGPCONSISTENCY.DOC CIRCULATION ELEMENT 3.2 Actively pursue the construction of a new interchange north of Winchester Road and other recommended system improvements outside its jurisdiction in cooperation with Caltrans, the City of Murrieta, Riverside County, and local developers. Measures should be taken to preserve anticipated right-of-way needs and to identify funding mechanisms for the interchange improvements. The location of a new interchange north of Winchester Road is currently being reviewed through a Project Study Report (PSR) by Caltrans. It is anticipated that Caltrans will complete this review by mid-2001 and the location for this interchange will be determined. The project contains two alternatives for the location of this interchange. Subdivision maps are also being processed which will reserve additional right-of-way for the ultimate location for the interchange. It should be noted that the applicant will support the City's efforts to design and secure jurisdictional approval for the construction of a new interchange at 1-15 at Cherry and/or Date Street. 3.3 Actively pursue the improvements to existing interchanges within the City and construction of new overpasses as required to achieve the adopted service level standards. Reference response to Policy 3.2. In addition, a mitigation measure in the project's EIR requires improvements to the I-15/Winchester Road interchange. This mitigation would help achieve level of service standards required in Goal 3. 3.4 Coordinate with the Riverside Transit Agency to provide fixed route transit service (bus or shuttle) along major transportation corridors connecting to regional employment and commercial areas, airports, health care facilities, and major recreation areas. The Harveston Specific Plan will comply with the City of Temecula and the Riverside Transit Agency to facilitate provision of transit service. Coordination and correspondence with the Riverside Transit Agency was completed as part of the Harveston EIR preparation. 3.5 Provide for express transit service through implementation of park -and -ride facilities along regional transportation corridors. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy, and park -and -ride facilities are not proposed with the Harveston project. 3.6 Coordinate with Western Riverside Council of Governments to identify, protect, and pursue opportunities for a light rail transit along major transportation corridors which connect Temecula to other population centers. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy, and it is the responsibility of the City of Temecula. 3.7 Encourage the formation of a special Southwest County agency or task force which would be responsible for identifying and prioritizing selected system improvements having regional significance and the development of funding sources which would allow for the timely implementation of these improvements. FEBRUARY 2001 17 PA2000BN1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC CIRCULATION ELEMENT Goal 4: This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy, and it is the responsibility of the City of Temecula. An efficient City circulation system through the use of transportation system management and travel demand management strategies. Discussion: This goal is not applicable because it is a City directed goal. However, the Harveston EIR incorporates Travel Demand Management (TDM) requirements, as mitigation measures, consistent with the Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP). The proposed project will comply with the conditions and requirements set forth by the City of Temecula and will implement all traffic signals as required by the traffic study in order to maximize efficient flow of traffic. The Harveston Specific Plan includes a comprehensive pedestrian trail system and incorporates features such as bus turnouts and shelters, as required by the Director of Public Works and the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). Policies 4.1 Establish a City-wide Circulation System Phasing and Financing Program for the orderly implementation of system improvements identified in the Circulation Element. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 4.2 Require proper spacing and interconnect traffic signals where feasible to maximize the smooth progression of traffic flows and to minimize delay and stop and go conditions which result in higher vehicle emissions and noise levels. The proposed project will comply with the conditions and requirements set forth by the City of Temecula and will implement all traffic signals as required by the traffic study in order to maximize efficient flow of traffic. 4.3 Discourage the provision of on -street (curbside) parking along principal arterial roadways to minimize traffic conflicts and increase the traffic carrying capacity of these roadways. The Specific Plan does not propose on -street parking along the principal arterial roadways (i. e., Date Street, Margarita Road, and Ynez Road). 4.4 Require new development to incorporate design features which facilitate transit service and encourage transit ridership such as bus pullout areas, covered bus stop facilities, efficient trail systems through projects to transit stops, and incorporation of pedestrian walkways that pass through subdivision boundary walls. The Harveston Specific Plan includes a comprehensive pedestrian trail system and incorporates features such as bus turnouts and shelters, as required by the Director of Public Works and the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). FEBRUARY 2001 18 P:\20008N160AGPCONSISTENCY.DOC CIRCULATION ELEMENT 4.5 Require specific plans and other mixed use projects to provide an internal system of trails linking schools, shopping centers, transit, and other public facilities within residential areas. The Harveston Specific Plan includes an extensive internal system of trails/paseos that connect the Mixed Use Village Center to the school, the lake/lake park and community park, and different residential areas. 4.6 Provide a comprehensive system of Class I and/or Class Il bicycle lanes to meet the needs of cyclist traveling to and from work and other destinations within the City. Consistent with the City of Temecula General Plan, the Harveston Specific Plan provides Class II bicycle lanes along most roadways within the Specific Plan area for recreational as well as ease of access between different planning areas and uses. (See Figure 4.8, Bicycle Plan). 4.7 Encourage a mix of uses within a project designed to maximize internal trip making, maximize the use of parking facilities, and to promote a shift from auto use to pedestrian and bicycle modes of travel. The proposed project is pedestrian oriented encouraging internal movement between the different uses and planning areas via trails and bike lanes. 4.8 Encourage the provision of additional regional public transportation services. The Harveston Specific Plan will comply with the City of Temecula and the Riverside Transit Agency to facilitate provision of transit service. Coordination and correspondence with the Riverside Transit Agency was completed as part of the Harveston EIR preparation. 4.9 Require transportation demand management plans to be submitted for preliminary review at the Specific Plan or Plot Plan stage of site development and submitted for final approval prior to the issuance of building permits, in accordance with the City's Transportation Demand Management Ordinance. The Harveston EIR incorporates Travel Demand Management (TDM) requirements, as mitigation measures, consistent with the Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP). 4.10 Encourage the implementation of employer Travel Demand Management (TDM) requirements included in the Southern California Air Quality Management District's Regulation 15 of the Air Quality Management Plan. The Harveston EIR incorporates TDM requirements as mitigation measures consistent with the AQMP. 4.11 The City shall establish a local Congestion Management Plan and monitor the performance and effectiveness of travel demand management programs within the City. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 19 PA200MN16OMPCONSISTENCY.DOC CIRCULATION ELEMENT Goal 5: An adequate supply of private and public parking to meet the needs of residents and visitors of the City. Discussion: The proposed Specific Plan contains parking requirements and standards (see Section 11.0, Development Standards) to provide adequate parking facilities on -site. A tapered street section will be used at internal neighborhood intersections and in locations where on -street parking is otherwise adequately provided. Adequate on -street parking has been defined in Section 11 of the Specific Plan. The Mixed Use Village Center provides the opportunity for "shared joint use parking" which helps minimize the number of ingress and egress points. Policies 5.1 Enforce City parking ordinances and standard design requirements which apply. The Harveston Specific Plan is prepared based on the City's General Plan and other applicable ordinances (i.e., parking ordinances) and standard design requirements. Parking standards are contained in Section 11.0, Development Standards, of the Specific Plan. 5.2 Require the consolidation of parking, and related circulation facilities, where appropriate, to minimize the number of ingress and egress points onto arterials. The Mixed Use Village Center provides the opportunity for "shared joint use parking " which helps minimize the number of ingress and egress points. 5.3 Provide additional public parking in the Old Town area where feasible through common parking areas or establishment of a parking district. This policy is not applicable because the Harveston Specific Plan is not within the Old Town Specific Plan area. 5.4 Require project developers to provide adequate on -site parking and/or to contribute to a program to acquire and maintain off -site facilities. The proposed Specific Plan contains parking requirements and standards (see Section 11.0, Development Standards) to provide adequate parking facilities on -site. 5.5 Encourage underground parking or parking structures where economically feasible in commercial areas. The proposed Specific Plan contains parking requirements and standards (see Section 11.0, Development Standards) to provide adequate parking facilities on -site. Additional measures will be incorporated to meet the demand and requirement in commercial areas. 5.6 Encourage joint development of parking facilities (e.g. joint -use of parking facilities) where feasible to maximize the efficient use of available parking. FEBRUARY 2001 20 PA2000\8N1602\GPC0NSISTENCYD0C CIRCULATION ELEMENT Goal 6: The proposed Specific Plan contains parking requirements and standards (see Section 11.0, Development Standards) to provide adequate parking facilities on -site. Additional measures will be incorporated to maximize efficiency. Safe and efficient alternatives to motorize travel throughout the City. Discussion: The proposed project provides for a separate system of paseo/trails that will be utilized by pedestrians and non -motorized modes of transportation. This system provides for ease of access between the different planning areas. This system of trails will also connect to the regional trails for ease access to other areas within the City. Policies 6.1 Promote the safety of pedestrians and bicyclist by adhering to uniform trail standards and practices and communicating safety practices to the public. Unless modified through this Specific Plan, all trails shall be constructed to ultimate City standards and practices that will ensure public safety. 6.2 Off-street bicycle and equestrian trails should minimize the number of locations where automobile cross traffic will be experienced. The proposed project provides for bicycle trails throughout the project site (see Figure 4.8, Bicycle Plan). The Specific Plan's loop road system will minimize the number of locations for automobile cross traffic. 6.3 Ensure accessibility of pedestrian facilities to the elderly and disabled. The Harveston Specific Plan seeks to ensure accessibility of facilities to all users, including the elderly and the disabled. ADA standards will be complied with throughout the Specific Plan. 6.4 Traffic signals along bike routes and where significant pedestrian activity is present shall be properly timed and periodically adjusted to allow for the safe movement of these non -motorized modes. The proposed Specific Plan includes a Circulation Plan and standards, which will dictate construction and upgrade of the roadway facilities consistent with City standards. All roadway and intersection designs will comply with City standards providing safe and efficient traffic patterns and circulation. 6.5 Adequate linkages shall be provided for non -motorized modes, between residential areas and commercial / employment activity centers, public institutions, and recreation areas. The proposed project provides for ease of access between the different planning areas by non- mntori7ed modes of transportation. As such, the project includes designated trail systems for use by pedestrians and bicycles and other non -motorized modes of transportation. FEBRUARY 2001 21 PA2000\8N1602\GPC0NSISTENCY.D0C CIRCULATION ELEMENT 6.6 Motorized vehicles and motorized cycles shall be prohibited from using the City's recreation trail system. The Harveston Specific Plan provides for a separate system of paseos/trails that will be utilized by pedestrians and non -motorized cycles only. Motorized vehicles and motorized cycles will be prohibited from using the pedestrian designated paseos/trails within the Specific Plan. Goal 7: A truck circulation system that provides for the safe and efficient transport of commodities and also minimizes noise, air pollution and traffic impacts to the City. Discussion: The Circulation Plan for Harveston project is based on the City of Temecula Circulation Element and does not designate primary truck routes on roadways providing access to different residential areas within the project site. The proposed project provides for measures to facilitate access and loading by trucks in order to minimize any potential circulation conflicts. Policies 7.1 Designate primary truck routes on selected arterial streets to minimize the impacts of truck traffic on residential areas. The Harveston Specific Plan Circulation Plan is based on the City of Temecula Circulation Element and does not designate primary truck routes on roadways providing access to different residential areas within the project site. 7.2 Require loading areas and access ways for trucks that minimize or eliminate conflicts with automotive and pedestrian areas to maintain safe and efficient traffic circulation. The proposed project provides for measures (see Section 11.0, Development Standards) to facilitate access and loading by trucks in order to minimize any potential circulation conflicts. FEBRUARY 2001 22 PA2000%8N1602\GPC0NSISTENCY.D0C HOUSING ELEMENT HOUSING ELEMENT Goal 1: A diversity of housing opportunities that satisfies the physical, social and economic needs of existing and future residents of Temecula. Discussion: The Specific Plan will provide 1,921 dwelling units on a wide range of lots to accommodate the existing and projected housing needs in the City. The residential development will provide a range of housing type options in terms of cost, density and type. The Harveston Specific Plan includes a wide variety of housing types within each density category and proposes a sustainable land use concept by incorporating the open space and recreational opportunities through a generous selection of park types. Policies 1.1 Provide an inventory of land at varying densities sufficient to accommodate the existing and projected housing needs in the City. The Harveston Specific Plan provides 1,921 dwelling units on individual lots ranging in size from 2,000 to 5,000 square feet. The target density for the proposed project is 6.3 dwelling units per acre. The Harveston Specific Plan also includes 300 high -density residential dwelling units at a target density of 17.8 units per acre. In addition to the high density, three .densities of Low Medium (578 dwelling units), Medium 1 (475 dwelling units), and Medium 2 (568 dwelling units), are included in the Specific Plan. The proposed housing types will provide a range of opportunity, which will satisfy the needs of various segments of the local housing market. 1.2 Encourage residential development that provides a range of housing types options in terms of cost, density and type, and provides the opportunity for local residents to live and work in the same community by balancing jobs and housing types. The proposed project introduces a wide range of housing type in terms of cost, density and design in order to meet the needs of the different segments of the local population. The project also includes commercial uses, which would create jobs locally and regionally. 1.3 Require a mixture of diverse housing types and densities in new developments around the mixed use village centers to enhance their people -orientation and diversity. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes high density housing in the Mixed Use Village Center overlay along with other uses. Additionally, in close proximity to the Mixed Use Village Center are proposed a variety of housing types and densities. 1.4 Support the use of innovative site planning and architectural design in residential development. The proposed project includes a wide variety of housing types within each density category. These varieties are achieved through innovative site planning and design and will cater to the needs of d►fferent groups of rlhen.t.e. FEBRUARY 2001 23 P.\2000\8N1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC HOUSING ELEMENT 1.5 Encourage the use of clustered development to preserve and enhance important environmental resources, and maintain important areas in open space. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes an efficient land use concept where different residential development types, including clustered development, are introduced and vast areas of open space are incorporated throughout the Specific Plan in the form of a community park, mini parks, paseo park, lake, lake park, arroyo park, and paseos. 1.6 Promote the development of compatible mixed use projects that promotes and enhances the village concept, facilitates the efficient use of public facilities, and supports alternative transit options. Goal 2: The Harveston Specific Plan is a project that incorporates different types of uses such as residential, service commercial, school, parks, and Mixed Use Village Center. Within the Mixed Use Village Center there is a wide range of uses which promote a pedestrian oriented concept (see Figure 11.16, Mixed Use Village Center Pedestrian Circulation). Paseos, trails, and bike lanes are provided for ease of access to recreational and other public facility uses (i.e., school, and church). Affordable housing for all economic segments of Temecula. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan is promoting a variety of housing opportunities that accommodate the needs of all economic levels of the population, and is providing opportunities to meet the City's fair share of low- and moderate -income housing. The project includes housing affordable to households with earnings in excess of approximately 120 percent of the current median income of the County of Riverside. The higher density dwelling units will be more affordable to buyers as well as renters. Policies 2.1 Promote a variety of housing opportunities that accommodate the needs of all economic levels of the population, and provides opportunities to meet the City's fair share of low- and moderate - income housing. The Harveston Specific Plan provides 1,921 dwelling units on individual lots ranging in size from 2,000 to 5,000 square feet. The target density for the proposed project is 6.3 dwelling units per acre. The Harveston Specific Plan also includes 300 high -density residential dwelling units at a target density of 17.8 units per acre. In addition to the high density, three densities of Low Medium (578 dwelling units), Medium 1 (475 dwelling units), and Medium 2 (568 dwelling units), are included in the Specific Plan. The proposed housing types will provide a range of opportunity, which will satisfy the needs of various economic levels of the local housing market. 2.2 Support innovative public, private and non-profit efforts in the development of affordable housing, particularly for special needs groups. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 24 PA200O.BN16OMPCONSIST£NCY.DOC HOUSING ELEMENT 2.3 Encourage the use of non-traditional housing models, including single -room occupancy structures (SRO) and manufactured housing, to meet the needs of special groups for affordable housing, temporary shelter and/or transitional housing. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 2.4 Pursue all available forms of private, local, state and federal assistance to support development and implementation of the City's housing programs. The proposed Harveston project includes housing affordable to households with earnings in excess of approximately 120 percent of the current median income of the County of Riverside. The higher density dwelling units will be more affordable to buyers as well as renters. Goal 3: Removal of governmental constraints in the maintenance, improvement and development of housing, where appropriate and legally possible. This goal is not applicable because it is a City directed goal. Policies 3.1 Provide reasonable processing time and fees for new construction or rehabilitation of housing. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.2 Consider mitigating development fees for projects providing affordable and senior citizen housing. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.3 Periodically review City development standards to ensure consistency with the General Plan and to facilitate high -quality affordable housing. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Goal 4: Conservation of the eldsting affordable housing stock. This goal is not applicable because it is a City directed goal. Policies 4.1 Monitor and regulate, if necessary, the number of affordable units eligible for conversion to market -rate units and develop programs to minimize the loss of these units. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 25 P:\2000,BN1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC HOUSING ELEMENT 4.2 Develop rehabilitation programs that are directed at preserving the integrity of the housing stock. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 4.3 Support the efforts of private and public entities in maintaining the affordability of units through implementation of energy conservation and weatherization programs. Goal 5: This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Equal housing opportunity for all residents in Temecula. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan promotes housing opportunities for all persons regardless of race, religion, sex, marital status, ancestry, national origin, age, physical handicap, or color. Policies 5.1 Encourage and support the enforcement of laws and regulations prohibiting the discrimination in lending practices in the sale or rental of housing. The Harveston Specific Plan promotes housing opportunities for all persons regardless of race, religion, sex, marital status, ancestry, national origin, age, physical handicap, or color. 5.2 Assure and support the efforts of others to ensure that unrestricted access to housing is available to all segments of the community. The proposed project supports and encourages unrestricted access to housing to all interested clients without discrimination. 5.3 Encourage housing design standards that promote the accessibility of housing for the elderly and disabled. The Specific Plan anticipates the use of certain residential product types by elderly and disabled, therefore, it incorporates the City's building codes and ADA measures in order to accommodate such use. 5.4 Encourage and consider supporting local private non-profit groups that address the housing needs of the homeless and other disadvantaged groups. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 26 PA2000\8N1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT Goal 1: A high quality parks and recreation system that meets the varying recreational needs of residents. Discussion: A major feature of the Harveston Specific Plan is the system of parks and landscaped parkways with paseos, which link the lake complex, and school recreational facilities and the community park in the Open Space and Recreation Program. The Project Park Program is extensive and provides a vast array of recreational opportunities in which all members of the community can participate. Further, the program incorporates many diverse elements in a coordinated, cohesive plan that interrelates with and links the various neighborhoods of the community with each other and to certain destination points, such as the lake, school, parks and mixed -use village. Policies 1.1 Apply the policies and standards contained in the City's Park and Recreation Master Plan to acquire sufficient parkland and recreation facilities to support new development. The Harveston Specific Plan includes a substantial amount of open space as community park, mini parks, arroyo park, lake park, paseo park and paseos and trails throughout the development. The provision of parks and open space complies with the City's Park and Recreation Master Plan. 1.2 Require the dedication of parkland and development of facilities to be consistent with the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. The proposed plan complies with the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. 1.3 Require developers of residential projects greater than fifty dwelling units to dedicate land based on the park acre standard of five (5) acres of usable parkland to one thousand (1,000) population, or the payment of in -lieu fees in accordance with the parks and Recreation Master Plan. Adequate amount of parks and open space has been dedicated based on the above standards and calculations. 1.4 Park credit for land with floodplains shall be given in accordance with the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. This policy is not applicable because the project site does not contain any flood plains. 1.5 Pursue the joint use of public lands available and suitable for recreation purposes, including lands under the jurisdiction of the Riverside County Flood Control District, Southern California Edison, water districts, and other public agencies. This policy is not applicable because the project proposes community and neighborhood parks throughout the development, and it is not in close vicinity of any public lands that can be utilized for joint use. FEBRUARY 2001 27 P:\2000PBN1602\GPCONS1STENCY.DOC OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT 1.6 Encourage the enhancement and preservation of significant natural features, including riparian areas, rock outcroppings, sensitive habitat areas and viewpoints through park design and site development. One feature of the Harveston Specific Plan is the Arroyo Park, which is a naturalistic park that preserves the existing creek bed and creates a riparian environment. The Arroyo Park will provide a different recreational experience to the residents of the community. 1.7 Encourage the enhancement and preservation of historic structures and landscape features in the design, development and use of parks. The design and development of the different parks within the Specific Plan area will be based on extensive use of landscape features to create a unique experience. No historic structures exist within the project area. 1.8 Encourage public safety and compatibility with adjacent use in park design and development, including location of buildings, activity areas, lighting and parking. Design features such as special architectural treatment, perimeter and interior landscaping, and lighting will be incorporated into the project for safety and compatibility with the adjacent uses. The Community Park has been designed consistent with City standards (see Figure 6.3, Community Park Detail). 1.9 Coordinate long range park and open space planning with Riverside County and the City of Murrieta. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 1.10 Maximize pedestrian and bicycle access to existing and new parks as an alternative to automobile access. The Specific Plan project proposes extensive trails and bike lanes that would connect to all the different planning areas and uses, including parks. 1.11 Encourage joint recreational use between school and park facilities when appropriate. This policy is not applicable because the community park and the proposed elementary school are not in close adjacency to one another, therefore making it difficult to encourage true joint use. 1.12 Consider the establishment of development impact fees to cover the cost of capital improvements for parks and recreation facilities needed to serve new development. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 28 P.\20001SN1607\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT Goal 2: Conservation and protection of surface water, groundwater and imported water resources. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan will coordinate with Riverside County Flood Control District to design necessary flood control improvements for Murrieta Creek and Temecula Creek that preserve the important natural features and resources of the local creeks and the riparian forest of the Santa Margarita River Watershed, to the maximum extent feasible. The project will protect groundwater in cooperation with the Rancho California Water District and conserve potable water by requiring water conservation techniques in all new development. The project will also encourage utilization of reclaimed water, if available, for irrigation and other appropriate uses. Policies 2.1 Coordinate with Riverside County Flood Control District to design flood control improvements for Murrieta Creek and Temecula Creek that preserve the important natural features and resources of the local creeks and the riparian forest of the Santa Margarita River, to the maximum extent feasible. The Harveston Specific Plan provides for drainage and flood control facilities and improvements in accordance with the City of Temecula and the Riverside County Flood Control District requirements. (See Section 5.0, Infrastructure Plan). 2.2 Identify and protect groundwater resources from depletion and sources of pollution in cooperation with the Rancho California Water District. The proposed project will comply with standard specifications to protect groundwater resources from depletion and sources of pollution in cooperation with the Rancho California Water District. 2.3 Conserve potable water by requiring water conservation techniques in all new development. The Harveston Specific Plan will comply with Title 20, California Administrative Code Section 1604 (f) (Appliance Efficiency Standards), which establish efficiency standards that set the maximum flow rate of all new showerheads, lavatory faucets, etc., as well as Health and Safety Code Section 17621.3 which requires low -flush toilets and urinals in virtually all buildings. 2.4 Use reclaimed water for the irrigation of parks, golf courses, publicly landscaped areas and other feasible applications as service becomes available from RCWD and EMWD. The proposed project will encourage utilization of reclaimed water, if available, for irrigation and other appropriate uses. FEBRUARY 2001 29 P:\20OMN1602\GPCONSIS7ENCY.DOC OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT 2.5 Require the use of soil management techniques to reduce erosion, eliminate off -site sedimentation, and prevent other soil -related problems that may adversely affect waterways in the community. All construction activities that results in the disturbance of at least five acres of total land area or activity which is part of a larger common plan of development of five acres or greater, will obtain the appropriate State general permit for National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits and pay the appropriate fees. All development within the Specific Plan boundaries will be subject to future requirements adopted by the City to implement the NPDES program. Mitigation measures may include, but not be limited to: onsite retention; covered storage of all outside storage facilities; vegetated swales; monitoring programs, etc. 2.6 Regulate and manage lands adjacent to or affecting watercourses as stipulated by the Regional Water Resources Control Board. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. The Specific Plan Project has, however, obtained 401 permits from the RWQCB. 2.7 Ensure that approved projects have filed a Notice of Intent and Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan in accordance with the Federal Clean Water Act, prior to issuance of building permits. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. The EIR does, however, require filing of a Notice of Intent as mitigation. 2.8 Ensure adequate inspection and enforcement of the requirements of General Construction Permits, particularly related to erosion control during grading and construction. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 2.9 Participate in regional planning for the Santa Margarita River Watershed in conjunction with Federal, State, Regional and local agencies, and non-profit organization. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 2.10 Participate in water resources management planning to facilitate the long-term availability of water resources for western Riverside County. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 30 PA20OMN16OMPCONSISTENCY.DOC OPEN SPACE/ CONSERVATION ELEMENT Goal 3: Conservation of important biological habitats and protection of plant and animal species of concern, wildlife movement corridors, and general biodiversity. Discussion: Based upon the findings of the biological studies performed for the site, the proposed project site does not include significant onsite biological resources. The project proposes an arroyo park, which will include the creation of a riparian habitat. The Arroyo Park will be developed consistent with the mitigation requirement and permits of the U.S. Army Corps and State Department of Fish and Game. The Specific Plan will also incorporate local native vegetation, mature trees, and/or other significant vegetation into the landscape design of the proposed development. Policies 3.1 Require development proposals to identify significant biological resources and provide mitigation, including the use of adequate buffering; selective preservation; the provision of replacement habitats; the use of sensitive site planning techniques including wildlife corridor/recreational trails; and other appropriate measure. Based upon the findings of the biological studies performed for the site, the proposed project site does not include significant onsite biological resources. The project proposes an arroyo park, which will include the creation of a riparian habitat. The Arroyo Park will be developed consistent with the mitigation requirement of the U.S. Army Corps and State Department of Fish and Game. 3.2 Work with State, regional and non-profit agencies and organizations to preserve and enhance significant biological resources on publicly owned lands. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.3 Coordinate with the County of Riverside and other relevant agencies in the adoption and implementation of the Riverside County Multi -Species Habitat Conservation Plan. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.4 Encourage developers to incorporate native drought -resistant vegetation, mature trees, and other significant vegetation into the site and landscape design for proposed projects. The Harveston Specific Plan will incorporate local native vegetation, mature trees, and/or other significant vegetation into the landscape design of the proposed development (see Section 10.0, Design Guidelines). 3.5 Maintain an inventory of existing natural resources in the City through periodic updates of the Master Environmental Assessment. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 31 PA2000N8N1602\GPCONS1STENCYDOC OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT 3.6 Limit the recreational use of designated open space areas where sensitive biological resources are present. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.7 Maintain and enhance the resources of the Temecula Creek, Santa Margarita River, Pechanga Creek and other water ways to ensure the long-term viability of the habitat, wildlife, and wildlife movement corridors. Goal 4: This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Conservation of energy through the use of available technology and conservation practices. Discussion: To reduce energy use, the proposed Specific Plan will utilize energy saving techniques such as orienting buildings properly (i.e., north/south lot orientation), planting trees to take advantage of the sun, ensuring adequate roof overhangs, providing properly insulated walls and providing simple heat storage systems such as dual paned windows. The project development will also include utilization of energy efficient building materials for construction in order to reduce energy use. Policies 4.1 Encourage the use of site planning techniques, building orientation and building design that reduce energy use. To reduce energy use, the proposed Specific Plan will utilize energy saving techniques such as orienting buildings properly (i.e., north/south lot orientation), planting trees to take advantage of the sun, ensuring adequate roof overhangs, providing properly insulated walls, and providing simple heat storage systems such as dual -paned windows. 4.2 Require the use of energy efficient building materials to reduce energy use. Goal 5: Besides using the above techniques, the project development will also include utilization of energy efficient building materials for construction in order to reduce energy use. Conservation of open space areas for a balance of recreation, scenic enjoyment, and protection of natural resources and features. Discussion: The Specific Plan will conserve open space areas for a balance of recreation, scenic enjoyment and protection of natural resources and features by including clustered housing as part of its land use proposal, and by dedicating substantial areas of open space as FEBRUARY 2001 32 PA20OMN160AGPCONSISTENCY.DOC OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT community park, mini parks, arroyo park, lake, lake park, paseo park, and extensive paseos and trail system. Policies 5.1 Pursue the conservation of the western and southern ridgelines, the Santa Margarita River, slopes in the Sphere of Influence, and other important landforms and historic landscape features through the development review process and as a condition of project approval. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 5.2 Identify significant viewsheds to proposed projects that may be preserved through the dedication of open space or the use of sensitive grading, site design and building techniques. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 5.3 Encourage the use of clustered development and other site planning techniques to maximize the preservation of open space. The Harveston Specific Plan includes clustered housing as part of its land use proposals, and it dedicates substantial areas of open space as community park, mini parks, arroyo park, lake, lake park, paseo park, and extensive paseos and trail system. 5.4 Retain and improve the quality of landscaping in parkways, public slopes, rights -of -way, parks, civic facilities and other public open areas. The Design Guidelines Section (10.0) of the Specific Plan includes landscaping guidelines, which proposes landscaping of high standards and qualityfor the entire site. 5.5 Coordinate with Homeowner's Association to maintain landscaping along slopes adjacent to public right-of-ways. The Harveston Specific Plan includes a maintenance plan (see Figure 12.2) which outlines the future maintenance responsibilities of slopes, roadways and public and private open space and recreational facilities. Landscape sections, which identify maintenance responsibilities, are also included in Section 12.0. 5.6 Coordinate with Homeowner's Associations to maintain landscaping along slopes adjacent to public right-of-ways. The Harveston Specific Plan has dedicated parkland in conformance with the policies and standards of the Park and Recreation Master Plan of the City of Temecula. The Specific Plan included a maintenance plan, which addresses maintenance responsibilities adjacent to Public right-of-way. 5.7 Require adequate open space in new development for both passive and active recreation. FEBRUARY 2001 33 PA20OMNI602\OPCONSISTENCY.DOC OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT The Harveston Specific Plan has dedicated adequate amounts of open space for both active and passive recreation, based on the requirements of the TCSD. 5.8 Require the vegetation of graded slopes concurrent with project development to minimize erosion and maintain the scenic character of the community. Vegetation of graded slopes will be required in order to minimize erosion and visual impacts concurrent with project development. 5.9 Require the connection of open space and recreation areas to adjacent developments and publicly owned recreation areas where appropriate. The proposed trail system will connect to the public Community Park which, is part of the Specific Plan area and also to City wide trails and the existing Margarita Park located off - site. 5.10 Study the feasibility of establishing a System of Transferable Development Credits, in conjunction with the County, to conserve open space or agricultural uses. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 5.11 Incorporate seismic hazard safety zones into valley -wide open space and park systems. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 5.12 Encourage the use of native vegetation where re -vegetation and landscaping is to occur. Goal 6: The proposed plan will utilize native vegetation for the re -vegetation of the Arroyo Park. Preservation of significant historical and cultural resources. Discussion: This goal is not applicable because according to the Initial Study (and the City of Temecula General Plan), the site does not contain any sensitive archaeological resources. Although the study found no paleontological sites, project implementation could expose fossils through grading and other development activities. Implementation of EIR mitigation measures will ensure that exposure of cultural resources during grading/construction does not occur. Policies 6.1 Maintain an inventory of areas of sensitive archaeological/paleontological sensitivity in the planning area. According to the Initial Study (and the City of Temecula General Plan), the site does not contain any sensitive archaeological resources. The cultural resources study that was prepared concluded the same. Although paleontological sites were not found on the site, FEBRUARY 2001 34 PA20OMN/602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT project implementation could expose fossils through grading and other development activities. Implementation of EIR mitigation measures will ensure that exposure of cultural resources during grading/construction does not occur. 6.2 Require sites proposed for future development to be evaluated for archaeological resources in accordance with the procedures established in a Memorandum of Agreement with the Eastern Information Center at UC Riverside. A cultural resource study was performed evaluating for archaeological resources in conformance with the procedures established in a Memorandum of Agreement with the Easter Information Center at UC Riverside. 6.3 Require sites proposed for future development that are identified in this Element as being of high or undetermined paleontological sensitivity to be evaluated by a qualified vertebrate paleontologist. Although the study found no paleontological sites, project implementation could expose fossils through grading and other development activities. Implementation of EIR mitigation measures will ensure that exposure of cultural resources during grading/construction does not occur. 6.4 Require sites containing significant archaeological or paleontological resources to either preserve identified sites or provide for the professional retrieval of artifacts prior to development. Implementation of the mitigation measures contained in the EIR will ensure that exposure of cultural resources during grading/conservation does not occur. 6.5 Require that a certified archaeologist and/or paleontologist be present on site during grading, earth moving, or demolition of structures when these resources have been discovered during construction, and for sites designated or potentially designated as culturally significant in order to ensure these sites are preserved and protected. Native American observers may be requested to be present on site to observe and retrieve cultural resources when deemed necessary by a certified archaeologist or paleontologist and/or when mandated by state law. Although the cultural resources study performed did not identify any paleontological sites, project implementation could expose fossils through grading and other development activities. Implementation of mitigation measures will ensure that exposure of cultural resources during grading/construction does not occur. 6.6 Not applicable because project is not in Old Town Specific Plan area. 6.7 Not applicable because project is not in Old Town Specific Plan area. 6.8 Not applicable because project is not in Old Town Specific Plan area. 6.9 Not applicable because project does not contain historic structures on -site. FEBRUARY 2001 35 PA20OWN/602\OPCONSISTENCY.DOC OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT 6.10 Not applicable because project does not contain historic structures on -site. 6.11 Not applicable because project does not contain historic structures on -site. Goal 7: Goal 8: Protection of prime agricultural land from premature conversion to urbanized uses. This goal is not applicable because the Harveston Specific Plan site does not contain any prime agricultural land, which would be converted to urbanized uses. A trail system that serves both recreational and transportation needs. Discussion: The proposed Harveston Specific Plan trail system proposed connections to the City wide trail system. It also seeks to create a pedestrian friendly environment where extensive trails and bike lanes are provided for ease of access between different planning areas and land uses. Policies 8.1 Provide a City-wide recreation system that connects to the County's regional trail system through adoption of a Master Plan of Trails that provides for bicycling, equestrian, hiking and jogging trails and support facilities. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 8.2 Negotiate land deeds as necessary to implement the City-wide trail system. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 8.3 Require proposed development to provide trail connections to the city-wide trail system as defined by the Parks and Recreation Master Plan and Master Plan of Trails. The proposed Harveston Specific Plan trail system proposes connections to the City-wide trail system, according to the Parks and Recreation Master Plan and Master Plan of Trails. 8.4 Require development plans to identify locations for an internal trails/sidewalk system that links land uses and provides convenient travel to transit facilities. The Specific Plan seeks to create a pedestrian friendly environment where extensive trails and bike lanes are provided for ease of access between different planning areas and land uses. FEBRUARY 2001 36 P:\2000.8N1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC OPEN SPACE / CONSERVATION ELEMENT Goal 9: Protection of dark skies from intrusive light sources, which may impact the Palomar Observatory Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan is located within thirty (30) miles of Mount Palomar Observatory. In order to reduce light and glare impacts to the operations at the Observatory, outdoor lighting will be from low-pressure sodium lamps that are oriented and shielded to prevent direct illumination above the horizon plane passing through the luminare. Current supplies of electrical service have been strained due to recent de -regulation of the power industry. Recent shortages in generation capacity may require residents and business owners to pay higher costs for electricity or accept limitations required by the utility purveyors during periods of limited supply. The State of California is in the process of addressing this issue, as it is a Statewide and regional issue. Limitations will be resolved as new generating capacity is brought on line over the next few years. The project will be developed in stages and is anticipated to commence construction in early-2001. Policies 9.1 Coordinate with the County of Riverside and California Institute of Technology for Economic Research Purposes to ensure preservation procedures for dark skies are incorporated into the City development review process. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Please see consistency analysis for Goal 9, above. 9.2 Participate in Palomar Observatory's dark sky conservation areas. The Harveston Specific Plan is located within thirty (30) miles of Mount Palomar Observatory. In order to reduce light and glare impacts to the operations at the Observatory, outdoor lighting will be from low pressure sodium lamps that are oriented and shielded to prevent direct illumination above the horizon plane passing through the luminare. FEBRUARY 2001 37 PA2000\8N1602OPCONSISTENCY.DOC GROWTH MANAGEMENT ELEMENT GROWTH MANAGEMENT / PUBLIC FACILITIES ELEMENT Goal 1: Cooperate management of growth among local governments within Riverside County. Discussion: This goal is not applicable because it is a City directed goal. However, the Harveston Specific Plan provides ample amounts of open space for the enjoyment of the future residents of the Harveston community as well as the residents of neighboring development and the City in general. Also, the infrastructure standards have been prepared in coordination with the adjacent jurisdiction and property owners to help ensure compatibility. The plan does create unique development standards that will maintain the quality of life and the integrity of the proposed development. Policies 1.1 Continue to participate with the Western Riverside Council of Governments in the preparation of plans and programs addressing regional issues, including the Growth Management Strategy, Comprehensive Transportation Plan, Water Resources Strategy, and School Facilities Plan. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 1.2 Strive to achieve the policies of WRCOG's Growth Management Strategy as appropriate through Temecula's Growth Management Program. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 1.3 Assist in the establishment of cooperative efforts to implement development standards, which address quality of life issues. The Harveston Specific Plan contains extensive development standards, which strive to enforce a set of standards that would enhance and maintain a high quality of life for the community residents. 1.4 Strive to achieve economic growth and prosperity, while preserving natural beauty and the social quality of life in southwestern Riverside County. The Harveston Specific Plan has been prepared in conformance with the City of Temecula General Plan, and as such the goal of the Specific Plan is to introduce a development within the southwestern Riverside County that will achieve economic growth (i.e., 112.4 acres of Service Commercial proposed) and yet preserve the beauty and quality of life in the area (i.e., extensive park and open space program proposed). 1.5 Encourage or assist in the establishment of natural reserves for the preservation of sensitive and endangered species, and to provide open space for residents. The Harveston Specific Plan provides ample amounts of open space for the enjoyment of the future residents of the Harveston community as well as the residents of neighboring developments and the City in general. The plan also includes a 10.5-acre arroyo park, which will create a riparian habitat and preserve the defined U.S. waters creek bed in its natural state. The project site does not contain any sensitive or endangered species. FEBRUARY 2001 38 PA200MN1602\GPC0NS1MNCKD0C GROWTH MANAGEMENT ELEMENT 1.6 Seek to establish minimum compatibility with adjacent jurisdictions for basic development standards related to infrastructure and engineering, while preserving unique zoning and design standards. The Harveston Specific Plan infrastructure standards have been prepared in coordination with the adjacent jurisdiction and property owners to help ensure compatibility. The plan does create unique development standards that will maintain the quality of life and the integrity of the proposed development. 1.7 Establish a joint planning process with the County to plan for future development in the Sphere of Influence. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 1.8 Establish a joint review process with the County to ensure that proposed projects in the Sphere of Influence can be adequately served in the future by the City. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 1.9 Guide the timing and provision of facilities and services to support development and protect or enhance the quality of life. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes a phasing plan of development (see Figure 12.1, Phasing Plan, in Section 12.0, Implementation and Administration) that would ensure provision of facilities and services to support development as the project buildout proceeds. 1.10 Require development to pay its fair share of the costs of facilities and services required to serve the resulting level of growth. The Harveston Specific Plan will be conditioned to pay Development Impact Fees and other required fees to mitigate its share of impacts on facilities and services that will serve the future growth. 1.11 Pursue joint efforts to achieve fiscal stability for both City and County government. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 1.12 Consider options to jointly contract with other jurisdictions for the provisions of services or facilities to achieve economies of scale. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 39 PA2000%8N/6020PC0NS1MNCY.D0C GROWTH MANAGEMENT ELEMENT Goal 2: Orderly and efficient patterns of growth within Temecula that enhance the quality of life for residents. Discussion: In an effort to enhance the quality of life for residents, the Harveston Specific Plan includes a Mixed Use Village Center that proposes a mix of uses with an efficient circulation and open space system. The proposed project also includes a variety of housing types in terms of cost, density and design to meet the needs of different segments of the population. In addition, it includes commercial uses, which would create jobs locally and regionally, therefore, maintaining a balance between jobs and housing opportunities. Policies 2.1 Prepare and implement a Growth Management Program for Temecula. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 2.2 Ensure that phasing of public facilities and services occur in such a way that new development is adequately supported as it develops. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes a phasing plan of development (see Figure 12.1, Phasing Plan, Section 12.0, Implementation and Administration) that would ensure provision of facilities and services to support development as the project buildout proceeds. 2.3 Establish and maintain level of service standards in order to document adequacy requirements. The Harveston Specific Plan EIR provides an analysis of the project's impacts on levels of service and proposes mitigation to ensure adequate level of service standards are maintained with project implementation. 2.4 Encourage development of Mixed Use Village Centers, as defined in the Land Use and Community Design Elements to reduce public service costs and environmental impacts through compatible land use relationships, and efficient circulation and open space systems. The Harveston Specific Plan includes a Mixed Use Village Center that proposes a mix of uses with an efficient circulation and open space system. 2.5 Encourage new development that helps to create and maintain a balance between jobs and housing opportunities. The proposed project includes a variety of housing types in terms of cost, density and design to meet the needs of different segments of the population. In addition, it includes commercial uses, which would create jobs locally and regionally, therefore, maintaining a balance between jobs and housing opportunities. 2.6 Establish priority growth areas within the City and Sphere of Influence where near -term urbanization will be encouraged. FEBRUARY 2001 40 PA2000\8N1602\GPC0NSISTENCY.D0C GROWTH MANAGEMENT ELEMENT This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 2.7 Discourage the use of assessment districts that promote urban sprawl and premature urbanization in rural and agricultural areas. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 2.8 Coordinate the Growth Management Program with the Congestion Management Program as necessary. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Goal 3: Effective and cost efficient sheriff, fire and emergency medial service within the City. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan EIR provides an analysis of the project's impacts on police and fire protection levels of service and proposes mitigation to ensure adequate level of service standards is maintained with project implementation. Policies 3.1 Strive to provide a minimum of one full-time officer per 1,000 residents for police protection services. The Harveston Specific Plan EIR provides an analysis of the project's impacts on police protection levels of service and proposes mitigation to ensure adequate level of service standards are maintained with project implementation. 3.2 Strive to provide a minimum response time of between 7 and 10 minutes of an alarm for 90 percent of all fires, in accordance with the Riverside County Fire Protection and Emergency Master Plan. The Harveston Specific Plan EIR provides an analysis of the project's impacts on fire protection levels of service and proposes mitigation to ensure adequate level of service standards are maintained with project implementation. 3.3 Require new development to address fire and police protection in a proactive and preventative way through street design, orientation of entryways, siting of structures, landscaping, lighting and other security features. The Harveston Specific Plan design guidelines and standards (see Section 10.0, Design Guidelines) provide for features listed above that would create a safe and secure environment for the residents. Additionally, the Specific Plan and EIR will be reviewed by police and fire so additional recommendation can be incorporated if necessary. 3.4 Coordinate with the County of Riverside in the location and phasing of new sheriff facilities or fire stations to ensure that adequate service levels are maintained. FEBRUARY 2001 41 PA?000\8N160Z\GPC0NSIMNCY.D0C GROWTH MANAGEMENT ELEMENT This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.5 Promote the establishment of Neighborhood Watch Programs in conjunction with the Sheriff's Department to increase the surveillance of neighborhoods. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.6 Consider the provision of police services by the City if it is more cost effective than contracting with the County of Riverside. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.7 Promote community awareness regarding drug use and gangs through the Police Department, Community Service Department, and public service organizations. Goal 4: This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. A quality school system that contains adequate facilities and funding to educate the youth of Temecula. Discussion: The Temecula Valley Unified School District has been actively involved in the Harveston Specific Plan process, and a 12.0-acre site has been designated for an elementary school in response to the District's request. The School District will be made aware of future legislative land use policy decisions. There will be a need to expand school facilities at all levels to accommodate students from the proposed project. The District anticipates funding the school facilities for the proposed project from the fees collected through an existing school agreement, with half of the estimate being funded by the State, so long as those funds are available. Policies 4.1 Provide information to the Temecula Valley Unified School district, when considering General Plan amendments, specific plans, zone changes, or other legislative land use policy decisions, to support the School district in providing adequate school facilities for students for new development to the extent permitted by law. The Temecula Valley Unified School District has been actively involved in the Harveston Specific Plan process, and a 12.0-acre site has been designated for an elementary school in response to the District's request. The School District will be made aware of future legislative land use policy decisions. 4.2 Promote and encourage the phasing of project development so that the School district may plan, finance, and construct school facilities intended to serve the development. The proposed project applicant is having continual discussions with the School District regarding the phasing of the development plan in relation to the timing of the school site development. FEBRUARY 2001 42 PA200MN1602\GPC0NSIMNCY.D0C GROWTH MANAGEMENT ELEMENT 4.3 Review proposed legislative land use decisions in the context of the adequacy of present and future facilities as permitted by law. The Harveston Specific Plan has been prepared based on the City of Temecula General Plan, and as such adheres to all the requirements of the City and takes into account adequacy of present and future facilities in making land use proposals. 4.4 Provide safe access for school children walking, bicycling, or driving to and from school sites through coordination between the school district, and City departments of Planning, Public Works, and Engineering. The proposed project provides for an extensive system of trails, paseos, and bike lanes. These pedestrian bicycle circulation systems have been designed through coordination with the City and School District and are consistent with the guidelines and requirements of the City of Temecula. 4.5 Pursue the establishment of a trade school, junior college or 4-year college in Temecula that offers an emphasis in the education required by the engineering, biotechnical and biomedical industries located in Temecula. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 4.6 Plan for the joint use of school/municipal facilities wherever feasible and desirable, including: the joint use of school grounds, buildings, City parks, multi -purpose buildings, and recreation facilities. Goal 5: This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Public and Quasi -public facilities and services which provide for the social, cultural, civic, religious, and recreational needs of the community. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan provides areas (i.e., community park, village green, lake park, club house facility and school) where citizens would come together and participate in community programs. Child care facilities are permitted uses within the Mixed Use Village Center and High -Density Residential areas of the Specific Plan area. Senior citizens centers are permitted uses within the Mixed Use Village Center of the Specific Plan area. Religious institutions and other quasi public uses are permitted and encouraged within the Mixed Use Overlay Zone. The proposed project encourages promoting such use for the benefit of all the community. Policies 5.1 Acquire a civic center site and construct permanent City Hall facilities when feasible. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy FEBRUARY 2001 43 P.V.000\8NI602\GPCONSISIENCY.DOC GROWTH MANAGEMENT ELEMENT 5.2 Continue to encourage citizens to participate in community programs and volunteer for public service positions. The Harveston Specific Plan provides areas (i.e., community park, club house facility and school) where citizens would come together and participate in community programs. The proposed project encourages promoting such activities for the benefit of all the community. 5.3 Evaluate the feasibility of providing child care facilities in connection with employment - generating uses. Child care facilities are permitted uses within the Mixed Use Village Center and High Density Residential areas of the Specific Plan area. The proposed project encourages promoting such use for the benefit of all the community. 5.4 Encourage the development of a senior citizens center(s). Senior citizens centers are permitted uses within the Mixed Use Village Center of the Specific Plan area. The proposed project encourages promoting such use for the benefit of all the community. 5.5 Encourage the provision of cultural facilities within the community, including: art museums, theaters, a performing arts center, special exhibitions, an outdoor amphitheater, and Indian Cultural Interpretive Center. The proposed Specific Plan includes an array of uses including, outdoor amphitheater, art displays, outdoor exhibition areas, and more. Such uses are permitted and encouraged within this zone. 5.6 Encourage the provision of special recreation facilities such as a stadium, a zoo, and an amusement park. This policy is not applicable because the proposed Harveston Specific Plan does not propose a stadium, a zoo, and an amusement park. 5.7 Encourage the sharing or combining of public facilities for educational, cultural, and recreational purposes to more efficiently utilize public spaces and to provide viable community gathering areas. Multi purpose facilities, which confirm the above listed uses are permitted and encouraged within the Mixed Use Overlay Zone. 5.8 Encourage the availability of sites for religious institutions and other quasi -public uses in the City. Religious institutions and other quasi -public uses are permitted and encouraged within the Mixed Use Overlay Zone. 5.9 Cooperate with Riverside County to provide for library facilities and services that are consistent with community needs. FEBRUARY 2001 44 PA2000\8N1602\GPC0NSIST£NCY.D0C GROWTH MANAGEMENT ELEMENT This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 5.10 Continue to assist non-profit community organizations in terms of financial and other forms of support to the extent feasible. Goal 6: This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. A water and wastewater infrastructure system that supports existing and future development in the Study Area. Discussion: The proposed waster and wastewater plans for Harveston Specific Plan area will support future development in the area. The proposed Harveston Specific Plan area is located within the Rancho California Water District water service area. The proposed water plan consists of 12- inch and 16-inch backbone pipelines for domestic and fire service to the proposed commercial, residential, and parkland uses. The wastewater flows are proposed to be treated at the Santa Rosa Water Reclamation Plant, which is owned and operated by the RCWD. Sewer from the proposed project area will be directed to the Eastern Municipal Water District sewer system along Santa Gertrudis Creek at two locations. Policies 6.1 Require landowners to demonstrate that an available water supply and sewer treatment capacity exists or will be provided to serve proposed development, prior to issuance of building permits. Section 5.0, In Plan, of the Specific Plan requires that future development provide assurance for provision of adequate water supply and sewer treatment capacity prior to issuance of building permits. 6.2 Require landowners, prior to issuance of building permits, to demonstrate that adequate wastewater capacity exists to accommodate the proposed development. Section 5.0, Infrastructure Plan, of the Specific Plan requires that future development provide assurance for provision of adequate wastewater capacity prior to issuance of building permits. 6.3 Coordinate with the water and wastewater districts when considering General Plan amendments, annexations, or development agreements; in order to assist the districts in planning for adequate capacity to accommodate future growth. The Harveston Specific Plan water and wastewater plans have been prepared in coordination with the appropriate districts. The districts were also contacted for input during the EIR process. 6.4 Coordinate with the wastewater district to make reclaimed water available for irrigation purposes in the City. FEBRUARY 2001 45 P:\2000\SNl602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC GROWTH MANAGEMENT ELEMENT The irrigation system will be designed to conform to the State's Water Conservation Assembly Bill 325 and City of Temecula Water Conservation Ordinances in effect. Additionally, the project will utilized reclaimed water, as available, for irrigation. 6.5 Encourage the preparation of a long-term water management program by the District, and assist the District where appropriate. The District has been contacted for information and requirements during preparation of the utility plan for the Harveston Specific Plan. The District was also contacted for input during the EIR process. 6.6 Require all new construction of water and sewer infrastructure to be consistent with utility master plans and to implement the policies of the General Plan. Goal 7: The Harveston Specific Plan Section 5.0, Infrastructure Plan, requires all new construction of water and sewer infrastructure be consistent with the utility master plans and policies of the General Plan. All water and sewer lines will be designed per EMWD and/or RCWD District requirements. An effective, safe and environmentally compatible flood control system. Discussion: Drainage andflood control facilities and improvements will be provided in accordance with the City of Temecula and the Riverside County Flood Control District requirements. The proposed drainage plan utilizes the project streets and storm drains to carry storm water to the existing natural drainage courses and to the drainage facilities under the 1-15 freeway. A storm drain system is proposed to carry storm water that exceeds surface street capacity. Policies 7.1 Work with the Riverside County Flood Control District and other agencies involved in the Murrieta Creek flood control improvements to implement a flood control solution that maximizes the retention of natural resources and the provision of recreation opportunities along the creek. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 7.2 Prepare a City of Temecula Master Drainage Plan, which incorporates the Murrieta Creek Area Drainage Plan and additional planning efforts into one document. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 7.3 Develop master drainage plans, when appropriate, for the Sphere of Influence, in conjunction with the Flood Control District. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 46 P:\2000\8NI602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC GROWTH MANAGEMENT ELEMENT Goal 8: A solid waste management system that provides for the safe and efficient collection, transportation, recovery and disposal of solid wastes. Discussion: The solid waste produced within the development area will be safely carried to the disposing facilities. Policies 8.1 Coordinate with the County of Riverside to provide and expand service for the collection, storage, transportation, recovery, and disposal of solid waste to meet the needs of the City. The proposed project will comply with the City of Temecula and County of Riverside requirements, and it will implement existing collection, storage, transportation, recovery and disposal of solid waste. 8.2 Provide for the collection and disposal of household hazardous waste through the adoption of a Household Hazardous Waste Element. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 8.3 Provide for solid waste reduction and recycling within the City through the adoption of a Source Reduction and Recycling Element. Goal 9: This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Adequate electrical, natural gas, and telecommunication systems to meet the demand of new and existing development. Discussion: Electrical service is currently provided in the area by Southern California Edison Company (SCE). Adequate electric power supply can be provided. Natural gas service is currently provided by Southern California Gas Company. SCG indicates that gas service could be provided to the Specific Plan area in accordance with the Company's policies and extension rules on file with the California Public Utilities Commission at the time contractual arrangements are made. Policies 9.1 Coordinate with the responsible companies to provide for the continued maintenance, development, and expansion of electricity, natural gas, and telecommunications systems to serve residents and businesses. As part of the Specific Plan EIR process, all utilities companies responsible for providing services to the new development were contacted to inquired about the level of service availability and additional requirements. 9.2 Pursue the undergrounding of utilities along arterial roads, where feasible. The Harveston Specific Plan requires all new utility lines be undergrounded, in conformance with the requirements of the City of Temecula. FEBRUARY 2001 47 P:\2000%8N160AGPCONSISTENCY.DOC PUBLIC SAFETY ELEMENT PUBLIC SAFETY ELEMENT Goal 1: Protection from natural hazards associated with geologic instability, seismic events, and flooding. Discussion: To protect from natural hazards associated with geologic instability, seismic events, and flooding, the Harveston Specific Plan EIR includes a geotechnical investigation that evaluates soils and geologic conditions to determine stability. Also, the Specific Plan and the EIR require that all new development onsite comply with the most recent Uniform Building Code seismic design standards. Policies 1.1 Require review of soil and geologic conditions to determine stability prior to project approval. In areas that may have significant geologic constraints, require analysis by a Registered Geotechnical Engineer. The Harveston Specific Plan EIR includes a geotechnical investigation prepared by a registered geotechnical engineer that evaluates soils and geologic conditions to determine stability. Geotechnical recommendations and mitigation measures will be incorporated as necessary. 1.2 Require mitigation of potential adverse impacts of geologic and seismic hazards, including ground surface rupture and liquefaction, at the project level. Mitigation measures are proposed and will be enforced at the project level for all identified potential geologic and seismic hazard impacts. 1.3 Monitor hazardous buildings in Old Town and work with property owners to remediate these buildings to improve structural integrity. This policy is not applicable because the Harveston Specific Plan is not located within the Old Town, and this is a City directed policy. 1.4 Require all new development to comply with the most recent Uniform Building Code seismic design standards. The proposed Harveston Specific Plan and the EIR will require that all new development onsite comply with the most recent Uniform Building Code seismic design standards. 1.5 Monitor the potential for seismic events and other geologic activity with the County of Riverside and California Division of Mines and Geology. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Additionally, the Specific Plan and the EIR require that all new development onsite comply with the most recent Uniform Building Code seismic design standards. FEBRUARY 2001 48 PA200MN1602ZPC0NS1MNCY.D0C PUBLIC SAFETY ELEMENT 1.6 Establish development management techniques to lessen the potential for erosion and landslides. Prior to initial grading, a soils report and geotechnical study will be performed that further analyze onsite soil conditions and slope stability and include appropriate measures to control erosion and landslide (see Sections 8.0, Grading Plan and 10.0, Design Guidelines). 1.7 Prohibit development in the floodway portion of the 100-year floodplain. This policy is not applicable because the project site is not located within the 100-year floodplain. 1.8 Encourage only compatible uses within the 100-year floodplain. This policy is not applicable because the project site is not located within the 100-year floodplain. 1.9 Minimize the intrusion into and alteration of the 100-year floodplain. This policy is not applicable because the project site is not located within the 100-year floodplain. Goal 2: Protection of the public and environmental resources from exposure to hazardous materials and waste. Discussion: Based on the results of a Phase 1 analysis for the site, there are no potential risks associated with hazardous materials. Policies 2.1 Minimize the risks associated with hazardous materials through careful land use planning. Goal 3: The Harveston Specific Plan provides a comprehensive development plan of all land within the Specific Plan area. Land use determination is based on the best and most appropriate use for the land and situation. Based on the results of a Phase 1 analysis for the site, there are no potential risks associated with hazardous materials. A safe and secure community, free from the threat of personal injury and loss of property. Discussion: To build a safe and secure community free from the threat of personal injury and loss of property, the Harveston Specific Plan incorporates defensible space into site plan and building design. The proposed project also provides secondary access points in conformance with the City standards to ensure timely emergency service response. Policies 3.1 Ensure adequate facilities and police and fire service personnel are provided in the City. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 49 PA200O8N160MPCONSIMNUDOC PUBLIC SAFETY ELEMENT 3.2 Continue to work with the community in operating Neighborhood Watch programs that promote mutual assistance and crime prevention activities among residents. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.3 Reduce the risk of wildland fire through imposition of site -specific development standards during project review. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.4 Require new development to incorporate defensible space into site plan and building design. The Harveston Specific Plan incorporates defensible space into site plan and building design (see Section 10.0, Design Guidelines). 3.5 Require all residential development with 35 or more dwelling units to provide secondary access that meets all City standards to ensure timely emergency service response. The proposed project does provide secondary access points in conformance with the City standards to ensure timely emergency service response. Goal 4: An effective response of emergency services following a disaster. This goal is not applicable because it is a City directed goal. Policies 4.1 Provide for and maintain a coordinated emergency service response to reduce community risks and property damage in the event of a disaster. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 4.2 Coordinate emergency response planning with Riverside County and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 4.3 Encourage community -wide emergency preparedness among City residents and the business community. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 4.4 Regulate location of critical facilities to ensure their continued functioning following a disaster. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 4.5 Establish and maintain an emergency operations center (EOC) for emergency and disaster situations in a safe and secure location. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 50 P:\2000N8N1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC NOISE ELEMENT NOISE ELEMENT Goal 1: Land Use planning that provides for the separation of significant noise generators from sensitive receptor areas. Discussion: The design of the Harveston land use plan has taken into account noise factors and has sought to maintain a balance where no significant noise impact would result. There are no significant noise generators included within the Harveston Specific Plan area. The noise emanating from construction activities is considered temporary, however the EIR provides mitigation measures to mitigate this impact. Policies 1.1 Discourage noise sensitive land uses in noisy exterior environments unless measures can be implemented to reduce exterior and interior noise to acceptable levels. Alternatively, encourage less sensitive uses in areas adjacent to major noise generators but require appropriate interior working environments. The design of the Harveston land use plan has taken into account noise factors and has sought to maintain a balance where no significant noise impact would result. The EIR provides a detailed impact analysis and mitigation measures, as necessary. 1.2 Limit the hours of construction activity in residential areas in order to reduce the intrusion of noise in the early morning and late evening hours, and on weekends and holidays. As part of the Harveston Specific Plan EIR, a noise study was conducted to analyze potential noise impacts and introduce mitigation measures, including limitations on hours of construction. 1.3 Incorporate noise standards in the Development Code to ensure that residents are not exposed to excessive levels of noise from stationary sources. As part of the Harveston Specific Plan EIR, a noise study was conducted to analyze potential noise impacts and introduce mitigation measures. The Development Code includes standards that ensure the residents are not exposed to excessive noise levels from stationary sources. 1.4 Require proposed industrial or commercial projects located near existing or planned residential areas to demonstrate that the project when constructed, will comply with the City noise requirements. The Harveston Specific design guidelines and development standards require the Service Commercial uses comply with the City noise requirements. 1.5 Work with the school district to relocate the school bus maintenance yard to an area that will not adversely impact sensitive receptors. This policy is not applicable because it is a City direrted policy. FEBRUARY 2001 51 P:1200MN1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC Nois ELEMENT 1.6 Ensure that current noise hazard areas in the City are identified, quantified, and mapped in a form that is available to decisionmakers. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 1.7 Utilize the information from the noise contour map in the General Plan in the development review process to ensure that noise sensitive land uses are not located near major stationary noise sources. Development of the land use plan of the proposed project utilized information from the noise contour map to ensure that the noise sensitive land uses are not located near major stationary noise sources. Additionally, as part of the Harveston Speck Plan EIR, a noise study was conducted to analyze potential noise impacts and introduce mitigation measures, including noise standards in the Development Code. 1.8 Minimize noise conflicts between land uses and the circulation network. Goal 2: The land use relationships of the Harveston Specific Plan area have been arranged in a manner to minimize any potential noise conflicts between land uses and the circulation network. Additionally, as part of the Harveston Specific Plan EIR, a noise study was conducted to analyze potential noise impacts and introduce mitigation measures, including noise standards in the Development Code. Existing light industrial uses will located next to residential uses in Planning Area No. L It should be noted that this will not present any conflict, as the side of the existing industrial building will be located at the rear of the residential uses. In addition, an additional landscape buffer has been included at the rear of these parcels. The control of noise between land uses. Discussion: As part of the Harveston Specific Plan EIR, a noise study was conducted to analyze potential noise impacts and to introduce mitigation measures, including noise standards in the Development Code. Policies 2.1 Limit the maximum permitted noise levels which cross property lines and impact adjacent land uses. As part of the Harveston Specific Plan EIR, a noise study was conducted to analyze potential noise impacts and introduce mitigation measures, including noise standards in the Development Code. FEBRUARY 2001 52 PA200O\8NJ602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC NOISE ELEMENT Goal 3: Consider noise issues in the planning process. Discussion: The Harveston Noise Study evaluates potential noise conflicts from project buildout and based upon identified noise impacts proposes the use of site design and building design techniques, including the use of landscape setbacks or berms, building orientation, and buffering of noise sensitive areas, as a means to minimize noise impacts and/or additional mitigation measures as appropriate. Policies 3.1 Establish standards for acceptable limits of noise for various lands use in the City. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.2 Work with the County of Riverside and the City of Murrieta in minimizing or avoiding conflicts between land use and noise prior to project approvals. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 3.3 Encourage the use of site design and building design techniques, including the use of landscape setbacks or berms, building orientation, and buffering of noise sensitive areas, as a means to minimize noise impacts. The Harveston Noise Study evaluates potential noise conflicts from project buildout and based upon identified noise impacts proposes the above techniques and/or additional mitigation measures as appropriate. 3.4 Evaluate potential noise conflicts for individual sites and projects. The Noise Study evaluates potential noise conflicts, and based upon identified noise impacts proposes mitigation measures as appropriate. 3.5 Require mitigation of all significant noise impacts as a condition of project approval. Goal 4: The Noise proposes mitigation measures, as necessary, which will be enforced as conditions of project approval. Minimize noise impacts from transportation noise sources. Discussion: To minimize noise impacts from transportation noise sources the Noise Study in the EIR evaluates the potential noise impacts and proposes mitigation measures as appropriate. Additionally, the proposed Specific Plan has been coordinating efforts with Caltrans and will comply with the requirements set. forth by that agency. FEBRUARY 2001 53 PA2000N1602\GPCONSIMNCY.DOC Nom ELEMENT Policies 4.1 Develop a program to construct barriers to mitigate sound levels where necessary or where feasible to ensure the peace and quiet of the community. The Noise Study as part of the EIR, evaluates the potential noise impacts and proposes mitigation measures as appropriate, in order to ensure peace and quiet within the community. 4.2 Ensure the effective enforcement of City, State, and Federal noise standards by all appropriate City Divisions. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 4.3 Enforce the speed limit on arterials and local roads to reduce noise impacts from vehicles, particularly in residential areas. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 4.4 Coordinate with Caltrans to ensure the inclusion of noise mitigation measures in the design of new highways projects or improvements to existing facilities including, interchange improvements along I-15, widening of SR 79 South, SR 79 North and the proposed Date Street/I- 15 interchange. The proposed Specific Plan has been coordinating efforts with Caltrans and will comply with the requirements set forth by that agency 4.5 The City shall participate in the planning and impact assessment activities of the Airport Land Use Commission and other regional or state agencies relative to any proposed expansion of the airport or change in flight patterns. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 54 PA2000\8NI60AGPCONSISTE1VCY.DOC COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT AIR QUALITY ELEMENT Goal 1: Improvement of air quality through proper land use planning in Temecula. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan contains a balanced mix of residential and employment opportunities, therefore, reducing vehicle miles traveled. The circulation plan and the land use plan have been coordinated to minimize land use conflicts and prevent potential impacts. As part of the EIR document, an Air Quality analysis was conducted to evaluate the air pollutant emissions and introduce mitigation measures, which will be enforced in order to reduce air pollution. Policies 1.1 Encourage new development that provides employment opportunities for residents of Temecula to improve the balance of jobs relative to housing. The Harveston Specific Plan contains a balanced mix of residential and employment opportunities, therefore, reducing vehicle miles traveled. The Specific Plan area contains a service commercial area, and a Mixed Use Village Center, which also includes commercial and retail. 1.2 Encourage in -fill development near activity centers and along transportation corridors. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 1.3 Minimize land use conflicts between emission sources and sensitive receptors. The circulation plan and the land use plan have been coordinated to minimized this conflict and prevent potential impacts. 1.4 Reduce air pollutant emissions by mitigating air quality impacts associated with development projects to the greatest extent feasible. Goal 2: As part of the EIR document, an Air Quality analysis was conducted to evaluate the air pollutant emissions and introduce mitigation measures, which will be enforced in order to reduce air pollution. Enhanced mobility to minimize air pollutant emissions. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan proposes a pedestrian -friendly environment where walking and biking are encouraged through provision of extensive walking trails/paseos and bike lanes that connect different planning areas and uses within the community. To have an efficient flow of traffic, the Specific Plan proposes a hierarchy of streets, in which arterials circumvent the FEBRUARY 2001 55 PAWOWN1602\CPCONSlSTENCY.DOC COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT community, collector roads proceed into the community, and internal neighborhood streets web throughout the neighborhoods. Policies 2.1 Implement transportation demand management techniques to reduce motor vehicle trips, including walking, bicycling, ridesharing, local transit, staggered work schedules and telecommunications. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes a pedestrian -friendly environment where walking and biking are encouraged through provision of extensive walking trails/paseos and bike lanes that connect different planning areas and uses within the community. 2.2 Maintain an orderly flow of traffic and improve mobility through the use of transportation systems management techniques. A Traffic and Circulation Analysis was prepared as part of the EIR, which analyzed the future traffic flow and proposed mitigations to improve the flow. Additionally, the Specific Plan proposes a hierarchy of streets, in which arterials circumvent the community, collector roads proceed into the community, and internal neighborhood streets web throughout the neighborhoods. This system allows an efficient flow of traffic. 2.3 Pursue development of a public transit system including local shuttle and bus routes, and bicycle and pedestrian trails that are linked to regional light rail. The Harveston Specific Plan will comply with the City of Temecula and the Riverside Transit Agency to facilitate provision of transit service. Coordination and correspondence with the Riverside Transit Agency was completed as part of the Harveston EIR preparation. All maps will be conditioned during the review stage to ensure compliance. 2.4 Promote alternatives to motorized transportation by establishing a convenient and efficient system of bicycle routes and pedestrian walkways. The proposed Specific Plan introduces a pedestrian and bicycle friendly environment where extensive systems of trails/paseos and bike lanes are provided for ease of access between different planning areas and uses. 2.5 Promote the use of alternative clean fueled vehicles for personal and business use. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 2.6 Encourage programs that reduce local traffic congestion at peak hours and during special events. A Traffic and Circulation Analysis was prepared which analyzes circulation in the Specific Plan area and its potential impact on a larger area during peak hours. The analysis proposes mitigations to reduce potential congestion. FEBRUARY 2001 56 PA2000BN1 OMPCONSISTENCY.DOC COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT Goal 3: Incorporate energy conservation practices and recycling to reduce emissions. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan requires future developments employ passive solar heating techniques in order to save energy consumption. Passive systems will include orienting buildings properly (i.e., north/south lot orientation), planting trees to take advantage of the sun, ensuring adequate roof overhangs, properly insulating walls, and incorporating simple heat storage systems, including dual paned windows. Policies 3.1 Encourage community -wide reductions in energy consumption through conservation. The Harveston Specific Plan encourages future developments employ passive solar heating techniques in order to save energy consumption. Passive systems will include orienting buildings properly (i.e., north/south lot orientation), planting trees to take advantage of the sun, ensuring adequate roof overhangs, properly insulating walls, and incorporating simple heat storage systems, including dual paned windows. 3.2 Promote local recycling of wastes and the use of recycled materials. The Harveston Specific Plan will comply with City of Temecula curb —side recycling programs. Goal 4: Effective coordination of air quality improvement efforts in the Western Riverside area. This goal is not applicable because it is a City, regional, and state agency directed goal. Policies 4.1 Coordinate planning efforts with other local, regional and state agencies, including WRCOG, SCAQMD and SCAG, in their efforts to improve regional air quality. This policy is not applicable because it is a City, regional, and state agency directed policy. 4.2 Encourage participation of local citizens, the business community and interested groups and individuals in air quality planning and implementation efforts. This policy is not applicable because it is a City, regional, and state agency directed policy. 4.3 Promote programs, which educate the public about regional air quality issues. This policy is not applicable because it is a City, regional, and state agency directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 57 P:\2000N8N1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT Goal 1: Enhancement of the City's image related to its regional and natural setting and its tourist orientation. Discussion: The proposed Harveston Specific Plan project includes plans for a 13.8-acre Arroyo Park, which will recapture more naturalistic California landscape and provide a naturalistic setting for walking, hiking, and picnicking, therefore offering a different recreation experience for the residents of the community as well as the City. Additionally, the proposed project offers extensive systems of trails and open space, which will be connected to different areas within the development. Another feature of the project, which would be attractive for visitors to the community is the lake connected to other parts of the community through trails. Policies 1.1 Promote the development of a comprehensive system of trails and open space areas that connect schools, public recreation areas, residential areas, and commercial centers. The Harveston Specific Plan has incorporated plans for a paseo/trail system that will connect public recreation area, schools, residential areas and commercial areas. 1.2 Promote the development of a comprehensive system of trails and open space areas that connect schools, public recreation areas, residential areas, and commercial centers. This policy is not applicable because the Harveston Specific Plan area is not located within the Old Town area. 1.3 Develop design standards to enhance the visual character of commercial centers that are located adjacent to I-15. The Harveston Specific Plan includes extensive design guidelines (see Section 10.0) and development standards (see Section 11.0) that will apply to the whole Specific Plan area (including the service commercial areas — adjacent to 1-15) and provide unifying elements to visually tie the community and create a distinct character. 1.4 Promote community identity by providing specially designed gateway signage at the primary entrances to the City. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes entry monumentation at the primary and secondary entrances to the community to promote an identity for the project area. (See Figures 10.2-10.5, Section 10.0, Design Guidelines). 1.5 Maintain and incorporate natural amenities such as: rock outcroppings, indigenous vegetation, streams and watercourses into development projects to protect the environment and provide natural landscaping, protect views, and to provide recreational opportunities in order to maintain the quality of life. FEBRUARY 2001 58 P:A200MN1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT The proposed project includes plans for a 10.5-acre Arroyo Park, which will recapture more naturalistic California landscape and provide a naturalistic setting for walking, hiking, and picnicking, therefore offering residents a different recreation experience. Goal 2: Design excellence in site planning, architecture, landscape architecture and signage in new development and modifications to existing development. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan introduces consistent and unifying design guidelines that would apply throughout the community to tie different elements into a design theme that would reject the image of the community. The Specific Plan includes flexible design standards for the commercial development that are compatible with standards for other uses in the community, yet create an identity for the commercial development. Additionally, the Harveston Specific Plan proposes entry monumentation at the primary and secondary entrances to the community to promote an identity for the project area. Policies 2.1 Establish and consistently apply design standards and guidelines for residential and non- residential development. The Harveston Specific Plan introduces consistent and unifying design guidelines (see Section 10.0) that would apply throughout the community to tie different elements into a design theme that would reflect the image of the community. 2.2 Promote a cohesive and integrated pattern of development for large undeveloped areas, by requiring the preparation of Specific Plans. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 2.3 Provide development standards to ensure higher quality design that is well integrated with the infrastructure and circulation systems. The Harveston Specific Plan as well as the Planning Area Development Standards (see Section 11.0) is compatible and well integrated with other elements in the Specific Plan document. 2.4 Formulate flexible design standards for commercial development that enhances the special identity and visual character of the commercial development. The Specific Plan includes flexible design standards for the commercial development that are compatible with standards for other uses in the community, yet create an identity for the commercial development. 2.5 Limit light/glare pollution through design standards for outdoor lighting and the use of low intensity lights. FEBRUARY 2001 59 P:120OWN/60?\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT The Harveston Specific Plan is located within thirty (30) miles of Mount Palomar Observatory. In order to reduce any potential impacts from light and glare, outdoor lighting will be from low pressure sodium lamps that are oriented and shielded to prevent direct illumination above the horizontal plane passing through luminare. 2.6 Enhance the individuality and special visual identity of commercial districts and unified streetscape plans. The proposed plan includes guidelines for different uses within the community and streetscape plans that seek to enhance the individuality and identity of each district and yet unify the whole community into a distinct design theme. Goal 3: Preservation and enhancement of the positive qualities of individual districts or neighborhoods. Discussion: Although this goal is not applicable because it pertains to existing older communities, the Specific Plan seeks to create neighborhoods with distinct character, yet tying them with unifying architectural and landscape themes. The use of landscaping is an important element in design of the Harveston Specific Plan. Landscape features from passive turf areas to group shade arbors and thematic and buffer landscape treatments all play important roles in creating a visually interesting development and reduce conflicts between different land uses. The Mixed Use Village Center in the Specific Plan area creates a pedestrian friendly environment where City residents can enjoy amenities such as plazas, gardens, gathering places, benches, and much more to have a recreational as well as social experience. Policies 3.1 Improve the appearance of neighborhood areas and the "edge" between neighborhoods through, landscaping, location of open space buffers, and special landscape features. The Harveston Specific Plan provides for special landscaping techniques as buffers between different planning areas and uses. 3.2 Preserve the scale and character of residential development by creating appropriate transitions between lower density, rural areas, and higher density development. The different land uses within the Specific Plan are arranged in a manner that creates transitions between different densities and different uses. Special design elements and landscaping achieves this transition. 3.3 Encourage the use of creative landscape design to create visual interest and reduce conflicts between different land uses. The use of landscaping is an important element in design of the Harveston Specific Plan. Landscape features from passive turf areas to group shade arbors and thematic and buffer FEBRUARY 2001 60 1PA2000\0160AGPCONS/STENCY.DOC COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT landscape treatments all play important roles in creating a visually interesting development and reduce conflicts between different land uses. 3.4 Improve the pedestrian orientation, convenience and safety of commercial centers through the provision of pedestrian amenities such as benches, plaza areas, information kiosks and other street furniture, and through careful site planning and architectural design. Goal 4: The Mixed Use Village Center in the Specific Plan area creates a pedestrian friendly environment where pedestrians can enjoy amenities such as plazas, gardens, gathering places, benches, and much more to have a recreational as well as social experience. A streetscape system that provides cohesiveness and enhances community image. Discussion: The sidewalks and paseos included in the proposed plan incorporate unique design features, landscaping, and amenities. Many of the proposed paseos will meander through the adjacent landscape; generous landscape parkways between roads and sidewalks create a positive image and provides identityfor the community. Policies 4.1 Promote the development of a continuous sidewalk and trail system throughout the City. The Harveston Specific Plan includes an extensive system of trails/paseos,- bike lanes, and sidewalks that circulate throughout the development and connect to city wide trail systems off - site. 4.2 Formulate a comprehensive streetscape program for the major streets in the City, including unified landscaping, lighting, paving patterns, and other public improvements. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 4.3 Encourage variety in the design of sidewalks and trails, with respect to alignment and surface materials, to provide a convenient and enjoyable experience for the users. The sidewalks and paseos included in the proposed plan incorporate unique design features, landscaping, and amenities offering users a different recreational experience. Many of the proposed paseos will meander through the adjacent landscape. 4.4 Establish a city-wide street tree and median/slope planting program. Section 10.0, Design Guidelines, of the Harveston Specific Plan requires that a detailed landscape program and guidelines for roadways and slopes be prepared by a qualified landscape architect, subject to review by City staff. The landscaping guidelines include a special street tree and median/slope planting program. The City (TCSD) will maintain all the landscaped medians and LDZ's adjacent to single family residential, on roadways with a 66 foot ROW of larger. The applicant or master developer will be responsible for maintenance of all slopes planting areas until such time as these operations are the responsibility of other parties. FEBRUARY 2001 61 P:\20OMN/602\GPCONS(STENCY.DOC COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT 4.5 Where feasible, require the provision of landscaped parkways between roads and sidewalks. The roadway sections contained in Section 10.0, Design Guidelines, of the Specific Plan depict generous landscaped parkways between roads and sidewalks. 4.6 Arterial roads should be designed as landscaped parkways that serve as unifying urban design elements. The Design Guidelines (Section 10.0) of the Specific Plan include a unifying urban design theme for the arterial roads. 4.7 Encourage the use of drought tolerant landscape materials that are easy to maintain and are approved by the City's Parks and Recreation Department. The plant material selection for common landscape areas for Harveston is presented in a plant palette that is broken down into different types of uses within the Specific Plan area (see Section 10.0, Design Guidelines). The plant material guidelines provide flexibility and diversity in plant material selection, while maintaining a limited palette in order to give greater unity and thematic identity to the community. The plant palette includes drought tolerant materials and will be subject to approval by the City's Community Services Department. 4.8 Establish and enforce weed abatement programs on undeveloped properties and along major arterials. Goal 5: An effort to enforce weed abatement programs along major arterials will be part of the maintenance program for roadways identified in Section 10.0, Design Guidelines, of the Specific Plan. Protection of public views of significant natural features. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan will not impact public views of the surrounding significant natural features. The project site does not include any natural features that would be impacted by the development. Policies 5.1 Work with the County of Riverside to protect the surrounding hillside areas. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 5.2 Promote the development of turn -outs on scenic roads. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 62 P.\20OMN160PGPCONSISrfNCY.DOC COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT 5.3 Require the revegetation and maintenance of graded slope areas. Goal 6: The Harveston Specific Plan (see Section &0, Grading Plan and 9.0, Landscaping) requires the revegetation and maintenance of graded slope areas. Maintenance and enhancement of the City's public spaces and resources. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan promotes public spaces within the development. In areas of high pedestrian activity (i.e., the Mixed Use Village Center) provisions for street furniture and shade trees are included. Outdoor sitting area and plazas are part of the Mixed Use Village Center. In addition, in paseos and passive recreation parks, trees and benches are provided for the convenience and comfort of the users. Policies 6.1 Provide for street furniture in areas with high pedestrian activity and provide for shade trees in shopping areas. The Design Guidelines of the Specific Plan provides detailed description of roadways, including street furniture and other elements. In areas of high pedestrian activity (i.e., the Mixed Use Village Center) provisions for street furniture and shade trees are included. In addition, in paseos and passive recreation parks, trees and benches are provided for the convenience and comfort of the users. 6.2 Establish improvement plans for the City's public spaces and include these plans in the Capital Improvement Program. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 6.3 Assure that operating and maintenance costs are adequately provided for public facilities. Goal 7: Section 12.0, Implementation and Administration, of the Specific Plan addresses costs of operating and maintaining public facilities. Additionally, Development Impact Fees, to be paid by the project, will provide for capital improvements. Community gathering areas, which provide for the social, civic, cultural and recreational needs of the community. Discussion: —he Harveston Specific Plan proposes gathering areas and plazas within the commercial -mcnts (Mixed Use Village Center) that will also accommodate social events. 'he Village Green creates a public gathering place, which will encourage social 00 "munity activities, such as concerts or farmers markets. Alsu, mini parks in r 63 p:1Z00P8N1601\GPCONSISfENCKDOC COMMUNITY DESIGN ELEMENT addition . to paseos and passive recreational parks and a clubhouse facility are provided throughout the development where residents will gather for social and recreational activities. Policies 7.1 Encourage the development of public spaces and plazas within commercial developments that can accommodate cultural and social events and function as community gathering areas. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes gothering areas and plazas within the commercial developments (Mixed Use Village Center) that will accommodate social events. Additionally, the Village Green creates a public gathering place, which will encourage social interaction and community activities, such as concerts orfarmers markets. 7.2 Encourage the development of multi -purpose facilities within commercial developments that may be leased for a variety of public and private events. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes multi purpose facilities within the commercial developments (Mixed Use Village Center) that will accommodate public and private events. The Village Club will include facilities that can be utilized for events such as weddings. Additionally, uses within the Mixed Use Village Center such as church can accommodate public and private events. 7.3 Encourage the development of a range of uses within commercial developments that provide for .day and evening activities. Day and evening activities are permitted and encouraged within the Mixed Use Village Center and Service Commercial areas. 7.4 Encourage development of common areas and facilities within residential developments to provide gathering areas for social and recreational activities. Mini parks in addition to paseos and passive recreational parks and a clubhouse facility are provided throughout the development where residents will gather for social and recreational activities. 7.5 Encourage the development of employee lunch areas within the industrialfbusiness park facilities. Some industrial/business park uses are permitted within Planning Are No. 12 of the Specific Plan. While the Specific Plan does not expressly require employee lunch areas within the industrial/business'park areas, the City's Development Code does. Section 12.1 of the Specific Plan states: "any development regulation and building requirement not addressed in the Specific Plan shall be subject to the City's adopted regulations. " It is anticipated that these employee lunch areas will be provided if these uses are developed. 7-6 Promote the provision of cultural facilities within the community including: art museums, theaters, performing art centers, outdoor amphitheaters, and special cultural exhibitions. The Harveston Specific Plen includes a Village Club where above activities are allowed and encouraged. Additionally, outdoor activities such as exhibitions, outdoor amphitheaters, and public gathering are also permitted in open space areas adjacent to the Mixed Use Village Center. FEBRUARY 2001 64 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ELEMENT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ELEMENT Goal 1: Development of a strong base of clean manufacturing activities which employs a skilled labor force and can be successfully integrated into Temecula's community character. Some clean manufacturing uses are allowed in the Planning Area No. 12 of the Specific Plan. This may contribute to the existing strong base of clean manufacturing activities which employs a skilled labor force. This type of development will also be held to the standards required of other clean manufacturing uses, thereby being successfully integrated into Temecula's community character. . Goal 2: Diversification of the economic base to include a range of manufacturing, retail and service activities. Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan has been designed taking into account the City of Temecula's socio- economic patterns, and therefore, will adapt to the City's both short and long-term economic conditions. The proposed project includes plans for retail, service commercial, and other activities that provides a broad selection of high -quality goods and services for residents, workers and tourists. Policies 2.1 Provide for industrial land uses, which facilitate a variety of user types, including manufacturing space, storage and distribution, back -office space, and research and development space. This policy is not applicable because the Harveston Specific Plan does not include industrial and manufacturing uses. 2.2 Plan for land use and development patterns that allow succession_ of use and will adapt to Temecula's economic conditions. The Harveston Specific Plan has been designed taking into account the City of Temecula's socio- economic patterns, and therefore, will -adapt' to, the City's both short and long-term economic conditions. 2.3 Promote development of properly located and well designed commercial centers to meet. the diverse service needs of the City. The Harveston Specific Plan includes plans for well designed commercial centers that will meet the many service needs of the City. The appropriate location of the Service Commercial supports the above policy. 2.4 Promote retail and other support activities that provide a broader selection of high -quality goods and services for residents, workers and tourists, including .apparel;, general., merchandise, home furnishings and appliances. FEBRUARY 2001 65 PA200NN160AGPCONSISTENCY.DOC E-eeNemi&DE,vELO.PMENT ELEmml' The proposed project includes plans Jor..ret4jl *and other activities that provides a broad selection of high -quality goods and services for residents, workers and tourists. 2.5-.. Use -redevelopment powers and opportunities to enhance development opportunities. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Goal 3: Maintajq, qn. economic, base, to provide, .sound fiscal foundation for the City as well as quality community facilities and high senesce levels. Plan prwposes a ')ad array of uses ranging from neighborhood retail commercial to service commercial, residential, recreational and school. The uses are phased in a manner to balance revenuegenerating land uses with uses that have negative fiscal impacts. o mme rqja?,,..activitieSi pfgy.ided for within the Specific Plan area will greatly help in providing fiscal b<#ance,,loyal tax, and emplqymfnt opportunities. Policies 3A J-;mfoqragq a_ pattern, of.deyelQpment, iha,tA)�Iiiices revenue generating land uses in phase with oth(vuses that havenegati.ye fiscal impa ts- V,- f X The-Woiweston Specific Pla?'z proposes a broad array of uses ranging from neighborhood retail commercial to service commercial, residential, recreational and school. The uses are phased in a manner to balance revenue generating land uses with uses that have negative fiscal impacts. 3.2 Encourage the growth or relocation", of - industries that generate local tax and employment advantages. The -; -c9mmirc4, activities provided for. within the Specific Plan area will greatly help in prqviding fiscal balance, local_tax, and employment opportunities. 3.3 Evaluate fiscal impacts of new development on an ongoing basis and provide appropriate mitigation strategies. This policy is not applicablSpe ,Fpuse sra (.�jt i y directed policy. 3.4 Take advantage of Temecula's regional capture of taxable sales and continue to establish i,,.Temecula as retailing center along lhS,1 kers,tate 15 corridor. fiq izcres of service commercial uses, which will help f.4R_,�c9nt9ins-1124 gAl -j,T c -'-,a ong the Interstate 15 corridor. .eM�.cula as a re FEBRUARY 2001 66 P.,\2000\8N1602\GPCONSISTENCY.DOC EcoNomic DEVELOPMENT LLEMENT_ Goal 4: Establishment of a diverse education and training and job placement system, -which will develop and maintain a high quality work, force in Temecula. IAi Discussion: The Harveston Specific Plan proposes leaming'institutions, such as university extehgibh, a junior college, and learning centers (for elementary through high school) within the Mixed Use Village Center. 7. Policies 4.1 Support economic development goals th ou hl a range 0,f 6d ucatioft-afid- itdinihg d6dWb'dt&,' The Harveston Specific Plan supports educational programs and activities that would benefit the residents locally and throughout the CityThe Mixed Use Village Cent&-,eontained in the Specific Plan permitted uses thd''t"l diffekenfedt&di� mdnd irdihing, activities and programs. 4.2 Establish a proactive, periodic dialogqe-e�ily in ihe p a.rmitig ptbdoss,7�bk�tween- the, City and educational institutions, including sch6o'l dikniictis'and community dol,16_geg'i�'dh issues related to the phasing of development, service standards and demands. During the development and design of ' the-Harveston Specific Plan, the project's�pldhniers have J "" - " . ­� 1 ,,. continually been in contact' with �ed�'c'a'iz6nal'-institutiphs-l-on such -:-.as A-hasing 'of development, service standards and demands. 2 he prcJ66t`i,iiiipacts`on ihese• institutions have been analyzed in the Environmental Impact Report. The project has been particularly in contact with the School District on the issue locating 12.'0,-dcre'Wementary- schbol withiwth,e project site. ..". , * 1, 1 - . � ., , � ! -. " I _�, - , . .. 1 ­1 1 . ','� 1, , a4 61 4.3 Explore the potential for a comprehensive: extension center through UC,'Riversidd-and/or the California State University system. The Harveston Specific Plan proposes learning institutions, such as university extension, a junior college, and learning centers (for elementar', ,y-.,through high school) �Withiir the,, Mit,,ed.' ume Village 9 Center. Goal 5: Promote the advantages to businesses 6f,locating in Temecula, including cost advantages, amenities, housing, community aciivi6s, vic sciM&s; Discussion: o The Harveston Specific Plan includes man ihc6itive for Tenmtula and in the Harveston community. The proposed project provides an array of housing opportunities with varying costs, sizes, and densities, wkiA. levels. In addition, it offers diverse amenities,"' -'; 60M`..,Ipa&,iv�throughout the community, which will appeal to many businesses. FEBRUARY 2001 7 w ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ELEMENT 5.1 Develop and maintain a marketing program to publicize the virtues of relocating to Temecula. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 5.2 Monitor the.economic conditions in Temecula in comparison to other locations in California and throughout the nation to determine relative advantages. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 5.3 Monitor the supply of housing in relation to the supply of jobs in terms of balancing area -wide jobs, households, worker earnings and housing expenses. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 5.4 Monitor existing businesses in Temecula and identify the elements of a business retention program. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. Goal 6: Develop Temecula as a comprehensive, recognizable tourist destination, with a range of attractions throughout and beyond the sphere of influence. This goal is not applicable because it is a City directed goal. Policies 6.1 Encourage and enhance cooperative efforts with the wine -making industry in the Temecula Valley to promote Temecula as a destination resort. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 6.2 Identify commercial recreation, convention and resort activities — including golf -oriented resorts — that can take advantage of Temecula's character and climate, while complementing wine - making activities. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 6.3 Revitalize and enhance Old Town to expand its role in local tourism and to improve its attractiveness, accessibility, and economic vitality. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. 6.4 Enhance the City's image through development of cultural facilities, including performance arts, museums. This policy is not applicable because it is a City directed policy. FEBRUARY 2001 68 P:V000IBN1602�GPCONSIS7ENCY.DOC PC RESOLUTION NO. 2020-36 A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA CERTIFY THE FINAL SUBSEQUENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPT FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPT A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPT A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (SP 13) (PA18-0660) Section 1. The Planning Commission of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. On May 7, 2018, Harveston-SAB LLC, a California Limited Liability Company, filed Planning Application Nos. PA18-0659, for a General Plan Amendment, and PA18-0660, for a Specific Plan Amendment. These applications (collectively, "Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. B. Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Pub. Res. Code § 21000, et seq.) and the State CEQA Guidelines (14 Cal. Code Regs. § 14000, et seq.), the City is the lead agency for the Project. C. The Project was processed, including but not limited to all public notices, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including CEQA. D. The Harveston Specific Plan (Specific Plan No. 13) was approved by the City Council on August 14, 2001 by the adoption of Resolution No. 01-72. Amendment No. 1 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) was approved by the City Council on August 26, 2003 by the adoption of Resolution No. 03-110. On August 14, 2001, the City Council certified the Program Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Harveston Specific Plan (SCH #99041033). E. CEQA encourages "tiering" EIRs for a sequence of actions so that later EIRs build on information in previous EIRs (Public Resources Code sections 21068.5 and 21093; CEQA Guidelines section 15152(d)). The Project is located within the Harveston Specific Plan area and, therefore, tiers off of the Program EIR for the Harveston Specific Plan. F. Pursuant to CEQA, City staff determined that the Project could have a significant effect on the environment and therefore a Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) should be prepared for the Project. G. On July 24, 2019, the City published and distributed a Notice of Preparation (NOP) to all agencies and persons that might be affected by the Project. The NOP was also distributed through the State Office of Planning and Research, State Clearinghouse (SCH # 2019070974). The NOP was circulated from July 24, 2019 through August 22, 2019 to receive comments and input from interested public agencies and private parties on issue to be addressed in the SEIR. H. On August 8, 2019, a public scoping meeting was held, at which time City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to comment on the issues to be addressed in the SEIR for the Project. I. Thereafter, the City contracted for the independent preparation of a SEIR for the Project, including all necessary technical studies and reports in support of the Draft SEIR. In accordance with CEQA and the CEQA Guidelines, the City analyzed the Project's potential impacts on the environment, potential mitigation, and potential alternatives to the Project. J. Thereafter, City staff filed a Notice of Completion with the State Clearinghouse, and circulated a Notice of Availability with the Draft SEIR and Appendices to the public and other interested parties, for a 45-day comment period between January 31, 2020 through March 16, 2020. The City published a Notice of Availability for the Draft SEIR in the San Diego Union Tribune, a newspaper of general circulation within the City. A Notice of Availability was also posted on the project site. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Community Development Department, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590; the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located at 41000 County Center Drive; the Temecula Chamber of Commerce located at 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A; and the City of Temecula website, where the documents were available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. K. During the comment period, the City received seven (7) written comments on the Draft SEIR from various agencies, individuals, and organizations. In compliance with CEQA Guidelines section 15088, the City prepared written responses to all comments. None of the comments presented any new significant environmental impacts or otherwise constituted significant new information requiring recirculation of the Draft SEIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines section 15088.5. L. The "Final SEIR" consists of the Draft SEIR and all of its appendices, the comments and responses to comments on the Draft SEIR, the Corrections and Additions to the SEIR, and the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program. The Final SEIR was made available to the public and to all commenting agencies on October 29, 2020, which is at least 10 days prior to certification of the Final SEIR, in compliance with Public Resources Code Section 21092.5(a). M. On November 9, 2020, the Planning Commission, held a duly noticed public hearing to consider the Final SEIR and the Project, at which time the Planning Commission heard and considered information presented by City staff on the Project and its environmental review. In addition, interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify regarding this matter. N. The Planning Commission has reviewed and considered the entire record, including the Final SEIR, evidence presented prior to and at the hearing, staff reports, technical studies, appendices, plans, and other materials: O. CEQA Guidelines section 15091 requires that the City, before approving the Project, make one or more of the following written finding(s) for each significant effect identified in the Final SEIR accompanied by a brief explanation of the rationale for each finding: 1. Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the project which avoid or substantially lessen the significant environmental effects as identified in the Final SEIR; or, 2. Such changes or alterations are within the responsibility and jurisdiction of another public agency and not the agency making the finding. Such changes have been adopted by such other agency or can and should be adopted by such other agency; or, 3. Specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including provision of employment opportunities for highly trained workers, make infeasible the mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the Final SEIR. P. These required written findings are set forth in Exhibit A, attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference as if set forth in full. Environmental impacts, or certain aspects of impacts, identified in the Final SEIR as potentially significant, but that can be reduced to less than significant levels with mitigation, are described in Exhibit A, Section IV. 2. The one environmental impact identified in the Final SEIR as significant and unavoidable despite the imposition of all feasible mitigation measures is described in Exhibit A, Section V. 3. Alternatives to the Project that might eliminate or reduce significant environmental impacts are described in Section VI of Exhibit A. Q. Public Resources Code section 21081.6 requires the City to prepare and adopt a mitigation monitoring and reporting program for any project for which mitigation measures have been imposed to assure compliance with the adopted mitigation measures. The Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program is attached hereto as Exhibit B, and is incorporated herein by reference. R. CEQA Guidelines section 15093 requires that if a project will cause significant unavoidable adverse impacts, the City must adopt a Statement of Overriding Considerations prior to approving the project. The Statement of Overriding Considerations is part of the findings, and is attached hereto as Exhibit A, and is incorporated herein by reference. Section 2. After due consideration of the Final SEIR and the Project, and in its independent judgment, the Planning Commission hereby finds and resolves that: A. All of the above recitals are true and correct, and are hereby incorporated into this section as though set forth in full. B. Agencies and interested members of the public have been afforded ample notice and opportunity to comment on the Final SEIR and on the Project. The Project has been environmentally reviewed pursuant to the provisions of CEQA and the State CEQA Guidelines. C. The Planning Commission has independently considered the administrative record before it, which is hereby incorporated by reference and which includes the Final SEIR, the written and oral comments on the Draft SEIR and Final SEIR, responses to comments incorporated into the Final SEIR, staff reports and presentations, and all oral and written testimony. D. The Final SEIR fully analyzes and discloses the potential impacts of the Project, and that those impacts have been mitigated or avoided to the extent feasible for the reasons set forth in the Findings attached herein as Exhibit A, with the exception of that impact found to be significant and unmitigable as discussed therein. E. The Final SEIR reflects the independent judgment of the Planning Commission. The Planning Commission further finds that the additional information provided in the staff reports, in comments on the Draft SEIR, the responses to comments on the Draft SEIR, and the evidence presented in written and oral testimony, does not constitute new information requiring recirculation of the SEIR under CEQA. None of the information presented has deprived the public of a meaningful opportunity to comment upon a substantial environmental impact of the Project or a feasible mitigation measure or alternative that the City has declined to implement. F. The Planning Commission, in the exercise of its independent judgment, hereby recommends that the City Council certify the Final SEIR for the Project, make appropriate environmental findings, adopt a Statement of Overriding Considerations, and adopt a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for the Project. The Planning Commission further recommends that the mitigation measures set forth therein be made applicable to the Project. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the City of Temecula Planning Commission this 91h day of November, 2020. r Lana' e Turley-Trejo, airperson ATTEST- G Luke Watson Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE )ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Luke Watson, Secretary of the Temecula Planning Commission, do hereby certify that the forgoing PC Resolution No. 2020-36 was duly and regularly adopted by the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula at a regular meeting thereof held on the 91h day of November, 2020, by the following vote: AYES: 5 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: Guerriero, Telesio, Turley-Trejo, Watts, Youmans NOES: 0 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: None ABSENT: 0 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: None ABSTAIN: 0 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: None Luke Watson Secretary EXHIBIT A RESOLUTION NO.2020- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA CERTIFYING THE FINAL SUBSEQUENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPTING FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPTING A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPTING A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (SP 13) (PA18-0660) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Procedural Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. On May 7, 2018, Harveston-SAB LLC, a California Limited Liability Company, filed Planning Application Nos. PA18-0659, for a General Plan Amendment, and PA18-0660, for a Specific Plan Amendment. These applications (collectively, "Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. B. The Project was processed, including but not limited to all public notices, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Public Resources Code § 21000, et seq.) and the CEQA Guidelines (14 Cal. Code Regs. § 15000 et seq.). C. Pursuant to CEQA, the City is the lead agency for the Project because it is the public agency with the authority and principal responsibility for reviewing, considering, and potentially approving the Project. D. The Project was processed, including but not limited to all public notices, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including CEQA. E. The Harveston Specific Plan (Specific Plan No. 13) was approved by the City Council on August 14, 2001 by the adoption of Resolution No. 01-72. Amendment No. 1 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) was approved by the City Council on August 26, 2003, by the adoption of Resolution No. 03-110. On August 14, 2001, the City Council certified the Program Environmental Impact Report for the Harveston Specific Plan (SCH #99041033). F. CEQA encourages "tiering" EIRs for a sequence of actions so that later EIRs build on information in previous EIRs (Public Resources Code sections 21068.5 and 21093; CEQA Guidelines section 15152(d)). The Project is located within the Harveston Specific Plan area and, therefore, tiers off of the Program EIR for the Harveston Specific Plan. G. Pursuant to CEQA, City staff determined that the Project could have a significant effect on the environment and therefore a Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) should be prepared for the Project. H. On July 24, 2019, in accordance with CEQA Guidelines section 15082, the City published and distributed a Notice of Preparation (NOP) to all agencies and persons that might be affected by the Project. The NOP was also distributed through the State Office of Planning and Research, State Clearinghouse (SCH #2019070974). The NOP was circulated from July 24, 2019 through August 22, 2019 to receive comments and input from interested public agencies and private parties on issue to be addressed in the SEIR. I. On August 8, 2019, in accordance with CEQA Guidelines section 15082(c)(1), the City held a public scoping meeting to obtain comments from interested parties on the scope of the Draft SEIR. J. In response to the NOP, four (4) written comments were received from various individuals and organizations. These comment letters assisted the City in formulating the analysis in the Draft SEIR. K. Thereafter, the City contracted for the independent preparation of a Draft SEIR for the Project, including all necessary technical studies and reports in support of the Draft SEIR. In accordance with CEQA and the CEQA Guidelines, the City analyzed the Project's potential impacts on the environment, potential mitigation, and potential alternatives to the Project. L. Upon completion of the Draft SEIR in January 2020, the City initiated a public comment period by filing a Notice of Completion with the State Office of Planning and Research on January 31, 2020. The City also published a Notice of Availability for the Draft SEIR in San Diego Union Tribune, a newspaper of general circulation within the City. A Notice of Availability was also posted on the project site. M. The Draft SEIR was circulated for public review from January 31, 2020 through March 16, 2020. Copies of the Draft SEIR were sent to various public agencies, as well as to organizations and individuals requesting copies. In addition, copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Community Development Department, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590; the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located at 41000 County Center Drive; the Temecula Chamber of Commerce located at 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A; and the City of Temecula website, where the documents have been available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. N. In response to the Draft SEIR, the City received seven (7) written comments from various agencies, individuals, and organizations. In compliance with CEQA Guidelines section 15088, the City prepared written responses to all comments. None of the comments presented any new significant environmental impacts or otherwise constituted significant new information requiring recirculation of the Draft SEIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines section 15088.5. Those comments and the Response to Comments, together with the Draft SEIR, the Corrections and Additions to the Draft SEIR, and the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, constitute the Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (Final SEIR). O. Pursuant to Public Resources Code section 21092.5, at least 10 days prior to certification, the City provided the Final SEIR, including responses to comments, to the public and all commenting public agencies. P. On November 9, 2020, the Planning Commission held a duly noticed public hearing to consider the Final SEIR and the Project, at which time heard and considered information presented by City staff on the Project and its environmental review. In addition, interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify regarding this matter.. Q. Following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearing and due consideration of the Project, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution No. 2020- recommending that the City Council certify the Final SEIR prepared for Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan, adopt Findings pursuant to CEQA, adopt a Statement of Overriding Considerations, and adopt a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for the Project. The Planning Commission also adopted Resolution No. 2020-_ and Resolution No. 2020- , thereby recommending that the City Council take various actions, including adoption of a Specific Plan Amendment and General Plan Amendment related to the approval of the Project. R. Section 15091 of the State CEQA Guidelines requires that the City, before approving a project for which an EIR is required, make one or more of the following written finding(s) for each significant effect identified in the Final SEIR accompanied by a brief explanation of the rationale for each finding: 1. Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the project which avoid or substantially lessen the significant environmental effects as identified in the Final SEIR; or, 2. Such changes or alterations are within the responsibility and jurisdiction of another public agency and not the agency making the finding. Such changes have been adopted by such other agency or can and should be adopted by such other agency; or, 3. Specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including provision of employment opportunities for highly trained workers, make infeasible the mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the Final SEIR. S. These required written findings are set forth in Exhibit A, attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference as if set forth in full. 1. Environmental impacts, or certain aspects of impacts, identified in the Final SEIR as potentially significant, but that can be reduced to less than significant levels with mitigation, are described in Exhibit A, Section IV. 2. The one environmental impact identified in the Final SEIR as significant and unavoidable despite the imposition of all feasible mitigation measures is described in Exhibit A, Section V. 3. Alternatives to the Project that might eliminate or reduce significant environmental impacts are described in Section VI of Exhibit A. T. CEQA section 21081.6 requires the City to prepare and adopt a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for any project for which mitigation measures have been imposed to ensure compliance with the adopted mitigation measures. The Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program is attached to this Resolution as Exhibit B, and is herein incorporated by reference as if set forth in full. U. CEQA Guidelines section 15093 requires that if a project will cause significant unavoidable adverse impacts, the City must adopt a Statement of Overriding Considerations prior to approving the project. A Statement of Overriding Considerations states that any significant adverse project effects are acceptable if expected project benefits outweigh unavoidable adverse environmental impacts. The Statement of Overriding Considerations is part of the findings, and is attached hereto as Exhibit A, and is incorporated herein by reference as if set forth in full. V. Prior to taking action, the City Council has heard, been presented with, reviewed, and considered the information and data in the administrative record, including the Final SEIR, the written and oral comments on the Draft SEIR and Final SEIR, responses to comments, staff reports and presentations, technical studies, appendices, and all oral and written testimony presented prior to and during the public hearings on the Project. W. Custodian of Records. The City Clerk of the City of Temecula is the custodian of records, and the documents and other materials that constitute the record of proceedings upon which this decision is based are located at the Office of the City Clerk, City of Temecula, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590. Section 2. Substantive Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula, California does hereby: A. Declare that the above Procedural Findings are true and correct, and hereby incorporates them herein by this reference as though set forth in full. B. Find that agencies and interested members of the public have been afforded ample notice and opportunity to comment on the Final SEIR and on the Project. C. Find and declare that the City Council has independently considered the administrative record before it, which is hereby incorporated by reference and which includes the Final SEIR, the written and oral comments on the Draft SEIR, responses to comments incorporated into the Final SEIR, staff reports and presentations, and all testimony related to environmental issues regarding the Project. D. Find and determine that the Final SEIR fully analyzes and discloses the potential impacts of the Project, and that those impacts have been mitigated or avoided to the extent feasible for the reasons set forth in the Findings attached as Exhibit A and incorporated herein by reference, with the exception of those impacts found to be significant and unmitigable as discussed therein. E. Find and declare that the Final SEIR reflects the independent judgment of the City Council. The City Council further finds that the additional information provided in the staff reports, in comments on the Draft SEIR, the responses to comments on the Draft SEIR, and the evidence presented in written and oral testimony, does not constitute new information requiring recirculation of the SEIR under CEQA. None of the information presented has deprived the public of a meaningful opportunity to comment upon a substantial environmental impact of the Project or a feasible mitigation measure or alternative that the City has declined to implement. F. Certify the Final SEIR as being in compliance with CEQA. The City Council further adopts the Findings pursuant to CEQA as set forth in Exhibit A; adopts the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program attached as Exhibit B; and adopts the Statement of Overriding Considerations as set forth in Exhibit A. The City Council further determines that all of the findings made in this Resolution (including Exhibit A) are based upon the information and evidence set forth in the Final SEIR and upon other substantial evidence that has been presented at the hearings before the Planning Commission and the City Council, and in the record of the proceedings. The City Council further finds that each of the overriding benefits stated in Exhibit A, by itself, would individually justify proceeding with the Project despite any significant unavoidable impacts identified in the Final SEIR or alleged in the record of proceedings. G. The City Council hereby imposes as a condition on the Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan each mitigation measure specified in Exhibit B, and directs City staff to implement and to monitor the mitigation measures as described in Exhibit B. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this I" day of December, 2020. Maryann Edwards, Mayor Pro Tern ATTEST: Randi Johl, City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Randi Johl, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 2020- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the 1 st day of December, 2020 by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Randi Johl, City Clerk EXHIBIT A Final HARVESTON GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT AND SPECIFIC PLAN AMENDMENT - PLANNING AREA 12 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations State Clearinghouse No. 2019070974 Prepared for City of Temecula October 2020 F ESA Final HARVESTON GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT AND SPECIFIC PLAN AMENDMENT - PLANNING AREA 12 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations State Clearinghouse No. 2019070974 Prepared for City of Temecula 2121 Alton Parkway Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92606 949.753.7001 esassoc.com Bend Orlando San Jose Camarillo Pasadena Santa Monica Delray Beach Petaluma Sarasota Destin Portland Seattle Irvine Sacramento Tampa Los Angeles San Diego Oakland San Francisco D181343 October 2020 ESA OUR COMMITMENT TO SUSTAINABILITY I ESA helps a variety of public and private sector clients plan and prepare for climate change and emerging regulations that limit GHG emissions. ESA is a registered assessor with the California Climate Action Registry, a Climate Leader, and founding reporter for the Climate Registry. ESA is also a corporate member of the U.S. Green Building Council and the Business Council on Climate Change (BC3). Internally, ESA has adopted a Sustainability Vision and Policy Statement and a plan to reduce waste and energy within our operations. This document was produced using recycled paper. TABLE OF CONTENTS Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations for Harveston General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan Amendment — Planning Area 12 Paqe I. Introduction.....................................................................................................................1 II. Project Description........................................................................................................1 III. Previous Environmental Review..................................................................................2 IV. Potentially Significant Environmental Impacts Determined to be Mitigated to a Less Than Significant Level..................................................................................4 V. Potentially Significant Environmental Impacts Determined to be Significant and Unavoidable.......................................................................................25 VI. Project Alternatives ................................... VII. Statement of Overriding Considerations 26 31 Harveston GPA/SPA— Planning Area 12 I ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Table of Contents This page intentionally left blank Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 II ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of April 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations Harveston General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan Amendment — Planning Area 12 I. Introduction The California Environmental Quality Act, Public Resources Code § 21000, et seq. ("CEQA") and the State CEQA Guidelines, 14 Cal. Code Regs. § 15000, et seq. (the "Guidelines") provide that no public agency shall approve or carry out a project for which an environmental impact report has been certified that identifies one or more significant effects on the environment caused by the project unless the public agency makes one or more of the following findings: A. Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the project, which avoid or substantially lessen the significant environmental effects identified in the Environmental Impact Report (EIR). B. Such changes or alterations are within the responsibility of another public agency and not the agency making the finding. Such changes have been adopted by such other agency or can and should be adopted by such other agency. C. Specific economic, social, or other considerations make infeasible the mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the EIR.1 Pursuant to the requirements of CEQA, the City Council of the City of Temecula hereby makes the following environmental findings in connection with the proposed Harveston General Plan Amendment (GPA) and Specific Plan Amendment (SPA) — Planning Area 12 Project (Project), as more fully described in the Final Subsequent EIR (SEIR). These findings are based upon written and oral evidence included in the record of these proceedings, comments on the Draft SEIR and the written responses thereto, and reports presented to the Planning Commission and City Council by City staff and the City's environmental consultants. II. Project Description The Project is located within the Harveston Specific Plan that was approved in 2001. This Specific Plan covers approximately 550 acres and is located between Margarita Road and Interstate 15, along the Temecula City limits, in the northwest section of the City. The Specific 1 Cal. Pub. Res. Code § 21081; 14 Cal. Code Regs. § 15091. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Plan depicts a land use designation of Service Commercial for the Project Site. The Project would include a GPA that would change the existing General Plan land use designation from Service Commercial (SC) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) and a SPA that would include a residential overlay to the Specific Plan on an 87.54-acre portion of Planning Area 12. The residential overlay would allow the future development of a maximum of 1,000 residential units. As set forth in the SEIR, objectives that the City of Temecula and applicant seek to achieve with this Project (the "Project Objectives") are as follows: The Project objectives include: • Create a development compatible with and sensitive to the existing land uses in the Project area. • Provide high -quality residential development that would help to fulfill the City's regional housing needs. • Promote the development of residential land uses that convey a high quality visual image and character. • Provide high -quality residential architecture that will be required/needed within the proposed residential overlay. III. Previous Environmental Review The Harveston Specific Plan Draft EIR (State Clearinghouse No. 99041033), dated November 2000, and the Harveston Specific Plan Final EIR and Response to Comments (State Clearinghouse No. 99041033), dated February 2001, were certified on August 14, 2001. City staff has determined that the Project would result in new significant environmental impacts that were not previously addressed in the certified Harveston Specific Plan EIR, and therefore a Subsequent EIR, in accordance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15162, is the appropriate document to respond to the Project -specific changes. CEQA Guidelines Section 15150(a) states that an EIR: may incorporate by reference all or portions of another document which is a matter ofpublic record or is generally available to the public. Where all or part of another document is incorporated by reference, the incorporated language shall be considered to be set forth in full as part of the text of the EIR. In light of the previous environmental review contained in the Harveston Specific Plan EIR (2001), the Draft SEIR incorporated by reference the relevant analysis of environmental topics considered in the previously certified Harveston Specific Plan EIR. On July 24, 2019, in accordance with CEQA Guideline Section 15082, the City published a Notice of Preparation (NOP) of a Draft SEIR that included an Initial Study and circulated it to governmental agencies, organizations, and persons that may be interested in the Project, including land owners, tenants, and business owners in proximity to the site. The NOP requested comments Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 2 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations on the scope of the Draft SEIR, and asked that those agencies with regulatory authority over any aspect of the Project to describe that authority. The comment period extended through August 22, 2019. Responses to the NOP were received from the following agencies: (1) the Native American Heritage Commission, Cultural and Environmental Department, (2) the Riverside Transit Agency and (3) the South Coast Air Quality Management District. No project -specific concerns were raised by these agencies. In addition to the pubic noticing required under CEQA, City staff held an informational meeting on August 8, 2019 at the Harveston Lake House located at 29005 Lakehouse Road, Temecula, CA 92591. At the public scoping meeting, a brief presentation and overview of the Project was provided. After the presentation, oral and written comments on the scope of the environmental issues to be addressed in the Draft SEIR were accepted. The following list provides the key issues raised during the NOP comment period (refer to Appendix A of the Draft SEIR): • Recommended consultation with California Native Tribes (refer to Section 3.3, Cultural Resources, and Section 3.12, Tribal Cultural Resources, of the Draft SEIR); • Construction impacts with bus stop/relocation of bus stop temporarily (refer to Chapter 2.0, Project Description and Section 3.11, Transportation, of the Draft SEIR); • Recommendations provided by SCAQMD regarding the analysis of air quality (refer to Section 3.1, Air Quality, and Section 3.5, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with aesthetics; • Concerns with air quality (refer to Section 3.1, Air Quality, and Section 3.5, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with hazards and hazardous materials; • Concerns with traffic on Ynez Road (refer to Section 3.11, Transportation, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with school capacities (refer to Section 3.9, Public Services, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with traffic generated by the Project (refer to Section 3.11, Transportation, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with traffic and how the overpass to I-15 is the key to traffic (refer to Section 3.11, Transportation, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with safe path to travel to schools (refer to Section 3.9, Public Services, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with parks (refer to Section 3.9, Public Services, and Section 3.10, Recreation, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with crime (refer to Section 3.9, Public Services, of the Draft SEIR); • Concerns with health issues for homes near the freeway (refer to Section 3.1, Air Quality, and Section 3.5, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change, of the Draft SEIR). Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 3 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations The level of specificity of an EIR is determined by the nature of the project and the rule of reason. Based on the environmental evaluations provided in the IS/NOP and the Draft SEIR, the environmental issues that were found to have no impact related to Project implementation included: aesthetics, agriculture and forestry, geology and soils, hazards and hazardous materials, hydrology and water quality, mineral resources, and wildfire. The environmental issues where impacts were found to be less than significant included: energy, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, land use and planning, population and housing, public services, recreation, and utilities and service systems. Through the preparation of an Initial Study and issuance of a Notice of Preparation, the City, as lead agency, has determined the key environmental issues that could have significant impacts prior to the implementation of mitigation, and which are the focus of this SEIR analysis, are: (A) air quality, (B) biological resources, (C) cultural resources, (D) noise, (E) transportation, and (F) tribal cultural resources. As discussed further below, air quality impacts remain significant and unavoidable following the imposition of all feasible mitigation. IV. Potentially Significant Environmental Impacts Determined to be Mitigated to a Less Than Significant Level The Draft SEIR identified the potential for the Project to cause significant environmental impacts in specific areas of: air quality; biological resources; cultural resources; noise; transportation; and tribal cultural resources. Measures have been identified that would mitigate all of the impacts in this section to a less than significant level. The City Council finds that the feasible mitigation measures for the Project identified in the Final Subsequent EIR would reduce the Project's impacts to a less than significant. A. Air Quality 1. Violation of Air Quality Standards (Project and Cumulative Construction) Construction activities associated with implementation of the Project could violate air quality standards related to NOx emissions and would result in significant air quality impacts. As described below, these impacts can be mitigated to less than significant levels. The Project would involve the construction of approximately 1,000 residences on 87.5 acres. Construction activities associated with the Project would generate NOx emissions from the following construction activities: (1) grading, and excavation; (2) construction workers traveling to and from Project Site; (3) delivery and hauling of construction supplies to, and debris from, the Project Site; (4) fuel combustion by on -site construction equipment; (5) building construction. The amount of NOx emissions generated on a daily basis could vary as a function of vehicle trips per day associated with debris hauling, delivery of construction materials, vendor trips, worker commute trips, and the types and number of heavy-duty, off -road equipment used and the intensity and frequency of their operation. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 4 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations The modeled peak daily NOx emissions associated with the Project's worst -case construction air emission scenario is provided in Table 3.1-7 of the Draft SEIR that shows the maximum NOx emissions could be 141 lbs/day. These potential maximum NOx emissions would exceed the SCAQMD regional significance threshold of 100 lbs/day, and therefore, represent a significant air quality impact. As described below, the impact from the generation of NOx emissions can be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the significant project and cumulative regional construction NOx emissions identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measure would reduce the project and cumulative regional construction NOx emissions to less than significant. Mitigation Measure AQ-1: During Project construction, all internal combustion engines/construction equipment (including tug boats but excluding crew and bio- survey boats) exceeding 50 horse power and operating on the Project Site shall meet Tier 4 CARB/U.S. EPA emission standards. If not already supplied with a factory equipped diesel particulate filter, all off -road diesel -powered construction equipment shall be outfitted with BACT devices certified by CARB. Any emissions control device used by the contractor shall achieve emission reductions that are no less than what could be achieved by a Level 3 diesel emissions control strategy for a similarly sized engine as defined by CARB regulations. In addition, construction equipment shall incorporate, where feasible, emissions savings technology such as hybrid drives and specific fuel economy standards. In the event that all off -road diesel -powered construction equipment cannot meet the Tier 4 engine certification, each project applicant shall use alternative measures, which include, but would not be limited to, reduction in the number and/or horsepower rating of construction equipment, limiting the number of daily construction haul truck trips to and from the Project, using cleaner vehicle fuel, and/or limiting the number of individual construction project phases occurring simultaneously. The effectiveness of alternative measures must be demonstrated through a future air emissions study with written findings supported by substantial evidence that is approved by the lead agency before use. b) Facts in Support of Findings The SEIR analysis of the Project determined that under an estimated worst -case construction scenario, implementation of the Project would result in significant air quality impacts associated with NOx emissions. Implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-1 would reduce the emissions of NOx. EPA Tier 4 standards require a significant reduction in NOx emissions associated with the internal combustion engines of construction equipment. As shown in Table 3.1-9 in Section 3.1, Air Quality, of the Draft SEIR, the modeled mitigated peak daily NOx emissions associated with the Project's worst -case construction scenario would be reduced to a maximum of 37 lbs/day which would not exceed the SCAQMD regional significance Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations threshold for NOx of 100 lbs/day. Therefore, construction NOx emissions would be reduced to less than significant. 2. Exposure of Sensitive Receptors to Pollutant Concentrations (Project and Cumulative Localized Operational Emissions) The daily on -site operational emissions generated by the Project were evaluated against SCAQMD's LSTs for a five -acre site at a distance of 82 feet to determine whether the emissions would cause or contribute to adverse localized air quality impacts. The nearest offsite sensitive receptors are the single-family residential dwelling units located across Ynez Road, approximately 100 feet from the Project Site. The Project's total operational -related emissions generated onsite are 2.14 lbs/day for PM2.5 which exceeds the SCAQMD's screening operational LST of 2.0 for PM2.5. Therefore, localized PM2.5 emissions from operational activities would be potentially significant. As described below, the impacts from the generation of operational PM2.5 emissions can be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the significant project and cumulative localized operational PM2.5 emissions to less than significant as identified in the Final SEIR. Mitigation Measure AQ-2: The following measures will be implemented to reduce operational emissions of ROG and NOX. These measures are not all inclusive and additional measures can be substituted or added to further reduce emissions. No residential units shall be constructed with fireplaces/hearths. If this measure is substituted, total emissions reductions from the added mitigation shall meet or exceed the emissions reductions from the removal of fireplaces from the Project (i.e., a reduction in emissions equal to or greater than the reduction in emissions between Table 3.18 and Table 3.1 10). • Residents of single-family units shall be provided information documenting the benefits of using low VOC paints and cleaning supplies. A Traffic Demand Management (TDM) program shall be developed to encourage the use of non -single occupant vehicles, including information on ride share, carpool, vanpool, bus, train and trolley opportunities within the City and the region. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 6 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations • All residential parking spaces provided shall be designed to, at a minimum, achieve CALGreen Tier 1 standards for electric vehicle supply equipment of the most current Title 24 iteration at the time of building construction.'. Implementing projects proposed within the SPA shall quantify NOX and ROG emissions from the implementing project operational activities and shall demonstrate achievement of the emissions performance standard of less than 55 pounds per day of ROG and less than 55 pounds per day of NOX. If the performance standard cannot be achieved, implementing projects shall incorporate all feasible project -level mitigation such that emissions of ROG and NOX are reduced to the furthest extent possible. b) Facts in Support of Findings The SEIR analysis of the Project determined that with the implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2, specifically banning fireplaces within the residential development, the Project's PM2.5 localized operational emissions would reduce from 2.14 lbs/day of PM2.5 (refer to Table 3.1-12, of the Draft SEIR) to 1.0 lbs/day of PM2.5 (refer to Table 3.1-14, of the Draft SEIR) which would not exceed the SCAQMD's significance threshold of 2.0 lbs/day. Therefore, the PM2.5 localized operational emissions would be reduced to less than significant. 3. Exposure of Sensitive Receptors to Pollutant Concentrations (Project and Cumulative Construction TAC Emissions) Project construction would result in short-term emissions of diesel PM, which is a toxic air contaminant (TAC). Diesel PM poses a carcinogenic health risk that is measured using an exposure period of 70 years. The exhaust of off -road heavy-duty diesel equipment would emit diesel PM during site grading; paving; installation of utilities, materials transport and handling; building construction; and other miscellaneous activities. The dose to which receptors are exposed is the primary factor used to determine health risk (i.e., the potential exposure to TACs to be compared to applicable standards). Dose is a function of the concentration of a substance or substances in the environment and the duration of exposure to the substance. Dose is positively correlated with time, meaning that a longer exposure period would result in a higher exposure level for the maximally exposed individual. Thus, the risks estimated for a maximally exposed individual are higher if a fixed exposure occurs over a longer period of time. According to OEHHA, carcinogenic health risk assessments, which determine the exposure of sensitive receptors to TAC emissions, should be based on a 70-year exposure period; however, such assessments should be limited to the period or duration of activities associated with the Proj ect. 2 The 2019 CALGreen standards require all single and two-family dwellings and townhouses with private attached garages to include a dedicated 208/240-volt branch circuit to be installed and for multi -family dwellings 15 percent of the total parking spaces (but no less than 1) shall provide capabilities for electrical vehicle charging. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 7 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Risk was calculated for the offsite and onsite residential receptors within 1,000 feet of the Project Site. There are no school receptors within this 1,000-foot radius. AERMOD was used to quantify concentrations at the offsite receptors. Health risk calculations were performed using a spreadsheet tool consistent with the OEHHA guidance. Detailed risk assessment is included as Appendix B, of the Draft SEIR. With Project construction activities, the maximum incremental increase in cancer risk is projected to be up to approximately 36-in-one million for construction risk for offsite residential receptors and 69-in-one million for onsite receptors. Risk for residential receptors would exceed the SCAQMD significance threshold of 10-in-one million, and therefore, impacts would be potentially significant. The maximum exposed offsite residential receptor is located directly across Ynez Rd west of Date Street. The maximum exposed onsite receptor would change depending on the location that is developed first. However, under a worst -case condition, the maximum exposed onsite receptor would be located close to and west of Date Street. As described below, the maximum cancer risk during construction activities would be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into the Project, which avoid or substantially lessen the potentially significant maximum cancer risk during construction activities. Mitigation: Implement Mitigation Measure AQ-1 and the following Mitigation Measure: Mitigation Measure AQ-3: During construction activities, the construction supervisor will ensure that any welders used onsite will be electric. b) Facts in Support of Findings The SEIR analysis of the Project determined that implementation of Mitigation Measures AQ-1 and AQ-3 would reduce maximum cancer risk for onsite residential receptors from 69 in one million prior to mitigation (refer to Table 3.1-13, of the Draft SEIR) to 2 in one million after mitigation (refer to Table 3.1-15, of the Draft SEIR). The reduction of the maximum cancer risk to 2 in one million would be less than SCAQMD's significance threshold of 10 in one million. Therefore, cancer risk impacts to onsite residential receptors would be reduced to less than significant. B. Biological Resources (Project and Cumulative) 1. Special Status Species, Sensitive Species, or Candidate Species (project and cumulative) The project would result in grading activities to the 87.5-acre Project Site. Project construction activities would result in the removal of non-native grassland habitat, Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 8 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations disturbed habitat, and urban/developed areas. The Project Site contains suitable nesting habitat for raptors and birds, including the California horned lark, protected under the MTBA and California Fish and Game Code (Sections 3503, 3503.5 and 3513) and contains suitable burrowing owl habitat. The proposed grading operations associated with the Project could result in significant impacts to suitable nesting habitat for raptors and birds, including the California horned lark and to suitable burrowing owl habitat. As described below, the potential impact to suitable nesting habitat for raptors and birds, and to suitable burrowing owl habitat would be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the significant raptors and birds nesting habitat and burrowing owl habitat as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce impacts to raptors and birds nesting habitat and burrowing owl habitat to less than significant. Mitigation Measures MM-BI0-1: Within three days of the start of any ground - disturbing activity during the nesting season (February 1 to August 31 for songbirds; January 15 to August 31 for raptors), a qualified biologist shall conduct a survey to determine if there are active nests within the onsite trees and vegetation. If an active nest is not found, no biological monitor is required. If active nests are detected, a minimum buffer (e.g., 300 feet for songbirds or 500 feet for raptors) around the nest shall be delineated and flagged, and no construction activity shall occur within the buffer area until a qualified biologist determines the nesting species have fledged and is no longer active or the nest has failed. The buffer may be modified (i.e., increased or decreased) and/or other recommendations proposed (e.g., a temporary soundwall) as determined appropriate by the qualified biologist to minimize impacts. The qualified biologist shall monitor the removal of onsite trees and vegetation. Nest buffer distance will be based on species, specific location of the nest, the intensity of construction activities, existing disturbances unrelated to the project and other factors. Mitigation Measure MM-BIO-2: Prior to the start of any ground -disturbing activity, each project applicant shall conduct protocol BUOW surveys in accordance with the protocols established by CDFW in the CDFW 2012 Staff Report on Burrowing Owl Mitigation to confirm the presence/absence of BUOW within the Project Site and the buffer area identified within the CDFW protocol; namely, a breeding season survey consisting of four visits (one during the period February 15 — April 15; two visits, at least three weeks apart, between April 15 and June 15; and a fourth visit after June 15, to be conducted at least three weeks after the third visit), and a one -day pre -construction survey to take place no more than 14 days before beginning ground -disturbing activities on the Project Site. For the timings of the breeding season surveys, these may be modified in collaboration with CDFW. If the burrowing owl is present, protective measures, including active or passive relocation, shall be developed in consultation with CDFW to ensure compliance with the Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 9 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Migratory Bird Treaty Act and other applicable CDFW Code requirements and include, but are not limited to the following: • Occupied BUOW shall not be disturbed during nesting season unless a qualified biologist verifies through non-invasive methods that either 1) the birds have not begun egg -laying or incubation or 2) that juveniles from the occupied burrows are foraging independently and are capable of an independent survival flight. A burrowing owl relocation plan shall be prepared that recommends methods needed to relocate the burrowing owls from the project site and provide measures that will be implemented for the maintenance, monitoring, and reporting of the relocated burrowing owls to increase chances of survivorship and better ensure compliance with CDFW guidelines. This plan shall be implemented during the non -breeding season, and prior to seasonal rains to promote the best outcome for conservation of the burrowing owl. In addition to the above, each project applicant can choose to conduct additional BUOW surveys in advance of the prescribed pre -construction survey(s) protocol established by CDFW in order to assess the presence/absence of BUOW on the project site. Surveys conducted earlier than the prescribed pre -construction surveys per CDFW guidelines, would allow each project applicant to start early consultation with CDFW regarding BUOW relocation (assuming BUOW are present within the project site) well in advance of project construction activities. However, early surveys and consultation with CDFW does not eliminate the need to conduct a pre - construction clearance survey in accordance with CDFW guidelines. The pre - construction clearance survey shall be conducted within 14 days of ground disturbance to document the continued absence of burrowing owl from the project site as well as the buffer areas. If construction is delayed or suspended for more than 30 days after the clearance survey, the project site as well as the buffer areas shall be resurveyed. All protective measures, including relocation, shall be reviewed and approved by the CDFW prior to the initiating any ground disturbing activities. b) Facts in Support of Findings With the implementation of Mitigation Measure BIO-1, a qualified biologist would conduct a survey of active nests if construction activities were to occur during the nesting season. If nests are present, the qualified biologist would establish a minimum buffer around the nest so that no construction activities would occur within the buffer area. The implementation of Mitigation BIO-1 would reduce potential impacts to nesting raptors and birds to less than significant. With the implementation of Mitigation Measure BIO-2, a protocol survey prior to construction activities would occur to ensure that no burrowing owls were present on the site. If the burrowing owl is present, buffer areas identified within the CDFW protocol would be required to be established and a burrowing owl relocation plan Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 10 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations would be implemented. The implementation of Mitigation Measure 13I0-2 would reduce potential impacts to burrowing owls to less than significant. C. Cultural Resources 1. Historical Resources (Project and Cumulative) The Project has the potential to impact historical resources on the portions within the Harveston Specific Plan area. Although the Eastern Information Center (EIC) records search did not identify known archaeological or historic architectural resources within the Project, the subsurface archaeological sensitivity analysis indicates that the Project area has low potential to contain subsurface archaeological resources. Although no known historical resources were identified within the Project area, there exists the possibility, however slight, that Project -related ground disturbing activities may encounter disturbed and/or intact archaeological deposits that may qualify as historical resources. Therefore, the Project has the potential to cause a substantial change in the significance of a historical resource. As described below, potential impacts to historical resources would be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to historical resources as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce potential impacts to historical resources to less than significant. Mitigation Measure CUL-1: Prior to issuance of each grading permit and prior to the start of any ground -disturbing activity, each project applicant shall retain a qualified archaeologist, defined as an archeologist meeting the Secretary of the Interior's Professional Qualification Standards for archeology (U.S. Department of Interior 2012) and as approved by the City of Temecula, to provide archaeological expertise in carrying out all mitigation measures related to archeological resources (Mitigation Measures CUL 2 through CUL-7). Mitigation Measure CUL-2: Prior to any ground disturbing activities associated with the Project, the qualified archaeologist shall conduct cultural resources sensitivity training for all construction personnel. Construction personnel shall be informed of the types of archaeological resources that may be encountered, and of the proper procedures to be enacted in the event of an inadvertent discovery of archaeological resources or human remains. Each project applicant shall ensure that construction personnel are made available for and attend the training and retain documentation demonstrating attendance. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 11 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Mitigation Measure CUL-3: If grading activities are proposed within intact native sediments on the Project Site which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater, the qualified archaeologist shall monitor ground disturbing activities. If cultural resources are discovered, the qualified archaeologist shall have the authority to stop and redirect grading in the immediate area of a find in order to evaluate the find and determine the appropriate next steps in consultation with the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. During the course of monitoring, if the qualified archaeologist can demonstrate based on observations of subsurface conditions that the level of monitoring should be reduced, increased, or discontinued, the archaeologist, in consultation with each project applicant and the City of Temecula may adjust the level of monitoring, as warranted. Mitigation Measure CUL-4: If grading activities occur within previously graded sediments and inadvertent discoveries of subsurface cultural resources are discovered, each construction contractor shall suspend grading within 100 feet of the find until the qualified archaeologist evaluates the find and determines the appropriate next steps in consultation with the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. Mitigation Measure CUL-5: If inadvertent discoveries of subsurface cultural resources are discovered either within the intact native sediments or previously graded sediments, grading activities shall be suspended within 100 feet of the find and each project applicant, the qualified archaeologist, and the Pechanga Tribe shall assess the significance of such resources and shall meet and confer regarding the mitigation for such resources. • Pursuant to PRC Section 21083.2(b), avoidance is the preferred method of preservation for archaeological resources. If preservation in place is not feasible, each project applicant and Pechanga Tribe shall discuss reburial of the resources on the Project property, in perpetuity. The measures for reburial shall include, at least, the following: Measures and provisions to protect the future reburial area from any future impacts in perpetuity. Reburial shall not occur until all legally required cataloging and basic recordation have been completed, with an exception that sacred items, burial goods and Native American human remains are excluded. Any reburial process shall be culturally appropriate. Listing of contents and location of the reburial shall be included in the confidential Phase IV report. The Phase IV Report shall be filed with the City under a confidential cover and not subject to Public Records Request. If each project applicant and the Pechanga Tribe cannot agree on the significance or the mitigation for such resources, these issues will be presented to the Planning Director for decision. The Planning Director will make the determination based on the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act with respect to archaeological resources and will take into account the religious beliefs, customs, and practices of the Pechanga Tribe. Notwithstanding any other rights available under the law, the decision of the Planning Director will be appealable to the City Planning Commission and/or City of Temecula City Council. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 12 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations Any newly discovered cultural resources shall be subject to a cultural resources evaluation pursuant to state law prior to restarting grading within 100 feet of the discovered resources. The cultural resources evaluation of the newly discovered cultural resources shall be detailed in a Cultural Resources Treatment Plan ("Plan"). Furthermore, after ground disturbing activities are completed, the archeologist shall prepare a monitoring report (consistent with the County of Riverside Phase IV monitoring report requirements) and submit the monitoring report to the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. Mitigation Measure CUL-6: The landowner shall relinquish ownership of all cultural resources, including sacred items. burial goods and all archaeological artifacts that are recovered as a result of Project implementation to the Pechanga Tribe for proper treatment and disposition. Mitigation Measure CUL-7: The developer is required to enter into a Cultural Resources Treatment Agreement with the Pechanga Tribe. The agreement shall be in place prior to issuance of each grading permit. To accomplish this, each project applicant should contact the Pechanga Tribe no less than 30 days and no more than 60 days prior to issuance of each grading permit. This Agreement will address the treatment and disposition of cultural resources, the designation, responsibilities, and participation of professional Pechanga Tribal monitors during grading, excavation and ground disturbing activities; project grading and development scheduling; terms of compensation for the monitors; and treatment and final disposition of any cultural resources, sacred sites, and human remains discovered onsite. The Pechanga monitor's authority to stop and redirect grading will be exercised in consultation with the project archaeologist in order to evaluate the significance of any potential resources discovered on the property. Pechanga and archaeological monitors shall be allowed to monitor all grading, excavation and groundbreaking activities, and shall also have the limited authority to stop and redirect grading activities should an inadvertent cultural resource be identified. b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with CEQA Guidelines Sections 15064.5(b)(1), and 15064.5(b)(4), which require a lead agency to identify feasible measures to mitigate a substantial adverse change in the significance of a historical resource. Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7 present feasible measures to reduce substantial adverse changes in the significance of historical resources by requiring qualified technical specialists to provide oversight and worker training, as well as define the specialists' qualifications. These measures also provide clear parameters for resource monitoring and steps to be executed if a cultural resources qualifying as unique archaeological resources are discovered. With implementation of these measures, impacts to resources qualifying as historical resources would be less than significant. 2. Unique Archeological Resources (Project and Cumulative) The Project has the potential to impact unique archeological resources on the portions within the Harveston Specific Plan area. Although the Eastern Information Center (EIC) records search did not identify known archaeological or historic architectural resources Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 13 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations within the Project, the subsurface archaeological sensitivity analysis indicates that the Project area has low potential to contain subsurface archaeological resources. Although no known archaeological resources were identified within the Project area, there exist the possibility, however slight, that archaeological resources that qualify as unique archaeological resources could be encountered during Project -related ground disturbance within intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site. Therefore, the Project has the potential to cause a substantial change in the significance of a unique archeological resource. As described below, these impacts can be mitigated to less than significant levels. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to unique archaeological resources as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce potential impacts to unique archaeological resources to less than significant. Mitigation: Implementation of Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7. b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with CEQA Section 21083.1(a), which requires reasonable efforts be made to preserve in place any and all identified unique archaeological resources, as defined in Section 21083.2, that a lead agency has determined would be significantly impacted by a project. Mitigation Measures CUL- 1 through CUL-7 present reasonable efforts for the preservation in place of unique archaeological resources by requiring qualified technical specialists to provide oversight and worker training, as well as define the specialists' qualifications. These measures also provide clear parameters for resource monitoring and steps to be executed if a cultural resources qualifying as unique archaeological resources are discovered. With implementation of these measures, impacts to unique archaeological resources would be less than significant. 3. Human Remains (Project and Cumulative) There are no human remains known to exist within the Project, and given past mass grading, the potential for intact human remains is extremely low within previously disturbed sediments. However, should Project ground disturbing activities extend into intact native sediments underlying the zone subject to mass sheet grading in 2003, it is possible that such actions could unearth, expose, or disturb previously unknown human remains. Therefore, the Project has the potential to disturb human remains and impacts would be potentially significant. As described below, these impacts can be reduced to less than significant. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 14 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to human remains as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measure would reduce potential impacts to human remains to less than significant. Mitigation Measure CUL-8: If human remains are encountered, California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5 states that no further disturbance shall occur until the Riverside County Coroner has made the necessary findings as to origin. Further, pursuant to PRC Section 5097.98(b), remains shall be left in place and free from disturbance until a final decision as to the treatment and disposition has been made. If the Riverside County Coroner determines the remains to be Native American, the NAHC must be contacted within 24 hours. The NAHC must then immediately identify the MLD upon receiving notification of the discovery. The MLD shall then make recommendations within 48 hours and engage in consultation concerning the treatment of the remains as provided in PRC Section 5097.98. b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5 and California Public Resources Code Section 5097.98, which require protocols to be implemented should human remains be identified during excavation activities. Mitigation Measure CUL-8 includes the requirements as outlined in California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5 and California Public Resources Code Section 5097.98, and would reduce potential impacts on human remains to less than significant. 4. Paleontological Resources (Project and Cumulative) The Project is underlain by the Pauba Formation, which is known to contain vertebrate fossils of late Irvingtonian and early Rancholabrean ages, and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (LRCM) records search has identified a number of fossil localities associated with the Pauba Formation within approximately 0.5 mile of the Project. As such, the Pauba Formation has a high paleontological sensitivity, and there exists the possibility that Project -related ground disturbing activities extending beyond the disturbed zone previously subject to mass sheet grading in 2003 could result in significant impacts to paleontological resources. As described below, these impacts can be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to paleontological resources as identified in the Final SEIR. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 15 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations The following mitigation measures would reduce potential impacts to paleontological resources to less than significant. Mitigation Measure CUL-9: Prior to the start of earth moving activities, each project applicant shall retain a qualified paleontologist defined as one meeting SVP standards (Society for Vertebrate Paleontology, 2010) to attend any pre -grade construction meetings to determine when and where excavations extend into intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site Working with each project applicant and the construction crew, the qualified paleontologist shall determine a paleontological monitoring schedule. The qualified paleontologist, or a paleontological monitor working under the direct supervision of the qualified paleontologist, shall monitor all ground -disturbing activity that are proposed to extend into intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site. The location, duration, and timing of monitoring shall be determined by the qualified paleontologist designated for the Project in consultation with each project applicant and City and shall be based on a review of geologic maps and grading plans. During the course of monitoring, if the qualified paleontologist can demonstrate based on observations of subsurface conditions that the level of monitoring should be reduced, increased, or discontinued, the paleontologist, in consultation with each project applicant and City of Temecula may adjust the level of monitoring, as warranted. Monitoring activities shall be documented in a Paleontological Resources Monitoring Report to be prepared by the qualified paleontologist at the completion of construction and shall be provided to the City of Temecula and filed with the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County within six (6) months of grading completion for each individual project on the Project Site. Mitigation Measure CUL-10: Prior to start of earth moving activities that are proposed to extend into intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site, the qualified paleontologist shall conduct pre - construction worker paleontological resources sensitivity training. This training shall include information on what types of paleontological resources could be encountered during excavations, what to do in case an unanticipated discovery is made by a worker, and laws protecting paleontological resources. All construction personnel shall be informed of the possibility of encountering fossils and instructed to immediately inform the construction foreman or supervisor if any bones or other potential fossils are unexpectedly unearthed in an area where a paleontological monitor is not present. Mitigation Measure CUL-11: In the event of unanticipated discovery of paleontological resources when a paleontological monitor is not present, each construction contractor shall cease ground -disturbing activities within 50 feet of the find until it can be assessed by the qualified paleontologist. The qualified paleontologist shall assess the find, implement recovery and reporting measures, if necessary, and determine if paleontological monitoring is warranted once work resumes. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 16 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with Public Resources Code (PRC) Section 5097.5 and Section 30244, which require reasonable mitigation of adverse impacts to paleontological resources from developments on public (state, county, city, district) lands. Mitigation Measures CUL-9 through CUL-11 present reasonable mitigation of adverse impacts to paleontological resources by requiring qualified technical specialists to provide oversight and worker training, as well as define the specialists' qualifications. These measures also provide clear parameters for resource monitoring and steps to be executed if a paleontological resource is discovered. With implementation of these measures, impacts to paleontological resources would be less than significant. D. Noise (Cumulative) 1. Operational Noise New development within the Project area may introduce noise levels that could exceed the City's exterior and interior noise standards at future onsite residential locations. Temecula's Noise Element includes an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn for outdoor living areas such as backyard associated with residential uses and an interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Specifically, new development within the Project area could expose nearby onsite sensitive receptors to exterior noise levels exceeding 65 dBA Ldn over ambient levels and expose nearby onsite sensitive receptors to interior noise levels exceeding 45 dBA Ldn due to traffic levels, thus resulting in potentially significant noise impacts to onsite sensitive receptors. The onsite sensitive receptors could be exposed to significant exterior and interior noise levels from future traffic noise levels along (1) Ynez Road from Date Street to Country Center Drive, (2) Ynez Road from Date Street to Waverly Lane, (3) Date Street/French Valley Parkway from Ynez Road to the I-15/French Valley Parkway Interchange, (4) I-15 North of the I- 15/French Valley Parkway Interchange, (5) I-15 South of the I-I5/French Valley Parkway Interchange. As described below, these impacts can be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant exterior and interior noise impacts as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce potential exterior and interior noise impacts to less than significant. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 17 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations Exterior Noise Mitigation Mitigation Measure N-1: Ynez Road from Date Street to County Center Drive: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 304 feet of the Ynez Road centerline. The noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences proposed to be located within 304 feet of Ynez Road between Date Street and County Center Drive, each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-2: Ynez Road from Date Street to Waverly Lane: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 271 feet of the Ynez Road centerline. The noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences proposed to be located within 271 feet of Ynez Road between Date Street and Waverly Lane, each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-3: Date Street/French Valley Parkway from Ynez Road to the I 15/French Valley Parkway Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 551 feet of the Date Street/French Valley Parkway centerline. The noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences proposed to be located within 551 feet of Date Street/French Valley Parkway between Ynez Road to the I 15/French Valley Parkway Interchange, each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-4: 115 North of the Future I 15/French Valley Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located anywhere on the Project Site. The noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 18 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations uses. The features to attenuate freeway noise levels so that the exterior noise standards could be achieved include sound walls, berms, or a combination of the two. Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-5: 115 South of the Future I 15/French Valley Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located anywhere on the Project Site. The noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential uses. The features to attenuate freeway noise levels so that the exterior noise standards could be achieved include sound walls, berms, or a combination of the two. Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Interior Noise Mitigation Mitigation Measure N-6: Ynez Road from Date Street to County Center Drive: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 121 feet of the Ynez Road centerline to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within 121 feet from the Ynez Road centerline need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building construction (i.e., windows ranging up to STC-28). Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-7: Ynez Road from Date Street to Waverly Lane: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 108 feet of the Ynez Road centerline to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within 108 feet from the Ynez Road centerline need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building construction (i.e., windows ranging up to STC-28). Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-8: Date Street/French Valley Parkway from Ynez Road to the I 15/French Valley Parkway Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 219 feet of the Ynez Road centerline to achieve the interior noise Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 19 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within 219 feet from the Ynez Road centerline need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building construction (i.e., windows ranging up to STC-28). Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-9: I-15 North of the future I 15/French Valley Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features for all onsite residences to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within each residence need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building construction would provide. Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-10: I-15 South of the future I 15/French Valley Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features for all onsite residences to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within each residence need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building construction would provide. Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. b) Facts in Support of Findings The implementation of Mitigation Measures N-1 through N-5 would reduce exterior noise levels to achieve the exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn. This reduction would result in a less than significant impact. The implementation of Mitigation Measures N-6 through N-10 would reduce interior noise levels to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. This reduction would result in a less than significant impact. E. Transportation 1. Impacts on Transportation from Existing (2019) Conditions With Project (Project) The Project would result in the generation of 8,648 daily trips. These increase trips were distributed on the surrounding roadway network using the RivTAM traffic model and the distribution was manually refined based on the understanding of roadway conditions and local traffic patterns. After distribution of Project traffic, levels of service and increase in delay at intersections were evaluated. According to the City of Temecula Traffic Impact Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 20 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations Analysis Guidelines, "an increase in delay at an intersection of 2.0 seconds or more at intersections operating at an unacceptable level shall be considered a significant impact and mitigation measures will be required to reduce the delay to pre -project or acceptable conditions." The Project is not responsible for mitigating intersections for which the Project does not cause in an increase in delay of 2.0 or more seconds, even if the intersection is operating at an unacceptable LOS (LOS E or LOS F). Based on the evaluation in the Traffic Study, the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection is projected to operate at LOS F during the PM peak hour for Existing (2019) Conditions (With Project) with a change in average control delay of 28.8 seconds. As such, the Project is forecast to result in a significant impact at Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection under Existing (2019) Conditions With Project. As described below, the impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection can be reduced to less than significant level. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measure would reduce the potential impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection to less than significant. Mitigation Measure T-1: Ynez Road and Waverly Lane: Prior to the first building permit, the developer shall install a traffic signal with left and right turns permitted. b) Facts in Support of Findings After implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1, the intersection at Ynez Road & Waverly Lane would operate at an acceptable LOS A with a delay of 4.9 seconds. With implementation of this mitigation, this impact would be reduced to less than significant. 2. Impacts on Transportation from Cumulative Year (2024) Conditions With Project (Cumulative) Ambient growth rates and traffic assumed from local pending and approved development projects were applied to develop Cumulative Year (2024) Conditions Without Project traffic forecasts. Growth rates gathered from the RivTAM model were used to create ambient traffic forecasts for this scenario. The City of Temecula provided a list of pending and approved development projects assumed to be in operation by 2024 as well as assuming that the 1-1 5/French Valley Parkway Interchange project would be constructed. With the addition of Project traffic, the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection would operate at LOS F during the PM peak hour for Cumulative (2024) Conditions With Project with a change in average control delay of 23.3 seconds which is considered a significant cumulative impact. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 21 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations As described below, the 2024 cumulative impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection can be reduced to less than significant. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential 2024 cumulative significant impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measure would reduce the potential 2024 cumulative impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection to less than significant. Mitigation: Implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1. b) Facts in Support of Findings After implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1, the intersection at Ynez Road & Waverly Lane would improve during the PM peak hour from LOS F to LOS C or better. Therefore, with the implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1, the Project would result in a less than significant 2024 cumulative impact at this intersection. 3. Impacts on Transportation from General Plan Buildout (2035) Conditions (With Project) A detailed travel demand model was used to evaluate growth within the City of Temecula and in the surrounding region. RivTAM utilizes inputs such as land use, travel behavior, and roadway network characteristics (number of lanes, speed, etc.) to estimate traffic demand on area roadways. The model is calibrated specifically to evaluate Riverside County and meets state and federal guidelines for model calibration. Model traffic volume growth from base year to future year was applied to the existing (2019) traffic counts to develop the General Plan Buildout (2035) Conditions (Without Project) traffic forecasts. The project trip generation estimates were applied to the traffic forecasts developed for General Plan Buildout (2035) Conditions Without Project. The addition of the General Plan Buildout roadway improvement did not impact trip distribution. Based on the traffic evaluation, the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane would operate at LOS F during the AM and PM peak hour for General Plan Buildout (2035) Conditions With Project with a change in average control delay of 12.7 seconds during the AM peak hour and 34.6 sections during the PM peak hour. As such, the Project is forecast to result in a significant impact at Ynez Road/Waverly Lane under General Plan Buildout (2035) Conditions With Project. As described below, the 2035 cumulative impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection can be reduced to less than significant. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 22 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential 2035 cumulative significant impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measure would reduce the potential 2035 cumulative impact at the Ynez Road/Waverly Lane intersection to less than significant. Mitigation: Implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1. b) Facts in Support of Findings After implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1, the intersection at Ynez Road & Waverly Lane would improve during the AM and PM peak hour from LOS F to LOS A and LOS B, respectively. Therefore, with the implementation of Mitigation Measure T-1, the Project would result in a less than significant 2035 cumulative impact at this intersection. F. Tribal Cultural Resources 1. Tribal Cultural Resources (Public Resources Code section 5020.1(k)) (Project and Cumulative) The Project Site has undergone mass sheet grading in 2003 as part of the Harveston Specific Plan development. The mass grading extending to depths of 10 to 24 feet below surface, which removed all surface native soils that could have contained tribal cultural resources. Although no known resources were identified within the Project area, there exists the possibility, however slight, that Project -related ground disturbing activities may encounter disturbed and/or intact tribal cultural resources that may qualify as historical resources. Therefore, the Project has the potential to cause a substantial change in the significance of a tribal cultural resource that is eligible for listing in the California Register of Historical Resources, or in a local register of historical resources as defined in Public Resources Code section 5020.1(k). As described below, these impacts can be mitigated to less than significant levels. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to tribal cultural resources as defined in Public Resources Code section 5020.1(k) as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce potential impacts to tribal cultural resources as defined in Public Resources Code section 5020.1(k) to less than significant. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 23 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Mitigation: Implementation of Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7. b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with PRC Section 21082.3, which requires any mitigation measures agreed upon in the consultation conducted pursuant to Section 21080.3.2 shall be recommended for inclusion in the environmental document and in an adopted mitigation monitoring and reporting program, if determined to avoid or lessen the impact pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (b), and shall be fully enforceable. The measures should be feasible to avoid or substantially lessen the impact on the identified tribal cultural resource. Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7 are feasible measures that will substantially lessen potential impacts to tribal cultural resources should they be identified during project construction. With implementation of these measures, impacts to tribal cultural resources would be less than significant. 2. Tribal Cultural Resources (Public Resources Code section 5024.1) (Project and Cumulative) The Project Site has undergone mas sheet grading in 2003 as part of the Harveston Specific Plan development. The mass grading extending to depths of 10 to 24 feet below surface, which removed all surface native soils that could have contained tribal cultural resources. Although no known resources were identified within the Project area, there exists the possibility, however slight, that Project -related ground disturbing activities may encounter disturbed and/or intact tribal cultural resources that may qualify as historical resources. Therefore, the Project has the potential to cause a substantial change in the significance of a tribal cultural resource that is a resource determined by the lead agency, in its discretion and supported by substantial evidence, to be significant pursuant to criteria set forth in subdivision (c) of Public Resources Code section 5024.1. As described below, these impacts can be mitigated to less than significant levels. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project which avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant impacts to tribal cultural resources as defined in subdivision (c) of Public Resources Code section 5024.1 as identified in the Final SEIR. The following mitigation measures would reduce potential impacts to tribal cultural resources as defined in subdivision (c) of Public Resources Code section 5024.1 to less than significant. Mitigation: Implementation of Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 24 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations b) Facts in Support of Findings The Project would comply with PRC Section 21082.3, which requires any mitigation measures agreed upon in the consultation conducted pursuant to Section 21080.3.2 shall be recommended for inclusion in the environmental document and in an adopted mitigation monitoring and reporting program, if determined to avoid or lessen the impact pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (b), and shall be fully enforceable. The measures should be feasible to avoid or substantially lessen the impact on the identified tribal cultural resource. Mitigation Measures CUL-1 through CUL-7 are feasible measures that will substantially lessen potential impacts to tribal cultural resource should they be identified during project construction. With implementation of these measures, impacts to tribal cultural resources would be less than significant. V. Potentially Significant Environmental Impacts Determined to be Significant and Unavoidable In the environmental topical area of Air Quality, there are instances where potential environmental impacts would remain significant and unavoidable despite the inclusion of all feasible mitigation, as discussed below: A. Air Quality 1. Violation of Air Quality Standards — Operation (Project and Cumulative) Operation of the Project would result in long-term regional emissions of ozone precursors (NOx and ROG) associated with area sources, such as natural gas consumption, landscaping, applications of architectural coatings, and consumer products, in addition to operational mobile emissions. According to the Project's Traffic Study (refer to Appendix I, of this Draft SEIR), development of the Project would result in an increase in 8,648 daily vehicle trips. Modeled operations emissions are presented in Table 3.1-8. As shown, the Project would result in long-term regional emissions of NOx (79 lbs/day) and ROG (65 lbs/day) that would exceed the SCAQMD's thresholds for NOx and ROG of 75 lbs/day. Therefore, operational NOx and ROG emissions would have the potential to result in significant regional impacts. a) Findings Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into the Project that avoid or substantially lessen the potential significant environmental effect as identified in the SEIR. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 25 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including provision of employment opportunities for highly trained workers, make infeasible the mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the Final SEIR. Mitigation: Implement Mitigation Measure AQ-2. b) Facts in Support of Findings Implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 would reduce NOx and ROG emissions by increasing energy efficiencies and reducing vehicle miles traveled. However, because the Project does not have a specific design, nor the total number of units to be constructed is known, the reductions that would be afforded by the implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 cannot be quantified. It is not possible, without specific Project data, to identify which and to what extent the measures identified under Mitigation Measure AQ-2 would be implemented. Therefore, while implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 will result in reduced NOx and ROG emissions, it is not possible to determine if these reductions will be sufficient to reduce emissions to below regulatory thresholds. Therefore, with the implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2, which bans the inclusion of fireplaces in the residential development, ROG and NOx emissions would be reduced to 63 Ibs/day and 64 Ibs/day, respectively, but both emissions would continue to exceed the SCAQMD regional significance threshold of 55 lbs/day and the impact would be significant and unavoidable. VI. Project Alternatives A. Alternatives Considered but Rejected in the Program SEIR An EIR must briefly describe the rationale for selection and rejection of alternatives. The Lead Agency may make an initial determination as to which alternatives are potentially feasible and, therefore, merit in-depth consideration, and which are clearly infeasible. Alternatives that are remote or speculative, or the effects of which cannot be reasonably predicted, need not be considered (CEQA Guidelines, Section 15126.6(f)(3)). The development of the Project on an alternative site was not considered feasible, because no other sites are owned or controlled by the Project Applicant. No other sites were identified that would support the Project and meet the project objectives based on size, configuration, location, and proximity to existing infrastructure. Furthermore, the use of an alternative site would be expected to result in the same or similar environmental impacts as the Project. Accordingly, an alternative site was rejected from further consideration. B. Alternatives Considered in the Program EIR Four alternative scenarios, representing a range of reasonable alternatives to the Project, were selected for detailed analysis. The goal for evaluating these alternatives is to identify ways to Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 26 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations avoid or lessen the significant environmental effects resulting from implementation of the Project, while attaining most of the project objectives. The following sections provide a general description of each alternative, its ability to meet the project objectives, and a qualitative discussion of its comparative environmental impacts. As provided in Section 15126.6(d) of the CEQA Guidelines, the significant effects of these alternatives are identified in less detail than the analysis of the Project in Chapter 3 of this SEIR. • No Project/No Development Alternative (Alternative 1) • No Project/Existing Specific Plan Alternative (Alternative 2) • Mixed Residential Development Alternative (Alternative 3) • Alternative/Mixed Land Use Alternative (Alternative 4) 1. Alternative 1 —No Project/No Development Alternative a) Summary of Alternative The No Project/No Development Alternative (Alternative 1) assumes that the proposed General Plan Amendment (GPA) to update the land use designation from Service Commercial (SC) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) and the proposed Specific Plan Amendment (SPA) that would include a residential overlay would not be adopted and not implemented. Further, the No Project/No Development Alternative also assumes no development would occur with the current land use designation of Service Commercial (SC). The Project Site would be left in its current undeveloped and previously graded state. b) Reasons for Rejecting Alternative The No Project/No Development Alternative would result in no environmental impacts. As a result, this alternative would have less overall environmental impacts compared to the Project. However, this Alternative would not meet any of the project objectives. In addition, this Alternative would not support the development objectives for the Harveston General Plan Amendment/Specific Plan amendment for Planning Area 12. The City Council hereby finds that each of the reasons set forth above is an independent ground for rejecting Alternative 1, and by itself, independent of any other reason, justifies rejection of Alternative 1. 2. Alternative 2 —No Project/Existing Specific Plan Alternative a) Summary of Alternative The No Project/Existing Specific Plan Alternative (Alternative 2) assumes that the proposed General Plan Amendment (GPA) to update the land use designation from Service Commercial (SC) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) and the proposed Specific Plan Amendment (SPA) that would include a residential overlay would not Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 27 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations be adopted and not implemented. Instead, Alternative 2 assumes the current land use designation of Service Commercial (SC) would remain, and there would be no residential overlay within Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan. Based on the Temecula General Plan Land Use Element, the target floor area ratio for service commercial is 0.3. Therefore, the estimated buildable square footage for the 87.54- acre Project Site is approximately 1,143,973 square feet3 of service commercial uses. b) Reasons for Rejecting Alternative The No Project/Existing Specific Plan Alternative (Alternative 2) would result in the same impacts compared to the Project related to odors, biological resources, cultural resources, excessive groundborne vibrations, and tribal cultural resources. Alternative 2 would result in less impacts compared to the Project related to land use and planning, noise, population and housing, public services, recreation, and utilities and service systems. The No Project/Existing Specific Plan Alternative would result in greater impacts compared to the Project related to air quality, energy, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, and transportation. As stated previously, the air quality standards/violations related to regional operational emissions of NOx and ROG (Project and Cumulative level) is considered significant and unavoidable with implementation of the Project. Because Alternative 2 would result in 2.6 times more traffic volumes compared to the Project, substantially more air emissions would be generated during operational activities. The additional NOx and ROG emissions under Alternative 2 would result in a greater significant and unavoidable impact to air quality compared to the Project. Overall, Alternative 2 would result in greater environmental impacts as compared to the Project. Further, this Alternative would not meet key Project objectives as no residential development is proposed. Therefore, Alternative 2 would not fully achieve all of the Project objectives, and would not achieve some Project objectives at all (for example, provide high quality residential development to help fulfill the City's regional housing needs). The City Council hereby finds that each of the reasons set forth above is an independent ground for rejecting Alternative 2, and by itself, independent of any other reason, justifies rejection of Alternative 2. 3. Alternative 3 — Mixed Residential Development Alternative a) Summary of Alternative The Mixed Residential Development Alternative (Alternative 3) assumes that, similar to the Project, the proposed General Plan Amendment (GPA) to update the land use designation from Service Commercial (SC) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) and the proposed Specific Plan Amendment (SPA) that would include a residential overlay to Harveston Specific Plan on an 87.54-acre portion of Planning Area 12 3 87.54 acres X 43,560 square feet = 3,813,242 square feet X 0.3 = 1,143,973 square feet of service commercial uses. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 28 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations would be adopted and implemented. However, the residential overlay would not allow the future development of a maximum of 1,000 single-family residential units. Instead, for Alternative 3, it is assumed the residential overlay would allow the future development of a maximum of 570 single-family residential units (i.e., detached and attached) and 430 multi -family units (i.e., apartments). b) Reasons for Rejecting Alternative The Mixed Residential Development Alternative (Alternative 3) would result in the same impacts compared to the Project related to odors, biological resources, cultural resources, land use and planning, groundborne vibration, and tribal cultural resources. Alternative 3 would result in less impacts compared to the Project related to air quality, energy, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, noise, population and housing, public services, recreation, transportation, and utilities and service systems. The Mixed Residential Development Alternative would not result in greater impacts when compared to the Project. Air quality standards/violations related to regional operational emissions of NOx and ROG (Project and cumulative level) is considered a significant and unavoidable impact with the implementation of the Project. This Alternative would reduce the regional operational NOx and ROG emissions; however, even with this reduction, as well as the implementation of Mitigation Measures AQ-1 and AQ-2, the Alternative would still result in an exceedance of the South Coast Air Quality Management District's daily significance threshold for NOx and ROG, emissions would remain significant and unavoidable, and the Alternative's reduction in emissions is not considered a substantial reduction. Overall, this Alternative would result in less impacts compared to the Project; however, this Alternative would not avoid or substantially lessen any of the significant and unavoidable environmental effects of the Project. Alternative 3 could achieve all Project objectives; however, the implementation of Alternative 3 would eliminate the flexibility for home builders to respond to market conditions and the 57 percent to 43 percent housing mix of Alternative 3 may not be likely to be built. Alternative 3 limits the number and type of units built with a maximum of 570 single-family residential units (i.e., detached and attached) and a maximum of 430 multi -family units (i.e., apartments). Although this housing mix was identified as an alternative that could achieve the Project objectives, there is no market justification or housing study that demonstrates that this specific housing mix will provide the high -quality residential development consistent with the Project's objectives, and information submitted to the City subsequent to the publication of the Draft EIR, and contained in the record, suggests that it will not. Although Alternative 3 would result in less impacts compared to the Project, this alternative is less likely to lead to any housing if it cannot be built due to the elimination of the flexibility for home builders to respond to market conditions. In that event, the alternative will not achieve the critical objective of providing high -quality residential development that would help Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 29 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations fulfill the City's regional housing needs. The City Council hereby finds that each of the reasons set forth above is an independent ground for rejecting Alternative 3, and by itself, independent of any other reason, justifies rejection of Alternative 3. 4. Alternative 4 — Alternative/Mixed Use Land Use Alternative a) Summary of Alternative The Alternative/Mixed Use Land Use Alternative (Alternative 4) assumes that the current land use designation of Service Commercial (SC) would remain for the four (4) parcels adjacent and nearest the I-15 (APNs 916400058, 916400042, 916400052, and 91600053). The existing acreages for APNs 916400058, 916400042, 916400052, and 91600053 are approximately 4.81 acres, 10.21 acres, 5.36 acres, and 7.87 acres, respectively. These four (4) parcels comprise of approximately 28.25 acres, or approximately 32 percent of the Project Site. Applying the target floor area ratio of 0.3 for service commercial uses per Table 3.1, Detailed Land Use Summary, of the approved Harveston Specific Plan, Alternative 4 would assume a proposed 369,1714 square feet of service commercial uses within the Project Site. It is assumed the remaining parcels would include the General Plan Amendment (GPA) to update the land use designation from Service Commercial (SC) to Specific Plan Implementation (SPI). It is also assumed the remaining parcels would include the proposed Specific Plan Amendment (SPA) which would include a residential overlay. The remaining parcels comprise of approximately 59.29 acres, or approximately 68 percent of the Project Site which would comprise of approximately 680 single-family residential units (i.e., detached and attached). b) Reasons for Rejecting Alternative The Alternative/Mixed Land Use Alternative (Alternative 4) would result in the same impacts compared to the Project related to odors, biological resources, cultural resources, energy, land use and planning, noise, and tribal cultural resources. Alternative 4 would result in less impacts compared to the Project in regards to population and housing, public services, recreation, and utilities and service systems. The Alternative/Mixed Land Use Alternative would result in greater impacts compared to the Project related to air quality, greenhouse gas emission and climate change, and transportation. Air quality standards/violations related to regional operational emissions of NOx and ROG (Project and cumulative level) is significant and unavoidable with the implementation of the Project. This Alternative would result in a greater significant and unavoidable impact to air quality standards/violations related to regional operational emissions of NOx and ROG (Project and cumulative level) as compared to the Project. Overall, Alternative 4 would result in greater environmental impacts as compared to the Project. The City Council hereby finds that each of the reasons set 4 28.25 acres X 43,560 square feet = 1,230,570 square feet X 0.3 = 369,171 square feet of service commercial uses. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 30 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations and Facts in Su000rt of Findings and Statement of Overridina Considerations forth above is an independent ground for rejecting Alternative 4, and by itself, independent of any other reason, justifies rejection of Alternative 4. C. Environmentally Superior Alternative As required by CEQA Guidelines Section 15126.6, one of the alternatives must be identified as on Environmentally Superior Alternative. The Environmentally Superior Alternative is the one that would result in the fewest or least significant impacts. If the Environmentally Superior Alternative is the No Project Alternative, then an Environmentally Superior Alternative must be selected from the remaining alternatives. As discussed above, air quality standards/violations related to regional operational emissions of NOx and ROG (Project and cumulative level) is considered significant and unavoidable with the implementation of the Project. Alternative 3 would reduce the regional operational NOx and ROG emissions; however, even with this reduction, as well as the implementation of Mitigation Measures AQ-1 and AQ-2, Alternative 3 would still result in an exceedance of the South Coast Air Quality Management District's daily significance threshold for NOx and ROG, emissions would remain significant and unavoidable, and the decrease in emissions is not considered to be substantial. This Alternative could meet the objectives established for the Project. With the reduction of impacts, Alternative 3 is considered to be the environmentally superior alternative but, for the reasons stated above, is hereby rejected by the City Council. VII. Statement of Overriding Considerations The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires the lead agency to balance the benefits of a proposed project against its unavoidable environmental risks in determining whether to approve the project. The City of Temecula proposes to approve the Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 Project although significant and unavoidable impacts have been identified in the EIR. Specifically, the significant and unavoidable project and cumulative impacts are described below. A. Significant and Unavoidable Impacts 1. Air Quality Violation of Air Quality Standards — Operation (Project and Cumulative) Operation of the Project would result in long-term regional emissions of ozone precursors (NOx and ROG) associated with area sources, such as natural gas consumption, landscaping, applications of architectural coatings, and consumer products, in addition to operational mobile emissions. According to the Project's Traffic Study (refer to Appendix I, of this Draft SEIR), development of the Project would result in an increase in 8,648 daily vehicle trips. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 31 ESA / 13181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations Findings and Facts in Su000rt of Findinas and Statement of Overridina Considerations Modeled operations emissions are presented in Table 3.1-8. As shown, the Project would result in long-term regional emissions of NOx (79 lbs/day) and ROG (65 lbs/day) that would exceed the SCAQMD's thresholds for NOx and ROG of 75 lbs/day. Therefore, operational NOx and ROG emissions would have the potential to result in significant regional impacts. Implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 would reduce NOx and ROG emissions by increasing energy efficiencies and reducing vehicle miles traveled. However, because the Project does not have a specific design, nor the total number of units to be constructed is known, the reductions that would be afforded by the implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 cannot be quantified. It is not possible, without specific Project data, to identify which and to what extent the measures identified under Mitigation Measure AQ- 2 would be implemented. Therefore, while implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2 will result in reduced NOx and ROG emissions, it is not possible to determine if these reductions will be sufficient to reduce emissions to below regulatory thresholds. Therefore, with the implementation of Mitigation Measure AQ-2, which bans the inclusion of fireplaces in the residential development, ROG and NOx emissions would be reduced to 63 lbs/day and 64 lbs/day, respectively, but both emissions would continue to exceed the SCAQMD regional significance threshold of 55 lbs/day and the impact would be significant and unavoidable. 2. Project Benefits The City of Temecula has balanced the Project's benefits against the Project's significant and unavoidable impacts. The City of Temecula finds that each of the following benefits supports the overriding of the significant impacts identified above and in the EIR. • The Project will create a development compatible with and sensitive to the existing land uses in the Project area. Specifically, the Project will allow for a transition area between existing single family development to the east and the I-15 freeway and commercial uses to the west, thereby ensuring a gradual shift in scale. • The Project will provide the opportunity for high -quality residential development that would help to fulfill the City's regional housing needs, including the City's Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) requirement. • The Project allows for residential development in an area that already includes development, and thus the Project will help to reduce development pressure in rural areas. • The Project is located near an area with commercial, retail, and restaurant uses, and thus will encourage reduction in vehicle miles traveled. • The Project will promote the development of residential land uses that convey a high quality visual image and character. • The Project will provide high -quality residential architecture that will be required/needed within the proposed residential overlay. • The Project will provide flexibility for home builders to respond to market conditions. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 32 ESA / D181343 Findings and Facts in Support of Findings and Statement of October 2020 Overriding Considerations EXHIBIT B and TABLE 5-1 MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR THE HARVESTON GENERAL PLAN (GPA) AND SPECIFIC PLAN (SPA) — PLANNING AREA 12 PROJECT Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Mitigation Measures Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Air Quality Mitigation Measure AQ-1: During Project construction, all internal Construction City of City of Field combustion engines/construction equipment (including tug boats but Temecula Temecula Verification and excluding crew and bio-survey boats) exceeding 50 horse power Sign -Off by and operating on the Project Site shall meet Tier 4 CARB/U.S. EPA City of emission standards. If not already supplied with a factory equipped Temecula diesel particulate filter, all off -road diesel -powered construction equipment shall be outfitted with BACT devices certified by CARB. Any emissions control device used by the contractor shall achieve emission reductions that are no less than what could be achieved by a Level 3 diesel emissions control strategy for a similarly sized engine as defined by CARB regulations. In addition, construction equipment shall incorporate, where feasible, emissions savings technology such as hybrid drives and specific fuel economy standards. In the event that all off -road diesel -powered construction equipment cannot meet the Tier 4 engine certification, each project applicant shall use alternative measures, which include, but would not be limited to, reduction in the number and/or horsepower rating of construction equipment, limiting the number of daily construction haul truck trips to and from the Project, using cleaner vehicle fuel, and/or limiting the number of individual construction project phases occurring simultaneously. The effectiveness of alternative measures must be demonstrated through a future air emissions study with written findings supported by substantial evidence that is approved by the lead agency before use. Mitigation Measure AQ-2: The following measures will be Pre -Construction/ City of City of City of implemented to reduce operational emissions of ROG and NOx. Post -Construction Temecula Temecula Temecula These measures are not all inclusive and additional measures can Building Official Project be substituted or added to further reduce emissions. or other Approval • No residential units shall be constructed with fireplaces/hearths. Designee If this measure is substituted, total emissions reductions from the added mitigation shall meet or exceed the emissions reductions from the removal of fireplaces from the Project (i.e., a reduction in emissions equal to or greater than the reduction in emissions between Table 3.1-8 and 3.1-10). • Residents of single-family units shall be provided information documenting the benefits of using low VOC paints and cleaning supplies. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-2 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 Mitigation Measures Air Quality (cont.) Responsible Action Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance 5. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting I Verification of Compliance Initials Date Remarks • A Traffic Demand Management (TDM) program shall be developed to encourage the use of non -single occupant vehicles, including information on ride share, carpool, vanpool, bus, train and trolley opportunities within the City and the region. All residential parking spaces provided shall be designed to, at a minimum, achieve CALGreen Tier standards for electric vehicle supply equipment of the most current Title 24 iteration at the time of building construction. Implementing projects proposed within the SPA shall quantify NOx and ROG emissions from the implementing project operational activities and shall demonstrate achievement of the emissions performance standard of less than 55 pounds per day of ROG and less than 55 pounds per day of NOx. If the performance standard cannot be achieved, implementing projects shall incorporate all feasible project -level mitigation such that emissions of ROG and NOx are reduced to the furthest extent possible. Mitigation Measure AQ-3: During construction activities, the Construction City of City of Field construction supervisor will ensure that any welders used onsite will Temecula Temecula Verification and be electric. Sign -Off by City of Temecula Biological Resources Mitigation Measure BI0-1: Within three days of the start of any Pre -Construction City of City of Issuance of ground -disturbing activity during the nesting season (February 1 to Temecula Temecula Grading Permit August 31 for songbirds; January 15 to August 31 for raptors), a Qualified qualified biologist shall conduct a survey to determine if there are Biologist active nests within the onsite trees and vegetation. If an active nest is not found, no biological monitor is required. If active nests are detected, a minimum buffer (e.g., 300 feet for songbirds or 500 feet for raptors) around the nest shall be delineated and flagged, and no construction activity shall occur within the buffer area until a qualified biologist determines the nesting species have fledged and is no longer active or the nest has failed. The buffer may be modified (i.e., increased or decreased) and/or other recommendations proposed (e.g., a temporary soundwall) as determined appropriate by the qualified biologist to minimize impacts. The qualified biologist shall monitor the removal of onsite trees and vegetation. Nest buffer distance will be based on species, specific location of the nest, the intensity of construction activities, existing disturbances unrelated to the project and other factors. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-3 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Biological Resources (cont.) Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure 13I0-2: Prior to the start of any ground -disturbing Pre -Construction City of City of Issuance of activity, each project applicant shall conduct protocol BUOW surveys Temecula Temecula Grading Permit in accordance with the protocols established by CDFW in the CDFW Qualified 2012 Staff Report on Burrowing Owl Mitigation to confirm the Biologist presence/absence of BUOW within the Project Site and the buffer area identified within the CDFW protocolLnamely, a breeding season survey consisting of four visits (one during the period February 15 — April 15; two visits, at least three weeks apart, between April 15 and June 15; and a fourth visit after June 15, to be conducted at least three weeks after the third visit), and a one -day pre -construction survey to take place no more than 14 days before beginning ground -disturbing activities on the Project Site. For the timings of the breeding season surveys, these may be modified in collaboration with CDFW. If the burrowing owl is present, protective measures, including active or passive relocation, shall be developed in consultation with CDFW to ensure compliance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and other applicable CDFW Code requirements and include, but are not limited to the following: • Occupied BUOW shall not be disturbed during nesting season unless a qualified biologist verifies through non-invasive methods that either 1) the birds have not begun egg -laying or incubation or 2) that juveniles from the occupied burrows are foraging independently and are capable of an independent survival flight. • A burrowing owl relocation plan shall be prepared that recommends methods needed to relocate the burrowing owls from the project site and provide measures that will be implemented for the maintenance, monitoring, and reporting of the relocated burrowing owls to increase chances of survivorship and better ensure compliance with CDFW guidelines. This plan shall be implemented during the non -breeding season, and prior to seasonal rains to promote the best outcome for conservation of the burrowing owl. In addition to the above, each project applicant can choose to conduct additional BUOW surveys in advance of the prescribed pre - construction survey(s) protocol established by CDFW in order to assess the presence/absence of BUOW on the project site. Surveys conducted earlier than the prescribed pre -construction surveys per CDFW guidelines, would allow each project applicant to start early consultation with CDFW regarding BUOW relocation (assuming BUOW are present within the project site) well in advance of project construction activities. However, early surveys and consultation with CDFW does not eliminate the need to conduct a pre -construction clearance survey in accordance with CDFW guidelines. The pre- Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-4 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 Monitorina and Mitigation Measures Responsible Action Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Verification of Compliance Initials Date Remarks construction clearance survey shall be conducted within 14 days of ground disturbance to document the continued absence of burrowing owl from the project site as well as the buffer areas. If construction is delayed or suspended for more than 30 days after the clearance survey, the project site as well as the buffer areas shall be resurveyed. All protective measures, including relocation, shall be reviewed and approved by the CDFW prior to the initiating any ground disturbing activities. Cultural Resources Mitigation Measure CULA: Prior to issuance of each grading permit and prior to the start of any ground -disturbing activity, each project applicant shall retain a qualified archaeologist, defined as an archeologist meeting the Secretary of the Interior's Professional Qualification Standards for archeology (U.S. Department of Interior 2012) and as approved by the City of Temecula, to provide archaeological expertise in carrying out all mitigation measures related to archeological resources (Mitigation Measures CUL-2 through CUL-7). Pre -Construction City of Temecula City of Temecula Qualified Archeologist Issuance of Grading Permit Mitigation Measure CUL-2: Prior to any ground disturbing activities Pre -Construction City of City of Issuance of associated with the Project, the qualified archaeologist shall conduct Temecula Temecula Grading Permit cultural resources sensitivity training for all construction personnel. Qualified Construction personnel shall be informed of the types of Archeologist archaeological resources that may be encountered, and of the proper procedures to be enacted in the event of an inadvertent discovery of archaeological resources or human remains. Each project applicant shall ensure that construction personnel are made available for and attend the training and retain documentation demonstrating attendance. Mitigation Measure CUL-3: If grading activities are proposed within Pre -Construction/ City of City of Verification by intact native sediments on the Project Site which are anticipated to Construction Temecula Temecula City of be 10 feet in depth or greater, the qualified archaeologist shall Qualified Temecula in monitor ground disturbing activities. If cultural resources are Archeologist consultation discovered, the qualified archaeologist shall have the authority to and Pechanga with Pechanga stop and redirect grading in the immediate area of a find in order to Tribal Tribe evaluate the find and determine the appropriate next steps in Representatives consultation with the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. During the course of monitoring, if the qualified archaeologist can demonstrate based on observations of subsurface conditions that the level of monitoring should be reduced, increased, or discontinued, the archaeologist, in consultation with each project applicant and the City of Temecula may adjust the level of monitoring, as warranted. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-55 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Cultural Resources (cont.) Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure CUL-4 If grading activities occur within previously graded sediments and inadvertent discoveries of subsurface cultural resources are discovered, each construction contractor shall suspend grading within 100 feet of the find until the qualified archaeologist evaluates the find and determines the appropriate next steps in consultation with the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. Pre -Construction/ Construction City of Temecula City of Temecula Qualified Archeologist and Pechanga Tribal Representatives Verification by City of Temecula in consultation with Pechanga Tribe Mitigation Measure CUL-5: If inadvertent discoveries of subsurface Pre -Construction/ City of City of Verification by cultural resources are discovered either within the intact native Construction Temecula Temecula City of sediments or previously graded sediments, grading activities shall Qualified Temecula in be suspended within 100 feet of the find and each project applicant, Archeologist consultation the qualified archaeologist, and the Pechanga Tribe shall assess and Pechanga with Pechanga the significance of such resources and shall meet and confer Tribal Tribe regarding the mitigation for such resources. Representatives • Pursuant to PRC Section 21O83.2(b), avoidance is the preferred method of preservation for archaeological resources. • If preservation in place is not feasible, each project applicant and Pechanga Tribe shall discuss reburial of the resources on the Project property, in perpetuity. The measures for reburial shall include, at least, the following: Measures and provisions to protect the future reburial area from any future impacts in perpetuity. Reburial shall not occur until all legally required cataloging and basic recordation have been completed, with an exception that sacred items, burial goods and Native American human remains are excluded. Any reburial process shall be culturally appropriate. Listing of contents and location of the reburial shall be included in the confidential Phase IV report. The Phase IV Report shall be filed with the City under a confidential cover and not subject to Public Records Request. • If each project applicant and the Pechanga Tribe cannot agree on the significance or the mitigation for such resources, these issues will be presented to the Planning Director for decision. The Planning Director will make the determination based on the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act with respect to archaeological resources and will take into account the religious beliefs, customs, and practices of the Pechanga Tribe. Notwithstanding any other rights available under the law, the decision of the Planning Director will be appealable to the City Planning Commission and/or City of Temecula City Council. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 55-6 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 Monitorina and Mitigation Measures Responsible Action Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Verification of Compliance Initials Date Remarks Any newly discovered cultural resources shall be subject to a cultural resources evaluation pursuant to state law prior to restarting grading within 100 feet of the discovered resources. The cultural resources evaluation of the newly discovered cultural resources shall be detailed in a Cultural Resources Treatment Plan ("Plan"). Furthermore, after ground disturbing activities are completed, the archeologist shall prepare a monitoring report (consistent with the County of Riverside Phase IV monitoring report requirements) and submit the monitoring report to the City of Temecula and the Pechanga Tribe. Cultural Resources (cont.) Mitigation Measure CUL-6: The landowner shall relinquish ownership of all cultural resources, including sacred items. burial goods and all archaeological artifacts that are recovered as a result of Project implementation to the Pechanga Tribe for proper treatment and disposition. Construction/ Post -Construction City of Temecula City of Temecula Qualified Archeologist and Pechanga Tribal Representatives Verification by City of Temecula in consultation with Pechanga Tribe Mitigation Measure CUL-7: The developer is required to enter into Pre -Construction City of City of Verification by a Cultural Resources Treatment Agreement with the Pechanga Temecula Temecula City of Tribe. The agreement shall be in place prior to issuance of each Qualified Temecula in grading permit. To accomplish this, each project applicant should Archeologist consultation contact the Pechanga Tribe no less than 30 days and no more than and Pechanga with Pechanga 60 days prior to issuance of each grading permit. This Agreement Tribal Tribe will address the treatment and disposition of cultural resources, the Representatives designation, responsibilities, and participation of professional Pechanga Tribal monitors during grading, excavation and ground disturbing activities; project grading and development scheduling; terms of compensation for the monitors; and treatment and final disposition of any cultural resources, sacred sites, and human remains discovered onsite. The Pechanga monitor's authority to stop and redirect grading will be exercised in consultation with the project archaeologist in order to evaluate the significance of any potential resources discovered on the property. Pechanga and archaeological monitors shall be allowed to monitor all grading, excavation and groundbreaking activities, and shall also have the limited authority to stop and redirect grading activities should an inadvertent cultural resource be identified. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-7 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Cultural Resources (cont.) Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure CUL-8: If human remains are encountered, California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5 states that no further disturbance shall occur until the Riverside County Coroner has made the necessary findings as to origin. Further, pursuant to PRC Section 5O97.98(b), remains shall be left in place and free from disturbance until a final decision as to the treatment and disposition has been made. If the Riverside County Coroner determines the remains to be Native American, the NAHC must be contacted within 24 hours. The NAHC must then immediately identify the MLD upon receiving notification of the discovery. The MLD shall then make recommendations within 48 hours and engage in consultation concerning the treatment of the remains as provided in PRC Section 5097.98. Pre -Construction/ Construction City of Temecula City of Temecula Qualified Paleontologist Verification by City of Temecula Mitigation Measure CUL-9: Prior to the start of earth moving Pre -Construction City of City of Issuance of activities, each project applicant shall retain a qualified Temecula Temecula Grading Permit paleontologist defined as one meeting SVP standards (Society for Qualified Vertebrate Paleontology, 2010) to attend any pre -grade construction Paleontologist meetings to determine when and where excavations extend into intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site Working with each project applicant and the construction crew, the qualified paleontologist shall determine a paleontological monitoring schedule. The qualified paleontologist, or a paleontological monitor working under the direct supervision of the qualified paleontologist, shall monitor all ground -disturbing activity that are proposed to extend into intact native sediments which are anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site. The location, duration, and timing of monitoring shall be determined by the qualified paleontologist designated for the Project in consultation with each project applicant and City and shall be based on a review of geologic maps and grading plans. During the course of monitoring, if the qualified paleontologist can demonstrate based on observations of subsurface conditions that the level of monitoring should be reduced, increased, or discontinued, the paleontologist, in consultation with each project applicant and City of Temecula may adjust the level of monitoring, as warranted. Monitoring activities shall be documented in a Paleontological Resources Monitoring Report to be prepared by the qualified paleontologist at the completion of construction and shall be provided to the City of Temecula and filed with the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County within six (6) months of grading completion for each individual project on the Project Site. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-8 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 Mitigation Measures Cultural Resources (cont.) Responsible Action Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance 5. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting I Verification of Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure CUL-10: Prior to start of earth moving activities Pre -Construction/ City of City of Verification by that are proposed to extend into intact native sediments which are Construction Temecula Temecula City of anticipated to be 10 feet in depth or greater on the Project Site, the Qualified Temecula qualified paleontologist shall conduct pre -construction worker Paleontologist paleontological resources sensitivity training. This training shall include information on what types of paleontological resources could be encountered during excavations, what to do in case an unanticipated discovery is made by a worker, and laws protecting paleontological resources. All construction personnel shall be informed of the possibility of encountering fossils and instructed to immediately inform the construction foreman or supervisor if any bones or other potential fossils are unexpectedly unearthed in an area where a paleontological monitor is not present. Mitigation Measure CUL-11: In the event of unanticipated Pre -Construction/ City of City of Verification by discovery of paleontological resources when a paleontological Construction Temecula Temecula City of monitor is not present, each construction contractor shall cease Qualified Temecula ground -disturbing activities within 50 feet of the find until it can be Paleontological assessed by the qualified paleontologist. The qualified paleontologist shall assess the find, implement recovery and reporting measures, if necessary, and determine if paleontological monitoring is warranted once work resumes. Noise Mitigation Measure N-1: Ynez Road from Date Street to County Construction City of City of Issuance of Center Drive: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each Temecula Temecula Building Permit project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to Building Official Noise Study residences located within 304 feet of the Ynez Road centerline. The or other Approval by noise attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard Designee Community of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as City of Development backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation Temecula Department features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound Community walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences Development proposed to be located within 304 feet of Ynez Road between Date Department or Street and County Center Drive, each project applicant shall other Designee demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-9 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Noise (cont.) Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure N-2: Ynez Road from Date Street to Waverly Construction City of City of Issuance of Lane: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project Temecula Temecula Building Permit applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences Building Official Noise Study located within 271 feet of the Ynez Road centerline. The noise or other Approval by attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 Designee Community dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as City of Development backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation Temecula Department features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound Community walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences Development proposed to be located within 271 feet of Ynez Road between Date Department or Street and Waverly Lane, each project applicant shall demonstrate other Designee that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-3: Date Street/French Valley Parkway from Construction City of City of Issuance of Ynez Road to the 1-1 5/French Valley Parkway Interchange: Prior to Temecula Temecula Building Permit the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall Building Official Noise Study provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 551 or other Approval by feet of the Date Street/French Valley Parkway centerline. The noise Designee Community attenuation features shall achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 City of Development dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for outdoor living areas such as Temecula Department backyards associated with residential uses. The noise attenuation Community features to achieve the exterior noise standards could include sound Development walls, berms, or a combination of the two. For those residences Department or proposed to be located within 551 feet of Date Street/French Valley other Designee Parkway between Ynez Road to the I-15/French Valley Parkway Interchange, each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-10 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 Mitigation Measures Noise (cont.) Responsible Action Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance 5. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting I Verification of Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure N-4: 1-15 North of the future 1-15/French Valley Construction City of City of Issuance of Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project Temecula Temecula Building Permit applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located Building Official Noise Study anywhere on the Project Site. The noise attenuation features shall or other Approval by achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for Designee Community outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential City of Development uses. The features to attenuate freeway noise levels so that the Temecula Department exterior noise standards could be achieved include sound walls, Community berms, or a combination of the two. Each project applicant shall Development demonstrate that the City's exterior standards will be achieved through Department or the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula other Designee Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-5: I-15 South of the future 1-1 5/French Valley Construction City of City of Issuance of Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project Temecula Temecula Building Permit applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences located Building Official Noise Study anywhere on the Project Site. The noise attenuation features shall or other Approval by achieve an exterior noise standard of 65 dBA CNEL or Ldn or lower for Designee Community outdoor living areas such as backyards associated with residential City of Development uses. The features to attenuate freeway noise levels so that the Temecula Department exterior noise standards could be achieved include sound walls, Community berms, or a combination of the two. Each project applicant shall Development demonstrate that the City's exterior noise standards will be achieved Department or through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of other Designee Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's exterior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-6: Ynez Road from Date Street to County Construction City of City of Issuance of Center Drive: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each Temecula Temecula Building Permit project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to Building Official Noise Study residences located within 121 feet of the Ynez Road centerline to or other Approval by achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Designee Community Windows proposed within 121 feet from the Ynez Road centerline City of Development need to be upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) Temecula Department higher than standard building construction (i.e., windows ranging up Community to STC-28). Each project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's Development interior noise standards will be achieved through the preparation Department or and submittal of a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community other Designee Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-11 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 and Mitigation Measures Noise (cont.) Responsible Action Verification of Compliance Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure N-7: Ynez Road from Date Street to Waverly Construction City of City of Issuance of Lane: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each project Temecula Temecula Building Permit applicant shall provide noise attenuation features to residences Building Official Noise Study located within 108 feet of the Ynez Road centerline to achieve the or other Approval by interior noise standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed Designee Community within 108 feet from the Ynez Road centerline need to be upgraded City of Development with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard Temecula Department building construction (i.e., windows ranging up to STC-28). Each Community project applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise Development standards will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of Department or a Noise Study to the City of Temecula Community Development other Designee Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-8: Date Street/French Valley Parkway from Construction City of City of Issuance of Ynez Road to the 1-1 5/French Valley Parkway Interchange: Prior to Temecula Temecula Building Permit the issuance of each building permit, each project applicant shall Building Official Noise Study provide noise attenuation features to residences located within 219 or other Approval by feet of the Ynez Road centerline to achieve the interior noise Designee Community standard of 45 dBA CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within 219 City of Development feet from the Ynez Road centerline need to be upgraded with sound Temecula Department transmission class rating (STC) higher than standard building Community construction (i.e., windows ranging up to STC-28). Each project Development applicant shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards Department or will be achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise other Designee Study to the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-12 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 Mitigation Measures Noise (cont.) Responsible Action Monitoring Enforcement Monitoring Indicating Phase Agency Agency Compliance 5. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting I Verification of Compliance Initials Date Remarks Mitigation Measure N-9: 1-15 North of the future 1-1 5/French Valley Construction City of City of Issuance of Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, each Temecula Temecula Building Permit project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features for all Building Official Noise Study onsite residences to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA or other Approval by CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within each residence need to be Designee Community upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than City of Development standard building construction would provide. Each project applicant Temecula Department shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be Community achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to Development the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Department or Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the other Designee City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Mitigation Measure N-10: 1-15 South of the future 1-1 5/French Construction City of City of Issuance of Valley Interchange: Prior to the issuance of each building permit, Temecula Temecula Building Permit each project applicant shall provide noise attenuation features for all Building Official Noise Study onsite residences to achieve the interior noise standard of 45 dBA or other Approval by CNEL or Ldn. Windows proposed within each residence need to be Designee Community upgraded with sound transmission class rating (STC) higher than City of Development standard building construction would provide. Each project applicant Temecula Department shall demonstrate that the City's interior noise standards will be Community achieved through the preparation and submittal of a Noise Study to Development the City of Temecula Community Development Department. Department or Building permits shall not be issued for these residences until the other Designee City of Temecula verifies that the City's interior noise standards have been achieved. Transportation Mitigation Measure T-1: Ynez Road and Waverly Lane: Prior to the Construction City of City of Issuance of first building permit, the developer shall install a traffic signal with Temecula Temecula Building Permit left and right turns permitted. Building Official or other Designee Harveston GPA/SPA — Planning Area 12 5-13 ESA / D181343 Final Subsequent Environmental Impact Report October 2020 PC RESOLUTION NO.2020-37 A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT A RESOLUTION ENTITLED "A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING A GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT APPLICATION TO REVISE THE GENERAL PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION FOR THE PARCELS WITHIN THE RESIDENTIAL OVERLAY OF PLANNING AREA 12 OF THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN FROM SERVICE COMMERCIAL TO A SPECIFIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION (SPI) LAND USE (PA18-0659)" Section 1. Procedural Findings. The Planning Commission of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. The Harveston Specific Plan (Specific Plan No. 13) was approved by the City Council on August 14, 2001 by the adoption of Resolution No. 01-72. On August 26, 2003, the City Council approved Amendment No. 1 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) by the adoption of Resolution No. 03-110. The Harveston Specific Plan as originally approved and as amended by Amendment No. 1 shall be referred to in this Resolution as the "Specific Plan". B. On May 7, 2018, Harveston-SAB LLC, a California Limited Liability Company filed two Planning Applications: No. PA18-0659, a General Plan Amendment and No. PA18-0660, a Specific Plan Amendment. These applications (collectively "Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. C. The Project was processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law. D. A Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) and Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program were prepared for the Project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act and the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines ("CEQA"). On July 24, 2019, the City published and distributed a Notice of Preparation (NOP) to all agencies and persons that might be affected by the Project. The NOP was also distributed through the State Office of Planning and Research, State Clearinghouse (SCH # 2019070974). The NOP was circulated from July 24, 2019 through August 22, 2019 to receive comments and input from interested public agencies and private parties on issues to be addressed in the SEIR. On August 8, 2019, a scoping session was held, at which time City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to determine the extent of issues to be addressed in the SEIR for the Project. The Draft SEIR was prepared under staff s direction by Environmental Science Associates (ESA). Thereafter, City staff filed a Notice of Completion with the State Clearinghouse, and circulated a Notice of Availability with the Draft SEIR and Appendices to the public and other interested parties, for a 45-day comment period between January 31, 2020 through March 16, 2020. A Notice of Availability was also posted on the project site. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Community Development Department, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590; the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located at 41000 County Center Drive; the Temecula Chamber of Commerce located at 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A; and the City of Temecula website. During the comment period, the City received seven (7) written comments on the Draft SEIR from various agencies, individuals, and organization. In compliance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15088, the City prepared written responses to all comments. None of the comments presented any new significant environmental impacts or otherwise constituted significant new information requiring recirculation of the Draft SEIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15088.5. The "Final SEIR" consists of the Draft SEIR and all of its appendices, the comments and responses to comments on the Draft SEIR, revisions to the Draft SEIR, and the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program. The Final SEIR was made available to the public and to all commenting agencies in accordance with the law. E. On November 9, 2020 the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula held a duly noticed public hearing on the proposed Final SEIR, proposed General Plan Amendment, and proposed Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) at which time all persons interested in these actions had the opportunity and did address the Planning Commission. F. Following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearing, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution No. 2020-36, "A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL CERTIFY THE FINAL SUBSEQUENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPT FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPT A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPT A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (PA18-0660)". Resolution No. 2020-36 is hereby incorporated by this reference as set forth in full. G. All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Resolution have occurred. Section 2. Further Findings. The Planning Commission, in recommending approval of the General Plan Amendment Application No. PA18-0659, consistent with Government Code section 65358, hereby finds, determines and declares that: A. The General Plan Amendment is in the public interest. The current General Plan designation for the residential overlay portions of Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan is a Service Commercial (SC) land use as specified in the Harveston Specific Plan. The General Plan Amendment is in the public interest because it allows for various types of residential housing including single-family residential and multi family residential which will provide the opportunity for high -quality residential development that would help to fulfill the C,'ity's regional housing needs, including the City's Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) requirement This General Plan amendment will provide property owners located within the Project site with additional options for developing their properties. Property owners will still be permitted to develop service commercial and will also have the option to develop commercial and/or residential uses within the project site. Section 3. Recommendation. The Planning Commission of the City of Temecula recommends that the City Council adopt a Resolution entitled, "A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT A RESOLUTION ENTITLED "A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING A GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT APPLICATION TO REVISE THE GENERAL PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION FOR THE PARCELS WITHIN THE RESIDENTIAL OVERLAY OF PLANNING AREA 12 OF THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN FROM SERVICE COMMERCIAL TO A SPECIFIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION (SPI) LAND USE (PA18-0659)"" in the substantially the same form attached to this Resolution as Exhibit "A", and incorporated herein by this reference. Section 4. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the City of Temecula Planning Commission this 9th day of November, 2020. �-R. 40, A a wo _ 730A ATTEST: Luke Watson Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE )ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Luke Watson, Secretary of the Temecula Planning Commission, do hereby certify that the forgoing PC Resolution No. 2020-37 was duly and regularly adopted by the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula at a regular meeting thereof held on the 9th day of November, 2020, by the following vote: AYES: 5 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: Guerriero, Telesio, Turley-Trejo, Watts, Youmans NOES: 0 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: None ABSENT: 0 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: None ABSTAIN: 0 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS No ;�2( '- Luke Watson Secretary EXHIBIT A RESOLUTION NO. 2020- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING A GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT APPLICATION TO REVISE THE GENERAL PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION FOR THE PARCELS WITHIN THE RESIDENTIAL OVERLAY OF PLANNING AREA 12 OF THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN FROM SERVICE COMMERCIAL TO A SPECIFIC PLAN IMPLEMENTATION (SPI) LAND USE (PA18-0659) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA HEREBY FINDS, DETERMINES AND RESOLVES AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Procedural Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. The Harveston Specific Plan (Specific Plan No. 13) was approved by the City Council on August 14, 2001 by the adoption of Resolution No. 01-72. On August 26, 2003, the City Countil approved Amendment No. 1 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) by the adoption of Resolution No. 03-110. The Harveston Specific Plan as originally approved and as amended by Amendment No. I shall be referred to in this Resolution as the "Specific Plan". B. On May 7, 2018, Harveston-SAB LLC, a California Limited Liability Company filed two Planning Applications: No. PA 18-0659, a General Plan Amendment and No. PA18-0660, a Specific Plan Amendment. These applications (collectively "Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. C. The Project was processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including the California Environmental Quality Act. D. A Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) and Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program were prepared for the Project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act and the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines ("CEQA"). On July 24, 2019, the City published and distributed a Notice of Preparation (NOP) to all agencies and persons that might be affected by the Project. The NOP was also distributed through the State Office of Planning and Research, State Clearinghouse (SCH # 2019070974). The NOP was circulated from July 24, 2019 through August 22, 2019 to receive comments and input from interested public agencies and private parties on issues to be addressed in the SEIR. On August 8, 2019, a scoping session was held, at which time City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to determine the extent of issues to be addressed in the SEIR for the Project. The Draft SEIR was prepared under staff s direction by Environmental Science Associates (ESA). Thereafter, City staff filed a Notice of Completion with the State Clearinghouse, and circulated a Notice of Availability with the Draft SEIR and Appendices to the public and other interested parties, for a 45-day comment period between January 31, 2020 through March 16, 2020. A Notice of Availability was also posted on the project site. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Community Development Department, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590; the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located at 41000 County Center Drive; the Temecula Chamber of Commerce located at 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A; and the City of Temecula website. During the comment period, the City received seven (7) written comments on the Draft SEIR from various agencies, individuals, and organization. In compliance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15088, the City prepared written responses to all comments. None of the comments presented any new significant environmental impacts or otherwise constituted significant new information requiring recirculation of the Draft SEIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15088.5. The "Final SEIR" consists of the Draft SEIR and all of its appendices, the comments and responses to comments on the Draft SEIR, revisions to the Draft SEIR, and the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program. The Final SEIR was made available to the public and to all commenting agencies in accordance with the law. E. On November 9, 2020 the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula held a duly noticed public hearing on the proposed Final SEIR, proposed General Plan Amendment, and proposed Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) at which time all persons interested in these actions had the opportunity and did address the Planning Commission. F. After hearing all written and oral testimony on the proposed Project and duly considering the comments received, and following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearing, the Planning Commission adopted (1) Resolution No. 2020- recommending to the City Council that it certify the Final SEIR, (2) Resolution No. 2020- recommending that the City Council adopt a resolution approving a General Plan Amendment to revise the General Plan Land Use designation for the parcels within the residential overlay of Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan from Service Commercial to a Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) land use, and (3) Resolution No. 2020- a resolution recommending that the City Council adopt a resolution approving Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13). G. On December 1, 2020 the City Council of the City of Temecula considered the Project and the Final SEIR for the Project, at a duly noticed public hearing at which time all interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. The Council considered all the testimony and any comments received regarding the Project and the Final SEIR prior to and at the public hearing. H. Following the public hearing, the Council adopted Resolution No. 2020- certifying the SEIR for the Harveston Specific Plan Amendment Project. L All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Resolution have occurred. Section 2. Legislative Findings. Consistent with Government Code section 65358, the City Council in approving the Project hereby finds, determines and declares that: General Plan Amendment A. The General Plan Amendment is in the public interest. The current General Plan designation for the residential overlay portions of PlanningArea 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan is a Service Commercial (SC) land use as specified in the Harveston Specific Plan. The General Plan Amendment is in the public interest because it allows for various types of residential housing including single-family residential and multi family residential which willprovide the opportunity for high -quality residential development that would help to fulfill the City's regional housing needs, including the City's Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) requirement This General Plan amendment will provide property owners located within the Project site with additional options for developing their properties. Property owners will still be permitted to develop service commercial and will also have the option to develop commercial and/or residential uses within the project site. Section 3. Amendment to General Plan Text. The City Council approves and amends the Land Use Element of the General Plan to revise the General Plan Land Use designation for the parcels within the residential overlay of Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan from Service Commercial to a Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) land use and amends Figure LU-3 of the Land Use Element of the General Plan as shown on Exhibit A, "Proposed General Plan" attached hereto and incorporated herein as though set forth in full. Section 4. City Manager Authorization. The City Manager is hereby authorized and directed to take all steps necessary to implement this General Plan Amendment. Section 5. Consistency with General Plan. The Land Use Element of the General Plan, as amended by this Resolution, is consistent with the other elements of the General Plan, consistent with Government Code Section 65300.5. Insofar as other portions of the General Plan need to be revised to effectuate this General Plan Amendment, the City Clerk is hereby authorized and directed to make all necessary revisions to effectuate this General Plan Amendment. Section 6. Severability. If any portion, provision, section, paragraph, sentence, or word of this Resolution is rendered or declared to be invalid by any final court action in a court of competent jurisdiction, or by reason of any preemptive legislation, the remaining portions, provisions, sections, paragraphs, sentences, and words of this Resolution shall remain in full force and effect and shall be interpreted by the court so as to give effect to such remaining portions of the Resolution. Section 7. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon its adoption. Section 8. Notice of Adoption. The City Clerk shall certify to the adoption of this Resolution. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Temecula this Pt day of December, 2020. Mary Ann Edwards, Mayor Pro Tern ATTEST: Randi Johl, City Clerk [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE ) ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Randi Johl, City Clerk of the City of Temecula, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution No. 2020- was duly and regularly adopted by the City Council of the City of Temecula at a meeting thereof held on the I st day of December, 2020 by the following vote: AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS: ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS: Randi Johl, City Clerk EXHIBIT A Existing General Plan Land Use Proposed General Plan Land Use AMA � 4�' r aA�. •' OQ' Sc yah��°Ro Raj . 2�` a4 4 ti 1 ti � P9 � ��� ✓ �Af��ti 'G p�a,o{ � r4 •l �4 L Q {9 w 8F Ch, T e�1TY pR h Project Site SPI 5�4y 4 Q L•M !• W 9 V �f /Y44 0 500 1ON Feel p;2LSPi I I� PC RESOLUTION NO. 2020-38 A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT A RESOLUTION ENTITLED "A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (SP 13) (PA18-0660)" Section 1. Procedural Findings. The Planning Commission of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. The Harveston Specific Plan (Specific Plan No. 13) was approved by the City Council on August 14, 2001 by the adoption of Resolution No. 01-72. On August 26, 2003, the City Countil approved Amendment No. 1 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) by the adoption of Resolution No. 03-110. The Harveston Specific Plan as originally approved and as amended by Amendment No. 1 shall be referred to in this Resolution as the "Specific Plan". B. On May 7, 2018, Harveston-SAB LLC, a California Limited Liability Company filed two Planning Applications: No. PA18-0659, a General Plan Amendment and No. PA18-0660, a Specific Plan Amendment. These applications (collectively "Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. C. The Project was processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law. D. A Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) and Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program were prepared for the Project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act and the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines ("CEQA"). On July 24, 2019, the City published and distributed a Notice of Preparation (NOP) to all agencies and persons that might be affected by the Project. The NOP was also distributed through the State Office of Planning and Research, State Clearinghouse (SCH # 2019070974). The NOP was circulated from July 24, 2019 through August 22, 2019 to receive comments and input from interested public agencies and private parties on issues to be addressed in the SEIR. On August 8, 2019, a scoping session was held, at which time City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to determine the extent of issues to be addressed in the SEIR for the Project. The Draft SEIR was prepared under staff s direction by Environmental Science Associates (ESA). Thereafter, City staff fled a Notice of Completion with the State Clearinghouse, and circulated a Notice of Availability with the Draft SEIR and Appendices to the public and other interested parties, for a 45-day comment period between January 31, 2020 through March 16, 2020. A Notice of Availability was also posted on the project site. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Community Development Department, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590; the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located at 41000 County Center Drive; the Temecula Chamber of Commerce located at 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A; and the City of Temecula website. During the comment period, the City received seven (7) written comments on the Draft SEIR from various agencies, individuals, and organization. In compliance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15088, the City prepared written responses to all comments. None of the comments presented any new significant environmental impacts or otherwise constituted significant new information requiring recirculation of the Draft SEIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15088.5. The "Final SEIR" consists of the Draft SEIR and all of its appendices, the comments and responses to comments on the Draft SEIR, revisions to the Draft SEIR, and the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program. The Final SEIR was made available to the public and to all commenting agencies in accordance with the law. E. On November 9, 2020 the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula held a duly noticed public hearing on the proposed Final SEIR, proposed General Plan Amendment, and proposed Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) at which time all persons interested in these actions had the opportunity and did address the Planning Commission. F. Following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearing, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution No. 2020-36, "A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL CERTIFY THE FINAL SUBSEQUENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT, ADOPT FINDINGS PURSUANT TO THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT, ADOPT A STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS, AND ADOPT A MITIGATION MONITORING AND REPORTING PROGRAM FOR AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (PA18-0660)". Resolution No. 2020-36 is hereby incorporated by this reference as set forth in full. G. All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Resolution have occurred. Section 2. Further Findings. Pursuant to Temecula Municipal Code Section 17.16.020, the Planning Commission, in recommending that the City Council approve Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan hereby finds, determines and declares that: A. The proposed specific plan amendment is consistent with the general plan and development code. The Harveston Specific Plan discusses, at length, the consistency between the Specific Plan and the General Plan. Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan does not make any material changes to the Specific Plan that would impact the consistency findings set forth in the Specific Plan. The findings of consistency contained in the Harveston Specific Plan are applicable and are incorporated herein by this reference. The General Plan's Land Use Element Goal 1 is to have a diverse and integrated mix of residential, commercial, industrial, recreational, public and open space land uses. The Harveston Specific Plan creates unified, cohesive neighborhoods, and commercial/mixed-use areas. In addition to these land uses, the Harveston Specific Plan provides neighborhood amenities, as well as open space and recreational facilities. Policy 1.6 of the General Plan 's Land Use Element is to encourageflexible zoning techniques in appropriate locations to encourage mixed use development, achieve innovative site design, and achieve a range of transition of densities. The residential overlay designation would overlay the existing Service Commercial (SC) zone that is designated on the Project Site within the existing Specific Plan. However, the allowance to develop Service Commercial (SC) will remain, as future developers will have the flexibility to develop commercial and/or residential uses within the Project Site. Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan is also consistent with the City's development code because the City will require that all new construction comply with the City's design and building standards. B. The proposed specific plan amendment would not be detrimental to the public interest, health, safety, convenience or welfare of the city. Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan would not be detrimental to the public interest, health, safety, convenience or welfare of the City because the Specific Plan clearly defines land uses, and establishes development standards, regulations and building criteria for each land use type. The proposed residential overlay and architectural style provides an additional land use option for development but does not add any additional acreage or lots to the previously approved Specific Plan. C. The subject property is physically suitable for the requested land use designations and the anticipated land use developments. The subject property area has been previously mass graded and additional acreage or area is not proposed as part ofAmendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan. The proposed residential overlay is located adjacent to existing residential development and a public community sports park accessible to future residents and near an area that contains commercial, retail, and restaurant uses. Therefore, the property is physically suitable for development under either the proposed residential overlay or the existing service commercial land use developments. D. The proposed specific plan amendment shall ensure development of desirable character which will be compatible with existing and proposed development in the surrounding neighborhood. Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan shall ensure development of desirable character which will be compatible with existing and proposed development in the surrounding neighborhood. With the proposed residential overlay and architectural style the Specific Plan will provide development standards which will be compatible with the existing surrounding development and already built Harveston community as the residential overlay is located directly adjacent to the existing Harveston community which contains single family, multi family, commercial, and mixed use development. Section 3. Recommendation. The Planning Commission of the City of Temecula hereby recommends that the City Council adopt a resolution approving Specific Plan Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan in substantially the same form as attached hereto as Exhibit «A„ Section 4. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the City of Temecula Planning Commission this 9th day of November, 2020. ATTEST: Luke Watson Secretary [SEAL] STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE )ss CITY OF TEMECULA ) I, Luke Watson, Secretary of the Temecula Planning Commission, do hereby certify that the forgoing PC Resolution No. 2020-38 was duly and regularly adopted by the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula at a regular meeting thereof held on the 9th day of November, 2020, by the following vote: AYES: 5 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: Guerriero, Telesio, Turley-Trejo, Watts, Youmans NOES: 0 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: None ABSENT: 0 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS: None ABSTAIN: 0 PLANNING COMMISSIONERS None Luke Watson Secretary EXHIBIT A RESOLUTION NO. 2020- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA APPROVING AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO THE HARVESTON SPECIFIC PLAN (SP 13) (PA18-0660) THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TEMECULA HEREBY FINDS, DETERMINES AND RESOLVES AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Procedural Findings. The City Council of the City of Temecula does hereby find, determine and declare that: A. The Harveston Specific Plan (Specific Plan No. 13) was approved by the City Council on August 14, 2001 by the adoption of Resolution No. 01-72. On August 26, 2003, the City Countil approved Amendment No. 1 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) by the adoption of Resolution No. 03-110. The Harveston Specific Plan as originally approved and as amended by Amendment No. 1 shall be referred to in this Resolution as the "Specific Plan". B. On May 7, 2018, Harveston-SAB LLC, a California Limited Liability Company filed two Planning Applications: No. PA 18-0659, a General Plan Amendment and No. PA18-0660, a Specific Plan Amendment. These applications (collectively "Project") were filed in a manner in accord with the City of Temecula General Plan and Development Code. C. The Project was processed including, but not limited to a public notice, in the time and manner prescribed by State and local law, including the California Environmental Quality Act. D. A Subsequent Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) and Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program were prepared for the Project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act and the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines ("CEQA"). On July 24, 2019, the City published and distributed a Notice of Preparation (NOP) to all agencies and persons that might be affected by the Project. The NOP was also distributed through the State Office of Planning and Research, State Clearinghouse (SCH # 2019070974). The NOP was circulated from July 24, 2019 through August 22, 2019 to receive comments and input from interested public agencies and private parties on issues to be addressed in the SEIR. On August 8, 2019, a scoping session was held, at which time City staff and interested persons had an opportunity to determine the extent of issues to be addressed in the SEIR for the Project. The Draft SEIR was prepared under staff s direction by Environmental Science Associates (ESA). Thereafter, City staff filed a Notice of Completion with the State Clearinghouse, and circulated a Notice of Availability with the Draft SEIR and Appendices to the public and other interested parties, for a 45-day comment period between January 31, 2020 through March 16, 2020. A Notice of Availability was also posted on the project site. Copies of the documents have been available for public review and inspection at the offices of the Community Development Department, located at City Hall, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California 92590; the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library located at 30600 Pauba Road; Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library located at 41000 County Center Drive; the Temecula Chamber of Commerce located at 26790 Ynez Court, Suite A; and the City of Temecula website. During the comment period, the City received seven (7) written comments on the Draft SEIR from various agencies, individuals, and organization. In compliance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15088, the City prepared written responses to all comments. None of the comments presented any new significant environmental impacts or otherwise constituted significant new information requiring recirculation of the Draft SEIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15088.5. The "Final SEIR" consists of the Draft SEIR and all of its appendices, the comments and responses to comments on the Draft SEIR, revisions to the Draft SEIR, and the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program. The Final SEIR was made available to the public and to all commenting agencies in accordance with the law. E. The Specific Plan provides standards and guidelines for development of specific land uses. Amendment No. 2 to the Specific Plan would update and modify those standards and land uses by adding a residential overlay land use with associated development and design standards along with a new architectural style. F. On November 9, 2020 the Planning Commission of the City of Temecula held a duly noticed public hearing on the proposed Subsequent Environmental Impact Report, proposed General Plan Amendment, and proposed Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13) at which time all persons interested in these actions had the opportunity and did address the Planning Commission. G. After hearing all written and oral testimony on the proposed Project and duly considering the comments received, and following consideration of the entire record of information received at the public hearing, the Planning Commission adopted (1) Resolution No. 2020- recommending to the City Council that it certify the Final SEIR, (2) Resolution No. 2020- recommending that the City Council adopt a resolution approving a General Plan Amendment to revise the General Plan Land Use designation for the parcels within the residential overlay of Planning Area 12 of the Harveston Specific Plan from Service Commercial to a Specific Plan Implementation (SPI) land use, and (3) Resolution No. 2020- a resolution recommending that the City Council adopt a resolution approving Amendment No. 2 to the Harveston Specific Plan (SP 13). H. On December 1, 2020 the City Council of the City of Temecula considered the Project and the Final SEIR for the Project, at a duly noticed public hearing at which time all interested persons had an opportunity to and did testify either in support or in opposition to this matter. The Council considered all the testimony and any comments received regarding the Project and the Final SEIR prior to and at the public hearing. I. Following the public hearing, the Council adopted Resolution No. 2020- certifying the Subsequent Final Environmental Impact Report for the Harveston Specific Plan Amendment Project. J. All legal preconditions to the adoption of this Resolution have occurred. Section 2. Further Findings. Consistent