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HomeMy WebLinkAbout051619 CC Budget WorkshopIn compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the office of the City Clerk (951) 694-6444. Notification 48 hours prior to a meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to that meeting [28 CFR 35.102.35.104 ADA Title II]. AGENDA TEMECULA CITY COUNCIL BUDGET WORKSHOP CONFERENCE CENTER 41000 MAIN STREET TEMECULA, CALIFORNIA MAY 16,2019 - 8:30 AM CALL TO ORDER: Mayor Mike Naggar Flag Salute: Council Member Stewart ROLL CALL: Edwards, Rahn, Schwank, Stewart, Naggar PUBLIC COMMENTS A total of 30 minutes is provided for members of the public to address the City Council on items that appear on the Consent Calendar or a matter not listed on the agenda. Each speaker is limited to three minutes. If the speaker chooses to address the City Council on an item listed on the Consent Calendar or a matter not listed on the agenda, a Request to Speak form may be filled out and filed with the City Clerk prior to the City Council addressing Public Comments and the Consent Calendar. Once the speaker is called to speak, please come forward. For all Public Hearing or Business items on the agenda, a Request to Speak form may be filed with the City Clerk prior to the City Council addressing that item. On those items, each speaker is limited to five minutes. BUSINESS 1. Review Fiscal Years 2020-24 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) and Review Fiscal Year 2019-20 CIP and Annual Operating Budgets for the City of Temecula, the Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) and the Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency (SARDA) Recommendation: That the City Council/Board of Directors review and discuss the Proposed Fiscal Years 2020-24 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) and review Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budgets for the City of Temecula, the Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) and the Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency (SARDA). Attachments: Agenda Report Transmittal Message Proposed Capital Improvement Program Proposed Annual Operating Budget ADJOURNMENT Next regular meeting: Tuesday, May 28, 2019, at 5:30 PM, for a Closed Session, with regular session commencing at 7:00 PM, City Council Chambers, 41000 Main Street, Temecula, California. NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC The full agenda packet (including staff reports, public closed session information, and any supplemental material available after the original posting of the agenda), distributed to a majority of the City Council regarding any item on the agenda, will be available for public viewing in the main reception area of the Temecula Civic Center during normal business hours. The material will also be available on the City's website at TemeculaCa.gov. and available for review at the respective meeting. If you have questions regarding any item on the agenda, please contact the City Clerk's Department at (951) 694-6444. CITY OF TEMECULA / TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT / SUCCESSOR AGENCY TO THE TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY AGENDA REPORT TO: City Council/Board of Directors FROM: Aaron Adams, City Manager/General Manager/Executive Director DATE: May 16, 2019 SUBJECT: Review Fiscal Years 2020-24 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) and Review Fiscal Year 2019-20 CIP and Annual Operating Budgets for the City of Temecula, the Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) and the Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency (SARDA) PREPARED BY: Jennifer Hennessy, Director of Finance/Treasurer RECOMMENDATION: That the City Council/Board of Directors review and discuss the Proposed Fiscal Years 2020-24 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) and review Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budgets for the City of Temecula, the Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) and the Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency (SARDA). DISCUSSION: Each year, the City Council holds a Budget Workshop in which staff presents the Five -Year Capital Improvement Program Budget and the Proposed Annual Operating Budget for the City, Temecula Community Services District (TCSD), and the Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency (SARDA). Any changes to the proposed budgets, as requested at the Budget Workshop, will be incorporated into the adopted budget, presented to Council at its June 11, 2019 meeting. The attached Transmittal Letter summarizes the highlights of the Fiscal Year 2019-20 Proposed Annual Operating Budget and Fiscal Years 2020-24 Capital Improvement Program documents. FISCAL IMPACT: The specific fiscal impacts by fund are noted in the attached Transmittal Letter. ATTACHMENTS: 1. Transmittal Message 2. Proposed Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 3. Proposed Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget May 16, 2019 The Honorable Mayor and Members of the City Council: I am pleased to submit the Proposed Annual Operating Budget for the Fiscal Year 2019-20. This budget document was developed to serve as the financial plan for the City's programs and policies. It reflects the resources necessary to meet the goals, programs, and service priorities that the City Council is committed to providing its citizens. The Fiscal Year 2019-20 Proposed Annual Operating Budget has been developed after a considerable review process. Departmental budget submittals were prepared and reviewed by line item in connection with projected revenues. Detailed performance objectives and accountability measures were developed consistent with the City's Quality of Life Master Plan. Five-year revenue and expenditure projections were developed to identify the future impacts of proposed staffing and program changes, as well as the impact of proposed capital improvement projects. The resulting budget is realistic and balanced, and continues to provide quality services to the community while effectively utilizing available resources. CITY OF TEMECULA PROFILE The City of Temecula is a dynamic community comprised of approximately 113,826 citizens. The City maintains 41 parks on 330 developed acres throughout the community, which provide recreation opportunities for both the citizens of Temecula, as well as surrounding communities. Police and Fire protection services are provided through contracts with Riverside County. The Temecula Valley Unified School District provides 32 schools with 27,991 students at the kindergarten through 12th grade levels within the City. The City of Temecula prides itself on its community focus and quality of life. Temecula's residents enjoy one of the finest lifestyles Southern California has to offer. Environmental and residential factors create a beautiful setting that attracts young, well-educated families to upscale homes that are relatively inexpensive by Southern California standards. Geography contributes to the City's population and retail growth from San Diego and Orange Counties. Temecula's leadership has approached economic growth from a qualitative standpoint, providing the City with a favorable share of the region's higher paying and high technology career opportunities. The City's average income levels are higher than the surrounding region, the educational performance of its young people is above the State average, and Temecula has been recognized as one of Nation's safest cities. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 -r City of Temecula now �.: Fiscal Year 2019-20 a Annual Operating Budget T.i:eir�€sa ECONOMIC INDICATORS The City of Temecula has experienced solid economic growth over the past year, as illustrated by the indicators discussed below. • Estimated Population: 113,826, up 0.5%from 2018 (source: State Department of Finance) • Median Age: 35.3 years old, up .2 from 2018 (Source: Claritas360 Report— 12-19-18) • Number of Households: 36,001, up 1.5%from 2018 (Source:Claritas360Report— 12-19-18) • Average Household Income: $116,464, up 6.2%from 2018 (Source:Claritos360Report— 12-19-18) • March Median Home Price: $475,000, down 3% from March 2018 (Source: Southwest Riverside County Association of Realtors) • Number of Jobs: 55,700, up 1.0% from 2018 (Source: EDD) • March Unemployment Rate: Temecula: 3.6% (no change from March 2018), Riverside County: 4.7%, CA: 4.6%, Nation: 3.8% (Source: EDD & BLS) Steady expansion of the City's economic base has led to growth in City revenues, which allows the City to continue to provide the high level of services citizens enjoy, as noted in a recent Citizen Opinion Survey stating that 93% of Temecula residents indicated they were satisfied with the City's municipal services. IMPACTS OF STATE/COUNTY LEGISLATION A number of legislative changes are being considered, which could have profound fiscal impacts on the City, including: ➢ Sheriff's Contract Rate Modification: The City was recently notified by the County Executive Office of a recommended change in the calculation methodology of the Riverside County Sheriff's contract rate. The Board of Supervisors is considering the inclusion of several public safety services not currently included in the contract rate, including: aviation services, patrol captains, crime analysts, portions of dispatch, etc. The increase to the City's Police budget would be $2.3 million if this change is implemented. The County Board of Supervisors is expected to consider this proposal later this year. ➢ Assembly Bill 213 — Annexation Financing: If passed, this bill will restore funding to 140 cities, including Temecula, that lost Vehicle License Fee revenue related to the annexation of inhabited territory, as a result of the passage of Senate Bill 89 in 2011. The City of Temecula could potentially recoup the $428,745 in lost Vehicle License Fee revenue. ➢ Proposition 64: Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA) In November 2016, California voters approved Proposition 64 by a margin of 56% to 44% to legalize recreational use of cannabis for persons 21 years of age and over. Under Proposition 64, local governments have the ability to regulate, license or prohibit commercial cannabis. The City of Temecula currently prohibits all commercial cannabis and has joined the County of Riverside's Cannabis Regulatory Task Force. Code Enforcement, Police, and the City Attorney's Office coordinate to shut down any marijuana retailers operating within the City. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ➢ 2017 State of California Housing Package In 2017, the State adopted a comprehensive housing package of 15 bills designed to increase the supply of housing in California, including the number of affordable homes. Currently there are approximately 200 housing related bills going through the legislative process. Generally, the bills stated aim is to address the state's housing shortfall by directly financing affordable housing production; facilitate private -market housing production by streamlining local review processes; increasing local accountability for accommodating a fair share of new housing development; harnessing private funding to pay for affordable housing; and preserving the affordability of existing subsidized housing. While the City is eligible for some of the direct sources of funding to facilitate the production of housing, including funding from SB 2, the Building Jobs and Homes Act. Community Development, it is anticipated that the City will be subject to a number of unfunded mandates as a result of the passage of any number of the current proposed housing related bills. ➢ State Water Resources Control Board 13383 Order On April 7, 2015, the State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) adopted statewide Trash Provisions to address the pervasive impacts trash has on the beneficial uses of surface waters. The Trash Provisions establish a statewide water quality objective for trash and a prohibition of trash discharge, or deposition where it may be discharged, to surface waters of the State. As a result of this Order, the City must install, operate and maintain full capture systems for the storm drain network that capture runoff. It is estimated that a total of 500 catch basin inlet filters will be installed over a 10-year period, beginning in 2019. 2019-20 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The City Council adopted the Temecula 2030 Quality of Life Master Plan (QLMP) in October 2011. The QLMP defines the strategic priorities of Temecula's residents, leaders, and partners for the City's next twenty years. It reflects the vision for the City's future, and commits the City to a performance based process to accomplish those goals. This plan was developed by engaging residents, businesses, local institutions and regional partners in an inclusive process. The QLMP outlines six Core Values: • Healthy and Livable City • A Sustainable City • Economic Prosperity • Transportation Mobility and Connectivity • A Safe and Prepared Community • Accountable and Responsive City Government In an effort to incorporate the QLMP into the City's budget process, City of Temecula Executive Staff met at the outset of the budget process to update the Citywide Five -Year Goals based on the Core Values of the Quality of Life Master Plan. These goals were then used by each Department to develop Short Term Objectives for completion in the upcoming fiscal year, and are reflected in the Department Information section of the budget document. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES The budget document includes the short term operational objectives for completion in Fiscal Year 2019- 20 and the performance measures for evaluating the completion of those objectives. These objectives were developed in a collaborative process with City staff in order to identify how each department can contribute to the overall long term goals of the City. The objectives were then used by the departments in order to identify and justify their Annual Operating Budget submittals. The short term objectives are detailed by Department in the Departmental Information section of this budget document. Each Department section also includes the objectives and performance measures cross referenced by the City's Long -Term Goals and QLMP Core Value, along with significant accomplishments, and a detail of the expenditure requests and personnel allocations which will be used to meet the objectives. LONG-RANGE FINANCIAL FORECAST With the recent passage of Measure S in November 2016 (one -cent Transactions and Use Tax) combined with ongoing fiscal restraint, the City is in a strong fiscal position over the coming five-year period, with all funds balanced, reserves fully -funded and available fund balance in both the General Fund and the Measure S Fund. As illustrated below, the General Fund Ending Balance over the ensuing five-year period is sufficient to meet the operational needs of the City as well as fully fund the Reserve for Economic Uncertainty (20% of Operating Expenditures) and the Secondary Reserve (5% of Operating Expenditures). In addition, a total of $8 million was deposited into an Internal Revenue Code General Fund 5-Year Projections Section 115 Irrevocable Fund Balance Trend 35,000,000 Pension Trust in Fiscal Year ktuals Projected 2017-18, in order to address 30,000,000 future pension liabilities of the 25,000,000 City. This Trust will serve as a tertiary reserve, in addition to 20,000,000 the aforementioned General - - - Fund Reserves. 15,000,000 Total Reserves, including the ,000,000 Trust proceeds totals $29.0 million for Fiscal Year 2019-20. 10 GENERAL FUND ANALYSIS 1W FY12-13 FY13-14 FY14-15 FY15-16 FY16-17 FY17-18 FY18-19 FY19-20 FY20-21 FY21-22 FY22-23 FY23-24 —Fund Balance —Funded Reserve O Desired Reserve Fiscal Year 2019-20 Ending Fund Balance is projected to be $26,476,568. Total Reserves, at 25% of Expenditures, totals $19,537,138, with another $460,305 assigned to cover the costs future Capital Projects and the Pechanga-funded police officer for Fiscal Year 2020-21, leaving an Unassigned (available) Fund Balance of $6,479,125. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget General Fund Revenue Highlights General Fund Revenue is projected to increase by 0.8% over the prior year with a total of $80,127,628, of which $5,735,418 was transferred in from the Measure S Fund to primarily cover the costs associated with additional Public Safety personnel. The change in the major revenue sources are noted below: • Sales Tax ($37,981,346) is projected to increase by 0.4% compared to the prior fiscal year due to anticipated leveling in both the Business/Industry and Autos/ Transportation sectors of the local economy. • Property Tax ($8,706,389) is projected to increase 4.1%, as assessed valuations continue to climb and property values are restored to pre -recessionary levels. • Franchise Fees ($3,351,304) are projected to increase 0.4% due to slight increases in electricity rates. • Transient Occupancy Tax ($3,338,860) is projected to increase by 3%, due to the opening of two new hotels during the prior year, combined with increased mid -week occupancies expected as a result of the recent expansion of the Pechanga Resort and Casino's convention center. • Licenses, Permits & Service Charges ($4,335,071) are projected to decrease by 18.2% due to less Development activity projected compared to the prior year, as the Roripaugh Ranch development created increased permit activity in FY2018-19. • Intergovernmental Revenues ($8,503,309) are projected to increase by 4.1% due to the increases expected in Property Tax In Lieu of Vehicle License Fees which is driven by increasing property values within the City. • Operating Transfers In ($3,151,887) represents funds deposited into Special Revenue Funds that are transferred into the General Fund to cover eligible expenditures. The Gas Tax Fund is anticipated to transfer $2,956,887 to be spent on street and road maintenance. The Supplemental Law Enforcement Services Fund is anticipated to transfer $195,000 to supplement the Police Department budget. • Operating Transfers In - Measure S ($5,735,418) will continue to fund 11 new Police Officers and staffing for Fire Station No. 95. General Fund Expenditure Highlights Property Tax 11% `Prop. Tax in Lieu of / VLF 11% Fiscal Year 2019-20 Franchise Fees 4% General Fund Revenue TOT 4% Measure C 2% `Licenses/Permits Sales Tax 5% 46% Measure S \ 7% \ Transfers In Other `Reimbursements 4% 2% 4% The largest expenditure of the General Fund is Public Safety, which has grown from 56% of total expenditures in the prior fiscal year, to 58% in Fiscal Year 2019-20. In accordance with the Measure S ballot language and City Council appropriation guidelines, the City has invested heavily in Public Safety over the past two years and continues to hold Public Safety as its highest priority. A total of $5.8 million, or 19%, of Measure S revenue is dedicated to Public Safety expenditures for FY2019-20 including the funding of the following: 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 w Annual Operating Budget The H�� o€ 4z4aero .Gail • Eleven Sworn Police Officers ($3.7 million) • Fire Station No. 95 Staffing ($1.7 million) • The funding for the future replacement Fire Ladder Truck and fire safety vehicles ($170,390) • The operations and maintenance of the Citywide Surveillance Camera system ($160,000) In addition to the ongoing Measure S-funded Public Safety expenditures, the Police Department will maintain 112 sworn officers and the Fire Department will provide four firefighter personnel per engine at all five Fire Stations. General Fund Operating Expenditures totals $78,148,553, which represents a 3.8% increase over the prior fiscal year. The majority of the increase is reflected in the two Public Safety departments, as noted below: • Police ($34,860,437) is increasing by 5.6% over the prior year, due to a projected 5% increase in the contract rates charged by the County to account for increased CalPERS pension costs and potential labor increases resulting from ongoing union negotiations. • Fire ($10,260,935) is increasing by 7.2% due to the anticipated increase in the contract rates charged by CalFire and Riverside County. The Total Fire Contract of $18 million is offset by the Structural Fire Tax Credit of $8.7 million. • Non -Safety Departments ($33,027,181) is increasing by 1.0% primarily due to the addition of 1.75 Full -Time Equivalent authorized positions in the Public Works Department and the City Manager's Office. Additionally, in accordance with the City's labor agreements, a 3% cost of living adjustment (COLA) is included for all employees, effective July 1, 2019. • Non -Departmental ($1,783,013) reflects a 6.6% decrease due to the slight decrease in the deposit into the Retiree Medical Contribution. The deposit exceeds the required amount in order to increase the City's funded -status of this trust fund and reduce future years' required contributions. Operating Transfers Out & One -Time Payments This category of expenditures reflects funds that are transferred to other funds, such as the CIP and Debt Service Funds. A total of $642,077 is being transferred to fund two Capital Projects: $200,000 for the I- 15 Congestion Relief project, to leverage funds received from CalTrans in order to help mitigate traffic on 1-15 Freeway; and $442,077 is being transferred to fund a new sidewalk on DLR Drive. A total of 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 w Annual Operating Budget The H�� o€ 4z4aero .Gail 6 $2,075,512 will be transferred to the Debt Service Fund for the annual Civic Center Lease payment, and $555,807 for the Debt Service on the Margarita Recreation Center renovation. Fund Balance & Reserves As noted above, the Ending Fund Balance, as of June 30, 2020 is projected to be $26,476,568, with the Reserve for Economic Uncertainty fully funded at $15,629,711, which represents 20% of General Fund Expenditures. Additionally, the Secondary Reserve, set at 5% of General Fund Expenditures, is fully - funded at $3,907,428. After Fund Balance assignments for future year expenditures, the remaining available fund balance totals $6,479,125. MEASURE S FUND With the approval of a one -cent transactions and use tax measure in November 2016, a new fund was established to account for this new revenue source and enhance budgetary accountability of Measure S expenditures. Fiscal Year 2019-20 Measure S revenue is conservatively projected to increase 2% over the prior year, to a total of $27,784,000. In accordance with the Council's approved spending guidelines, Measure S revenue is to be appropriated in the following order: 1. Public Safety 2. Asset Management 3. Capital Improvement Projects 4. General Services Public Safety (19%) The Proposed Budget includes $5,816,879 of Measure S funding dedicated to Public Safety, for the continued funding of 11 Sworn Police Officers and Fire staffing for Fire Station No. 95 which opened January 1, 2018. Additionally, Measure S will fund the future replacement of public safety vehicles and the operating costs of the Citywide Surveillance Camera system. Measure S - FY19-20 Appropriations $27,784,000 Capital Projects $13,109,728 42% Asset Management/Investment (10%) As noted in Council's appropriation guidelines for Measure S, ensuring adequate reserves are set - aside for the future replacement of City -owned assets is critical to the long-term viability of the City's operations. As such, the Proposed Budget includes contributions towards several Replacement Reserve Funds, including: 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget • Vehicle Replacement Reserve - $500,000 • Technology Replacement Reserve - $500,000 • Facilities Replacement Reserve - $500,000 • Street Maintenance Reserve - $1,500,000 As the City finalizes the Replacement Schedule for each category of assets noted above, the benefitting departments will also deposit funds into the reserve accounts to create adequate funding levels to purchase replacement assets in future Operating Budgets. Capital Improvement Program (42%) The Proposed Budget includes $13,109,728 of Measure S revenue allocated to fund 54 separate CIP projects. The influx on Measure S funding has allowed the City to leverage other funding sources, such as Development Impact Fees and various Grant funds, to complete projects in a more timely manner. Major Projects for FY2019-20 include: • Bike Lane and Trail Program at Temecula Creek South Side Trail - $571,000 to augment Development Impact Fee funds and AB2766 funds to install new gates, pave and stripe an existing maintenance road for a Class 1 Trail that parallels Temecula Creek. • Citywide Drainage Master Plan - $720,000 to fund a new project to develop a study of the City's drainage courses and provide a higher level of flood protection. • Citywide Financial System Upgrade - $613,184 to augment Technology Replacement funds necessary to upgrade the City's nearly 20-year old Financial System. • Citywide Streetlight Acquisition and LED Conversion - $800,000 to add funding allocated in the prior year for the purchase of the Southern California Edison owned streetlights within the City limits and retrofit to a more efficient Light Emitting Diode (LED) lighting system. • Citywide Surveillance Cameras - $720,347 to augment Development Impact Fees and funding allocated in the prior year to fund a new Surveillance Camera network covering City -owned facilities and traffic signals. • Community Recreation Center (CRC) Renovation - $500,000 to provide initial funding for the design of a rehabilitation, improvement and reconfiguration of the CRC facility. • Eagle Soar Splash Pad Control System Renovation - $300,000 to provide funding for the updating of the splash pad control system to meet current Health & Safety requirements. • French Valley Parkway/1-15 Over -Crossing and Interchange Improvements -Phase II - $1,971,845 — to provide funding for the right-of-way acquisition associated with this highly anticipated project. • Margarita Recreation Center - $720,000 to augment funding allocated in the prior year to fully - fund the construction of a new recreation center in Margarita Community Park. • Park Restroom Expansion, Renovations and ADA Improvements - $780,000 to augment funding allocated in a prior year for the renovation and installation of new restroom facilities at various parks throughout the City. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget • Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail Extension and Interconnect - $957,709 to augment grant funding allocated in a prior year for the design and construction of the extension of the existing trail from Ynez Road to the Murrieta Creek Multi -Purpose Trail. General Services (29%) The Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) has historically been funded with voter -approved Measure C funding and program -related revenue. Measure S funding is used to augment Measure C, in order to maintain the award -winning programs, activities and events TCSD provides to the citizenry. • TCSD Operations contribution - $7,989,182 • Library contribution - $921,203 • Service Level B — Residential Streetlights - $71,037 • Enhanced Custodial Services - $78,539 The Ending Fund Balance within the Measure S Fund is projected to be $1,670,169, which will carry - forward to the ensuing fiscal year. MAJOR SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Special Revenue Funds are used to account for activities paid for by taxes or other designated revenue sources that have specific limitations on use according to law. The City has eleven Special Revenue Funds. The major Special Revenue funds are highlighted below. Fund 100 - Gas Tax: Gas Tax revenue is projected to be $2,956,887, which reflects an increase of 23% due to higher volumes of gasoline sales over the prior year. These funds are transferred to the General Fund to support street and road maintenance. Fund 102 — Road Maintenance Rehabilitation Account (RMRA): Per the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 (SB1-Beall), increased gas tax and vehicle registration fees were imposed to fund street and road projects and other transportation uses Statewide. RMRA revenue is projected to be $1,875,831 for FY2019-20, to be allocated to the Pavement Rehabilitation Capital Improvement Project. Fund 103 — Street Maintenance Fund: This fund was established in FY2018-19 to accumulate resources for the future replacement of streets and roads throughout the City. Funding of $1.5 million from Measure S is programmed for Fiscal Year 2019-20. Fund 120 — Development Impact Fees: DIF revenue is projected to be $6,204,021, which reflects an increase of 34%. DIF revenue varies from year-to-year as it is based on anticipated development projects. The majority of DIF Revenues are transferred to the CIP to fund capital projects. Fund 125 — Public, Education & Government (PEG): PEG Fund revenues are received from local cable operators for the sole purpose of supporting the access facilities within the City. PEG Revenues are projected to be $214,723, which will be spent on various technology equipment used to support the broadcast of City Council meetings and events. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Fund 140 — Community Development Block Grant (CDBG): CDBG revenue is projected to be $559,111, which reflects the reimbursement for operations and Capital projects expected to be completed during the fiscal year. Fund 170 — Measure A: Measure A revenue is projected to be $3,251,000, which reflects a 0.2% increase over the prior year. This revenue is restricted for use on local streets and roads, and is programmed to support street and road maintenance. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Internal Service Funds are used to account for the funding of goods and services provided by one department to other benefitting departments on a cost -reimbursement basis. Additionally, the City maintains several Replacement Funds designed to accumulate resources for the future replacement of City equipment, technology and facilities. Fund 300 — Insurance: Projected expenses total $1,026,259, which covers the cost of administering the City's liability and property insurance programs. The projected Fund Balance is $621,999, which exceeds the desired balance of $450,000. Fund 305 — Workers' Compensation: Projected expenses total $255,779, which covers the cost of administering the City's self -insured Workers' Compensation program. The projected Fund Balance is $1,759,398, which exceeds the desired balance of $1.5 million. Fund 310 — Vehicles and Equipment: Projected expenses total $380,000 to replace several vehicles and heavy equipment that have reached the end of their useful life. The projected Fund Balance is $3,783,659. Fund 320 — Information Technology: Projected expenses total $4,112,021, which provides for the management of the City's computer and telephone systems. The projected Fund Balance is $488,092. Fund 325 — Technology Replacement: Projected expenses total $1,138,534 for the replacement of technology -related equipment that has surpassed its useful life, including an upgrade to the City's financial software system. The projected Fund Balance is $1,635,145. Fund 330 — Support Services: Projected expenses total $413,551, which provides for the management of the City's central receptionist, printing and mail activities. The projected Fund Balance is $4,170. Fund 335 — Support Services Replacement: Projected expenses total $50,000, which provides for the replacement of the City's duplicating machines. The projected Fund Balance is $435,814. Fund 340 — Facilities: Projected expenses total $1,359,094, which provide for the operations and maintenance of the City's buildings and parking structure. The projected Fund Balance is $508,564. Fund 350 — Facility Replacement: Projected expenses total $201,714, which provide for the replacement of equipment, systems and fixtures within City -owned facilities. The projected Fund Balance is $388,335. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget SUCCESSOR AGENCY TO THE REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY (SARDA) Fund 380 — SARDA: Projected expenses total $7,530,321, which reflects an increase of $10,649 in accordance with the debt service schedule on the outstanding Redevelopment Agency Tax Allocation Bonds. TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT (TCSD) The Temecula Community Services District was established as an assessment district to provide a comprehensive neighborhood and community park system, as well as a complement of recreational and cultural programs and events. Combined revenue for TCSD totals $24,461,642, which reflects an increase of 11.3% due primarily to the contributions from the Measure S Fund to fill the funding gap in the TCSD Operations Fund, as well as an increase in Service Level D — Refuse/Recycling Fund, due to the "extra -ordinary" charge imposed by CR&R to compensate for market constraints on recycled products. Combined expenditures total $24,807,774, which reflects an increase of 7.0% due to higher costs in the TCSD Operations Fund as a result of the 3% cost of living adjustment provided to all employees, the reclassification of three employees, and increased allocations from the Information Technology department due to a higher number of computer devices than in the prior year. Expenditures in Service Level D — Refuse/Recycling Fund also increase, due to the aforementioned "extra -ordinary" charge. As noted in the adjacent chart, TCSD's Special Tax (Measure C) funds $240.00 approximately 33% of the District's Parks and Recreation budget. The $200.00 remaining 67% comes from Measure S $160.00 and programmatic revenues. $120.00 $80.00 Additionally, Measure S contributes to the funding of the Library Fund $40.00 ($921,203) and Service Level B — $000 Residential Streetlight Fund ($71,037). TCSD Per Capita Funding CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (CIP) The City's five-year Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is presented to the City Council under separate cover. This program provides a five-year plan for capital improvements that is updated annually to ensure compliance with the program. The impact of capital projects on maintenance and operating costs were taken into consideration in the development of the operating budget. Circulation, infrastructure, parks, affordable housing, and other various projects are identified in the CIP budget. Overall, the Proposed Fiscal Years 2020-24 CIP includes 68 separate projects with total cost to complete estimated at $435,270,888, as outlined in the table below. Revenue from various identified sources for the Five -Year Capital Improvement Program is projected to be $334,305,104. This amount includes a pending $50 million INFRA grant to fund the French Valley Parkway Phase II project. Staff is aggressively 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget pursuing this vital funding source. The City of Temecula's CIP is a project planning and delivery document which includes several projects with unidentified funding sources in the third, fourth, and fifth years of the five-year program, totaling $102,797,737. The City is continually exploring and applying for federal, state and regional funding opportunities to enable the delivery of these currently unfunded projects. The five-year CIP is updated annually and newly secured revenues are programmed toward prioritized projects that may be shown as unfunded at this time. Type of Project Number of Projects Cost of Projects Circulation 22 $345,956,136 Infrastructure/ Other 34 61,363,635 Parks and Recreation 11 15,097,397 SARDA/ Housing TOTAL 1 12,853,720 2019-20 AUTHORIZED STAFFING Total authorized Full Time Equivalent (FTE) positions total 176.45 authorized positions, which reflects an increase of 4.75 positions compared to the prior year. Two of the authorized positions (Office Specialist and Community Services Manager) are associated with the Margarita Recreation Center and will remain unfunded until the facility has been rehabilitated. The following positions have been added to the list of Authorized Positions: • Office Aide III (Part-time) — City Manager's Office • Office Specialist II — Public Works-CIP Department • IT Technician I (Media) — Information Technology Department • Management Aide I — TCSD Human Services Department • Park Ranger I — TCSD Park Rangers Department Additionally, the FY2019-20 Operating Budget includes a 3% cost of living adjustment for all employees and the reclassification of 6 positions, per the provisions of the City's labor agreements. Total Authorized Positions total 176.45, which remains below the peak in 2007-08 by 34.3 positions. In addition to the Authorized Positions, the City employs a significant number of part- time, non-benefitted Project employees, primarily to assist with the multitude of programs offered by the Temecula Community Services District. For FY2019-20, an estimated 61.5 full-time equivalent (FTE) will be hired as seasonal and part-time support. kulhorired ftAiu. 2sao m0 2sau iaa0 50.0 City of Temecula Authorized Positions Trend 1995 - 2020 General Fund Budget S9u,000000 seB,0000w $70,0001000 $KOD01 oo s5RODDIM $40,�. 0 $3goog000 $10, o ,000 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 w Annual Operating Budget The H�� o€ 4z4aero .Gail Public Safety personnel is supplied through contracts with Riverside County and CalFire. A total of 112 Sworn Police Officers and 17 Community Service Officers are included in the Police Budget, and a total of 71 Fire personnel are reflected in the Fire Department Budget for FY2019-20. 2019-20 BUDGET POLICIES Two new Budget Policies are recommended to be added in FY2019-20, including the following: • XIII: Signature Delegation Policy — to provide the City Manager the ability to delegate his signature authority for certain contracts and agreements to Executive Staff members and the Purchasing Manager, in order to expedite the procurement process. Additionally, this policy delegates negotiating authority for personal injury and property damage settlements to the Risk Manager, up to $8,000. XV: Emergency Appropriation Policy — to authorize the City Manager to appropriate budgetary funds for the emergency purchase of goods and services to address and respond to emergencies. CONCLUSION In conclusion, the City is in a strong fiscal position with the General Fund balanced and all reserves fully - funded not only in Fiscal Year 2019-20, but throughout the ensuing five-year period. I would like to express my appreciation to the City Council for providing the direction and support crucial to achieving the City's goals. I would also like to recognize the contributions of the City staff for not only creating a successful operating budget, but also for their commitment to providing top quality services to all who live, work and play in Temecula. I would like to give special thanks to: Greg Butler, Assistant City Manager, Jennifer Hennessy, Director of Finance; Rudy Graciano, Fiscal Services Manager; Pascale Brown, Fiscal Services Manager; and Patricia Hawk, Budget Manager for their long hours and dedication to the City and this budget process. Sincerely, Aaron Adams City Manager 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 CITY OF TEMECULA CALIFORNIA Proposed Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-2024 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-2024 City of Temecula City Council City Management Mike Naggar, Mayor Aaron Adams, City Manager James Stewart, Mayor Pro Tern Greg Butler, Assistant City Manager Maryann Edwards, Council Member Matt Rahn, Council Member Zak Schwank, Council Member City of Temecula 41000 Main Street Temecula, California 92590 (951) 694-6430 TemeculaCA.gov Celebrating 3o Years Mayor Naggar states, "It took 30 years of dedication, hard work and a lot of love from our community, engaged citizens, families and businesses to build our City, so this year we are shining a spotlight on what, exactly, we all LOVE about our beautiful City." There are infinite reasons to LOVE Temecula. Its picturesque vineyards, award -winning wineries, themed City parks, championship golf courses, charming Old Town, rolling hills, morning mist, afternoon ocean breezes, the shopping experience at Promenade Temecula, world -class entertainment at Pechanga Resort & Casino, diverse restaurant choices, family -friendly citywide events, quaint neighborhoods, friendly neighbors, equestrian trails, fun parades, community theater, museums, top rated schools, maximum public safety, the people, inclusiveness, cultured tourists, generous business community, scenic mountainous backdrop, proximity to the ocean, hiking, biking, the weather and endless hometown LOVE. "I love it all in Temecula, but what melts my heart is our uniquely close-knit inclusive community of individuals and families with special needs; and I am so very proud to be their advocate," adds Mayor Naggar. The City of Temecula will be emphasizing the special talents that these individuals and emerging adults can bring to the workforce throughout the year, including a special needs workforce luncheon scheduled for the Spring. "Their special abilities far exceed their special needs, and it's exciting to see our business community recognize this as well. That's what I LOVE most about Temecula," Naggar adds. Aft a Capital Improvement Program The H-1.15—th—Uifn i. Fiscal Years 2020-24 Wine Ca uy TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION TransmittalMessage.............................................................................................................7 Resolutionof the City Council.............................................................................................12 California Society of Municipal Finance Officers (CSMFO) Certificate of Award..................13 City Organizational Chart....................................................................................................14 Descriptionof Levels...........................................................................................................15 Parameters for CIP Budget Cost Estimates........................................................................16 Description of Revenue Sources.........................................................................................17 SUMMARIES ProjectedRevenue Summary.............................................................................................21 Project Summary by Type of Project...................................................................................22 Expenditure Summary by Project Graph.............................................................................30 CIP Major Revenue Sources Graph....................................................................................31 Comparison Between Projected Revenue and Costs..........................................................32 CIRCULATION PROJECTS Abbott Corporation Roadway Improvements.......................................................................40 Butterfield Stage Road Extension........................................................................................42 Cherry Street Extension and Murrieta Creek Low -Flow Crossing to Diaz Road...................44 Citywide Buffered Bike Lane Striping......................................................................46 Diaz Road Expansion (Rancho California Road to Cherry Street).......................................48 Emergency Vehicle Pre-Emption Upgrade Program — Citywide..........................................50 Flashing Beacons and Speed Advisory Signs.....................................................................52 French Valley Parkway / Interstate 15 Improvements — Phase 11.........................................54 French Valley Parkway / Interstate 15 Improvements — Phase III........................................56 Interstate 15 Congestion Relief...........................................................................................58 Interstate 15 / State Route 79 South Ultimate Interchange..................................................60 Medians and Parkways — Citywide......................................................................................62 9 Ark Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) CIRCULATION PROJECTS (continued) Murrieta Creek Bridge at Overland Drive.............................................................................64 Nicolas Road Extension and Improvement..........................................................................66 Overhead Street Name Sign Replacement Program - Citywide..........................................68 Pavement Rehabilitation Program - Citywide......................................................................70 Pechanga Parkway Widening.............................................................................................72 Traffic Signal Equipment Enhancement Program — Citywide...............................................74 Traffic Signal Installation — Citywide....................................................................................76 Traffic Signal — Park and Ride Access Improvements.........................................................78 Traffic Signal System Upgrade............................................................................................80 Ynez Road Improvements...................................................................................................82 INFRASTRUCTURE / OTHER PROJECTS Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition Plan Implementation...............................87 Bike Lane and Trail Program — Citywide.............................................................................89 Bike Lane and Trail Program — Pump Track........................................................................91 Bike Lane and Trail Program — Temecula Creek South Side Trail.......................................93 City Facilities Rehabilitation................................................................................................95 Citywide Drainage Master Plan...........................................................................................97 Citywide Financial System Upgrade....................................................................................99 Citywide Streetlight Acquisition and Light Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit ...........................101 Citywide Surveillance Cameras.........................................................................................103 Community Recreation Center (CRC) Renovations..........................................................105 Comprehensive General Plan Update...............................................................................107 Electric Vehicles Charging Station....................................................................................109 Expanded Recycled Water Conversion Project.................................................................111 4 The Hewn el Swehern G1lfernia wee ca um, Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) INFRASTRUCTURE / OTHER PROJECTS (continued) Fiber Optic Communication System Upgrade...................................................................113 Fire Station 73 Gym/Garage.............................................................................................115 Fire Station 84 Training Room Renovation........................................................................117 HistoryMuseum................................................................................................................119 Interstate 15 / State Route 79 South Interchange Enhanced Landscaping ........................121 Library Parking — Phase II.................................................................................................123 Main Street Property Improvements..................................................................................125 Margarita Recreation Center.............................................................................................127 Medians and Traffic Calming Improvements — Citywide....................................................129 Murrieta Creek Improvements...........................................................................................131 Old Town Parking Structure..............................................................................................133 Pechanga Parkway Environmental Mitigation...................................................................135 Pedestrian Signal Equipment Upgrade — Citywide............................................................137 PublicSafety Monument...................................................................................................139 Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail Extension and Interconnect .....................141 Santa Gertrudis Creek Phase 11 — Margarita Under-Crossing............................................143 Sidewalks— Citywide........................................................................................................145 Sidewalks — DLR Drive.....................................................................................................147 Sidewalks — Old Town Boardwalk Enhancement..............................................................149 Temecula Elementary School (TES) Pool Renovation......................................................151 Utility Undergrounding — Citywide.....................................................................................153 C74'�r Thn Hewn.15—th—Uif— la Wi aC—tiy Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) PARKS and RECREATION PROJECTS Children's Museum Enhancement Project.........................................................................156 Community Services Master Plan.....................................................................................158 Eagle Soar Splash Pad Control System Renovation.........................................................160 Flood Control Channel Reconstruction and Repair...........................................................162 Parks Improvement Program............................................................................................164 Park Restrooms Renovations, Expansion, and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Improvements...................................................................................................................166 Playground Equipment Enhancement and Safety Surfacing.............................................168 Ronald Reagan Sports Park Restroom Expansion and Renovation..................................170 Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library Enhancement and Renovation .....................172 Sports Court Resurfacing..................................................................................................174 Sports Field Lighting Light Emitting Diode (LED) Conversion............................................176 SARDA / HOUSING PROJECTS AffordableHousing...........................................................................................................180 FUTURE YEARS PROJECTS Circulation.........................................................................................................................183 I nfrastructure/Other...........................................................................................................183 Parks and Recreation........................................................................................................183 APPENDIX Glossaryof Terms.............................................................................................................185 Index.................................................................................................................................189 6 C7 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 TRANSMITTAL MESSAGE Honorable Mayor and Members of the City Council: It is with great pleasure that I submit the City of Temecula's Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Budget for Fiscal Years 2019-20 through 2023-24. This document is the result of several internal CIP review meetings, which incorporates previous City Council direction, and analyzes each project for feasibility, necessity, funding sources, and timing. All departments were involved in the process and contributed significantly to the discussions, resulting in a comprehensive proposed Five -Year Capital Improvement Program. All projects presented in this five-year budget have been carefully programmed to ensure the community's capital improvement needs are met both now and in the future. CITY OF TEMECULA PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHICS The City of Temecula is a dynamic, fast growing community, which extends across 30 square miles of gently rolling hills and comprises approximately 113,826 residents of various cultural backgrounds. The City maintains approximately 90% of the 345 total miles of streets within its boundaries. Additionally, the City has 41 parks on 330 developed acres, providing extensive recreational opportunities for both Temecula citizens and surrounding communities. The Temecula Valley Unified School District provides 32 schools for 27,991 students in Kindergarten through 12' grade. The City of Temecula focuses on community needs and quality of life through its day-to-day operations, a proactive economic development element, and by meeting the City's capital improvement needs. Temecula's residents enjoy one of the finest lifestyles Southern California has to offer. Environmental and residential factors produce a beautiful setting that attracts young, well-educated families to fashionable homes that are inexpensive by Southern California standards. Geography contributes to the City's population and retail growth from San Diego and Orange Counties. Temecula's leadership has approached economic growth from qualitative standpoint, providing Temecula with a favorable share of the region's higher paying and high technology career opportunities. The City's average income levels are higher than the surrounding region, the educational performance of its young people is above the State average, and Temecula has been recognized as one of Nation's safest cities. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT POLICY Temecula has experienced solid economic growth over the past year with steady expansion of several major circulation, infrastructure, and parks and recreation projects. The City continues its efforts to grow and sustain the economy of Temecula through business attraction, retention, workforce development, higher education, and tourism. The City partners with the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce, Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau (Visit Temecula rN J � Aft Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Valley), Small Business Development Center, Riverside County Economic Development Agency, Riverside County Workforce Development Agency, and the Economic Development Coalition of Southwest California. These alliances leverage the assets and resources necessary to reinforce our market. The City's economic development policy centers on providing a broad range of infrastructure improvements to encourage both tourism and business investment in the City of Temecula. Some of the more favorable attributes of Temecula includes a business friendly atmosphere, a high standard of living and high quality of life, a well-educated workforce, competitive housing prices, access to the major ports of Southern California, convenient freeway access, and centralized location between Los Angeles, San Diego, and Orange counties. By providing a commercial and residential core that is attractive, of high quality, and possesses adequate infrastructure to support the residential, business and tourist population, Temecula has quickly become a destination location for a broad spectrum of the population. Measure S approved by the voters on November 2016 (one -cent Transactions and Use Tax for the City). The measure was approved based on the commitment to maintain 9-1-1 emergency response times, prevent cuts to local paramedic/police/fire protection, school safety patrols, youth/after-school, senior and disabled services; improvement freeway interchanges/reduce traffic and provide for other general services. CAPITAL BUDGET POLICY The purpose of the CIP Budget document is to serve as a planning tool, which coordinates the financing and scheduling of major projects undertaken by the City. The CIP Budget document has been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. This document is dynamic and, consequently, must be revised annually to address changing needs, priorities, and financial conditions. The capital improvements presented in this document are the City's major projects, which exceed $30,000 in cost, have long-term life spans, and are generally non- recurring. Each project cost is identified based on current year estimates, and future projected costs appropriations are increased by a 2% inflationary index. Future operating and maintenance costs are estimated based on the life of the project to maintain the project life with a 2% yearly inflator and are included in the City of Temecula's annual operating budget. These projects include land and right-of-way acquisition, design, construction or rehabilitation of public buildings or facilities, public infrastructure design and construction, park design and construction, and redevelopment projects. The City's goal in providing a CIP Budget is to develop a multi -year plan for capital improvements, update it annually, and follow through with all capital improvements in accordance with the plan. In determining the relative merit of a proposed project, key management team members evaluate projects for feasibility, community enhancement, infrastructure, historic preservation, and safety. 8 (3` Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PLAN DEVELOPMENT The City Council adopted the Temecula 2030 Quality of Life Master Plan (QLMP) in October 2011. The QLMP defines the strategic priorities of Temecula's residents, and partners for the City's next twenty years. It reflects the vision for the City's future, and commits the City to a performance based process to accomplish those goals. This plan was developed by engaging residents, businesses, local institutions and regional partners in an inclusive process. The QLMP provides the framework for the City's Strategic Budgeting activities. The City Council has set priorities and guided staff in developing six Core Values upon which to focus time and resources (as identified in the QLMP). These areas include: 1. Healthy and Livable City 2. Economic Prosperity 3. A Safe and Prepared Community 4. A Sustainable City 5. Transportation Mobility and Connectivity 6. Accountable and Responsive City Government All projects presented in the CIP are carefully programmed in concurrence with the City's Quality of Life Master Plan to ensure the community's capital improvement needs are met both now and in the future. The project sheets have been updated to include the specific Core Value(s) each project satisfies. The framework for the CIP is further defined in the City's CIP fiscal policy to provide a structure within which fiscal decisions can be made and to optimize all available resources toward the accomplishment of the City's Core Values as defined in the QLMP. This CIP budget document was developed by incorporating input from key management team members based on community comments and feedback received throughout the year. Through several internal CIP review meetings, the team then identified and evaluated community needs in the areas of roads/streets, bridges, public buildings, and parks and recreation facilities. Each proposed project was reviewed and discussed to ensure funding, timing, and necessity. All projects will be evaluated by the City's Planning Commission to ensure consistency with the provisions of the City of Temecula General Plan, while considering the City's long-term vision as developed by the City Council. The proposed Circulation, Infrastructure, and Parks and Recreation projects will be reviewed by the Planning Commission, Public/Traffic Safety Commission, and the Parks and Recreation Commission. Projects in this document have been scheduled in each of the five fiscal years based on community needs, as determined by the City Council and availability of funding. Priority rankings in each major category (Circulation, Infrastructure/Other, Parks and Recreation, and 9 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency/Housing) have been assigned in accordance with the priority guidelines as shown on the Description of Priorities page herein. Additionally, since many projects in the CIP are conceptual in nature, the general outline for cost estimates provided in last year's CIP document were revised and utilized as shown on the Parameters for CIP Budget Cost page herein. The Fiscal Years 2020-24 CIP identifies a total of sixty eight (68) projects, consisting of twenty two (22) Circulation projects with cost to complete totaling $345,956,136; the Infrastructure/Other section consists of thirty four (34) projects totaling $61,363,635; the Parks and Recreation section consists of eleven (11) projects totaling $15,097,397; and the Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency (SARDA)/Housing) section consists of one (1) project totaling $12,853,720. The total cost to complete all of the proposed projects is $435,270,888 of which $118,035,382 is programmed for Fiscal Year 2019-20. Also of note, in this document, there is $102,797,737 in projects with unspecified funding sources. These projects have been identified as necessary infrastructure for the City, and will require that funding sources be identified before the projects can commence. Number of Type of Total Cost to Projects Project Complete 22 Circulation $345,956,136 34 Infrastructure/Other 61,363,635 11 Parks and Recreation 15,097,397 1 SARDA/Housing 12,853,720 68 $435,270,888 CIP BUDGET INFORMATION PROVIDED Information included in this document is as follows: • Description of Levels provides the guidelines used in prioritizing projects. • Parameter for CIP Budget Cost Estimates provides standard estimating criteria for project costs. • Description of Revenue Sources provides a general description of sources of revenue for the CIP. • Projected Revenue Summary provides five-year projections for each of the major sources of funds to be utilized for capital improvements. Me �.� [[ 6{ Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 • Project Summary by Type of Project provides summary information of the Capital Improvement projects by the type of project and priority. • Comparison Between Projected Revenue and Costs provides summary information of costs versus revenue in each Fiscal Year by source of funds. • Project Description Sheets each sheet provides a Project Description, Benefit/Core Value, Project Status, Department, Level, Project Cost (including the fiscal year or years in which the project is anticipated to be constructed), Source of Funds, Future Operation & Maintenance Costs, and a location map. Project description categories include Circulation, Infrastructure/Other, Parks and Recreation, and SARDA/Housing. • Future Years Projects provide an opportunity for long range planning that exceeds the five-year period in each of the major groupings (Circulation, Infrastructure, Parks and Recreation, Redevelopment and Affordable Housing). CONCLUSION The revenue estimates, although conservative, are strictly estimates. The actual amount of funds available for construction will vary based upon the state of the economy. The City's major revenue sources are primarily received from various County programs, State grant programs, and Special Districts. The City Council will be updated throughout the year on the status of projects and corresponding revenue sources. The Fiscal Years 2020-24 Capital Improvement Program is a result of a total team effort of both City staff and City Council. There are forty (40) projects which are scheduled to begin design and twenty eight (28) construction and/or be completed in Fiscal Year 2019-20. These projects are intended to enhance the safety and quality of life for all citizens in the City of Temecula. I would like to thank staff and the City Council for all of the contributions that were made in developing the capital budget that will serve as the footprint for Temecula's future. Sincerely, Aaron Adams City Manager is a,a Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL (Place Holder) `A Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 CSMFO CERTIFICATE OF AWARD CaCifornia Society of JWunicipaCFinance Officers Certificate ofAward Excellence Award Fiscal Year 2018-2019 Capital Budget Presented to the City of Temecula For meeting the criteria established to achieve the CSMFO Excellence Award in Budgeting January 4, 2019 sae. Margaret Moggia Sara Roush, Chair CSMFO President Recognition Commiuee Dedicated Excellence in Municipal Financial Reporting 13 Th. Hart d 5—tt .n �. w Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 CITY ORGANIZATIONAL CHART City Attorney City Clerk Finance Public Works Human Resources Economic Development Citizens of Temecula City Council City Manager Commissions Community Development Information Technology/Support Services Community Services Police / Fire [Contract] Emergency Management 14 R H-,td 5—th— w . Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 DESCRIPTION OF LEVEL RANKING AND FUTURE YEARS PROJECTS LEVEL I: The project is urgent and must be completed as soon as feasible. Failure to address the project may impact the health, safety, or welfare of the community or have a potential significant impact on the financial well-being of the City. The project must be initiated or financial opportunity losses may result. LEVEL II: The project is important and addressing it is necessary. The project impacts safety, law enforcement, health, welfare, economic base, quality of life, and has been identified as a priority in the Quality of Life Master Plan. LEVEL III: The project will enhance quality of life and will provide a benefit to the community. Completion of the project will improve the community by providing cultural, recreational, and/or aesthetic value, or is deemed as a necessary improvement to a public facility. FUTURE YEARS PROJECTS: The project will be an improvement to the community, but does not necessarily need to be completed within a five-year capital improvement program time frame. 15 ANk The H—of Fa her. Calilr wne Ca�nvy Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PARAMETERS FOR CIP BUDGET COST ESTIMATES ADMINISTRATION COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF ESTIMATED TOTAL PROJECT COSTS Estimated Total Protect Costs Over $10 Million $5 Million to $10 Million $1 Million to $5 Million $500,000 to $1 Million $100,000 to $500,000 Less than $100,000 Administration Costs Percentage 7% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% DESIGN COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL CONSTRUCTION COSTS Estimated Total Design Costs Construction Costs Percentage Over $10 Million 7% $5 Million to $10 Million 10% $1 Million to $5 Million 15% $500,000 to $1 Million 18% $100,000 to $500,000 20% Less than $100,000 25% ACQUISITION COSTS (vacant, per square foot) Property Zoning Estimated Cost (vacant, per sq. ft.) Industrial Property $12.00 Commercial/Retail/Office $20.00 Commercial — Old Town $50.00 Rural/Residential $0.50 - $2.00 Flood Plain $0.57 Multi -Family Residential $5.00 Single Family Residential $3.00 CONSTRUCTION COSTS Building Type EstimatedCost Assembly Use Building (per sq. ft.) $300 Office (per sq. ft.) $300 Multi -Family Housing (per sq. ft.) $175 Community Parks (per acre) $340,000 Neighborhood Parks (per acre) $250,000 Parameters for the CIP cost estimates are adjusted annually to reflect current economic conditions and cost of living increases. Future projected cost appropriations are increased by 2% inflationary index. Future operating and maintenance costs are estimated based on the life of the project to maintain the project life with a 2% yearly inflator, where applicable, and are included in the City of Temecula annual operating budget. `r Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 DESCRIPTION OF REVENUE SOURCES Assembly Bill 2766 (AB 2766) State funds that are available to implement programs and projects that reduce air pollution from motor vehicles. Capital Financing Funding available through financing proceeds to be used for Capital Improvements. Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) The Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides funds through the Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) for local community development, housing activities, and public services. The primary objective of the CDBG Program is the development of viable communities by providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and expanded economic opportunities primarily focused on low- and moderate -income persons and neighborhoods. Community Facilities District (CFD) A tool that allows the City to construct desired and authorized public improvements with costs of the projects paid for by the benefitted properties within the boundaries of a designated area. The costs are then financed through the issuance of bonds payable over a period of years. Department of Water Resources (DWR) Proposition 84 Funding made available from the State of California Department of Water Resources funding from the Safe Drinking Water, Water Quality and Supply, Flood Control, River and Coastal Protection Bond Act of 2006. 2015 Proposition 84 Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM) Implementation Grant, California Public Resources Code Section 75026 of Divisions 26.5 of the California Water Code (CWC). Development Impact Fees (DIF) Fees generated by development applications to offset the effect of development to include infrastructure, fire protection, public facilities and services, libraries, roads, schools, parks, traffic signal mitigation and open space/public art. Fees are determined by the cost of the project at the time of application. Facilities Replacement Fund This Fund was established to accumulate resources necessary to replace future Facilities systems, equipment and fixtures. General Fund City General Funds retained for capital improvement projects. 17 IM R Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 DESCRIPTION OF REVENUE SOURCES (continued) Highway Safety Improvement Program The Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP), codified as Section 148 of Title 23, United States Code (23 U.S.0 §148), is a core federal -aid program to States for the purpose of achieving a significant reduction in fatalities and serious injuries on all public roads. Highway Bridge Program This program is funded by Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and authorized by United States Code (USC) Title 23, Section 144. The purpose of the Program is to replace or rehabilitate public highway bridges over waterways, other topographical barriers, other highways, or railroads when the State and the Federal Highway Administration determine that a bridge is significantly important and is unsafe because of structural deficiencies, physical deterioration, or functional obsolescence. Infrastructure For Rebuilding America (INFRA) The INFRA program provides dedicated, discretionary funding for projects that address critical issues facing our nation's highways and bridges. Measure A (Local Streets and Roads) Riverside County's half -cent sales tax to fund transportation projects to improve local streets and roads, major highways, commuter rail, and public transit throughout Riverside County. Measure S Pursuant to Ordinance 16-06, on November 8, 2016, the people of Temecula approved a local 1% Transactions and Use Tax, effective on April 1, 2017, to maintain 9-1-1 emergency response times, prevent cuts to local paramedic, police, fire protection, school safety patrols, youth/after-school, senior, disabled services, improve freeway interchanges, reduce traffic and provide for other general services. Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC) The MSRC is the Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee, established under state law (AB 2766) whose sole mission is to fund projects that reduce air pollution from motor vehicles within the South Coast Air District in Southern California. Public Art Fund Public Artwork enhances the quality of life for individuals living and working in the Temecula. This fund was adopted by City Council for design, acquisition, installation, improvement, maintenance and insurance of public artwork displayed on City property; offering of performing arts programs on City property for the community; and art education programs on City property for the community (provided, however, that not more than five percent of the fund's annual budget shall be used for this purpose). 18 C( Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 DESCRIPTION OF REVENUE SOURCES (continued) Quimby The City's park -in -lieu or park development fee is assessed under provisions of the Subdivision Map Act which allows the City to require the dedication of land or the payment of a fee in lieu of land to be used for the purchase (or development) of park property. Reimbursements/Other Funding made available from other agencies or sources on a reimbursement, donation, and contribution basis. The actual agreement states the conditions of monies specific to a particular project. Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient, Transportation Equity Act - Legacy for Users (SAFETEA—LU) Signed into law on August 10, 200S, and provides for highways, highway safety, and public transportation to improve safety, reduce traffic congestion, and other activities related to solving transportation problems. This new program takes off where STP, TEA-21, and ISTEA left off. Senate Bill 1(SB1)/Road Repair and Accountability Act (RMRA)/Active Transportation Program (ATP) The State of California imposes per gallon excise and sales taxes on fuel sales, as well as registration taxes on motor vehicles, for allocation to agencies for transportation purposes. In 2017, the State established the Road Repair and Accountability Act (RMRA) to allocate a greater share of additional monies for transportation purposes. Senate Bill 621 Represents a regional organization made up of tribal governments primarily within Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations (TASIN) member tribes contribute a percentage of their gaming revenues to the Indian Gaming Special Distribution Fund (SDF), as established by the State Legislature, to offset the impacts of Indian gaming on public services and infrastructure. Senate Bill 821 SB 821, the Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program, is provided through the Transportation Development Act (TDA), funded through a % cent of the general sales tax collected statewide. The TDA provides two major sources of funding for public transportation: the Local Transportation Fund (LTF) and the State Transit Assistance (STA). The LTF provides funding for essential transit and commuter rail services, SB 821 and planning. Each year, two percent of the LTF revenue is made available for use on bicycle and pedestrian facility projects through the SB 821 program. 19 G� Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 DESCRIPTION OF REVENUE SOURCES (continued) State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) The State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) is the biennial five-year plan adopted by the California Transportation Commission (CTC) for future allocations of certain State transportation funds for State highway improvements, intercity rail, and regional highway and transit improvements. State law requires the Commission to update the STIP biennially, in even -numbered years, with each new STIP adding two new years to prior programming commitments. State Highway Operation Protection Program & Minor Program (SHOPP) State Highway System's program that funds repair and preservations, emergency repairs, safety improvements and some highway operational improvements. Surface Transportation Program (STP) Federal funds available for local agencies to improve the safety and efficiency of the local transportation system. Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds Series 2017A and 2017B As of January 31, 2012, the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Temecula has been dissolved and the City has elected to become the Successor Agency. The Successor Agency will be responsible for the winding down of the remaining activities of the dissolved Redevelopment Agency. These remaining activities include completing affordable housing and infrastructure projects that are funded with tax allocation bonds issued by the former redevelopment agency. The Series 2017A and 2017B Refunding Bonds were issued in 2017 to refinance 2002, 2006, 2007, 2010, and 2011 Tax Allocation Bonds to provide financing for low and moderate income housing projects. The outstanding bonds will be repaid in full in 2038. Monies to pay bond debt service is requested from the State and disbursed by the County from the Trust Fund established to accumulate tax increment generated by the former Temecula Redevelopment Agency area. Technology Replacement Fund This fund is used for the replacements of computers, system software and all other Information Technology equipment. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Multi -jurisdictional development impact fee paid for by new development to provide the transportation infrastructure necessary to accommodate new development. WRCOG-BEYOND Framework Fund Program Local assistance funding program for Economic Development and Sustainability Projects. 20 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PROJECTED REVENUE SUMMARY Available Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Fund 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 Projected 2022- 2023-2024 Funds FUNDING SOURCE Revenue 2023 Revenue Revenue Available Assembly Bill 2766 $ 267,322 $ 133,576 $ 136,245 $ 138,967 $ 141,743 $ 144,575 $ 962,428 Capital Financing 6,405,000 $ 6,405,000 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) 943,361 323,660 323,660 323,660 323,660 $ 2,238,001 Facilities Replacement Fund 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 $ 1,500,000 General Fund 8,426,877 642,077 100,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 $ 11,168,954 Measure S 15,403,001 13,109,728 4,558,640 7,574,577 2,052,000 1,842,000 $ 44,539,946 Public Art 27,280 128,992 70,823 41,138 9,255 8,127 $ 285,615 Road Maintenance and Rehabilitation Account(RMRA) 1,105,403 1,873,331 1,918,154 1,956,517 1,995,647 2,034,777 $ 10,883,829 Technology Replacement 763,534 $ 763,534 Community Facilities Districts Roripaugh Community Facilities District #03-02 15,940,793 $ 15,940,793 Roripaugh Community Facilities District #16-01 6,585,898 $ 6,585,898 Wolf Creek Community Facilities District 268,073 $ 268,073 Development Impact Fees (DIF) Corporate Facilities - 307,416 210,033 141,377 50,110 44,103 $ 753,039 Fire Facilities 46,734 185,321 154,944 105,761 26,978 26,809 $ 546,547 Library Facilities 937,040 172,005 230,000 179,069 80,738 71,458 $ 1,670,310 Open Space and Trails 576,556 137,453 200,919 145,183 37,576 37,576 $ 1,135,263 Parks and Recreation 496,485 471,570 689,310 498,092 128,918 128,918 $ 2,413,293 Police Facilities 68,495 176,135 155,411 96,045 11,386 11,288 $ 518,760 Quimby 1,466,962 211,412 321,935 8,835 8,835 - $ 2,017,979 Street Improvements 2,103,717 3,902,741 1,864,075 1,008,261 84,909 78,111 $ 9,041,814 Traffic Signals 198,979 317,968 266,717 144,141 12,011 11,057 $ 950,873 Measure A Programs Measure A (Local Streets and Roads) 4,459,049 1,242,460 1,283,089 1,325,135 1,368,387 1,412,829 $ 11,090,949 Grants Department Water Resources Grant Prop 84 (DWR) 426,029 $ 426,029 Highway Bridge Program(HBP) 575,445 88,530 7,543,641 $ 8,207,616 Highway Safety Improvement Program(HSIP) 2,605,910 $ 2,605,910 Infrastructure For Rebuilding America (INFRA) 50,000,000 $ 50,000,000 Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC) 141,000 $ 141,000 SAFETEA-LU 931,360 $ 931,360 SBIATPAugmentation 4,430,000 1,502,000 $ 5,932,000 State Highway operation Protection Program & minor Program (SHOPP) 1,250,000 $ 1,250,000 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) 47,600,000 $ 47,600,000 Surface Transportation Program (STP) 1,810,302 $ 1,810,302 Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds Series 2017B 12,853,720 $ 12,853,720 Redevelopment Property Tax Trust Fund 750,000 $ 750,000 Reim bursements/Other Developer Contribution 934,129 144,649 $ 1,078,778 Lease Agreement 737,700 $ 737,700 Pechanga Tribe Contributions 4,225,519 $ 4,225,519 Rancho California Water District (RCWD) 518,322 $ 518,322 Riverside County 164,904 $ 164,904 Settlement Proceeds 500,000 $ 500,000 Shea Homes Reimbursement 92,510 $ 92,510 Senate Bills Senate Bill 621 1,426,783 $ 1,426,783 Senate Bill 821 223,300 $ 223,300 Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Community and Environmental Transportation Accountability Program (CETAP/RCTC) 681,514 $ 681,514 Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) 6,668,036 495,923 53,302,980 $ 60,466,939 TOTAL REVENUE $ 79,814,167 $ 51,003,700 $ 61,403,845 $ 74,528,322 $ 60,935,133 $ 6,619,937 $ 334,305,104 21 E't M N L 0 OO L N ay L M CD CD E>- 0 V L (� CL U- E Q m U m H a) 0) O d 15 E 0 N of C LL 11 d c K F M N O 7 0) 0 0 0 0 0 0 O Cl) O N r O M 000 000 co N 0) cl 10 0) (O C Ci C I� Cl O C0 0) (O W N V N Ord (ON a) h(O 00 0) O (O 0) N m U) M OD 0) (O c0 (O (O � a0 M 't O O N Cl) N v N f� 7 0 (O 0 0 0 O O O O O Cl) N N O M O O M 0 0 0 O O O a1 O N I- (O cM N (O 0) I c c C I- M O ((0 Om00 M00 V (Ord (0N 0) O(O T� O c m N ' O M W O( 0(O 7 00 M (O O r N r r M a.�r: O 10100 O O00 O OI-- co O O (O N W oD 10 � M N O V 0) W M (O m m coaD (�0 (NO oc n (0 Or co N O m M O m 00 COO N(O ON I� z 000 Nr- fo N r 0 c Ico M r M a] m 0 w 0 o _ 0 c7�� NW s W�fn (4U m s s s t t � 00000 `oaaaaa N N N 0) 0) N E E E E E r 0 0 0 0 07 0) i i i E2 � M N co 0 n'n'n'aa2 E O E E E E E a ` Z) w a] c ._ ._ ._ . . 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OMD N N O O O O O O O O O N N 0(0 O O O O O O O O O o o o (0 N (0 N O u7 7 V O O C. C. O O C C C O N N O O O C. 7 V N N r (00 I� m m m (O O r N m O m 0 7 I- 7 7 h mO N N 0 ^ N N V m f-- O CO N m N O O O m O W CDN CDm OD m O 10 O co m 0 (0 O (0 O O't OI: (O CD V O V m O m O co VONM ONNN N co m m 0 0 � H U) N m N 2 N ca a) 2 CD CD O C N N O C N N U)lU)I V1 N N O) LL F C E U LL C m 0 w 0 ¢ c @ 7 @ W U > m L LL N O C m 0_ C EU J H t m c n N E w Q ,. a (n C y E - L Cc > EO '.' c1 .0 C J lL O` a N C E m c d O E 0 0 0 m 'm = U ii v aa)) o L m m m N `m `m E m = o m v v> 0 ."0 a a¢LL(n 0. www(n(nU O N n ri W O N co Lo 0o O I N co (O W A m N .., A" (3-W fom:. Wrne Caunsry Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 EXPENDITURE SUMMARY BY PROJECT PARKS and RECREATION 2% ISARDA/ HOUSING 2% INFRASTRUCTURE_ 9% PROJECTED EXPENDITURES: $4359270,888 TION 30 i (3—W fom:. Wrne Caunsry OTF 0! DIF 7% Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 CIP MAJOR REVENUE SOURCES SARDA 3% STATE � � � � m A r 21% COUNTY 44% PROJECTED REVENUES: $33493059104 SPECIAL DISTRICTS 7% GENERAL& MEASURE S FUNDS 11% 31 �CM � N E O `N N / O N O L L Q M �+ V 'Q tR m U- tU E CD O a ocW C v 0 O d GO � d rn�(0 v�°iv y O E E U U M 0 O O a W � c a! 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N o O (n 7 cV O N U p '5 U O N M (o I- O m m I- m 00 00 M 10 M m O m d - 7 (o (V M oo M � r G � N LL N M co M O O N N N U O M M N m N GO n N � (o O O O I,- 0 7 N a O O 0000 (� I- 7 (V O (V ry ? N M � O 0 0 cV Cl) N „ a m 0 N R O H m c .N O U p LL i y y clal 30 a L L ry J N d d c Y tl N p N V C C J N C E E a)O > > C 2$ ±+ i a a C C 92= E E W m (Ep 'C cc cc � � CU 0 > LL N l0 l0 r N E L LL co W w L) a a E o c m £+�+ c d o >6i >6i d U cJ � c m m rn U m G� cfnU»�of o mtq m o D e c o U) U d Y t o d d n- I� mU LL LLLL2_2 a O r- M Am R Capital Improvement Program h'"""o`S'h— C''`—i w,ne c-nvy Fiscal Years 2020-24 CIRCULATION PROJECTS Table of Contents Abbott Corporation Roadway Improvements.......................................................................40 Butterfield Stage Road Extension........................................................................................42 Cherry Street Extension and Murrieta Creek Low -Flow Crossing to Diaz Road...................44 Citywide Buffered Bike Lane Striping......................................................................46 Diaz Road Expansion (Rancho California Road to Cherry Street).......................................48 Emergency Vehicle Pre-Emption Upgrade Program — Citywide..........................................50 Flashing Beacons and Speed Advisory Signs.....................................................................52 French Valley Parkway / Interstate 15 Improvements — Phase 11.........................................54 French Valley Parkway / Interstate 15 Improvements — Phase III........................................56 Interstate 15 Congestion Relief...........................................................................................58 Interstate 15 / State Route 79 South Ultimate Interchange..................................................60 Medians and Parkways — Citywide......................................................................................62 Murrieta Creek Bridge at Overland Drive.............................................................................64 Nicolas Road Extension and Improvement..........................................................................66 Overhead Street Name Sign Replacement Program - Citywide..........................................68 Pavement Rehabilitation Program - Citywide......................................................................70 PechangaParkway Widening.............................................................................................72 Traffic Signal Equipment Enhancement Program — Citywide...............................................74 Traffic Signal Installation — Citywide....................................................................................76 Traffic Signal — Park and Ride Access Improvements.........................................................78 Traffic Signal System Upgrade............................................................................................80 Ynez Road Improvements...................................................................................................82 39 We DR�LL . ii�'P'140� ` � � il N_ICOL�EI}P n Al Tho Hwrt of Sw�iwni. w . C—vy Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 ABBOTT CORPORATION ROADWAY IMPROVEMENTS Circulation Project Project Description: In accordance with the Owner Participation Agreement (OPA) between Abbott and City of Temecula, initially recorded in 2002, this project includes the design and construction of roadway improvements on Motor Car Parkway, Ynez Road, Margarita Road, and Solana Way. This project has been included on the City of Temecula's Recognized Obligation Payment Schedule (ROPS) for the Successor Agency to the Redevelopment Agency (SARDA). Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic circulation on Motor Car Parkway, Ynez Road, Margarita Road, and Solana Way. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity and Economic Prosperity. Project Status: This project has not yet started. Department: Public Works/Planning - Account No. 210.165.620 Level: II 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Construction I I I I 1 1 $750,000 $ 750,000 Totals $ $ $ $ $ $ $750,000 $ 750,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost RPTTF- Redevelopment Property Tax Trust Fund I I I I 1 1 $750.000 1 $ 750.000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 41 i� Butterfield Stage Road Extension Circulation Project Location cox �{` f � t ,. - � .. •� � µ The map ButterfieldStage.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculam.gov/gis c Legend CIP Area U City Boundary 0 200 400 Feet III Ji lI II 2018 Aerial Data 42 y R Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 w e Ca°iry BUTTERFIELD STAGE ROAD EXTENSION Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the complete design and construction of four lanes on Butterfield Stage Road (from Rancho California Road to Murrieta Hot Springs Road), four lanes on Murrieta Hot Springs Road (from Butterfield Stage Road to the City limits), and two lanes on Calle Chapos (from Butterfield Stage Road to Walcott Road), totaling approximately 3.2 miles of road. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic circulation by providing a crucial north and south arterial road on the eastern side of the City. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: Phase I and Phase II of this project (Murrieta Hot Springs Road to La Serena) have been completed. Phase III (La Serena to Rancho California Road) is scheduled to be completed during Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.723 PW09-02 & PW 15-11 Level: I 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 2,391,135 $ 131,927 $ 2,523,062 Acquisition $15,006,728 $ 1,193,936 $ 16,200,664 Construction $13,137,631 $ 9,480,698 $ 22,618,329 Construction Engineering $ 468,762 $ 749,215 $ 1,217,977 Design/Environmental $ 782,838 $ 106,066 $ 888,904 Utilities $ 203 $ 797 $ 1,000 Totals $31,787,297 1 $11,662,639 1 $ $ $ $ $ $ 43,449,936 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost CFD #03-02 (Roripaugh Ranch) $ 30,217,838 $10,886,903 $ 41,104,741 Reimbursement/Other(EMWD) $ 11,622 $ 11,622 Reimbursement/Other (RCWD) $ 30,002 $ 518,322 $ 548,324 Reimbursement/Other (Shea Homes) $ 81,298 $ 92,510 $ 173,808 Reimbursement/Other (SCE) $ 8,537 $ 8,537 Reimbursement/Other (County of Riverside) $ 164,904 $ 164,904 TUMF $ 1,438,000 $ 1,438,000 Total Funding: $31,787,297 $ 11,662,639 $ $ $ $ $ $ 43,449,936 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Note: Assumes that only minor right-of-way acquisitions would be necessary and that all major right-of-way dedications are voluntary. 43 Cherry Street Extension and Murrieta Creek Low Flow Crossing to Diaz Road Circulation Project Location 0 400 800 Feet The map CherryStreetExtension.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 44 Alk Wne Ca.ntry Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 CHERRY STREET EXTENSION AND MURRIETA CREEK LOW -FLOW CROSSING TO DIAZ ROAD Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the design and construction of the extension of Cherry Street from Adams Avenue to Diaz Road, including a new low -flow crossing of Murrieta Creek at the northerly City limits. This project also includes environmental studies and permits, Encroachment Permit from Riverside County Flood Control and potential for mitigation. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic circulation and access to from and to the northerly industrial area west of Murrieta Creek. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: This is a new project Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.524 Level: I 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 50,000 $ 50,000 $ 202,000 $ 302,000 Construction $1,364,000 $ 1,364,000 Construction Engineering $ 86,800 $ 86,800 Design/Environmental $ 130,000 $266,000 $ 100,000 $ 496,000 MSHCP $ 68,200 $ 68,200 Totals $ - $ - $ 180,000 $316,000 $1,821,000 $ $ - $ 2,317,000 Source of Funds: Unspecified') Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost $ 180,000 1 $316,000 1 a 1 1 $ 496,00 $1,821,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Project cannot be constructed until a funding source is identified $ 1,821,000 45 Citywide Buffered Bike Lane Stripping Circulation Project Location "V. T EhgF•�,i. 0 ��i - 4r'JA'S 0 NEW 0"' 46 Lt Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 CITYWIDE BUFFERED BIKE LANE STRIPING Circulation Project Project Description: The Citywide Buffered Bike Lane striping project will include the installation of buffered bike lines and green thermoplastic bike legends along various streets and roads throughout the City. Benefit / Core Value: This project will support the overall goals and objectives, as part of our Multi -Use Trails and Bikeways Master Plan, and expand the City's bicycle trail network. This project satisfies the City's Core Values of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete by Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.526 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE2019 2019-20 Project Cost: Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration 1 $ 35,000 1 $ 35,000 Construction $ 154,000 $ 154,000 Totals $ $ 1 $ 189,000 1 $ $ $ $ $ 189,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost AB2766 $ 56,700 $ 56,700 Senate Bill 8210) $ 132,300 $ 132,300 Total Funding: $ $ $ 189,000 $ $ $ $ $ 189,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) SB 821 application in process, project needs to be completed February 2020 47 .189 Diaz Road Expansion Circulation Project Location �V r0 71p 7 '2, Q. , t Q• \+�" " Fir' ' Legend ' CI P Area 1 r rri City Boundary c� The map DiazRoad.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 48 0 400 800 Feet I I I I 2018 Aerial Data Hewn a{�ernJlifwni. W ne cannery Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 DIAZ ROAD EXPANSION (Rancho California Road to Cherry Street) Circulation Project Project Description: Converts Diaz Road into a Major Arterial (4 Lanes Divided) classification, between Cherry Street and Rancho California Road. Improvements will be added to Diaz Road on its current alignment as shown in the Roadway Plan of the General Plan's Circulation Element. This project includes the design, environmental clearance, right of way acquisition, and construction necessary to complete the 2.2 mile segment. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic circulation by expanding an important north -south arterial on the west side of the City and completes a portion of the designated Western Bypass. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility & Connectivity. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete by Fiscal Year 2021-22. Department: Public Works - 210.265.521 PW 17-25 Level: III 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 1,011 $ 82,502 $ 80,000 $ 208,000 $ 371,513 Construction $ 3,085,000 $ 3,085,000 Construction Engineering $ 385,000 $ 385,000 Design/Environmental $ 1,749 $ 568,251 $ 570,000 MSHCP $ 155,000 $ 155,000 Totals 1 $ 2,760 $ 650,753 $ 80,000 1 $ $ 3,833,000 1 $ $ $ 4,566,513 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DIF (Street Improvements) $ 590 $ 590 Measure S $ 2,170 $ 80,753 $ 80,000 0$ 3,337,077 $ 3,500,000 TUMF (WRCOG)"' $ 570,000 $ 495,923 $ 1,065,923 Total Funding: $ 2,760 1 $ 650,753 1 $ 80,000 1 $ $ 3,833,000 1 $ $ $ 4,566,513 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) TUMF Zone funding is pursuant to approval of the Public Works Committee to program PAED and ENG to Diaz Road (designated Western Bypass). After the approval of the WRCOG Executive Committee, an agreement between the City and WRCOG will need to be executed. After the PAED and ENG phases are complete, City will request that any unused funds be reprogrammed to the CON phase. 49 Emergency Vehicle Pre-Emption Upgrade Program - Citywide Circulation Project Location ��� �>} l �.tyFeGC - 4r'JA'S 0 NEW 0"' 50 Alk C3e TYa Ncarr aE Sr,..:h..rn CaIE w e c—" Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 EMERGENCY VEHICLE PRE-EMPTION UPGRADE PROGRAM - CITYWIDE Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the enhancement and upgrade of emergency vehicle pre-emption equipment at twenty (20) signalized intersections Citywide. The project includes upgrade of pre-emption optical detectors, wiring, and optical processor cards. The requested appropriation for Fiscal Year 2019-20 is for upgrading the gate on Kahwea Road to include pre-emption equipment to allow emergency vehicle access. Benefit / Core Value: This project enhances traffic safety and supports the long-term maintenance and rehabilitation of City assets and infrastructure. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community, and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: A priority list of project locations has been developed, and the project is anticipated to be completed in 2020. The Kahwea Road gate upgrade will be completed in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.522 Level: 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DIF (Police Facilities) $ 196,455 $ 155,545 1 1 1 1 1 1 $ 352,000 Total Funding: $ 196,455 $ 155,545 1 $ $ - 1 $ $ $ $ 352,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 51 Flashing Beacons and Speed Advisory Signs Circulation Project Location aF 14,EtigF,�,Gv 4rNEW "' 52 7it the Hcaii nfSwihcin CeliE W,ne [Door . Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 FLASHING BEACONS AND SPEED ADVISORY SIGNS Circulation Project Project Description: This project maintains the City's Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program, School Area Safety, and Arterial Traffic Calming by installing flashing beacons, rectangular rapid flashing beacons (RRFB) and speed advisory signs to advise motorists of the school zone, crosswalks and speed limits. This project includes solar powered panels, programmable timers, chargeable batteries, aluminum poles, and pull boxes. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic safety on roadways, neighborhoods, and school zones. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community, and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: The installation of flashing beacons and LED speed limit display signs is ongoing. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.670 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 2,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 7,000 Construction $ 86,811 $ 52,473 $ 30,000 $ 30,000 $ 30,000 $ 30,000 $ 30,000 $ 289,284 Design $ 2,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 7,000 Totals $ 86,811 $ 56,473 $ 32,000 $ 32,000 $ 32,000 $ 32,000 $ 32,000 $ 303,284 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 53 G" French Valley Parkway/I-15 Improvements - Phase 11 Q% 1989 Circulation Project Location 0 400 800 Feet Them a p FrenchValleyParkway_Phasell.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 54 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 FRENCH VALLEY PARKWAY / I - 15 IMPROVEMENTS - PHASE II Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the design and construction of the two lane northbound collector/distributer road system beginning north of the Winchester Road Interchange on -ramps and ending just north of the 1-15/1-215 junction with connectors to 1-15 and 1-215. Benefit / Core Value: This project will address and improve traffic circulation in the City's northern area by providing the northbound collector/distributer road system. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: The environmental re-evaluation and design are estimated to be completed in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.726 PW16-01 (Ref: PW02-11) Level: I Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Administration $ 2,346,778 $ 108,306 $ 431,715 $ 227,000 $ 227,000 $133,000 $ 3,473,799 Acquisition $ 9,393,251 $ 4,039,870 $ 1,540,130 $ 990,000 $ 15,963,251 Caltrans Oversight $ 671,000 $ 8,900,000 $ 9,571,000 Construction $ 38,950,000 $ 50,000,000 $ 88,950,000 Construction Engineering $ 1,330,000 $ 1,330,000 Design/Environmental $ 16,061,518 $ 2,004,685 $ 18,066,203 Utilities $ 1,993 $ 1,993 Totals $ 27,803,540 $ 6,823,861 $ 1,971,845 $ 50,397,000 $ 50,227,000 $ 133,000 $ $ 137,356,246 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund i11 $ 3,674,862 $ 561,312 $ 4,236,174 CFD(Harveston) $ 1,005,840 $ 1,005,840 DIF (Street Improvements) $ 75,360 $ 75,360 Federal Highway Administration $ 8,000 $ 8,000 Measure A (Local streets and Roads) $ 1,627,914 $ 1,627,914 Measure S $ 193,629 $ 260,371 $ 1,971,845 $ 1,865,640 $ 4,291,485 Reimbursements/ Other (Land Donation) $ 6,000,000 $ 6,000,000 SAFETEA-LU $ 671,000 $ 931,360 $ 1,602,360 STIP Augmentation $ 37,600,000 $ 37,600,000 STIP«' $ 10,000,000 $ 10,000,000 TUMF (RCTC)13) $ 2,343,000 $ 2,343,000 TUMF (WRCOG)14) $ 8,552,988 $ 2,536,872 $ 11,089,860 TUMF (WRCOG)15) $ 3,471,937 $ 246,807 $ 3,718,744 TUMF (WRCOG)") $ 59,015 $ 1,865,985 $ 1,925,000 TUMF (CETAPnwRCOG)(7) $ 790,995 $ 681,514 $ 1,472,509 INFRA(l) $ 50,000,000 $ 50,000,000 Unspecified('' $ 227,000 1 $133,000 1 1 $ 360,000 Total Funding: $ 27,803,540 $ 6,823,861 $ 1,971,845 $ 50,397,000 $ 50,227,000 1 $133,000 1 $ I $ 137,356,246 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) General Fund Includes Required Contribution match for TUMF(CETAP/RCTC) funds. (2) State Transportation Improvement Program -2014 RCTC Call for projects as approved by the Commission on November 13, 2013($10,000,000). (3) TUMF (RCTC)- Regional funding is pursuant to RCTC Agreement No. 06-72-048-00 for a total of $7,517,000($5,517,000-ROW; $2,000,000-PS&E). $200,000 City Match, Phase I expended $3,174,000-ROW; $2,000,000 PS&E; $200,000 City Match. Phase II expended $2,343,000 ROW. (4) TUMF (WRCOG) - TUMF Zone funding is pursuant to WRCOG Agreement No. 06-SW-TEM-1079 for a total of $11,575,000 reduced to $11,451,875($975,752-PA&ED; $8,801,875-PS&E; $1,674,248-ROW) for Phase I and Phase 11. (5) TUMF (WRCOG) - TUMF Zone funding is pursuant to WRCOG Agreement No. 05-SW-TEM-1064 for $4,078,000 reduced to $4,043,000 ($108,724 PA&ED;3,934,296 PS&E) for Phase I and Phase 11. (6) TUMF (WRCOG) - TUMF Zone Funding is pursuant to WRCOG Agreement No. 05-SW-TEM-1064 for $1,925,000-ROW. No expenditures for Phase 1. (7) TUMF (CETAPIRCTC) - Funding is pursuant to the RCTC Agreement No. 17-73-007-00 in the amount of $1,472,509 ($673,562 ROW; $798,947 DESIGN; $106,603 City (8) Applied for U.S. Department of Transportation Infrastructure for Rebuilding America (INFRAH) Grant. (9) Project cannot be constructed until a funding source is identified. 55 ation Proiect Locatioy cC Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 FRENCH VALLEY PARKWAY / I - 15 IMPROVEMENTS - PHASE III Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the design and construction of the French Valley Parkway Interchange and the southbound collector/distributor road system. Benefit / Core Value: This project will address and improve traffic circulation in the City's northern area by providing a full service interchange with on and off ramps in both directions. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: Based on funding availability, the design will begin once construction is complete for Phase II of the project. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.728 Level: I Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Total Project Cost Administration $100,000 $ 1,268,000 $ 1,368,000 Acquisition $ 80,000 $ 8,400,000 $ 8,480,000 Caltrans Oversight $ 15,200,000 $ 15,200,000 Construction $ 102,500,000 $ 102,500,000 Engineering $ 2,050,000 $ 2,050,000 Design/Environmental $ 10,460,000 $ 10,460,000 Totals $ $180,000 $ $ $ $ 139,878,000 $ $ 140,058,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Total Project Cost General Fund $ 30,000 $ 30,000 Measure S $150,000 $ 150,000 TUMF (WRCOG)(') $ 9,822,980 $ 9,822,980 TUMF (WRCOG)(z' $ 43,480,000 $ 43,480,000 Unspecified(') $ 86,575,020 $ 86,575,020 Total Funding: $ - $ 180,000 $ - $ - $ - $139,878,000 $ $ 140,058,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) TUMF (WRCOG) - TUMF Zone Funding is eligible for construction of Winchester Interchange pursuant to 2009 Nexus-$9,822,980.00 (2) TUMF (WRCOG) - TUMF Zone Funding is eligible for construction of French Valley Interchange pursuant to 2009 Nexus-$43,480,000.00 (3) The implementation for this project extends beyond FY 2022-23. Project cannot be constructed until a funding source is identified. 57 I-15 Congestion Relief Circulation Project Location A rb � �Q` z - �` + t „ r Sty «1 S to � i c''- ?e .✓' � ?, v ! tia ' �`�. �}�.3, a444�. Legend yy CIP Area ' City Boundary 0 400 800 Feet The map I-15CongestionRelief.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I r r r Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temecular .gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 58 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 1 - 15 CONGESTION RELIEF Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the design and construction of a single auxiliary lane, northbound Interstate 15 (1-15) connecting the Temecula Parkway on -ramp to the Rancho California Road off -ramp. Benefit / Core Value: This project provides an operational improvement to relieve congestion on northbound 1-15. It represents one of several operational improvements identified by the Move 1-15 Regional Task Force to address congestion on 1-15. This project also satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity Project Status: Project development is set to commence in Fiscal Year 2019-20 Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.609 Level: I 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 50,000 $ 200,000 $ 100,000 $ 200,000 $ 550,000 Construction $ 1,250,000 $2,528,500 $ 3,778,500 Construction Engineering $ 321,500 $ 321,500 Design/Environmental $ 350,000 $ 350,000 Totals $ - $ 400,000 $ 1,450,000 $ 100,000 $3,050,000 $ - $ - $ 5,000,000 Source Of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budqet Appropriation Proiected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 400,000 $ 200,000 $ 100,000 $ 700,000 SHOPP(') $ 1,250,000 $ 1,250,000 Unspecifiedizi $ 3,050,000 $ 3,050,000 Total Funding: $ $ 400,000 $ 1,450,000 $ 100,000 $3,050,000 $ $ $ 5,000,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) SHOPP - State Highway Operation and Protection Program and Minor Program (2) Project cannot be constructed until a funding source is identified. 59 Interstate-15/State Route 79 South Ultimate Interchange %, Circulation Project Location 0 200 400 Feet The map Interstate15_StateRoute79.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this ii map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculam.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 60 Q Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 INTERSTATE 151 STATE ROUTE 79 SOUTH ULTIMATE INTERCHANGE Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes right-of-way acquisition, design, environmental clearance, and construction of a ramp system that will improve access to Interstate15 from Temecula Parkway/State Route 79 South. The interchange will accommodate traffic generated by future development of the City's General Plan land use as well as regional traffic volume increases forecasted for the year 2037. This project is crucial, as the projected traffic volume increases currently exceed the capacity of the existing interchange improvements constructed by the Riverside County Transportation Department. Benefit / Core Value: This project will improve circulation, freeway access, and level of service at the Interstate 15 and Temecula Parkway / State Route 79 South intersection. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: Environmental clearance was completed in 2010. Right -of -Way acquisition and utility easements were completed in 2013. Design and preparation of construction Plans, Specifications, and Estimate was completed in 2016. The construction contract was advertised and awarded in 2016-17. Construction of the interchange improvements started in June 2016 and were substantially completed in December 2018. Substantial Project completion is followed by a one (1) year plant establishment period February 2019 through January 2020 and a three (3) year maintenance period February 2020 through January 2023. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.662 PW04-08 Level: I 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 1,310,715 $ 135,816 $ 120,000 $ 80,000 $ 80,000 $ 1,726,531 Acquisition $13,032,881 $ 150,847 $13,183,728 Construction $ 24,542,298 $ 3,965,895 $ 28,508,193 Construction Engineering $ 3,540,372 $ 760,906 $ 4,301,278 Design/Environmental $ 4,107,505 $ 120,422 $ 4,227,927 Utilities $ 729 $ 9,271 $ 10,000 Totals $46,534,500 1 $ 5,143,157 1 $ 120,000 1 $ 80,000 1 $ 80,000 1 $ $ $51,957,657 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost CFD (Crowne Hill) $ 502,211 $ 502,211 Reimbursement/ Other (Morgan Hill) $ 1,190,582 $ 1,190,582 SAFETEA-LUI'I $ 1,439,840 $ 1,439,840 Senate Bill 621 $13,111,737 $ 1,146,783 $ 120,000 $ 80,000 $ 80,000 $14,538,520 STP (RCTC)/ZI $11,165,698 $ 1,810,302 $12,976,000 TUMF (RCTC/Region)(3) $ 4,452,000 $ 4,452,000 TUMF (RCTC/CETAP)(4) $ 5,400,000 $ 5,400,000 TUMF (WRCOG)15/ $ 8,576,872 $ 1,448,372 $10,025,244 Reimbursement/RCWD(6) $ 280,560 $ 280,560 Reimbursement/EMWDI'/ $ 415,000 $ 415,000 Reimbursement/Lease(s) $ 737,700 $ 737,700 Total Funding: $46,534,500 $ 5,143,157 1 $ 120,000 $ 80,000 1 $ 80,000 $ $ $51,957,657 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) SAFETEA-LU - Funding is pursuant to Authorization/Agreement Summary (E-76) (63.51 % of Federal Participating Costs, up to $1,439,840) (2) STP(RCTC) - Funding is pursuant to Authorization/Agreement Summary (E-76)(63.51 % of Federal Participating Costs, up to $12,976,000) (3) TUMF (RCTC/Region) - Funding is pursuant to RCTC Agreement No. 06-72-506 ($4,452,000 Total) (4) TUMF (RCTC/CETAP) - Funding is pursuant to RCTC Agreement No. 11-72-041-00 ($5,400,000 Total;$1,400,000 ROW;$4,000,000 CON). (5) TUMF (WRCOG) - Funding is pursuant to WRCOG Agreement 13-SW-TEM-1163($10,025,244 CON) (6) Pursuant to RCWD UA 23316 - RCWD shall reimburse City for actual costs of Additive Bid No. 01 ($280,560) (7) Pursuant to EMWD UA 23317 - EMWD shall reimburse City for actual costs of Additive Bid No. 02 ($415,000) (8) Revenues collected on Lease Agreement with Front Street - Service Station, LP dated September 11, 2013 (est. $740,000) 61 Medians and Parkways - Citywide Circulation Project Location "V. T EhgF•�,i. 0 ��i - 4r'JA'S 0 NEW 0"' 62 _'43) Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 MEDIANS AND PARKWAYS - CITYWIDE Circulation Project Project Description: Pursuant to Conditions of Approval, this project completes the missing portions of the raised landscaped median island on (a) Rancho California Road between Moraga Road to Lyndie Lane ($188,000), and (b) Ynez Road from Date Street to the City boundary ($100,000). Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic circulation by elimination potential conflicts between left turn movements and through traffic on circulation element streets with a classification of major arterial or higher. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of A Safe and Prepared Community and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: This project will reimburse developers for eligible improvements upon project completion. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.622 PW02-15 Level 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Construction $ 666,838 $ 188,000 $ 100,000 1 1 1 1 1 $ 954,838 Totals $ 666,838 $ 188,000 $ 100,000 1 $ $ $ $ $ 954,838 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted Expenditures Budget Appropriation 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project rrojected Projected Projected Projected Cost Ult- (Street Improvements) 1 $ 666,838 1 $ 188,000 1 $ 100,000 1 1 1 1 1 $ 954,838 Total Funding: 1 $ 666,838 1 $ 188,000 1 $ 100,000 1 $ $ $ $ $ 954,838 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 63 Murrieta Creek Bridge at Overland Drive Circulation Project Location 0 100 200 Feet The map MurrietaCreekBridge.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I t t t and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 64 Gt Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 MURRIETA CREEK BRIDGE AT OVERLAND DRIVE Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the design and construction of a new bridge crossing over Murrieta Creek between Rancho California Road and Winchester Road. This project also includes environmental studies, mitigation, acquisition of right-of-way, and installation of new traffic signals at Overland Drive intersections with Diaz Road and Enterprise Circle West and Commerce. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic circulation and access to Overland Drive freeway over -crossing. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: This project is currently in design and is partially funded by the Federal Highway Bridge Program (HBP). During design phase, staff will continue seeking additional programming and allocation of more HBP funds for the project. Department: Public Works -Account No. 210.265.648 PW16-05 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 38,751 $ 201,249 $ 240,000 $ 480,000 Acquisition $ 150,000 $ 150,000 Construction $ 1,034,965 $ 9,465,035 $ 10,500,000 Construction Engineering $ 610,000 $ 610,000 Design/Environmental $ 1,688,274 $ 265,590 $ 88,530 $ 2,042,394 MSHCP $ 473,550 $ 51,450 $ 525,000 Totals $ 38,751 1 $ 2,039,523 1 $ 1,774,105 1 $ 938,530 1 $ 9,516,485 1 $ $ $ 14,307,394 Source Of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DIF (Street Improvements) $ 38,751 $ 1,729,668 $ 1,508,515 $ 850,000 1 $ 4,126,934 HBP(') $ 309,855 $ 265,590 $ 88,530 $ 7,543,641 $ 8,207,616 Unspecified(2) $ 1,972,844 $ 1,972,844 Total Funding: $ 38,751 $ 2,039,523 $ 1,774,105 $ 938,530 $ 9,516,485 $ - $ $ 14,307,394 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Highway Bridge Program (HBP) Funding is 88.53% HBP and 11.47%City Matching Funds. Design will not move forward until project is federally programmed (1) HBP Capacity is not Available for FY2018.19,Some City local match funds being allocated for that year in event funds become available. (2) Project cannot be constructed until a funding source is identified. 65 J Nicolas Road Extension and Improvements Circulation Proiect Location Aft At 4 L-JW I 9"M 1` W & A -4- I 0o • .4b 0, it 4 aru L Z 7 00 ACME IMP .0 , o Ox 6� 41 Legend 40 tj CIPArea 0 200 400 Feet The map NicolasRoadExtension_lmprovements.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented onthis map are subject to update and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculam.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 66 a. The Hcan of Seu.�rpni' w aCau�vy Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 NICOLAS ROAD EXTENSION AND IMPROVEMENTS Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the design, environmental documents and permits, construction, improvements and extension of Nicolas Road from Roripaugh Ranch Phase II westerly boundary to Calle Girasol/Liefer Road. The improvements include approximately 4,000 LF road improvements and culvert crossing at Santa Gertrudis Creek. The developer of the Roripaugh Ranch will take the lead in completing the design and the environment document while the City will take the lead in the construction Phase. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic circulation on the eastern side of the City. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: The design is almost complete and the environmental document and permits are being processed. Construction process is anticipated to begin in late Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.604 Level: I 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 581,989 $ 581,989 Acquisition $ 1,440,000 $ 1,440,000 Construction $ 8,700,000 $ 8,700,000 Construction Engineering $ 232,796 $ 232,796 Design/Environmental $ 250,003 $ 250,003 MSHCP $ 435,000 $ 435,000 Totals $ $11,639,788 1 $ $ $ $ $ $ 11,639,788 Source Of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost (Roripaugh Ranch) CFD #16-01 Elm Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 67 Overhead Street Name Sign Replacement Program - Citywide Circulation Project Location G��� aF TEtigF,�,Gv 4rNEW "' 68 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 OVERHEAD STREET NAME SIGN REPLACEMENT PROGRAM - CITYWIDE Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the conversion of existing Internally Illuminated Street Name Signs (IISNS) from fluorescent tubes to a Reflective Non- Illuminated Street Name Sign panel including sign brackets and removal of electrical service wiring. Benefit / Core Value: This project eliminates energy consumption and costs associated with illuminated Street Name Signs and supports the long-term maintenance and rehabilitation of City assets and infrastructure. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity and a Sustainable City. Project Status: This project is estimated to be completed in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.603 Level: II 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ 20,000 Fixtures/Furn/Equip $ 90,000 $ 90,000 $ 180,000 Totals 1 $ $ 100,000 $ 100,000 1 $ - $ $ $ $ 200,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S Total Fundin Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 69 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PAVEMENT REHABILITATION PROGRAM - CITYWIDE Circulation Project Anticipated Year of Useful Construction/Estimated Street and Limits Life(Years) Project Cost Funding Source Prior Years Actual Expenditures $23,483,532 Meadowview Loop (Via Norte/Del Rey) (10-20) FY 2019 Carryover Budget Commerce Center Drive/Rider Way/Enterprise Circle (10-20) West and South $3,307,202 General Fund Rancho Vista Road (Paseo Goleta to Butterfield Stage Rd) (10-20) $1,105,403 RMRA i' i Ynez Road (Winchester Rd to Equity Drive)/Equity Drive/ (10-20) $2,304,196 Measure A County Center Drive $6,716,801 Pauba Road (Margarita Rd to Via Rami) (10-20) 2019-20 Avenida Alvarado/Rio Nedo/Aqua Vista Way/ (10-20) Tierra Alta Way Winchester Road (Nicolas Rd to Eastern City Limits)/ (10-20) Nicolas Road (Winchester Rd to North General Kearny Rd) $1,873,331 RMRA (' ) Rancho California Road (Humber Drive to Margarita Rd) (10-20) $3,397,313 Measure A Santiago Road (1-15 to Ynez Rd) (10-20) $5,270,644 Business Park Drive/Single Oak Drive/Diaz Road (10-20) 2020-21 (Rancho California Rd to Rio Nedo) Del Rio Road/Via Montezuma/Las Haciendas Street/ (10-20) Calle Cortez (10-20) Pauba Road (Meadows Pkwy to Butterfield Stage Rd)/ (10-20) $1,918,154 RMRA ' I Meadows Parkway (Pauba Rd to Rancho California Rd) $1,283,089 Measure A Butterfield Stage Road (Pauba Rd to Rancho California Rd) (10-20) $3,201,243 Solana Way (Ynez Rd to Margarita Rd)/Ynez Road (10-20) 2021-22 (Rancho California Rd to Solana Way) Jedediah Smith Road (Temecula Pkwy to Margarita Rd) (10-20) Enterprise Circle North (Winchester Rd to Winchester Rd) (10-20) Winchester Road (Dandy Pkwy to Diaz Rd)/Dendy Parkway (10-20) (Winchester Rd to Diaz Rd)/Diaz Road (Rancho California Rd to Diaz Rd)/(Rio Nedo to Winchester Rd) $1,956,517 RMRA N General Kearny Road (Margarita Rd to Calls Pins Colada) (10-20) $1,325,135 Measure A Margarita Road (Solana Way to Date St) $3,281,652 Rancho Vista Road (Ynez Rd to Margarita Rd)/Ynez Road (10-20) 2022-23 (Pauba Rd to Rancho California Rd) Ridge Park Drive (Rancho California Rd to Vincent Moraga Drive (10-20) Vincent Moraga Drive (Rancho California Rd to Ridge Park Driv (10-20) Old Town Front Street (Moreno Rd to Rancho California Rd) (10-20) $1,995,647 RMRA ' Butterfield Stage Road (Temecula Pkwy to Pauba Rd) (10-20) De Portola Road (Margarita Rd to Butterfield Stage Rd) (10-20) Moraga Road (Rancho California Rd to Margarita Rd) (10-20) $1,368,387 Measure A Ynez Road (Equity Drive to City Limit) (10-20) La Paz Street (Temecula Pkwy to Ynez Rd) (10-20) $3,364,034 Meadows Parkway (Temecula Pkwy to Pauba Rd) (10-20) 2023-24 Pauba Road (Ynez Rd to Margarita Rd) (10-20) Rainbow Canyon Road (Pechanga Pkwy to City Limit) (10-20) $2,034,777 RMRA ' Deer Hollow Way (Pechanga Pkwy to Peppercorn Drive) (10-20) $1,412,829 Measure A Nicolas Road (North General Kearny Rd to Joseph Rd) (10-20) $3,447,606 Total $48,765,512 (1) Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 (8131) - Road Maintenance and Rehabilitation Account (RMRA) * For Fiscal Year 2019-20 and beyond, the list of Streets are subject to change based on the updated Pavement Management Program. 70 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PAVEMENT REHABILITATION PROGRAM - CITYWIDE Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the environmental processing, design, construction of pavement rehabilitation, and reconstruction of major streets as recommended in the Pavement Management Program update. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves pavement conditions so that the transportation needs of the public, business industry, and government can be met. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: A priority list of rehabilitation projects from the Pavement Management Program is used to determine the projects to be undertaken. Construction is completed annually based on the allocated funds. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.655 Level: I 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 2,436,294 $ 861,766 $ 841,860 $ 848,230 $ 840,970 $ 855,000 $ 855,000 $ 7,539,120 Construction $ 19,960,210 $ 4,839,262 $ 3,867,544 $ 1,787,526 $ 1,880,035 $ 1,939,034 $ 2,022,606 $ 36,296,217 Construction Engineering $ 305,979 $ 498,780 $ 561,240 $ 565,487 $ 560,647 $ 570,000 $ 570,000 $ 3,632,133 Design/Environmental $ 781,049 $ 516,993 $ 1,298,042 Totals $ 23,483,532 $ 6,716,801 1 $ 5,270,644 1 $ 3,201,243 1 $ 3,281,652 1 $ 3,364,034 1 $ 3,447,606 1 $ 48,765,512 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 2,385,412 $ 3,307,202 $ 5,692,614 Gas Tax $ 1,200,000 $ 1,200,000 RMRA(1)-Sal $ 1,251,263 $ 1,105,403 $ 1,873,331 $ 1,918,154 $1,956,517 $1,995,647 $2,034,777 $ 12,135,092 Measure $ 16,646,857 $ 2,304,196 $ 3,397,313 $ 1,283,089 $ 1,325,135 $ 1,368,387 $ 1,412,829 $ 27,737,806 Measure S $ 2,000,000 $ 2,000,000 Total Funding: $ 23,483,532 $ 6,716,801 $ 5,270,644 $ 3,201,243 $ 3,281,652 $ 3,364,034 $ 3,447,606 $ 48,765,512 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Road Repair and Accountability Act (RMRA) 71 V� i aYi'" Pechanga Parkway Widening Circulation Project Location I I\'\' I \�-L l llllZ Legend CI P Area V .t City Boundary 0 200 400 Feet The map PechangaParkwayWidening.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 72 R Capital Improvement Program UiS """"'�°''`u' w— e W—y Fiscal Years 2020-24 PECHANGA PARKWAY WIDENING Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the widening of Pechanga Parkway from Via Gilberto to North Casino Drive to provide a Principal Arterial Road with six (6) lanes of traffic. This project will be designed, environmentally cleared and constructed to mitigate the traffic impacts related to the recently completed expansion of the adjacent Pechanga Resort & Casino Project. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves pavement conditions so that the transportation needs of the public, business industry, and government can be met. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: Construction is scheduled to start in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.530 PW15-14 Level: 1 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 409,192 $ 110,703 $ 519,895 Construction $ 3,820,000 $ 3,820,000 Construction Engineering $ 210,000 $ 210,000 Design/Environmental $ 365,289 $ 4,816 $ 370,105 MSHCP $ 80,000 $ 80,000 Totals $ 774,481 $ 4,225,519 $ $ $ - $ $ $ 5,000,000 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Total Fundi Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) In accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement Approved by the City Council on 11/17/2015. 73 Traffic Signal Equipment Enhancement Program - Citywide Circulation Project Location Of. TEhgFCG< 4rNEW "' 74 71 � Ze-�`% Tho Hw�t of X W ne Country Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 TRAFFIC SIGNAL EQUIPMENT ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM - CITYWIDE Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the enhancement and upgrade of existing traffic signal equipment, including battery back-up systems, Light Emitting Diode (LED) traffic signal indications, traffic signal controller cabinets, service cabinets, safety street lighting, replacement of traffic signal controllers, signal communication equipment, closed circuit television (CCTV) camera equipment and fiber optic cable. This project will also includes an upgrade of existing traffic signal conductors including conduit, service conductors, and detector cable to comply with current standards. Benefit / Core Value: This project enhances traffic safety and supports the long-term enhancements and rehabilitation of City assets and infrastructure. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community, and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: Enhancements will be completed on an ongoing basis when funding becomes available. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.680 Level: 1 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 10,747 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ 60,747 Construction $ 456,237 $ 358,763 $ 50,000 $ 865,000 Fixtures/Furn/Equip $ 525,284 $ 105,757 $ 375,000 $ 275,000 $ 200,000 $140,000 $250,000 $ 1,871,041 Totals $ 981,521 1 $ 475,267 1 $ 435,000 1 $ 285,000 1 $ 210,000 1 $150,000 1 $260,000 1 $ 2,796,788 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DIF (Traffic Signals) Measure S $ 525,284 $ 456,237 $ 16,504 $ 458,763 $ 435,000 $ 285,000 $ 210,000 $150,000 $260,000 $ 541,788 $ 2,255,000 Total Funding: $ 981,521 $ 475,267 $ 435,000 $ 285,000 $ 210,000 $150,000 $260,000 $ 2,796,788 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 75 Q l E S The McCapital Improvement Program ui 5—h...n CaiEornio w °" Fiscal Years 2020-24 TRAFFIC SIGNAL INSTALLATION - CITYWIDE Circulation Project Total Project Signal Location Cost Year Funding Source Prior Year Actual Expenditures $ 778,415 DIF(Traffic)/Developer De Portola Road at Campanula Way (East)(1) $ 260,000 2019-20 DIF(Traffic) Future Traffic Signals $ 300,000 2019-20 Measure S Meadows Parkway at Pauba Road (1) $ 237,423 2019-20 DIF(Traffic) Total $ 797,423 Meadows Parkway at Campanula Way (West) (1) $ 280,000 2020-21 DIF(Traffic) Future Traffic Signals $ 300,000 2020-21 Measure S Total $ 580,000 Future Traffic Signals $ 300,000 2021-22 Measure S Total $ 300,000 Future Traffic Signals $ 300,000 2022-23 Measure S Total $ 300,000 Future Traffic Signals $ 300,000 2023-24 Measure S Total $ 300,000 3,055,838 (1) DIF Traffic Developer Reimbursement Prior Year Actual Expenditures $ 778,415 Fiscal Year 2019-20 $ 797,423 Fiscal Year 2020-21 $ 580,000 Fiscal Year 2021-22 $ 300,000 Fiscal Year 2022-23 $ 300,000 Fiscal Year 2023-24 $ 300,000 TOTAL: $ 3,055,838 76 ( R Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 TRAFFIC SIGNAL INSTALLATION - CITYWIDE Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the design, construction, installation and modification of traffic signals at various locations throughout the City. The project also includes reimbursement for developer installed traffic signals. Benefit i Core Value: This project improves traffic safety and circulation throughout the City. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community, and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: A priority list of traffic signals has been developed. The traffic signals scheduled for installation will be designed and constructed in the scheduled fiscal year when funding becomes available. Reimbursements for developer installed traffic signals will be made as Development Impact Fee (DIF) traffic become available. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.682 Level: I Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Administration $ 44,480 $ 72,670 $ 117,150 Construction $ 732,223 $ 113,465 $ 600,000 $ 580,000 $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $2,925,688 Design/Environmental $ 1,712 $ 11,288 $ 13,000 Totals $ 778,415 $ 197,423 $ 600,0001 $ 580,000 1 $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $ 3,055,838 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2018 2018-19 Actual Carryover Adopted 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Developer Contributions $ 250,000 $ 250,000 DIF (Traffic signals) $ 528,415 $ 197,423 $ 300,000 $ 280,000 $1,305,838 Measure S $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $1,500,000 Total Funding: $ 778,415 $ 197,423 $ 600,000 $ 580,000 1 $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $ 300,000 $3,055,838 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 77 Traffic Signal Park and Ride Access lmprovements Circulation Project Location ,9v 0 200 400 Feet The map TraffcSignal_ParkandRide.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 78 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 TRAFFIC SIGNAL PARK AND RIDE ACCESS IMPROVEMENTS Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes the installation of a traffic signal on Temecula Parkway at Wabash Lane. The project also includes relocating the access of the Park and Ride facility on Temecula Parkway at La Paz Road from Vallejo Avenue to Wabash Lane. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic safety and circulation throughout the City. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community, and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: Design will be initiated during Fiscal Year 2019-20 and construction is to follow. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.605 Level: I Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Administration $ 147,125 $ 147,125 Construction $ 588,500 $ 62,269 $ 650,769 Construction Engineering $ 17,655 $ 17,655 Design/Environmental $ 187,700 $ 187,700 MSHCP $ 11,250 $ 18,175 $ 29,425 Totals $ $ 952,230 1 $ 80,444 1 $ $ $ $ $1,032,674 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Developer Contributions "' $ 175,000 $ 175,000 General Fund $ 226,725 $ 226,725 Measure S $ 50,505 $ 80,444 $ 130,949 Settlement Proceeds $ 500,000 $ 500,000 Total Fundin . $ - $ 952,230 $ 80,444 $ - $ - $ - $ - $1,032,674 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Temecula Hospitality Group, also known as Fine Hospitality Group 79 Traffic Signal System Upgrade Circulation Project Location aF 14,EtigF,�,Gv 4rNEW "' 80 a� 74,, WNQ Cw� q Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 TRAFFIC SIGNAL SYSTEM UPGRADE Circulation Project Project Description: This project will install protected/permissive traffic signal heads, on new signal poles and signal mast arms, relocate existing equipment and modify existing striping and raised medians at the following five (5) intersections: Margarita Road at Verdes Lane, Ynez Road at Town Center North and Town Center South, Redhawk Parkway at Paseo Parallon/Overland Trail, and Winchester Road at Enterprise Circle. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic safety and circulation throughout the City. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of A Safe and Prepared Community, and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete by Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.610 Level: I Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Administration $ 5,000 $ 5,000 Construction $ 481,900 $ 481,900 Construction Engineering $ 62,000 $ 62,000 Design/Environmental $ 33,000 $ 33,000 Totals $ - $ 38,000 $ 543,900 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 581,900 Source Of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost HSIP(') Measure S $ 38,000 $ 489,510 $ 54,390 $ 489,510 $ 92,390 Total Funding: $ - $ 38,000 $ 543,900 $ $ - $ - $ $ 581,900 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Highway Safety Improvement Program 81 o.� Ynez Road Improvements Circulation Project Location .,ARM 41VFI,�FFR \\ u f J ' v We -c•J AA Legend „mayALCIP Area 0 400 800 Feet The map YnezRoadlmprovements.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I 1I 1�1 Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 82 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 YNEZ ROAD IMPROVEMENTS Circulation Project Project Description: This project includes widening Ynez Road, from Rancho Vista Road to La Paz Street, to two lanes in each direction, and the completion of missing segments of curb & gutter, sidewalk, landscaped medians, street lights and modify the traffic signal at Santiago Road. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves traffic circulation by widening an important arterial road in this part of the City. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: The project will be completed by Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.535 Level: II 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost- Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 21,841 $ 150,874 $ 322,285 $ 495,000 Construction $ 3,135,000 $ 3,135,000 Construction Engineering $ 165,000 $ 165,000 Design/Environmental $ 93,256 $ 353,510 $ 165,000 $ 611,766 MSHCP $ 165,000 $ 165,000 Totals $ 115,097 $ 504,384 $ 3,952,285 $ $ - $ - $ - $ 4,571,766 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DIF (Street Improvements) $ 115,097 $ 504,384 $ 3,952,285 1 1 1 1 $ 4,571,766 Total Funding: $ 115,097 $ 504,384 $ 3,952,285 1 $ - $ $ $ $ 4,571,766 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 83 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 INFRASTRUCTURE / OTHER PROJECTS Table of Contents Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition Plan Implementation...............................87 Bike Lane and Trail Program — Citywide.............................................................................89 Bike Lane and Trail Program — Pump Track........................................................................91 Bike Lane and Trail Program — Temecula Creek South Side Trail ....................................... 93 City Facilities Rehabilitation................................................................................................95 Citywide Drainage Master Plan...........................................................................................97 Citywide Financial System Upgrade....................................................................................99 Citywide Streetlight Acquisition and Light Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit ...........................101 Citywide Surveillance Cameras.........................................................................................103 Community Recreation Center (CRC) Renovations..........................................................105 Comprehensive General Plan Update...............................................................................107 Electric Vehicles Charging Station....................................................................................109 Expanded Recycled Water Conversion Project.................................................................111 Fiber Optic Communication System Upgrade...................................................................113 Fire Station 73 Gym/Garage.............................................................................................115 Fire Station 84 Training Room Renovation........................................................................117 HistoryMuseum................................................................................................................119 Interstate 15 / State Route 79 South Interchange Enhanced Landscaping ........................121 Library Parking — Phase II.................................................................................................123 Main Street Property Improvements..................................................................................125 Margarita Recreation Center.............................................................................................127 Medians and Traffic Calming Improvements — Citywide....................................................129 Murrieta Creek Improvements...........................................................................................131 Old Town Parking Structure..............................................................................................133 Pechanga Parkway Environmental Mitigation...................................................................135 Pedestrian Signal Equipment Upgrade — Citywide............................................................137 PublicSafety Monument...................................................................................................139 85 Th. Hwa.1 Soueharn Udi i. w eC—ty Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 INFRASTRUCTURE / OTHER PROJECTS Table of Contents (continued) Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail Extension and Interconnect .....................141 Santa Gertrudis Creek Phase II — Margarita Under-Crossing............................................143 Sidewalks— Citywide........................................................................................................145 Sidewalks— DLR Drive.....................................................................................................147 Sidewalks — Old Town Boardwalk Enhancement..............................................................149 Temecula Elementary School (TES) Pool Renovation......................................................151 Utility Undergrounding — Citywide.....................................................................................153 86 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition Plan Implementation Infrastructure/Other Project Location 4rNEW "' 87 d Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) TRANSITION PLAN IMPLEMENTATION Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: The American with Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition Plan Implementation will utilize the recently completed Transition Plan and implement its recommendations based on the established priorities. The implementation will include improvements to public facilities, programs, and public right of ways to modify/remove identified barriers over a fiscally constrained framework. Benefit / Core Value: This project furthers the City's Core Values of A Safe and Prepared Community, Accountable and Responsive City Government, as well as Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: The American With Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition Plan Upgrade was completed in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The implementation of the Transition Plan recommendation has become an ongoing program. Department: Public Works / Building Safety - Account No. 210.265.612 Level: I 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 79 $ 78,581 $ 77,987 $ 78660 $ 78,660 $ 78,660 $ 78,660 $ 471,287 Construction $ 245,000 $ 245,000 $ 245:000 $ 245,000 $ 245,000 $ 245,000 $ 1,470,000 Totals Prior Years Source of Funds: FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost CDBG(1) $ 79 $ 323,581 $ 322,987 $ 323,660 $ 323,660 $ 323,660 $ 323,660 $ 1,941,287 Total Funding: $ 79 $ 323,581 $ 322,987 $ 323,660 $ 323,660 $ 323,660 $ 323,660 $ 1,941,287 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Community Development Block Grant- Action Plan Fiscal Year 2019-20 88 il i Th. N..• Bike Lane and Trail Program Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 BIKE LANE AND TRAIL PROGRAM - CITYWIDE Infrastructure / Other Project Actuals To Cost to Date Complete Year Funding Source Bike Lane and Trail Program $ 203,359 $ 250,000 2019-20 DIF (Open Space and Trails) AB2766 Lake Skinner Trail $ 200,000 2019-20 DIF (Open Space and Trails) AB2766 Rancho California Bicycle Lane and Cycle Track $ 200,000 2021-22 DIF (Open Space and Trails) AB2766 Yukon to Ynez $ 115,724 2022-23 DIF (Open Space and Trails) $ 338,392 AB2766 Unspecified Long Canyon Creek Trail $ 666,641 2023-24 Unspecified North General Kearney Trail $ 150,000 2023-24 Unspecified Total $ 203,359 $ 2,124,116 $ 2,327,475 89 Al - ( Tho H­ o, Sw`llitwni, Wf a c-, Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 BIKE LANE AND TRAIL PROGRAM - CITYWIDE Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: The Multi -Use Trails and Bikeways Master Plan was completed in Fiscal Year 2015-16. The Master Plan includes new and potential trail and bikeway segment information sheets that detail constraints, solutions, surface types and widths, and estimated construction costs. The plan also details multiple recommendations including, but not limited to: new signs, gates, fence openings, sharrows, green paint, bike boxes, separated bikeways, bicycle boulevards, striping, maps, bike racks, fix -it stations, bike shares, bike corrals, bike lockers, cycle tracks, rapid flashing beacons, crossings, bicycle detection and actuation at signalized intersections, pedestrian and bicycle counts, access and maintenance agreements, and trailheads. The City is a Bronze Level Bicycle Friendly Community and this program is intended to allow for continued implementation of facilities and programs, which further the City's commitment to proving a safe and convenient network that connects schools, parks, open space, shopping, and employment centers. Benefit / Core Value: This project provides alternative modes of transportation and increases connectivity and accessibility to Old Town, Wine Country, and the City's many schools, parks, trails, and open space areas. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of A Sustainable City and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: The Master Plan was completed in Fiscal Year 2015-16 and includes a list of capital improvements throughout the City. Improvements will be made on an ongoing basis as funding becomes available. Department: Planning / Public Works - Account No. 210.265.703 Level: Prior Years Project Cost: FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Administration $ 6,452 $ 25,000 $ 5,000 $ 5,000 $ 5,000 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ 96,452 Construction $ 49,763 $ 203,028 $ 95,000 $ 95,000 $ 95,000 $ 411,088 $ 895,000 $ 1,843,879 Design/Environmental $ 147,144 $ 90,000 $ 50,000 $ 100,000 $ 387,144 Totals $ 203,359 $ 318,028 1 $ 100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $ 486,088 $ 1,020,000 $ 2,327,475 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost AB2766 $ 179,353 $ 50,000 $100,000 $100,000 $ 216,955 $ 144,575 $ 790,883 BEYOND Grant $ 19,857 ilk.$ 19,857 DIF (Open Space and Trails) $ 183,502 $ 138,675 $ 50,000 $ 242,552 $ 614,729 Unspecified* $ 269,133 $ 632,873 $ 902,006 Total Fundin $ 203,359 $ 318,028 $ 100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $ 486,088 $ 1,020,000 $ 2,327,475 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 *Project cannot be constructed until a funding source is identified 0 Bike Lane and Trail Program - Pump Track Infrastructure/ Other Project Location PP <<rr The map PumpTrack.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 91 Legend io CIPArea 0 100 200 Feet I I I I 2018 Aerial Data ]1 Tho Hwrt o1 Swe�'fa,ni� W e Cwntry Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 BIKE LANE AND TRAIL PROGRAM - PUMP TRACK Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project will include the design and construction of a Bicycle Pump Track at Ronald Reagan Sports Park located just north of the existing skate park. The pump track will consist of hard packed dirt with an asphalt cap sculpted into a series of rollers, berms, banked turns, and transitions. These features are designed to permit a rider to traverse a looped course with minimal pedaling using gravity to flow through the course. The pump track area will also include an infield material to allow for drainage, hardscape paved entry area with signage, bench seating, shade structure, landscaping, and bike racks. Benefit / Core Value: This project supports healthy and active lifestyles by promoting recreation programs, parks, trails, and facilities. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of A Sustainable City and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete by Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Planning/Public Works - Account No. 210.265.718 Level: I Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Administration $ 2,453 $ 22,547 $ 24,000 $ 49,000 Construction $ 175,500 $ 69,000 $ 244,500 Construction Engineering $ 12,000 $ 12,000 Design/Environmental $ 4,213 $ 70,287 $ 74,500 Totals $ 6,666 $ 268,334 $ 105,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 380,000 Prior Years Source of Funds: FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DIF (Open Space and Trails) $ 6,666 $ 268,334 $ 105,000 1 1 1 1 1 $ 380,000 Total Funding: $ 6,666 $ 268,334 $ 105,000 1 $ $ $ $ $ 380,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Bike Lane and Trail Program - Temecula Creek South Side Trail Infrastructure/ Other Project Location `hl aF T EhgF�,i, G~~ v 4rNEW "' 93 A ft w eco. . Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 BIKE LANE AND TRAIL PROGRAM - TEMECULA CREEK SOUTH SIDE TRAIL Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project includes an agreement with Riverside County Flood Control to install new gates, pave and stripe an existing maintenance road for a Class I Trail. The route would parallel Temecula Creek on the South side, connecting Butterfield Stage Road to Loma Linda Road, terminating at the alignment with Avenida de Missiones. This section of trail is part of the proposed seventeen (17) mile Temecula Loop Trail identified in the Multi -Use Trails and Bikeways Master Plan. Benefit / Core Value: This section of trail would satisfy the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity, and A Sustainable City. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Planning/Public Works - Account No. 210.265.720 Level: I Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Administration $ 50,000 $ 50,000 Construction $ 600,000 $ 600,000 Design/Environmental $ 150,000 $ 150,000 Totals $ $ $ 800,000 $ $ $ $ $ 800,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost AB2766 $ 67845 $ 67,845 DIF (Open Space and Trails) $ 161:155 $ 161,155 Measure S $ 571,000 $ 571,000 Total Funding: $ $ $ 800,000 $ $ $ $ $ 800,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 94 City Facilities Rehabilitation Infrastructure/Other Project Location A I Of. 1 E tiMECG� 4rNEW "' 95 Q Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 CITY FACILITIES REHABILITATION Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project facilitates rehabilitation projects at City owned and operated facilities such as the Mary Phillips Senior Center, Community Recreation Center, Temecula Elementary School pool and locker room, Civic Center, Field Operations Center, Maintenance Facility, TVE2, Escallier House & Barn, Mercantile Building, Old Town Parking Garage, Old Town Sixth Street Parking Lot, S.A.F.E., Temecula Children's Museum, Temecula Community Center, Temecula Public Library, Temecula Valley Museum and the Chapel of Memories. The rehabilitation projects could include, but is not limited to, parking lot rehabilitation and light replacements, heating ventilation and air conditioner (HVAC) upgrades, roof repairs, carpet and flooring replacement, cabinet re-facing/replacement, concrete repairs, replacement of fencing and repair of swimming pools. Benefit / Core Value: This project minimizes emergency repair costs, prolongs the service life of facilities, and upgrades aging facility components. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City and A Safe and Prepared Community. Project Status: A priority list of rehabilitation projects has been developed. Rehabilitation projects are completed on an ongoing basis as funding becomes available. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.701 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 158,660 $ 49,788 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ 333,448 Construction $ 1,767,460 $ 109,555 $ 250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $ 3,127,015 Design/Environmental $ 43,727 $ 14,474 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ 183,201 Totals $ 1,969,847 $ 173,817 $ 300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $ 3,643,664 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 1,576,183 $ 173,817 $ 1,750,000 DIF (Corporate Facilities) $ 250,000 $ 250,000 Facilities Replacement Fund $ 143,664 $ 300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $ 1,643,664 Total Funding: $ 1,969,847 $ 173,817 $ 300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $ 3,643,664 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 .p Citywide Drainage Master Plan Infrastructure/ Other Project Location G��� aF TE:LgF�CGv j�- 4rNEW " 97 R Capital Improvement Program wMe c-vy Fiscal Years 2020-24 CITYWIDE DRAINAGE MASTER PLAN Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: Prepare a report that shows all drainage courses within the City and existing drainage improvements that have been constructed to control storm runoff. In addition, the study will include a master hydrology study and a hydraulic study for the City showing the anticipated storm flows at build -out. Benefit / Core Value: The Master Drainage Plan will provide the City with sufficient up-to-date and accurate information to systematically plan and manage its drainage systems and provide higher level of flood protection to its residents, communities, properties, and infrastructure investments. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of A Safe and Prepared Community and A Sustainable City. Project Status: This project will start in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.722 Level: I 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 120,000 $ 120,000 Desiqn/Environmental $ 600,000 $ 600,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S Total Fundi Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 98 Citywide Financial System Upgrade Infrastructure/ Other Project Location pF TMFc�'C ti`�� Ci v_ w - 4r'JA'S 0 NEW 0"' 99 a� 7"' The Hca,i ei Sw,e`�I'[ wme c"—y Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 CITYWIDE FINANCIAL SYSTEM UPGRADE Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project includes the implementation costs associated with the upgrade of the City's Financial Accounting System. The City's current system was implemented in 2001, and a successor Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solution is available. The ERP system will integrate with existing software platform used Citywide and will provide upgraded core applications for financial management and human resource management. Benefit / Core Value: This project increases efficiencies, accountability and transparency of the City's financial, accounting and human resource information. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete by Fiscal Year 2021-22. Department: Finance - Account No. 210.265.724 Level: I 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Information Technology I 1 1 $ 1,376,718 1 1 1 1 $ 1,376,718 Totals 1 $ $ $ 1,376,718 1 $ $ $ - $ $ 1,376,718 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S $ 613184 $ 613,184 Technology Replacement $ 763:534 $ 763,534 Total Funding: $ $ $ 1,376,718 $ $ $ $ $ 1,376,718 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 66,934 66,934 66,934 $ 66,934 100 Citywide Streetlight Acquisition and Light Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Infrastructure/ Other Project Location 0.1v 1 En1F� 4rNEW "' 101 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 CITYWIDE STREETLIGHT ACQUISITION AND LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) RETROFIT Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: Phase I of this project is to purchase the Southern California Edison (SCE) owned streetlights within the City's boundary, including the light poles, mast arms, and light fixtures. Phase 11 of this project includes retrofitting the purchased lights with a Light Emitting Diode (LED) lighting system. Benefit / Core Value: This project provides for the opportunity to reduce facilities costs, reduce energy usage, and extend the life of lighting infrastructure. This project satisfies the City's Core Value of A Sustainable City. Project Status: This project is estimated to be completed in Fiscal Year 2019-20 Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.688 Level 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 104,305 1 $ 104,305 Fixtures/Furn/Equip $ 7,099,006 $ 800,000 $ 7,899,006 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 2,503,311 $ 2,503,311 Measure S $ 4,700,000 $ 800,000 $ 5,500,000 Total Funding: $ $ 7,203,311 1 $ 800,000 $ $ - $ $ $ 8,003,311 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (600,000) (618,000) (636,540) $ (655,636) 102 Citywide Surveillance Cameras Infrastructure/ Other Project Location aF 1 EnTFC. 4rNEW "' 103 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 CITYWIDE SURVEILLANCE CAMERAS Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: The Citywide Camera Surveillance system will be utilized by the City to support public safety, traffic management, and asset protection activities in service to its citizens. The City's goal for the system is to standardize and integrate existing and new video management systems to provide video technology to improve overall safety and security to the residents of the City. Benefit / Core Value: To protect property and life. This project provides Police the ability to perform virtual patrols, maximizing staff efficiency and resources. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community and A Sustainable City. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete by the end of Fiscal Year 2020-21. Department: Information Technology - Account No. 210.265.711 PW17-01 Level: 1 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 2,593 $ 2,593 Construction* $ 1,723,344 $ 114,980 $ 1,373,386 $ 150,000 $ 3,361,710 Design $ 138,347 $ 31,736 $ 170,083 Totals $ 1,864,284 1 $ 146,716 $ 1,373,386 $ 150,000 $ $ $ $ 3,534,386 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DIF (Corporate Facilities) $ 549,048 $ 653,039 $1,202,087 DIF (Police Facilities) $ 566,998 $ 146,716 $ 713,714 Measure S $ 748,238 $ 720,347 $ 150,000 $ 1,618,585 Total Funding: $ 1,864,284 $ 146,716 $ 1,373,386 $ 150,000 $ $ - $ - $ 3,534,386 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 160,000 260,000 1 $ 260,000 260,000 1 $ 260,000 *Construction includes camera purchase and installation to facilities 104 Community Recreation Center (CRC) Renovation >, ,e Infrastructure/ Other Project Location 0 200 400 Feet The map CRCrenovation.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temecular .gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 105 ( a Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER (CRC) RENOVATIONS Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project facilitates the rehabilitation, improvement, and reconfiguration of the Community Recreation Center. Projects include: expansion and reconfiguration of teen center; conversion of office space to accommodate a dedicated police substation; renovation of key components of the building including safety features, flooring, roof, and restroom facility access; ADA compliance; renovation and expansion of existing office space and rec rooms including AV upgrades; expanded storage space and upgraded kitchen equipment.. Benefit / Core Value: This project will create a safe, engaging place for teens to participate in individual and group social, recreational, physical, and educational activities, while also providing necessary renovations to the CRC facility. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of a Healthy and Livable City. Project Status: Planning and preliminary design will begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.265.730 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 75,000 $ 150,000 $ 187,000 $ 412,000 Construction $ 1,850,000 $ 2,313,000 $ 4,163,000 Design/Environmental $ 425,000 $ 425,000 Totals $ - $ - $ 500,000 $ 2,000,000 $ 2,500,000 $ - $ $ 51000,000 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DIF (Parks & Recreation) $ 806,048 $ 400,000 $ 1,206,048 DIF (Quimby) $ 1,193,952 $ 500,000 $ 1,693,952 Measure S $ 500,000 $ 1,600,000 $ 2,100,000 Total Funding: $ - $ - $ 500,000 1 $ 2,000,000 $ 2,500,000 $ - $ $ 5,000,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 106 Comprehensive General Plan Update Infrastructure/ Other Project Location G��� aF TEtigF,�,Gv j�- 4rNEW "' 107 J R Capital Improvement Program Th. """°'s« h" m w°. c..°e.y—Y Fiscal Years 2020-24 COMPREHENSIVE GENERAL PLAN UPDATE Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: California State Law requires that each city prepare and adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for its future development. The General Plan is the fundamental policy document of the City of Temecula. It provides the framework for management and utilization of the City's physical, economic, and human resources. This document guides civic decisions regarding land use, conservation of existing housing and the provision of new dwelling units, the provisions of supporting infrastructure and public services, the protection of environmental resources, the allocation of fiscal resources, and the protection of residents from natural and human -caused hazards. The City's General Plan was last updated in 2005. The General Plan will serve as the blueprint for the community for approximately the next fifteen years. This project will update all of the elements of the General Plan and will also include the implementation of new legislation to ensure compliance with State Law. Benefit / Core Value: The General Plan update satisfies all six of the City's core values: Healthy and Livable City; Economic Prosperity; Safe and Prepared Community; Sustainable City; Transportation, Mobility, and Connectivity; and Accountable and Responsive Local Government. Project Status: This project is estimated to start in Fiscal Year 2021-22. Department: Community Development - Account No. 210.265. Level: 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Total Project Cost Administration $ 1,000,000 $ 500,000 $ 1,500,000 Design/Environmental $ 500,000 $ 500,000 Totals $ $ $ $ $ 1,000,000 1 $1,000,000 $ $ 2,000,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Expenditures Budget 2019-20 Adopted 2020-21 Appropriation Projected 2021-22 Projected ` 2022-23 Projected 2023-24 Projected Total Project Cost General Fund I I I I I $ 1,000,000 $1,000,000 $ 2,000,000 Total Funding: 1 $ - $ $ $ $ 1,000,000 $1,000,000 $ $ 2,000,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 108 Electric Vehicles Charging Station Infrastructure/ Other Project Location 0 EMF�'i. ��i G~N - 4r'JA'S 0 NEW 0"' 109 Ak ��l R Capital Improvement Program Tho"— o{sa°ho-C•';`—;• Fiscal Years 2020-24 wee Ca�ntry ELECTRIC VEHICLES CHARGING STATION Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project includes the design and construction of improvements to accommodate electric vehicle charging station installations at various City facilities. The project also includes accommodating four charging stations at each of the following facilities: 1) Park & Ride on Temecula Parkway at La Paz; 2) Sixth Street Parking Lot at Mercedes Street; 3) Parking Structure on Mercedes Street. The improvements include extending the necessary power, upgrading electrical panels, if necessary, concrete base, and Dual Port Bollard USA Gateway Station with concrete mounting kit. Benefit / Core Value: This project encourages alternative transportation options. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of A Sustainable City. Project Status: Project must be complete by Fiscal Year 2023 per grant program guidelines. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.683 Level: 1 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Construction $ 188,000 1 1 1 1 1 1 $ 188,000 Totals $ $ 188,000 1 $ - $ - $ - $ $ $ 188,000 Source Of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost AB2766 $ 47,000 $ 47,000 MSRCGrant(1) $ 141,000 $ 141,000 Total Funding: 188,000 $ $ $ $ $ 188,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee aus Expanded Recycled Water Conservation Project Infrastructure/Other Project Location 0 V - A . "'I . E.M. 4rNEW "' 111 Ak ]] 7" wee C« M,y Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 EXPANDED RECYCLED WATER CONVERSION PROJECT Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project includes the administration, design and construction of six (6) sites within the City for the conversion of water facilities from potable to recycled water. This effort is in cooperation with Rancho California Water District (RCWD) to administer the implementation of improvements in association with the State of California Department of Water Resources Proposition 84 Grant Agreement. Benefit / Core Value: This project will reduce use of potable water, increase overall water savings and enhance energy efficiencies and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This project satisfies the City's Core Value of A Sustainable City, a Healthy and Livable City and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: Project is estimated to be complete by Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works -Account No. 210.265.689 PW 17-29 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 21,998 $ 21,998 Construction $ 460,562 $ 460,562 Design/Environmental $ 85,479 $ 85,479 Totals $ $ 568,039 1 $ $ $ $ $ $ 568,039 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DWRGrant(1) $ 426,029 $ 426,029 Measure S 1 1 $ 142.010 $ 142.010 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Department of Water Resources Proposition 84 Grant Agreement ISM Fiber Optic Communication System Upgrade Infrastructure/ Other Project Location 1`�� c,Y "l'E�gF,CGC - 4r'JA'S 0 NEW 0"' 113 Ak (,e'G( Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 FIBER OPTIC COMMUNICATION SYSTEM UPGRADE Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project will install optic communication system upgrades including conduit, cable, traffic signal controllers and related communication equipment to improve safety and operations with optimized traffic signal timing coordination. Signalized intersections will be improved along the Winchester Road, Rancho California Road and Temecula Parkway corridors. Benefit / Core Value: This project will upgrade the City's communication system equipment. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of A Safe and Prepared Community. Project Status: A request for proposal (RFP) for design is in process. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.550 Level: 1 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Construction $ 1,218,200 $ 1,218,200 Design/Environmental $ 40,209 $ 62,791 $ 103,000 Totals $ 40,209 1 $ 1,280,991 1 $ $ $ $ $ $ 1,321,200 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost HSIP") $ 1,208,200 $ 1,208,200 Measure S $ 40,209 1 $ 72,791 $ 113,000 Tn+nl Fiin'linn• G an 90Q G 1 9Rrl QQ1 G _ G _ G _ G _ G _ G 1 271 Son Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Highway Safety Improvement Program IlfEII Fire Station 73 Gym/Garage Infrastructure/ Other Project Location 0 100 200 Feet The map FireStation73Gym_Garage.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 115 ( Q FIRE STATION 73 GYM/GARAGE Infrastructure / Other Project Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Project Description: This project will consist of adding a structure in the rear of the property to park the squad and Urban Search and Rescue (USR) vehicle as well as adding a gym to the facility. Benefit / Core Value: This improvement to the station will allow for the station crew to stay at the facility to workout on a daily basis. The addition of the garage will offer an outside storage with roof to house the squad USR to reduce the wear and tear on these vehicles. This project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Safe and Prepared Community, as a Sustainable City and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Fire Services - Account No. 210.265.697 Level: II 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 75,000 $ 75,000 Construction $ 125,000 $ 125,000 Design/Environmental $ 54,000 $ 54,000 Totals $ $ $ 254,000 $ $ $ $ 254,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 Source of Funds: 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S I 1 1 $ 254,000 1 1 1 1 $ 254,000 Total Funding: $ - $ $ 254,000 1 $ - $ - $ $ $ 254,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 iim Fire Station 84 Training Room Renovation Infrastructure) Other Project Location 0 100 200 Feet The map FireStation84TrainingRm.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I i and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 117 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 FIRE STATION 84 TRAINING ROOM RENOVATION Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project includes the design, construction and renovation of Fire Station #84, including upgrades to the training room. This fire station serves as the headquarter station for the City of Temecula Fire Department. This renovation will give a fresh look to the station as well as update the facility to be more energy efficient. The renovation will add a gym to the facility, upgrade electrical, upgrade the windows, and re -paint the exterior and interior of the station. The living quarters will also receive some renovations to the bathrooms, kitchen and day room. Benefit / Core Value: This project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Safe and Prepared Community, as a Sustainable City and Accountable and Responsive City Government. This improvement will create a better learning experience for our community members that attend these classes for training. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Fire Services - Account No. 210.265.687 Level: II 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 168,750 $ 168,750 Construction $ 349,000 $ 349,000 Design/Environmental $ 149,000 $ 149,000 Totals $ - $ 666,750 $ $ - $ - $ - $ $ 666,750 Source of Funds: Prior Years Actual Expenditures FYE 2019 Carryover Budget 2019-20 Adopted 2020-21 Appropriation Projected 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S $ 666,750 1 1 1 1 1 $ 666,750 Total Funding: $ $ 666,750 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ $ 666,750 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 i`t] History Museum Infrastructure/ Other Project Location Of. T-Elq-F �� �, *0 - 4r'JA'S 0 NEW 0"' 119 a HISTORY MUSEUM Infrastructure / Other Project Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Project Description: This project facilitates the rehabilitation, improvement, reconfiguration, and rebranding of the Temecula Valley Museum as the Temecula Museum of Arts and Culture. Projects include: reconfiguration and relocation of permanent exhibits; an update of downstairs space to offer a flexible space that can be used for events and rentals, accommodate rotating exhibits, and allow for easier installation; and renovation of key components of the building including safety features, flooring, and restroom facility access Benefit / Core Value: This project will increase safety for staff and patrons, by improving installation processes and access to restroom facilities; elevate overall quality and experience for patrons through reconfiguration; and attract more artists and visitors through the increased capacity for exhibition and rebranding. In addition, this project continues to promote the Temecula Valley as a destination. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Economic Prosperity. Project Status: This project is subject to the outcome of the current Community Services Master Plan process; scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: TCSD - Account No. 210.290 Level Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Construction I I I 1 1 $ 304,000 1 1 $ 304,000 Totals 1 $ $ $ $ $ 304,000 1 $ $ $ 304,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Unspecified* I I I 1 1 $ 304,000 1 1 1 $ 304,000 Total Funding: 1 $ $ $ $ $ 304,000 1 $ $ $ 304,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 *Project cannot be constructed until a funding source is identified. 120 . UF'r E,11erGY r: Interstate 15/SR 79 South Interchange Enhanced Landscaping Infrastructure/ Other Project Location NNW , .. i k 46 r - • f \ " �• 3 �{ ` �• n i,� � '� �; off, �1(t•�, '3 �r ,, �° b � . vim. ' ".� X ��� �� • Legend :. CIPArea City Boundary 0 200 400 Feet The map 115_SR79Landscaping.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this ii map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculam.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 121 ( Q Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 INTERSTATE 151 SR 79 SOUTH INTERCHANGE ENHANCED LANDSCAPING Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: The project includes the landscape beautification of the Interstate 15/State Route 79 South (Temecula Parkway) interchange to implement the Interstate 15 Branding and Visioning- Conceptual Landscape Corridor Plan in association with Visit Temecula Valley and the Pechanga Tribe. Benefit / Core Value: This project meets the City-wide long-term goals as identified in the Quality of Life Master Plan to include a Healthy and Livable City and Economic Prosperity. Project Status: This project is in the design phase. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.690 PW17-19 Level: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Administration $ 14,578 $ 60,867 $ 47,133 $ 61,200 $ 183,778 Construction $ 2,952,867 $ 2,952,867 Construction Engineering $ 235,000 $ 235,000 Design/Environmental $ 29,915 $ 335,990 $ 365,905 MSHCP $ 150,000 $ 150,000 Totals $ 44,493 $ 396,857 $ 47,133 $ - $ 3,399,067 $ - $ - $ 3,887,550 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S $ 44,493 $ 396,857 $ 47,133 $ 446,200 $ 934,683 Unspecified* I I I 1 1 $ 2,952,867 $ 2,952,867 Tntal Fiinrlinn• I R AA dq2 1 0 ..1CA R57 1 R A7 1.'2.'2 I1 . :1 iqq nF7 I R _ IR _1 . 1 RR7 SSn Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 $ 50,000 1 $ 52,020 *Project cannot be constructed until a funding source is identified. IPA Tho Hoart oT $.rr� �mi' LIBRARY PARKING - PHASE II Infrastructure / Other Project Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Project Description: This project includes the study, design, and construction of alternatives to provide additional parking for the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library. Phase II covers the design and construction of an expansion of the current on -site parking facility. The Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment (FF&E) covers camera system infrastructure, Public Wi-Fi and other identified Information Technology needs. Benefit I Core Value: This project provides additional parking for Library patrons, meetings, and special programs. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of a Healthy and Livable City. Project Status: Phase II Design is complete and construction of the expansion will start in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works / Temecula Community Services -Account No. 210.290.153 PW 13-09 Level: II 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future otal Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected ProjectecW Years Cost Administration $ 288,394 $ 145,095 $ 433,489 Construction $ 230,160 $ 1,973,753 $ 2,203,913 Construction Engineering $ 54,288 $ 210,490 $ 264,778 Design/Environmental $ 230,690 $ 14,310 $ 245,000 Information Technology $ 10,346 $ 49,654 $ 60,000 MSHCP 1 $ 89,716 $ 89,716 Totals $ 813,878 1 $ 2,483,018 $ $ $ $ $ $ 3,296,896 Prior Years . FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 37,628 $ 37,628 DIF (Library Facilities) $ 765,904 $ 1,496,022 $ 2,261,926 DIF (Police Facilities) $ 10,346 $ 39,654 $ 50,000 Measure S $ 947,342 $ 947,342 Total Funding: $ 813,878 $ 2,483,018 $ $ $ $ - $ - $ 3,296,896 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 fifrzl Main Street Property Improvements i-1,4=. Infrastructure/ Other Project Location low ® ..Ap�8 .� _•- �i:•. �� _ .,� �� ��. \ do ✓ �`�` .� �'� - y'::i � Y � wit • /1� ' . A � � . o . !'� ,r.4 ✓�� \ v , Legend %iuoj ,�D �, ��� '' CIP Area 0 100 200 Feet The map MainStreetProperty.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculam.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 125 as �l Tho Hwrt oT Sure�f Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 MAIN STREET PROPERTY IMPROVEMENTS Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project includes site improvements on parcel 922-036-045, adjacent to the Temecula Community Theater and Pennypickles Workshop to include general plumbing and electrical relocations and repairs, installation of landscaping and various hardscape components. Benefit / Core Value: This project will enhance the newly acquired City property. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of a Healthy and Livable City. Project Status: This project is scheduled to be complete by Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services - Accounts No. 210.265.691 PW17-20 Level: I 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 8,284 $ 16,716 $ 25,000 Construction $ 66,069 $ 48,931 $ 115,000 Construction Engineering $ 10,000 $ 10,000 Design/Environmental $ 50,000 $ 50,000 Totals $ 74,353 $ 125,647 $ $ $ - $ - $ - $ 200,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 74,353 $ 125,647 1 1 1 1 1 $ 200,000 Total Funding: $ 74,353 $ 125,647 1 $ $ $ $ $ $ 200,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 126 dMA Margarita Recreation Center Infrastructure/ Other Project Location _r V9 tin. �r /�►- — Legend U CIPArea 0 100 200 Feet The map MargaritaRecCenter.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temecular .gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 127 Al _t ,_ cf MARGARITA RECREATION CENTER Infrastructure / Other Project Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Project Description: This project consists of construction of a new recreation center in Margarita Community Park in place of the former YMCA building. The project includes the demolition of the existing building and pool, constructing a new building and pool as determined by a Community Needs Assessment and available budget. The Information Technology Equipment covers camera system infrastructure, access control, Public Wi-Fi and other identified Information Technology needs. Benefit / Core Value: This project will provide the City a new facility to meet the increasing demands of recreational programs. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of a Healthy and Livable City and A Safe and Prepared Community. Project Status: Concept Design started in Fiscal Year 2017-18. Final design and environmental approval anticipated in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services- Account No. 210.265.692 Level: I Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Administration $ 23,747 $ 485,571 $ 509,318 Construction $ 5,918,788 $ 5,918,788 Construction Engineering $ 508,535 $ 520,000 $ 1,028,535 Design/Environmental $ 459,867 $ 459,867 Information Technology $ 15,634 $ 524,366 $ 200,000 $ 740,000 Totals $ 39,381 $ 7,897,127 $ 720,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 8,656,508 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budqet Appropriation Proiected Proiected Proiected Proiected Cost Capital Financing $ 6,405,000 $ 6,405,000 DIF (Police Facilities) $ 15,634 $ 121,366 $ 137,000 Measure S $ 23,747 $ 1,370,761 $ 720,000 $ 2,114,508 Total Funding: $ 39,381 1 $ 7,897,127 $ 720,000 $ $ $ $ $ 8,656,508 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 $ 744,600 1 $ 759,492 1 $774,682 1 $ 790,175 128 '�' $ .. MURRIETq� H =' �f 5 1� .w� OTSPRINGS RD rr z D ,►`r x a N`GO�PS 4: y a V f QSE gooG sn%�+G� Q�l1PV1 a Etp`NCNO yQ. toy r i �i < a DR oA O� Eo%�Nq IVY UBq j RD NIARVPII ., r. rf'OO O CA GdLIFORNIq,RD aVISTPop oN ty �.00 7s p'S G `r a+'� - DE PORTOLA RD 4 P` SPNTWGpRD y mh O ?�' 1 OV V�?ORT LPEKWy Sr TEMEGU J���V o r , C9 �yR NAWY. P .off Jpy� 4� u° 3yda 0 1,�1 ` a Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 MEDIANS AND TRAFFIC CALMING IMPROVEMENTS - CITYWIDE Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project includes the design and construction of raised concrete medians (with stamped concrete), neighborhood identification medians, pedestrian bulb -outs, and other features to provide neighborhood traffic calming at locations such as Seraphina Road, Nighthawk Pass, Roripaugh Road, Suzi Lane, Chandler Drive, Channel Street, Del Rey Road, Via Norte and other traffic calming program locations throughout the City. Benefit / Core Value: This project provides neighborhood traffic calming, enhances pedestrian, bicycle safety and the quality of life at various locations within the City. This project satisfies the City's Core Values of A Safe and Prepared Community, A Sustainable City, and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: This project has a priority list of locations and will be constructed in priority order. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.704 Level: II 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 25,000 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ 45,000 Construction $ 41,752 $ 165,148 $220,000 $230,000 $ 656,900 Construction Engineering $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ 30,000 Design/Environmental $ 29,900 $ 25,100 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 $ 95,000 Totals 71,652 225,248 $ 2 6 00,000 $ 270,000 $ 826,900 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DIF (Street Improvements) $ 40,000 $ 40,000 Measure S $ 31,652 $ 200,248 $260,000 $270,000 $ 761,900 Reimbursements (TVUSD) (1) $ 25,000 $ 25,000 Total Funding: $ 71,652 $ 225,248 $ - $260,000 $ - $270,000 $ - $ 826,900 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Temecula Valley Unified School District Contribution 130 R MURRIETA CREEK IMPROVEMENTS Infrastructure / Other Project Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Project Description: This project includes the design and construction of the proposed United States Army Corps of Engineers and Riverside County Flood Control improvements to the Murrieta Creek within the City limits. This project also includes the study, design, and construction of alternatives to reconfigure the existing Southside Parking Lot which has been impacted by the Riverside County Flood Control's acquisition of a portion of the parking lot. Benefit / Core Value: This project helps prevent flooding of Old Town Temecula and mitigate the property acquisition impacts to the South Side Parking Lot. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of A Safe and Prepared Community and A Sustainable City. Project Status: The City is working with Riverside County to form a Joint Powers Authority to further the implementation of this project. Construction of Phase II, just south of Rancho California Road to south of First Street bridge, started Fall 2015 and is almost complete. Design for the parking lot reconfiguration has begun and the City is working with the adjacent property owners to ensure that the new parking design will maximize the number of parking spaces. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.735 PW 15-07 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 35,196 $ 87,432 $144,649 $ 267,277 Construction $ 5,000 $ 144,000 $ 449,000 $ 598,000 Design/Environmental $ 151,460 $ 53,697 $ 205,157 Totals $ 191,656 $ 285,129 1 $ 449,000 $ $ $ $144,649 1 $ 1,070,434 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Reimbursements"' 1 $ 55,798 1 $ 285,129 1 $ 449,000 1 1 1 1 $144,649 1 $ 934,576 Total Fundinq: 1 $ 191,656 1 $ 285,129 1 $ 449,000 1 $ $ $ $144,649 1 $ 1,070,434 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Construction of the Southside Parking Lot Reconfiguration will not occur until the Purchase and Sale Agreement with Riverside County Flood Control is executed and the proceeds are received. Frontier Sale of Utility Easement. 132 j�- Old Town Parking Structure Infrastructure/ Other Project Location yr 14, EIVIF,�,Gv 4rNEW "' 133 Wine Cwnuy Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 OLD TOWN PARKING STRUCTURE Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project will include the design and eventual construction of a new parking structure in Old Town. The Old Town Parking Management Plan outlines a number of parking strategies that can be implemented in Old Town over time. Additional parking structures are anticipated to be constructed as part of the long term parking management strategy. Benefit / Core Value: This project will satisfy the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City and Economic Prosperity. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.694 PW 17-15 Level: III 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration Design/Environmental $ 90,759 $ 13,750 $ 14,241 $ 881,250 $ 105,000 $ 895,000 Totals 104,509 895,491 1 $ $ $ $ 1,000,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 104,509 $ 895,491 $ 1,000,000 Total Funding: $ 104,509 $ 895,491 $ $ $ $ $ $ 1,000,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 134 . of re.y�o Pechanga Parkway Environmental Mitigation Infrastructure) Other Project Location 0 400 800 Feet The map PechangaPkwyEnviro.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temecular .gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 135 C 7e G{ Capital Improvement Program wMe c—vy Fiscal Years 2020-24 PECHANGA PARKWAY ENVIRONMENTAL MITIGATION Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project includes the design, construction, and implementation of an environmental mitigation site required for the Pechanga Parkway Project, including acquisition and planting of the mitigation site in Temecula Creek. In addition, this project provides water to plant material and monitoring the mitigation site for five (5) years. Benefit / Core Value: This project increases environmental mitigation areas. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of A Sustainable City. Project Status: The design and construction of new wetlands was completed during Fiscal Year 2014-15. Upon the approval of the resource agencies, the maintenance of the created area is estimated to be completed by the end of Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works -Account No. 210.265.516 PW11-01 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 323,995 $ 199,832 $ 523,827 Acquisition $ 20,442 $ 5,000 $ 25,442 Construction $ 164,684 $ 49,865 $ 214,549 Construction Engineering $ 1,710 $ 8,290 $ 10,000 Design/Environmental $ 271,079 $ 5,086 $ 276,165 Utilities $ 1,023 $ 1,023 Totals $ 782,933 $ 268,073 $ - $ - $ $ - $1,051,006 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost CFD (Wolf Creek) I$ 782,933 $ 268,073 1 1 1 1 1 1 $1,051,006 Total Funding: $ 782,933 $ 268,073 1 $ $ -1 $ 1 $ -I $ -1 $1,051,006 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 136 Pedestrian Signal Equipment Upgrade - Citywide Infrastructure/ Other Project Location of. 14, EIVIIF,�,Gv 4rNEW "' 137 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PEDESTRIAN SIGNAL EQUIPMENT UPGRADE - CITYWIDE Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project will install pedestrian countdown signal heads, ADA compliant pedestrian pushbutton equipment and upgrade traffic signal controllers to improve safety and operations at signalized intersections Citywide including the Butterfield Stage Road, Jefferson Avenue, Margarita Road, Redhawk Parkway, Pechanga Parkway, Rancho California Road, Temecula Parkway and Ynez Road corridors. Benefit / Core Value: This project improves pedestrian safety and traffic circulation throughout the City. In addition this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable Community and A Safe and Prepared Community. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.518 Level: I 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budqet Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 5,000 $ 5,000 Construction $ 803,200 $ 803,200 Construction Engineering $ 105,000 $ 105,000 Design/Environmental $ 33,000 $ 33,000 Totals $ - $ 38,000 $ 908,200 $ - $ - $ - $ 946,200 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost HSIP") $ 908,200 1 $ 908,200 Measure S $ 38,000 $ 38,000 Total Funding: 1 $ - $ 38,000 1 $ 908,200 1 $ $ $ $ $ 946,200 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Highway Safety Improvement Program 138 Public Safety Monument Infrastructure/ Other Project Location Of TE�yE�,G me I- 4rNEW "' 139 Wine Cwnuy PUBLIC SAFETY MONUMENT Infrastructure / Other Project Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Project Description: To identify suitable location in park space/public for an acknowledgement and tribute to the men and women who serve as first responders in Police, Fire and emergency service occupations. The design of such a tribute would be in partnership with public safety personnel and serve as a reminder to residents of their dedication and sacrifice to maintaining the safety of our community. Benefit / Core Value: To honor Fire and Police. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of A Sustainable City, and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: Project will be funded as funding becomes available. Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.265 Level: II 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 5,000 $ 5,000 Design/Environmental $ 25,000 $ 25,000 Totals $ $ - $ $ 30,000 1 $ $ 30,000 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Unspecified" I I 1 1 $ 30,000 1 1 $ 30,000 Total Funding: $ $ - $ $ $ 30,000 1 $ $ $ 30,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 `Project cannot be constructed until a funding source is identified 140 anta �1Y8µ9 Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail Extension and Interconnect Infrastructure/ Other Project Location 0 200 400 Feet The map SantaGertrudisCreek.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculam.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 141 r, Q Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK PEDESTRIAN/BICYCLE TRAIL EXTENSION AND INTERCONNECT Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project includes the design, environmental, and construction of the extension and interconnect of the existing Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail from Ynez Road to the Murrieta Creek Multi -Purpose Trail. The extension and interconnect will provide access and under -crossings at Ynez Road, Interstate 15 and Jefferson Avenue, and a continuous paved trail along the Santa Gertrudis Creek to interconnect with the Murrieta Creek Multi -Purpose Trail. Benefit / Core Value: The project provides additional pedestrian and bicycle trails for the community. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: The design and environmental document is expected to be complete by the end of Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.739 PW08-04 Level: 1 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 170,397 $ 394,277 $ 278,313 $ 842,987 Construction $ 3,570,000 $ 647,043 $ 4,217,043 Construction Engineering $ 265,600 $ 265,600 Design/Environmental $ 410,043 $ 342,069 $ 752,112 MSHCP $ 178,500 $ 32,353 $ 210,853 Totals 580,440 4,750,446 957,709 1 $ $ 6,288,595 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost AB2766 $ 58,683 $ 58,683 BTA"I $ 223,311 $ 223,311 General Fund $ 78,920 $ 78,920 DI (Open Space and Trails) $ 219,526 $ 169,547 $ 389,073 Measure S $ 821,899 $ 957,709 $ 1,779,608 S61 ATP Augmentation z $ 3,759,000 1 $ 3,759,000 Total Funding: $ 580,440 $ 4,750,446 1 $ 957,709 1 $ $ $ $ $ 6,288,595 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 1) Bicycle Transportation Account 2) California Transportation Commission (CTC) adopted the 2017 Active Transportation Program Augmentation on October 18,2017 and allocated the funds at their December 6, 2017 meeting. 142 Santa Gertrudis Creek Phase II - Margarita Undercrossing 1989 Infrastructure) Other Project Location 0 200 400 Feet The map SantaGertrudisCreekPhasel I.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 143 �3 Capital Improvement Program Th. H—,,.fS ,-h w , -- Fiscal Years 2020-24 „e co�nvy SANTA GERTRUDIS CREEK PHASE II - MARGARITA UNDER -CROSSING Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project includes the design, environmental, and construction of the under -crossing in Santa Gertrudis Creek at Margarita Road to connect to the pedestrian/bicycle trail. The under -crossing at Margarita Road will provide a continuous paved trail along the Santa Gertrudis Creek at this location. Benefit / Core Value: The project provides a safe pedestrian and bicycle trail connection for the community. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: This is a new project. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.732 PW19-04 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 110,000 $ 50,000 $ 146,200 $ 306,200 Construction $ 1,462,000 $ 1,462,000 Construction Engineering $ 220,000 $ 220,000 Design/Environmental $ 323,000 $ 323,000 MSHCP $ 73,100 $ 73,100 Totals 5433,000 50,000 1,901,300 2,384,300 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S $ 433,000 $ 50,000 $ 399,300 $ 882,300 2019ATP(SB1)r $ 1,502,000 $1,502,000 TM.1 F—rlinn• I Q _1 G _1 Q 11'34 nnn I 4 Fn nnn I Q 1 Qn1 Znn I G _I (Z _I G 9 4Rd'Ann Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 1) California Transportation Commission (CTC) adopted the 2019 Active Transportation Program Augmentation on January 30 - 31, 2019. Sidewalks - Citywide Infrastructure/ Other Project Location aF 14,EhgF,�' G G� v_ 4rNEW "' 145 7] ��l W e c--y SIDEWALKS - CITYWIDE Infrastructure / Other Project Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Project Description: This project will include the construction of sidewalks at various locations throughout the City. Benefit / Core Value: This project will provide walking surfaces for pedestrians. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity and A Sustainable City. Project Status: A study to identify areas with missing sidewalks and prioritize them was completed as part of the Trails and Bikeways Master Plan Update in Fiscal Year 2015-16. Based on the study and the available resources, sidewalks will be constructed in the selected areas considering economy of scale and proximity to private development. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.708 PW17-24, PW17-27 & PW17-28 Level: I Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Administration $ 179,912 $ 1,493 $ 150,000 $ 50,000 $ 50,000 $ 50,000 $ 50,000 $ 531,405 Construction $ 109,462 $ 233,204 $ 540,596 $ 320,000 $ 320,000 $ 320,000 $ 320,000 $ 2,163,262 Construction Engineering $ 4,412 $ 37,588 $ 13,000 $ 60,000 $ 60,000 $ 60,000 $ 60,000 $ 295,000 Design/Environmental $ 96,787 $ 62,142 $ 46,000 $ 70,000 $ 70,000 $ 70,000 $ 70,000 $ 484,929 Totals $ 390,573 1 $ 334,427 1 $ 749,596 $ 500,000 1 $ 500,000 1 $ 500,000 $ 500,000 $ 3,474,596 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 375,000 $ 375,000 Measure S $ 15,573 $ 334,427 $ 658,596 $ 500,000 $ 500,000 $ 500,000 $ 500,000 $ 3,008,596 Senate Bill 821/RCTC $ 91,000 $ 91,000 Total Funding: $ 390,573 $ 334,427 1 $ 749,596 1 $ 500,000 $ 500,000 $ 500,000 $ 500,000 $ 3,474,596 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 146 Sidewalks - DLR Dr Infrastructure/ Other Project Location 0 200 400 Feet Them a p Sidewalks DLR.mxd ismaintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data `EW 7] ��l W e c--y SIDEWALKS - DLR DRIVE Infrastructure / Other Project Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Project Description: This project will include the construction of sidewalks on the north side of northerly leg, west side, and south side of the southerly leg of DLR Drive. Benefit / Core Value: This project will provide walking surfaces for pedestrians and will facilitate the construction of the Lexus dealership. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of Transportation Mobility and Connectivity, A Sustainable City, and Economic Prosperity. Project Status: This is a new project Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.721 Level: I Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 2023-24 Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years Cost Administration $ 74,000 $ 74,000 Construction $ 284,130 $ 284,130 Construction Engineering $ 18,081 $ 18,081 Design/Environmental $ 51,660 $ 51,660 MSHCP $ 14,206 $ 14,206 Totals $ - $ - $ 442,077 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 442,077 Prior Years Source of Funds: Actual Expenditures FYE 2019 2019-20 Carryover Adopted 2020-21 Budget Appropriation Projected 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 442,077 1 1 1 1 1 $ 442,077 Total Funding: $ 442,077 $ - $ - $ - $ 442,077 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 148 Sidewalks - Old Town Boardwalk Enhancements Infrastructure/ Other Project Location MITI*,, � 5 pko eh p ZP o+ P�> ,may. qq� t; - m F f " Legend CIP Area 0 200 400 Feet The map Sid ewelks _OldTown.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I i Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 149 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 SIDEWALKS - OLD TOWN BOARDWALK ENHANCEMENT Infrastructure / Other Project Project Description: This project will establish programs that will remove boardwalk plank boards and replace them with colored concrete sidewalks stamped with wood grain finish similar to what was installed with the new Main Street bridge. Benefit / Core Value: This project promotes a sustainable walkable surface that will require little maintenance. New sidewalks will enhance American with Disabilities Act(ADA) access. It will also promote a "walkable" community by connecting the City. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City and Transportation Mobility and Connectivity. Project Status: Design is complete, construction to follow. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.696 PW17-16 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 144,845 $ 30,000 $ 50,000 $ 224,845 Construction $ 46,624 $ 666,567 $ 86,375 $ 799,566 Construction Engineering $ 60,000 $ 28,152 $ 88,152 Totals 191,469 756,567 $ 164,527 $ - $ 1,112,563 Source of Funds: Prior Years Actual Expenditures FYE 2019 Carryover Budget 2019-20 Adopted 2020-21 Appropriation Projected 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Projected Projected Projected Cost CDBGmizl Measure S $ 91,243 $ 100,226 $ 296,793 $ 459,774 1 $ 164,527 1 1 1 1 1 $ 388,036 $ 724,527 Total Funding: $ 191,469 $ 756,567 1 $ 164,527 1 $ $ $ $ $ 1,112,563 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) Community Development Block Grant- Action Plan Fiscal Year 2017-18 150 Temecula Elementary School (TES) Pool Renovation O��D Infrastructure/ Other Project Location 0 100 200 Feet The map TESPoolRenovation.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I i AI and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temecular .gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 151 Gt Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 TEMECULA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (TES) POOL RENOVATION Infrastructure Project Project Description: This project includes the renovation of the Temecula Elementary School (TES) pool building, including roof replacement and the reconstruction of the pool deck. The City of Temecula maintains and operates this pool facility. Benefit / Core Value: This project protects the City's vast investment in facilities. This project satisfies the City's Core Value of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: Land surveying is currently in progress. Design will be initiated during this fiscal year and construction is to follow. Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.290.143 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 39,600 $ 39,600 Construction $ 247,500 $ 247,500 Design/Environmental $ 48,000 $ 48,000 Totals $ - $ 335,100 $ $ $ - $ - $ $ 335,100 Source of Funds: Prior Years Actual Expenditures FYE 2019 Carryover Budget 2019-20 Adopted 2020-21 Appropriation Projected 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Projected Projected Projected Cost DI F (Parks & Recreation) $ 335,100 1 1 1 1 1 $ 335,100 Total Funding: $ $ 335,100 1 $ - $ - $ - $ $ $ 335,100 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 152 Utility Undergrounding - Citywide Infrastructure/Other Project Location ��� ar TEhgFCG` G y_ 00 - 4r'JA'S 0 NEW 0"' 153 ]1 Tho Hwrr of Sarrt��i W a Country UTILITY UNDERGROUNDING - CITYWIDE Infrastructure / Other Project Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Project Description: This project includes the undergrounding of utilities at various locations throughout the City to extend the undergrounding done by the developers beyond the limits of their developments. The requested funding covers the following two locations: 1) approximately 600 LF in front of Julian Charter School (located at 29141 Vallejo Avenue) between two private developments (the Gateway Development and Hope Lutheran Church); 2) approximately 250 LF on Third Street just east of Old Town Front Street and west of the proposed hotel. Benefit I Core Value: Undergrounding of this 600 LF segment of existing overhead utility lines along Vallejo Avenue will result in a total of 2,000 LF of utility undergrounding as the two adjacent private developments will improve their frontage overhead utilities as well. Also, the utilities on Third Street, between Mercedes and Old Town Front will be undergrounded as a result of the proposed hotel and this project. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of A Sustainable City. Project Status: This project was initiated in Fiscal Year 2017-18. Implementation is contingent on adjacent developments. Department: Public Works - Account No. 210.265.776 Level: II 2022-23 Prior Years FYE2018 2018-19 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Construction $ 89.061 $ 123,439 $ 212.500 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S $ 89,061 $ 155,314 1 1 1 1 1 $ 244,375 Total Funding: $ 89,061 $ 155,314 1 $ - $ - $ - $ $ $ 244,375 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 154 (7 rho Hwn of Sawh�• w:. Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PARKS and RECRECATION PROJECTS Table of Contents Children's Museum Enhancement Project.........................................................................156 Community Services Master Plan.....................................................................................158 Eagle Soar Splash Pad Control System Renovation.........................................................160 Flood Control Channel Reconstruction and Repair...........................................................162 Parks Improvement Program............................................................................................164 Park Restrooms Renovations, Expansion, and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Improvements...................................................................................................................166 Playground Equipment Enhancement and Safety Surfacing.............................................168 Ronald Reagan Sports Park Restroom Expansion and Renovation..................................170 Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library Enhancement and Renovation .....................172 Sports Court Resurfacing..................................................................................................174 Sports Field Lighting Light Emitting Diode (LED) Conversion............................................176 155 +� l Children's Museum Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 CHILDREN'S MUSEUM ENHANCEMENT PROJECT Parks and Recreation Project Basement (Recycling Room) - Remove & Replace entire room with new theme Library(Travel & Time) - New Exhibit(Time/Geography);new Book Worm Exhibit; Refresh Bookshelves Dining Room (Power & Electricity) - Upgrade Electrical Wall Exhibit Hallway & Museum Wide - Sound System Upgrade; New sound effects throughout; Puzzling Predicaments (Escape Room Concept) Maze Room - Refresh entire Room Basement (Recycling Room) - Remove & Replace entire room with new theme Bedroom (Perception/Illusion Room) - Refresh entire room; add themed exhibit Foyer (Flight Room) - Refresh/Renovate Bathroom (Hydroelectric room) - New toilet exhibit; refresh balance Music Room - Wall Exibits use existing Organ Ambiance update Play Room - Computer upgrades Life Science Hallway - Refresh Total Total Prior Project Year Cost Actuals 2019-20 Funding Source $ 63,572 DIF (Parks& Recreation) $ 21,518 Measure S $ 20,000 Measure S $ 20,000 Measure S $ 25,000 Measure S $ 200,000 Measure S $ 50,000 Measure S $ 50,000 DIF (Parks & Recreation) $ 50,000 DIF (Parks & Recreation) $ 25,000 Measure S $ 10,000 Measure S $ 10,000 Measure S $ 63,572 $ 481,518 $ 545,090 156 C74' 1h.Ha„oiS—lho.. Capital Improvement Program w ec—try Fiscal Years 2020-24 CHILDREN'S MUSEUM ENHANCEMENT PROJECT Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: As exhibits and play experiences in the Children's Museum become outdated, this project allows for the re -design and replacement of exhibit areas or refurbishment of existing exhibits. This process provides the museum visitors new and updated play experiences. Benefit / Core Value: This project enhances existing exhibit areas of the Children's Museum. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of a Healthy and Livable City. Project Status: A project list has been developed. Projects are completed on an on -going basis as funding becomes available. Department: Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.290.125 Level: II 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 432 $ 9,568 $ 10,000 Construction $ 63,140 $ 457,950 $ 521,090 Design/Environmental $ 14,000 $ 14,000 Totals $ 63,572 $ 481,518 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ $ 545,090 Source of Funds: Prior Years Actual Expenditures FYE 2019 Carryover Budget 2019-20 Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 Appropriation Projected Projected 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Projected Projected Cost DIF (Parks & Recreation) Measure S $ 63,572 $ 81,518 1 $ 400,000 $ $ 145,090 400,000 Total Funding: $ 63,572 $ 481,518 $ $ $ $ $ $ 545,090 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 157 Community Services Master Plan Parks and Recreation Project Location aF TEhgF,�' G 4rNEW "' 158 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 COMMUNITY SERVICES MASTER PLAN Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: The Community Services Department's prior Master Plans (Youth, 2008; Cultural Arts, 1999; and Parks and Recreation, 1993) no longer adequately address the services, facilities, and parks currently managed by the City; nor do these documents reflect current demographic, statutory, financial, and social factors. The Community Services Master Plan will provide a pathway for the future, taking into account the existing capacity, location, and condition of facilities, programs, and parks as well as the needs and desires of City residents. Benefit / Core Value: This project will create a comprehensive Master Plan to enable the orderly and consistent planning, acquisition, development, and administration of the City's Community Services facilities, programs, and parks. It will also protect the City's existing investment in these resources. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: The Community Services Master Plan will be conducted as resources are identified. Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.290.117 Level: II 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 125,000 $ 125,000 Design/Environmental $ 151,200 $ 151,200 TM.1. I 4; I 4 77F ?nn I 4; I Ct _I 4 I CZ 1 4 1 4 77r ?no Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 159 . OF'r E.Nff. V Eagle Soar Splash Pad Control System Renovation mm ymmy���. Parks and Recreation Project Location �= 7 EL SOL Q �^e t � N. • J 'rlt �F � �r �k f +�' � F R i �c a �Pcf�rt Legend CIPArea 0 100 200 Feet The map EagleSoarSplashPad.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 160 (ie.� R H—, aE S—he— Gals —,. W—co, tq Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 EAGLE SOAR SPLASH PAD CONTROL SYSTEM RENOVATION Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: This project provides for the renovation and updating of the splash pad control system to meet current Health & Safety requirements. Benefit / Core Value: This project enhances the safety for the splash deck users and reduces the risk of exposure to unsanitary water. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete in Fiscal Year 2019-20 Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.290.145 Level: I 2023-24 PCOJ@Ct Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration I $ 20,000 I I I $ 20,000 Construction $ 280,000 $ 280.000 SOUCCe of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S $ 300,000 1 1 1 1 $ 300,000 Total Funding: $ $ $ 300,000 $ - $ - $ - $ $ 300,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 161 Flood Control Channel Reconstruction and Repair Parks and Recreation Project Location 0 � 1989 oNs 0 NEW OY4O4� 162 Q Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 FLOOD CONTROL CHANNEL RECONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: This project repairs and reinforces the earth and berms between specific park sites and flood control channels, and fortifies the banks to prevent further erosion into the park sites. A report for Pala Community Park, Margarita Community Park, and Long Canyon Creek Park was developed. The funding identified through Fiscal Year 2019-20 covers the construction work required to protect Pala Park. The Future Years funding is to protect Margarita and Long Canyon Community Parks. Benefit / Core Value: This project prevents further erosion into specific park sites. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of a Healthy and Livable City. Project Status: A study of the affected parks was completed in Fiscal Year 2014-15. Design and construction of the recommended fixes will be implemented based on available funds. Design for Pala Park was completed in Fiscal Year 2015-16. Environmental process commenced in Fiscal Year 2017-18 and will conclude in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works / Temecula Community Services -Account No. 210.290.127 PW11-10 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 159,907 $ 131,053 $ 220,000 $ 510,960 Construction $ 45,531 $ 665,000 $ 426,672 $3,900,000 $ 5,037,203 Construction Engineering $ 78,500 $ 160,000 $ 238,500 Design/Environmental $ 241,474 $ 89,219 $ 550,000 $ 880,693 MSHCP $ 37,027 $ 15,377 $ 52,404 Totals $ 446,912 $ 1,000,799 $ 442,049 $ $ $4,830,000 $ $ 6,719,760 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 446,912 $ 203,372 $ 650,284 Measure S $ 797,427 $ 442,049 $ 1,239,476 Unspecified* $4,830,000 $ 4,830,000 Total Funding: $ 446,912 $ 1,000,799 $ 442,049 $ $ - $4,830,000 $ $ 6,719,760 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 *Project cannot be constructed until a funding source is identified 163 Parks Improvement Program Parks and Recreation Project Location G��� QF TE,M1gFeGv j�- 4rNEW "' 164 as 1 ( _1 t he H­ of Sa ho G.14.. w . C-.t y Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PARKS IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: This project facilitates rehabilitation and improvement projects at various City parks The rehabilitation and improvement projects could include, but are not limited to, parking lot repairs and resurfacing, landscape medians, raised and cracked concrete sidewalk replacement, fencing repair and replacement, landscaping and irrigation system efficiency upgrades, lighting system repairs and efficiency upgrades, on -site drainage improvements and other similar projects. Benefit / Core Value: This project protects the City's vast investment in parks and open space facilities. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community, and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: A priority list of rehabilitation projects has been developed. Rehabilitations are completed on an on -going basis. Department: Public Works / Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.290.130 Level: 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 21,400 $ 23,000 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 $ 144,400 Construction $ 1,563,181 $ 102,419 $ 230,000 $230,000 $230,000 $230,000 $230,000 $ 2,815,600 Totals $ 1,584,581 $ 125,419 $ 250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $ 2,960,000 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost General Fund $ 1,060,000 $ 1,060,000 Measure S $ 274,581 $ 125,419 $ 250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $ 1,650,000 DIF (Quimby) $ 250,000 $ 250,000 Total Funding: $ 1,584,581 $ 125,419 $ 250,000 $250,000 1 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $ 2,960,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 165 L �esa� ru� Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PARK RESTROOMS RENOVATIONS, EXPANSION AND AMERICANS WITH DISABILITY ACT(ADA) IMPROVEMENTS Parks and Recreation Project Prior Year Project Fiscal Funding Park Restrooms Actuals Cost Year Source Prior Year Actuals $ 39,094 $ 39,094 Measure S Butterfield Stage Park -New Restroom Facility $ 250,000 2019-20 Measure S Restroom renovation - Various sites ADA Compliance Enhancements $ 58,706 2019-20 Measure S Vail Ranch Park - New Restroom Facility $ 650,000 2019-20 Measure S Restroom renovation - Various sites ADA Compliance Enhancements $ 130,000 2019-20 Measure S Total $ 39,094 $ 1,127,800 Prior Year $ 39,094 FY 2019-20 $ 1,088,706 FY 2020-21 TOTAL: $ 1,127,800 166 AftL C7,_� R Capital Improvement Program ^°'"° °"'° Fiscal Years 2020-24 w °Ca,mry PARK RESTROOMS RENOVATIONS, EXPANSION AND AMERICANS WITH DISABILITY ACT(ADA) IMPROVEMENTS Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: This project provides for the design and construction of new park restroom facilities and the renovation, expansion and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) improvements of existing restroom facilities at various Parks. The restroom expansion includes adding additional restroom buildings, renovating concession and bringing restroom facilities to meet current ADA accessibility compliance standards. Benefit / Core Value: This project provides additional restrooms for park patrons and brings facility to accessibility compliance. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, and A Safe and Prepared Community. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete by Fiscal Year 2021-22. Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services -Account No. 210.290.155 PW17-06 Level: 1 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 40,000 $ 40,000 $ 80,000 Construction $ 39,094 $ 208,706 $ 685,000 $ 932,800 Construction Engineering $ 20,000 $ 30,000 $ 50,000 Design/Environmental $ 25,000 $ 10,000 $ 35,000 Information Technology $ 15,000 $ 15,000 $ 30,000 Totals $ 39,094 $ 308,706 $ 780,000 $ $ $ - $ - $ 1,127,800 Source Of Funds: Prior Years Actual Expenditures FYE 2019 Carryover Budget 2019-20 Adopted Appropriation 2020-21 Projected 2021-22 Projected 2022-23 Projected 2023-24 Projected Total Project Cost Measure S $ 39,094 $ 308,706 1 $ 780,000 1 1 1 1 $ 1,127,800 Total Funding: $ 39,094 $ 308,706 $ 780,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 1,127,800 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 25,000 $ 25,500 26,010 $ 26,530 167 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT ENHANCEMENT AND SAFETY SURFACING Parks and Recreation Project Park Playground Riverton Park, Temeku Resurfacing, Rotary Park Park Playground Enhancement Future Playgrounds Enhancements Future Playgrounds Enhancements Future Playgrounds Enhancements Future Playgrounds Enhancements Future Playgrounds Enhancements Total Prior Year Project Fiscal Funding Actuals Cost Year Source $ 1,440,992 $ 889,008 2019-20 DIF (Quimby) $ 86,905 $ 294,194 2019-20 Measure S $ 500,000 2019-20 Measure S $ 500,000 2020-21 Measure S $ 500,000 2021-22 Measure S $ 500,000 2022-23 Measure S $ 500,000 2023-24 Measure S $ 1,527,897 $3,683,202 $5,211,099 Prior Years $1,527,897 FYE 2019 $1,183,202 FY 2019-20 $ 500,000 FY 2020-21 $ 500,000 FY 2021-22 $ 500,000 FY 2022-23 $ 500,000 FY 2023-24 $ 500,000 TOTAL: $5,211,099 168 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT ENHANCEMENT AND SAFETY SURFACING Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: This project includes the re -design, enhancement of playground equipment, and safety surfacing at existing City parks to comply with current state and federal regulations and enhance the quality of the parks. The projects include playground safety assessments, planning and evaluation, playground quality enhancements such as fencing, surfacing, accessibility and or new equipment. Benefit / Core Value: This project protects the City's vast investment in parks and open space facilities. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community, and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: The enhancement of playground equipment and safety surfacing will be performed at one to two sites per year. A priority list has been developed and enhancement will be completed on an ongoing basis. Department: Public Works / Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.290.120 PW18-17 Level: II 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 1,965 $ 23,000 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 $ 124,965 Construction $ 1,496,029 $ 1,000,681 $ 480,000 $480,000 $ 480,000 $480,000 $480,000 $ 4,896,710 Design/Environmental $ 444 $ 135,530 $ 135,974 Information Technology $ 29,459 $ 23,991 $ 53,450 Totals $ 1,527,897 $ 1,183,202 $ 500,000 $500,000 $ 500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $ 5,211,099 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost DIF (Parks & Recreation) $ 1,040,000 $ - $ 1,040,000 DIF (Police Facilities) $ 29,459 $ 23,991 $ 53,450 DIF (Quimby) $ 200,000 $ 240,000 $ 440,000 Measure S $ 258,438 $ 919,211 $ 500,000 $500,000 $ 500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $ 3,677,649 Total Fundin $ 1,527,897 $ 1,183,202 $ 500,000 $500,000 $ 500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $ 5,211,099 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 169 . pF 1E.tr£C G" Ronald Reagan Sports Park Restroom Expansion and Renovation TMyy� Parks and Recreation Project Location 0 200 400 Feet The map RonaldReaganRestroom.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update I and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculaca.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 170 as .� R Capital Improvement Program Th. "°'^ w aCaunery Fiscal Years 2020-24 RONALD REAGAN SPORTS PARK RESTROOM EXPANSION AND RENOVATION Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: This project provides for the design and construction of the restroom building expansion at Ronald Reagan Sports Park. The restroom expansion includes adding additional restroom stalls and urinals, renovating the snack bar, and enlarging the storage case. Benefit / Core Value: This project provides additional facilities for park patrons. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.290.114 PW18-03 Level: 1 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration $ 40,000 $ 40,000 Construction $ 550,000 $ 550,000 Construction Engineering $ 75,000 $ 75,000 Design/Environmental $ 30,000 $ 30,000 Fixtures/Furn/Equip $ 30,000 $ 30,000 Totals $ $ 725,000 $ $ $ $ $ $ 725,000 Prior Years Source of Funds: FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S $ 725,000 1 1 1 1 1 $ 725,000 Total Funding: $ $ 725,000 1 $ - $ - $ - $ $ $ 725,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library Enhancement and Renovation Parks and Recreation Project Location OVI E IV] tcy 4rNEW "' 172 as Th. Hw.,otS-0— a w *C—uy Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 RONALD H. ROBERTS TEMECULA PUBLIC LIBRARY ENHANCEMENT AND RENOVATION Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: The Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library opened in 2006 with over 5 million visitors since then, the carpet and chairs have experienced significant wear. This project allows for the installation of new carpeting for the 34,000 square foot facility, and also the reupholster of the final twelve chairs that were not included as part of the previous Capital Project. Benefit / Core Value: This project updates and enhances the appearance of the facility. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City. Project Status: This project is estimated to be complete in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Department: Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.290.146 Level: 1 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Equipment $ 21504I $ 21,504 Installation I 1 1 $ 143:000 $ 143,000 Source Of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S $ 164,504 1 1 1 1 $ 164,504 Total Funding: $ $ $ 164,504 1 $ $ $ $ $ 164,504 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 173 Sports Court Resurfacing Parks and Recreation Project Location O-V T E hyF '7. 4rNEW "' 174 as Il Capital Improvement Program w . C­e.y vy Fiscal Years 2020-24 SPORTS COURT RESURFACING Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: This project includes repairs and resurfacing of sport court surfacing at various parks and facilities. Surfacing includes tennis courts, basketball courts, and hockey rinks at various parks. Benefit / Core Value: This project protects the City's vast investment in parks and open space facilities. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Values of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community, and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: Projects will be completed on an on -going basis as funding becomes available. Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.290.141 Level: Prior Years FYE 2019 Project Cost: Actual Carryover Expenditures Budget 2019-20 Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 Appropriation Projected Projected 2022-23 Projected 2023-24 Projected and Future Years Total Project Cost Construction $ 100,000 $ 50,000 $ 50,000 $ 200,000 Totals $ - $ 100,000 1 $ $ 50,000 1 $ $ 50,000 1 $ $ 200,000 Prior Years Source of Funds: FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S $ 100,000 1 1 $ 50,000 $ 50,000 $ 200,000 Total Funding: 1 $ $ 100,000 1 $ $ 50,000 $ $ 50,000 $ $ 200,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 175 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 SPORTS FIELD LIGHTING - LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) CONVERSION Parks and Recreation Project Sports Parks Paloma Del Sol - Sports Light LED Upgrade - Soccer and Softball Fields Ronald Reagan North/South Fields/Hockey Rink/Skate Park Prior Year Project Funding Actuals Cost Year Source $ 250,000 2019-20 Measure S $ 280,000 2019-20 Measure S $ 530,000 FY 2019-20 $ 530,000 TOTAL: $ 530,000 176 as 1 ( _1 t he H-of S_,ho GeliE w . C—.t y Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 SPORTS FIELD LIGHTING - LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) CONVERSION Parks and Recreation Project Project Description: This project provides for the replacement of the aging sports field lighting components with new LED technology at various sports parks. Benefit/Core Value: This project enhances the safety of sport field users, reduces unnecessary light pollution and increases energy efficiency at City parks. In addition, this project satisfies the City's Core Value of a Healthy and Livable City, A Safe and Prepared Community, and Accountable and Responsive City Government. Project Status: Project will be completed on an on -going basis as funding becomes available. Department: Public Works/Temecula Community Services - Account No. 210.290.113 Level: 1 2023-24 Project Cost: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Administration Construction $ 25,000 $ 225,000 $ 10,000 $ 270,000 $ 35,000 $ 495,000 Totals $ $ 250,000 $ 280,000 $ - $ - $ - $ $ 530,000 Source of Funds: Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Measure S 1 1 $ 250,000 $ 280,000 1 1 1 1 1 $ 530,000 Total Funding: 1 $ $ 250,000 $ 280,000 1 $ - $ - $ $ $ 530,000 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 177 Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 SUCCESSOR AGENCY TO THE TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY (SARDA) Table of Contents AffordableHousing...........................................................................................................180 179 Affordable Housing *Successor Agency to the Temecula redevelopment Agency (SAKDA)lHousing Project Location 0 200 400 Feet The map AffordableHousing_SARDA.mxd is maintained by City of Temecula GIS. Data and information represented on this map are subject to update Al and modification. The City of Temecula assumes no warranty or legal responsibility for the information contained on this map. This map is not for reprint or resale. Visit the City of Temecula GIS online at https://temeculam.gov/gis 2018 Aerial Data 180 A% All C7*"1%1 f ha He t vi Sunburn "4 — v, .Co nety Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 AFFORDABLE HOUSING Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency (SARDA)/ Housing Project Project Description: This project serves as a placeholder for the proceeds remaining from the 2017A and 2017B Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds Series issued by the former Temecula Redevelopment Agency. Once a specific project is identified, staff will bring forward a recommendation to the Oversight Board and SARDA for formal approval. Benefit / Core Value: The specific Benefit/Core Value will be identified when the funds are appropriated to a specific capital project. Project Status: The City is currently in negotiation with the developer of Vine Creek Apartments, a 100% affordable, 60 unit development, for a portion of the Tax Allocation Bond proceeds. The project's entitlements were approved in February 2019, and a Disposition and Development Agreement (DDA) is expected to be finalized by Summer 2019, outlining the business terms and financial contribution from the City. Department: SARDA - Account No. 380.800.815 Level: I 2023-24 Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Projected Project Cost: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 and Future Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Years Cost Prior Years FYE 2019 2019-20 Source of Funds: Actual Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Total Project Expenditures Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Projected Cost Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds Series 2017B $12,853,720 $12,853,720 Total Funding: $ - $ - $ - $12,853,720 $ - $ - $ - $12,853,720 Future Operation & Maintenance Costs: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 (1) $4million 2010 TABS have already been spent on Front Street Plaza. 181 G( Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 FUTURE YEARS PROJECTS CIRCULATION Project Department Estimate* Cherry Street Extension Diaz Road to Jefferson Avenue Public Works 11,180,000 La Paz Street Widening from Ynez Road to Temecula Parkway Public Works 2,500,000 Nicolas Valley - Community Facilities District (Liefer Road) Public Works 4,088,508 Pauba Road Improvements - east of Margarita Road on the north side Public Works 130,000 Rainbow Canyon Road Widening from Pechanga Parkway to City Limit Public Works 8,000,000 Rancho California Road East of Meadows Parkway Public Works 470,000 Rancho Way Extension from Diaz to Margarita Road Public Works 28,337,000 Temecula Creek Crossing Public Works 16,777,300 Ynez Road Widening from Tierra Vista Road to Rancho Vista Road Public Works 580,000 TOTAL $ 72,062,808 INFRASTRUCTURE/OTHER Project Department Estimate* Corporate Meeting and Event Space Community Services 625,000 Fire Station 92 and 95 Bay Door Replacement Fire Services 200,000 Pedestrian and Bicycle Bridge Overcrossing into Old Town Planning 1,890,000 Old Town Gymnasium Community Services 4,630,000 Southside Branch Library Community Services 6,640,000 Southside Recreation Center Community Services 4,500,000 TOTAL $ 18,485,000 PARKS and RECREATION Project Department Estimate* Ronald Reagan Sports Park North/South Fields Back Stops, Dugout, and Parking Lot with Trash Enclosures Ronald Reagan Sports Park Upper Soccer Paving and Materials/Eauioment Storaae Bays Sports Complex - Joint Use (Riverside County Flood Control District) Vail Ranch Park Site D Ynez Road and Overland Landscaping Community Services Community Services Community Services Community Services Community Services TOTAL 857,000 481,250 8,250,000 1,843,000 200,000 $ 11,631,250 *Estimates are planning level at the time the project was reviewed and they do not account for inflation and economic conditions 183 The H— of S—h.. C.M.—I Wine country Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 GLOSSARY OF TERMS Abatement — Abatement usually applies to tax levies, special assessments, and service charges. Accounting System — The methods and records established to identify, assemble, analyze, classify, record, and report a government's transactions and to maintain accountability for the related assets and liabilities. Adoption — Formal action by the City Council that sets the spending limits for the fiscal year. Appropriation — A legal authorization granted by the City Council to make expenditures and incur obligations for specific purposes. Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) — A federal law providing for a wide range of protection to individuals which directly benefit District members. Assessment District — A separate local government agency formed to provide specific local public improvements that directly benefit District members. Audit — A systematic collection of the sufficient, competent evidential matter needed to attest to fairness of management's assertions in the financial statements or to evaluate whether management has efficiently and effectively carried out its responsibilities. Budget — A plan of financial operation embodying an estimate of proposed expenditures for a given period and the proposed means of financing them. Used without any modifier, the term usually indicates a financial plan for a single fiscal year. Budgetary Control — The control or management of a government or enterprise in accordance with an approved budget for the purpose of keeping expenditures within the limitations of available appropriations and revenues. Capital Improvement — Construction or major repair of City buildings, infrastructure, and facilities such as streets, roads, highways, bridges, curbs, gutters, sidewalks, storm drains, traffic signals, streetlights, gas and water distribution facilities, and parks. Capital Improvement Program (CIP) — Annual appropriations in the City's budget for capital purposes such as street improvements, building construction, and park improvements. Capital Expenditures — Expenditures resulting in the acquisition of or addition to the government's general fixed assets having a unit cost of $5,000 or more and a useful life of greater than one year. Infrastructure assets of $100,000 or more are also recorded capital expenditures. Capital Outlay — Expenditures which qualify as capital costs according to accounting standards. This includes furniture, fixtures, machinery, equipment, and other relatively minor fixed assets. 185 7"d The Hw of Sa h.. C.M.—I Wine country Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 GLOSSARY OF TERMS (continued) Capital Project — A specific undertaking involving the procurement, construction or installation of facilities and related equipment which improves, preserves, enhances, or modernizes the City's provision of municipal services, has a long-term useful life, and for which costs exceed $25,000. Construction Engineering — Engineering work during the construction process that ensures projects are constructed in accordance with design parameters and specifications. The primary construction engineering functions are construction inspections, laboratory services, field surveys and design plan updates or interpretations. Contingency — A budgetary reserve set -aside for emergency or unanticipated expenditures. Contractual Services — Contracts for professional services. Core Value: The Quality of Life Master Plan (QLMP) provides the framework for the City's Strategic Budgeting activities. The City Council has set priorities and guided staff in developing six (6) Core Values upon which to focus time and resources (as identified in the QLMP). These areas include: Healthy and Livable City 2. Economic Prosperity 3. A Safe and Prepared Community 4. A Sustainable City 5. Transportation Mobility and Connectivity 6. Accountable and Responsive City Government Department — An organizational unit comprised of programs and program managers. A single director manages each department. Encumbrances — An amount of money committed for the payment of goods and services not yet received or paid for. Expenditures — Decreases in net current assets. Fiscal Year — The period designated by the City signifying the beginning and ending period for recording financial transactions. The City of Temecula has a fiscal year of July 1 through June 30. Fund — An accounting entity with a set of self -balancing accounts recording revenues and expenditures and transactions for specific activities. Fund Balance — The difference between the assets (revenues and other resources) and liabilities (expenditures incurred or committed to) for a particular fund. 186 7"d The H— of S—h.. C.M.—I Wine country Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 GLOSSARY OF TERMS (continued) Future Years — The intent of the future period is to project out to ten (10) years, projects that are anticipated by staff and the City Council that will ultimately have a very large impact on the City and surrounding area. General Fund — Accounts for tax and other general fund revenues (e.g., sales taxes, property taxes, fines and forfeitures, investment interest, etc.) and records the transactions of general governmental services (e.g., police, fire, library, parks and recreation, public service, etc.). Goals — The desired result of accomplishments within a given time frame, usually a fiscal year. Grants — Contributions or gifts of cash or other assets from another government to be used or expended for a specified purpose. Objectives — The necessary steps to achieve a desired goal. Operations & Maintenance — Office supplies and other materials used in the normal operations of City departments. Includes items such as books, maintenance materials, and contractual services. Organization — A unit of operation having specific responsibilities and duties and collectively form an Agency. The terms organization and division is used interchangeably throughout the budget document (i.e., Accounting Organization, Traffic Division, etc.). Resources — Total amounts available for appropriation including estimated revenues, fund transfers, and beginning balances. Revenues — The yield of taxes and other sources of income that a governmental unit collects and receives for public use. Special Assessment — A compulsory levy made against certain properties to defray all or part of the cost of a specific capital improvement or service deemed to benefit primarily those properties. Taxes — Compulsory charges levied by a government to finance services performed for the common benefit. This term does not include specific charges made against particular persons or property for current or permanent benefits, such as special assessments; nor does the term include charges for services rendered only to those paying such charges (i.e., sewer service charges). Transfers In/Out — Payments from one fund to another fund primarily for work or services provided. Unspecified — Funds that have not been identified for various proposed projects. 187 �heHwrt of Sauehsr� w�. INDEX Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Abbott Corporation Roadway Improvements.................................................................................. 40 AffordableHousing...................................................................................................................... 180 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition Plan Implementation .......................................... 87 Bike Lane and Trail Program — Citywide........................................................................................ 89 Bike Lane and Trail Program — Pump Track................................................................................... 91 Bike Lane and Trail Program — Temecula Creek South Side Trail .................................................. 93 Butterfield Stage Road Extension................................................................................................... 42 California Society of Municipal Finance Officers (CSMFO) Certificate of Award ............................. 13 Cherry Street Extension and Murrieta Creek Low -Flow Crossing to Diaz Road .............................. 44 CIP Major Revenue Sources Graph............................................................................................... 32 CirculationProjects........................................................................................................................ 39 City Facilities Rehabilitation........................................................................................................... 95 CityOrganizational Chart............................................................................................................... 14 Citywide Buffered Bike Lane Striping............................................................................................. 46 Citywide Drainage Master Plan...................................................................................................... 97 Citywide Financial System Upgrade............................................................................................... 99 Citywide Streetlight Acquisition and Light Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit ...................................... 101 Citywide Surveillance Cameras.................................................................................................... 103 Community Recreation Center (CRC) Renovations..................................................................... 105 Comparison Between Projected Revenue and Costs..................................................................... 33 Comprehensive General Plan Update.......................................................................................... 107 Descriptionof Levels...................................................................................................................... 15 Description of Revenue Sources.................................................................................................... 17 Diaz Road Expansion (Rancho California Road to Cherry Street) .................................................. 48 Electric Vehicles Charging Station............................................................................................... 109 Emergency Vehicle Pre-Emption Upgrade Program — Citywide ..................................................... 50 Expanded Recycled Water Conversion Project............................................................................ 111 Expenditure Summary by Project Graph........................................................................................ 31 188 -+� The Hwnei Sewh�. W: INDEX (continued) Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Fiber Optic Communication System Upgrade.............................................................................113 Fire Station 73 Gym/Garage.......................................................................................................115 Fire Station 84 Training Room Renovation..................................................................................117 Flashing Beacons and Speed Advisory Signs...............................................................................52 French Valley Parkway / Interstate 15 Improvements — Phase 11...................................................54 French Valley Parkway / Interstate 15 Improvements — Phase III..................................................56 Future Years Projects.................................................................................................................183 Glossaryof Terms.......................................................................................................................185 HistoryMuseum..........................................................................................................................119 Infrastructure/Other Projects.........................................................................................................85 Interstate 15 / State Route 79 South Interchange Enhanced Landscaping...................................121 Interstate 15 / State Route 79 South Ultimate Interchange.............................................................60 Interstate 15 Congestion Relief......................................................................................................58 Introduction......................................................................................................................................7 LibraryParking — Phase II............................................................................................................123 Main Street Property Improvements.............................................................................................125 MargaritaRecreation Center........................................................................................................127 Medians and Parkways — Citywide.................................................................................................62 Medians and Traffic Calming Improvements — Citywide...............................................................129 Murrieta Creek Bridge at Overland Drive........................................................................................64 MurrietaCreek Improvements......................................................................................................131 Nicolas Road Extension and Improvement.....................................................................................66 OldTown Parking Structure.........................................................................................................133 Overhead Street Name Sign Replacement Program - Citywide.....................................................68 Parameters for CIP Budget Cost Estimates...................................................................................16 Parks and Recreation Projects.....................................................................................................155 Pavement Rehabilitation Program - Citywide.................................................................................70 Pechanga Parkway Environmental Mitigation..............................................................................135 189 CC Th, Hoare of 5—h—C,W..i, W ne Camuy INDEX (continued) Capital Improvement Program Fiscal Years 2020-24 Pechanga Parkway Widening........................................................................................................72 Pedestrian Signal Equipment Upgrade — Citywide.......................................................................137 Project Summary by Type of Project..............................................................................................22 Projected Revenue Summary........................................................................................................21 PublicSafety Monument..............................................................................................................139 Resolution of the City Council........................................................................................................12 Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail Extension and Interconnect................................141 Santa Gertrudis Creek Phase II — Margarita Under-Crossing.......................................................143 Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency (SARDA)......................................179 Sidewalks— Citywide...................................................................................................................145 Sidewalks— DLR Drive................................................................................................................147 Sidewalks — Old Town Boardwalk Enhancement.........................................................................149 Temecula Elementary School (TES) Pool Renovation.................................................................151 Traffic Signal — Park and Ride Access Improvements....................................................................78 Traffic Signal Equipment Enhancement Program — Citywide..........................................................74 Traffic Signal Installation — Citywide...............................................................................................76 TrafficSignal System Upgrade.......................................................................................................80 TransmittalMessage........................................................................................................................7 Utility Undergrounding — Citywide................................................................................................153 YnezRoad Improvements..............................................................................................................82 190 Proposed Annual Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019=2020 ANNUAL OPERATING BUGET Fiscal Year 2019-20 City Council Mike Naggar, Mayor James Stewart, Mayor Pro Tem Maryann Edwards, Council Member Matt Rahn, Council Member Zak Schwank, Council Member City of Temecula City Management Aaron Adams, City Manager Greg Butler, Assistant City Manager City of Temecula 41000 Main Street Temecula, California 92590 (951) 694-6430 TemeculaCA.gov Celebrating 3o Years Mayor Naggar states, "It took 30 years of dedication, hard work and a lot of love from our community, engaged citizens, families and businesses to build our City, so this year we are shining a spotlight on what, exactly, we all LOVE about our beautiful City." There are infinite reasons to LOVE Temecula. Its picturesque vineyards, award -winning wineries, themed City parks, championship golf courses, charming Old Town, rolling hills, morning mist, afternoon ocean breezes, the shopping experience at Promenade Temecula, world -class entertainment at Pechanga Resort & Casino, diverse restaurant choices, family -friendly citywide events, quaint neighborhoods, friendly neighbors, equestrian trails, fun parades, community theater, museums, top rated schools, maximum public safety, the people, inclusiveness, cultured tourists, generous business community, scenic mountainous backdrop, proximity to the ocean, hiking, biking, the weather and endless hometown LOVE. "I love it all in Temecula, but what melts my heart is our uniquely close-knit inclusive community of individuals and families with special needs; and I am so very proud to be their advocate," adds Mayor Naggar. The City of Temecula will be emphasizing the special talents that these individuals and emerging adults can bring to the workforce throughout the year, including a special needs workforce luncheon scheduled for the Spring. "Their special abilities far exceed their special needs, and it's exciting to see our business community recognize this as well. That's what I LOVE most about Temecula," Naggar adds. Ak 3 _ City of Temecula R Fiscal Year 2019-20 neHeanorsov^e,^car &,y Annual Operating Budget I kh, I ali 1 *11 MW L119DI►rR INTRODUCTION Transmittal Message ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 7 Directory------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 20 City Organizational Chart---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 21 Mission and Value Statements --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22 Citywide Long Term Goals--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 23 Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) Award------------------------------------------------ 25 California Society of Municipal Finance Officers (CSMFO) Award -------------------------------------- 26 City of Temecula at a Glance------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 27 BUDGET GUIDE Understanding the Budget Document------------------------------------------------------------------------ 29 Budgetary Fund Structure--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 31 Descriptionof Funds---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 33 Funds and Departments------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 38 Funding Sources by Department------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 39 BudgetProcess----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 40 BudgetCalendar--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 43 FIVE-YEAR FORECAST Long Range Financial Projection-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 45 Five -Year Financial Projection — General Fund-------------------------------------------------------------- 47 Five -Year Revenue Projection — General Fund-------------------------------------------------------------- 49 Five -Year Expenditure Projection — General Fund--------------------------------------------------------- 51 Five -Year Financial Projection — Measure S Fund---------------------------------------------------------- 55 Five -Year Financial Projection — Temecula Community Services District Fund ---------------------- 58 Annual Operating Budget 3 Ak 4 _ City of Temecula R Fiscal Year 2019-20 neHeanorsov^e,^CaI,&'y Annual Operating Budget TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) FINANCIAL SUMMARIES FundBalance Summary------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 59 Summary of Major Revenue Sources-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 60 General Fund: Revenues by Source------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 65 RevenueDetail-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 66 FundSummaries------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 68 Measure S Fund: FundSummaries------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 70 Special Revenue and Debt Service Funds: RevenueDetail-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 72 FundSummaries------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 75 Temecula Community Services District (TCSD): Revenue By Source-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 91 RevenueDetail-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 92 FundSummaries------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 97 Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency (SARDA): FundSummary------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------107 Internal Service Funds: RevenueDetail ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 109 FundSummaries ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 111 DEPARTMENTAL INFORMATION CityCouncil --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 121 CityManager ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 128 CityClerk ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 141 CityAttorney ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 145 Finance Department---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------147 HumanResources ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 153 Community Development Department----------------------------------------------------------------------161 PublicWorks Department--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------183 PoliceDepartment ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 209 FireDepartment--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------222 Annual Operating Budget 4 Ak 5 _ City of Temecula R Fiscal Year 2019-20 neHeanorsov^e,^CaU.&'y Annual Operating Budget TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) Non-Departmental-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------230 Temecula Community Services District---------------------------------------------------------------------- 231 Internal Service Funds------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 250 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Capital Improvement Program Summary------------------------------------------------------------------- 266 CIP Project Summary by Type of Project--------------------------------------------------------------------269 CIP Future Years Projects---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------277 Projected CIP Revenue Summary-----------------------------------------------------------------------------278 Annual Operating and Maintenance Costs — Capital Improvement Program ----------------------- 279 Description of CIP Revenue Sources -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 280 BUDGET POLICIES General Financial Policies--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 284 APPENDICES Appendix A - Personnel Summary of Changes in Authorized Positions, Personnel and Benefit Costs -------------- 336 Schedule of Authorized Positions-------------------------------------------------------------------338 Schedule of Changes in Allocated Positions ------------------------------------------------------- 343 Summary of Budgeted Positions --------------------------------------------------------------------- 351 Appendix B — Supplemental Information LocatorMap ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 352 Community Profile and Demographics------------------------------------------------------------- 353 Summary of Interfund Transfers ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 356 G A N N Appropriations Limit--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 357 Assessed and Estimated Actual Value of Taxable Property ------------------------------------ 358 Summary of Federal Grant Expenditures ---------------------------------------------------------- 359 LegalDebt Margin --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 360 Annual Operating Budget 5 Ak s City of Temecula �% Fiscal Year 2019-20 The H—tof Southern C.hf., la Wine Country Annual Operating Budget TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) DebtObligations ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 361 Summary of Construction and Property Values -------------------------------------------------- 362 Summary of Property Tax Rates---------------------------------------------------------------------363 Principal Secured Property Owners ----------------------------------------------------------------- 364 Computation of Direct and Overlapping Bonded Debt ----------------------------------------- 365 Largest Employers by Number of Employees ----------------------------------------------------- 367 Comparative City Information ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 368 Appendix C — Glossary/Index Glossaryof Acronyms----------------------------------------------------------------------------------370 Glossary of Terms--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 372 Annual Operating Budget 6 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget May 16, 2019 The Honorable Mayor and Members of the City Council: I am pleased to submit the Proposed Annual Operating Budget for the Fiscal Year 2019-20. This budget document was developed to serve as the financial plan for the City's programs and policies. It reflects the resources necessary to meet the goals, programs, and service priorities that the City Council is committed to providing its citizens. The Fiscal Year 2019-20 Proposed Annual Operating Budget has been developed after a considerable review process. Departmental budget submittals were prepared and reviewed by line item in connection with projected revenues. Detailed performance objectives and accountability measures were developed consistent with the City's Quality of Life Master Plan. Five-year revenue and expenditure projections were developed to identify the future impacts of proposed staffing and program changes, as well as the impact of proposed capital improvement projects. The resulting budget is realistic and balanced, and continues to provide quality services to the community while effectively utilizing available resources. CITY OF TEMECULA PROFILE The City of Temecula is a dynamic community comprised of approximately 113,826 citizens. The City maintains 41 parks on 330 developed acres throughout the community, which provide recreation opportunities for both the citizens of Temecula, as well as surrounding communities. Police and Fire protection services are provided through contracts with Riverside County. The Temecula Valley Unified School District provides 32 schools with 27,991 students at the kindergarten through 12th grade levels within the City. The City of Temecula prides itself on its community focus and quality of life. Temecula's residents enjoy one of the finest lifestyles Southern California has to offer. Environmental and residential factors create a beautiful setting that attracts young, well-educated families to upscale homes that are relatively inexpensive by Southern California standards. Geography contributes to the City's population and retail growth from San Diego and Orange Counties. Temecula's leadership has approached economic growth from a qualitative standpoint, providing the City with a favorable share of the region's higher paying and high technology career opportunities. The City's average income levels are higher than the surrounding region, the educational performance of its young people is above the State average, and Temecula has been recognized as one of Nation's safest cities. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 -r City of Temecula now �.: Fiscal Year 2019-20 a Annual Operating Budget T.i:eir�€sa ECONOMIC INDICATORS The City of Temecula has experienced solid economic growth over the past year, as illustrated by the indicators discussed below. • Estimated Population: 113,826, up 0.5%from 2018 (source: State Department of Finance) • Median Age: 35.3 years old, up .2 from 2018 (Source: Claritas360 Report— 12-19-18) • Number of Households: 36,001, up 1.5%from 2018 (Source:Claritas360Report— 12-19-18) • Average Household Income: $116,464, up 6.2%from 2018 (Source:Claritos360Report— 12-19-18) • March Median Home Price: $475,000, down 3% from March 2018 (Source: Southwest Riverside County Association of Realtors) • Number of Jobs: 55,700, up 1.0% from 2018 (Source: EDD) • March Unemployment Rate: Temecula: 3.6% (no change from March 2018), Riverside County: 4.7%, CA: 4.6%, Nation: 3.8% (Source: EDD & BLS) Steady expansion of the City's economic base has led to growth in City revenues, which allows the City to continue to provide the high level of services citizens enjoy, as noted in a recent Citizen Opinion Survey stating that 93% of Temecula residents indicated they were satisfied with the City's municipal services. IMPACTS OF STATE/COUNTY LEGISLATION A number of legislative changes are being considered, which could have profound fiscal impacts on the City, including: ➢ Sheriff's Contract Rate Modification: The City was recently notified by the County Executive Office of a recommended change in the calculation methodology of the Riverside County Sheriff's contract rate. The Board of Supervisors is considering the inclusion of several public safety services not currently included in the contract rate, including: aviation services, patrol captains, crime analysts, portions of dispatch, etc. The increase to the City's Police budget would be $2.3 million if this change is implemented. The County Board of Supervisors is expected to consider this proposal later this year. ➢ Assembly Bill 213 — Annexation Financing: If passed, this bill will restore funding to 140 cities, including Temecula, that lost Vehicle License Fee revenue related to the annexation of inhabited territory, as a result of the passage of Senate Bill 89 in 2011. The City of Temecula could potentially recoup the $428,745 in lost Vehicle License Fee revenue. ➢ Proposition 64: Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA) In November 2016, California voters approved Proposition 64 by a margin of 56% to 44% to legalize recreational use of cannabis for persons 21 years of age and over. Under Proposition 64, local governments have the ability to regulate, license or prohibit commercial cannabis. The City of Temecula currently prohibits all commercial cannabis and has joined the County of Riverside's Cannabis Regulatory Task Force. Code Enforcement, Police, and the City Attorney's Office coordinate to shut down any marijuana retailers operating within the City. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ➢ 2017 State of California Housing Package In 2017, the State adopted a comprehensive housing package of 15 bills designed to increase the supply of housing in California, including the number of affordable homes. Currently there are approximately 200 housing related bills going through the legislative process. Generally, the bills stated aim is to address the state's housing shortfall by directly financing affordable housing production; facilitate private -market housing production by streamlining local review processes; increasing local accountability for accommodating a fair share of new housing development; harnessing private funding to pay for affordable housing; and preserving the affordability of existing subsidized housing. While the City is eligible for some of the direct sources of funding to facilitate the production of housing, including funding from SB 2, the Building Jobs and Homes Act. Community Development, it is anticipated that the City will be subject to a number of unfunded mandates as a result of the passage of any number of the current proposed housing related bills. ➢ State Water Resources Control Board 13383 Order On April 7, 2015, the State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) adopted statewide Trash Provisions to address the pervasive impacts trash has on the beneficial uses of surface waters. The Trash Provisions establish a statewide water quality objective for trash and a prohibition of trash discharge, or deposition where it may be discharged, to surface waters of the State. As a result of this Order, the City must install, operate and maintain full capture systems for the storm drain network that capture runoff. It is estimated that a total of 500 catch basin inlet filters will be installed over a 10-year period, beginning in 2019. 2019-20 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The City Council adopted the Temecula 2030 Quality of Life Master Plan (QLMP) in October 2011. The QLMP defines the strategic priorities of Temecula's residents, leaders, and partners for the City's next twenty years. It reflects the vision for the City's future, and commits the City to a performance based process to accomplish those goals. This plan was developed by engaging residents, businesses, local institutions and regional partners in an inclusive process. The QLMP outlines six Core Values: • Healthy and Livable City • A Sustainable City • Economic Prosperity • Transportation Mobility and Connectivity • A Safe and Prepared Community • Accountable and Responsive City Government In an effort to incorporate the QLMP into the City's budget process, City of Temecula Executive Staff met at the outset of the budget process to update the Citywide Five -Year Goals based on the Core Values of the Quality of Life Master Plan. These goals were then used by each Department to develop Short Term Objectives for completion in the upcoming fiscal year, and are reflected in the Department Information section of the budget document. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES The budget document includes the short term operational objectives for completion in Fiscal Year 2019- 20 and the performance measures for evaluating the completion of those objectives. These objectives were developed in a collaborative process with City staff in order to identify how each department can contribute to the overall long term goals of the City. The objectives were then used by the departments in order to identify and justify their Annual Operating Budget submittals. The short term objectives are detailed by Department in the Departmental Information section of this budget document. Each Department section also includes the objectives and performance measures cross referenced by the City's Long -Term Goals and QLMP Core Value, along with significant accomplishments, and a detail of the expenditure requests and personnel allocations which will be used to meet the objectives. LONG-RANGE FINANCIAL FORECAST With the recent passage of Measure S in November 2016 (one -cent Transactions and Use Tax) combined with ongoing fiscal restraint, the City is in a strong fiscal position over the coming five-year period, with all funds balanced, reserves fully -funded and available fund balance in both the General Fund and the Measure S Fund. As illustrated below, the General Fund Ending Balance over the ensuing five-year period is sufficient to meet the operational needs of the City as well as fully fund the Reserve for Economic Uncertainty (20% of Operating Expenditures) and the Secondary Reserve (5% of Operating Expenditures). In addition, a total of $8 million was deposited into an Internal Revenue Code r General Fund 5-Year Projections Section 115 Irrevocable Fund Balance Trend 35,000,000 Pension Trust in Fiscal Year ktuals Projected 2017-18, in order to address 30,000,000 future pension liabilities of the 25,000,000 City. This Trust will serve as a tertiary reserve, in addition to 20,000,000 the aforementioned General Fund Reserves. 1 15,000,000 — — — — — — Total Reserves, including the Trust proceeds totals $29.0 million for Fiscal Year 2019-20. GENERAL FUND ANALYSIS _W 10,000,000 FY12-13 FY13-14 FY14-15 FY15-16 FY16-17 FY17-18 HIS-19 FY19-20 FY20-21 FY21-22 FY22-23 FY23-24 —Fund Balance —Funded Reserve O Desired Reserve Fiscal Year 2019-20 Ending Fund Balance is projected to be $26,476,568. Total Reserves, at 25% of Expenditures, totals $19,537,138, with another $460,305 assigned to cover the costs future Capital Projects and the Pechanga-funded police officer for Fiscal Year 2020-21, leaving an Unassigned (available) Fund Balance of $6,479,125. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 10 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget General Fund Revenue Highlights General Fund Revenue is projected to increase by 0.8% over the prior year with a total of $80,127,628, of which $5,735,418 was transferred in from the Measure S Fund to primarily cover the costs associated with additional Public Safety personnel. The change in the major revenue sources are noted below: • Sales Tax ($37,981,346) is projected to increase by 0.4% compared to the prior fiscal year due to anticipated leveling in both the Business/Industry and Autos/ Transportation sectors of the local economy. • Property Tax ($8,706,389) is projected to increase 4.1%, as assessed valuations continue to climb and property values are restored to pre -recessionary levels. • Franchise Fees ($3,351,304) are projected to increase 0.4% due to slight increases in electricity rates. • Transient Occupancy Tax ($3,338,860) is projected to increase by 3%, due to the opening of two new hotels during the prior year, combined with increased mid -week occupancies expected as a result of the recent expansion of the Pechanga Resort and Casino's convention center. • Licenses, Permits & Service Charges ($4,335,071) are projected to decrease by 18.2% due to less Development activity projected compared to the prior year, as the Roripaugh Ranch development created increased permit activity in FY2018-19. • Intergovernmental Revenues ($8,503,309) are projected to increase by 4.1% due to the increases expected in Property Tax In Lieu of Vehicle License Fees which is driven by increasing property values within the City. • Operating Transfers In ($3,151,887) represents funds deposited into Special Revenue Funds that are transferred into the General Fund to cover eligible expenditures. The Gas Tax Fund is anticipated to transfer $2,956,887 to be spent on street and road maintenance. The Supplemental Law Enforcement Services Fund is anticipated to transfer $195,000 to supplement the Police Department budget. • Operating Transfers In - Measure S ($5,735,418) will continue to fund 11 new Police Officers and staffing for Fire Station No. 95. General Fund Expenditure Highlights Property Tax 11% `Prop. Tax in Lieu of / VLF 11% Fiscal Year 2019-20 Franchise Fees 4% General Fund Revenue TOT 4% Measure C 2% `Licenses/Permits Sales Tax 5% 46% Measure S \ 7% \ Transfers In Other `Reimbursements 4% 2% 4% The largest expenditure of the General Fund is Public Safety, which has grown from 56% of total expenditures in the prior fiscal year, to 58% in Fiscal Year 2019-20. In accordance with the Measure S ballot language and City Council appropriation guidelines, the City has invested heavily in Public Safety over the past two years and continues to hold Public Safety as its highest priority. A total of $5.8 million, or 19%, of Measure S revenue is dedicated to Public Safety expenditures for FY2019-20 including the funding of the following: 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 11 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 w Annual Operating Budget The H�� o€ 4z4aero .Gail • Eleven Sworn Police Officers ($3.7 million) • Fire Station No. 95 Staffing ($1.7 million) • The funding for the future replacement Fire Ladder Truck and fire safety vehicles ($170,390) • The operations and maintenance of the Citywide Surveillance Camera system ($160,000) In addition to the ongoing Measure S-funded Public Safety expenditures, the Police Department will maintain 112 sworn officers and the Fire Department will provide four firefighter personnel per engine at all five Fire Stations. General Fund Operating Expenditures totals $78,148,553, which represents a 3.8% increase over the prior fiscal year. The majority of the increase is reflected in the two Public Safety departments, as noted below: • Police ($34,860,437) is increasing by 5.6% over the prior year, due to a projected 5% increase in the contract rates charged by the County to account for increased CalPERS pension costs and potential labor increases resulting from ongoing union negotiations. • Fire ($10,260,935) is increasing by 7.2% due to the anticipated increase in the contract rates charged by CalFire and Riverside County. The Total Fire Contract of $18 million is offset by the Structural Fire Tax Credit of $8.7 million. • Non -Safety Departments ($33,027,181) is increasing by 1.0% primarily due to the addition of 1.75 Full -Time Equivalent authorized positions in the Public Works Department and the City Manager's Office. Additionally, in accordance with the City's labor agreements, a 3% cost of living adjustment (COLA) is included for all employees, effective July 1, 2019. • Non -Departmental ($1,783,013) reflects a 6.6% decrease due to the slight decrease in the deposit into the Retiree Medical Contribution. The deposit exceeds the required amount in order to increase the City's funded -status of this trust fund and reduce future years' required contributions. Operating Transfers Out & One -Time Payments This category of expenditures reflects funds that are transferred to other funds, such as the CIP and Debt Service Funds. A total of $642,077 is being transferred to fund two Capital Projects: $200,000 for the I- 15 Congestion Relief project, to leverage funds received from CalTrans in order to help mitigate traffic on 1-15 Freeway; and $442,077 is being transferred to fund a new sidewalk on DLR Drive. A total of 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 IF, City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 w Annual Operating Budget The H�� o€ 4z4aero .Gail 6 $2,075,512 will be transferred to the Debt Service Fund for the annual Civic Center Lease payment, and $555,807 for the Debt Service on the Margarita Recreation Center renovation. Fund Balance & Reserves As noted above, the Ending Fund Balance, as of June 30, 2020 is projected to be $26,476,568, with the Reserve for Economic Uncertainty fully funded at $15,629,711, which represents 20% of General Fund Expenditures. Additionally, the Secondary Reserve, set at 5% of General Fund Expenditures, is fully - funded at $3,907,428. After Fund Balance assignments for future year expenditures, the remaining available fund balance totals $6,479,125. MEASURE S FUND With the approval of a one -cent transactions and use tax measure in November 2016, a new fund was established to account for this new revenue source and enhance budgetary accountability of Measure S expenditures. Fiscal Year 2019-20 Measure S revenue is conservatively projected to increase 2% over the prior year, to a total of $27,784,000. In accordance with the Council's approved spending guidelines, Measure S revenue is to be appropriated in the following order: 1. Public Safety 2. Asset Management 3. Capital Improvement Projects 4. General Services Public Safety (19%) The Proposed Budget includes $5,816,879 of Measure S funding dedicated to Public Safety, for the continued funding of 11 Sworn Police Officers and Fire staffing for Fire Station No. 95 which opened January 1, 2018. Additionally, Measure S will fund the future replacement of public safety vehicles and the operating costs of the Citywide Surveillance Camera system. Measure S - FY19-20 Appropriations $27,784,000 Capital Projects $13,109,728 42% Asset Management/Investment (10%) As noted in Council's appropriation guidelines for Measure S, ensuring adequate reserves are set - aside for the future replacement of City -owned assets is critical to the long-term viability of the City's operations. As such, the Proposed Budget includes contributions towards several Replacement Reserve Funds, including: 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 13 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget • Vehicle Replacement Reserve - $500,000 • Technology Replacement Reserve - $500,000 • Facilities Replacement Reserve - $500,000 • Street Maintenance Reserve - $1,500,000 As the City finalizes the Replacement Schedule for each category of assets noted above, the benefitting departments will also deposit funds into the reserve accounts to create adequate funding levels to purchase replacement assets in future Operating Budgets. Capital Improvement Program (42%) The Proposed Budget includes $13,109,728 of Measure S revenue allocated to fund 54 separate CIP projects. The influx on Measure S funding has allowed the City to leverage other funding sources, such as Development Impact Fees and various Grant funds, to complete projects in a more timely manner. Major Projects for FY2019-20 include: • Bike Lane and Trail Program at Temecula Creek South Side Trail - $571,000 to augment Development Impact Fee funds and AB2766 funds to install new gates, pave and stripe an existing maintenance road for a Class 1 Trail that parallels Temecula Creek. • Citywide Drainage Master Plan - $720,000 to fund a new project to develop a study of the City's drainage courses and provide a higher level of flood protection. • Citywide Financial System Upgrade - $613,184 to augment Technology Replacement funds necessary to upgrade the City's nearly 20-year old Financial System. • Citywide Streetlight Acquisition and LED Conversion - $800,000 to add funding allocated in the prior year for the purchase of the Southern California Edison owned streetlights within the City limits and retrofit to a more efficient Light Emitting Diode (LED) lighting system. • Citywide Surveillance Cameras - $720,347 to augment Development Impact Fees and funding allocated in the prior year to fund a new Surveillance Camera network covering City -owned facilities and traffic signals. • Community Recreation Center (CRC) Renovation - $500,000 to provide initial funding for the design of a rehabilitation, improvement and reconfiguration of the CRC facility. • Eagle Soar Splash Pad Control System Renovation - $300,000 to provide funding for the updating of the splash pad control system to meet current Health & Safety requirements. • French Valley Parkway/1-15 Over -Crossing and Interchange Improvements -Phase II - $1,971,845 — to provide funding for the right-of-way acquisition associated with this highly anticipated project. • Margarita Recreation Center - $720,000 to augment funding allocated in the prior year to fully - fund the construction of a new recreation center in Margarita Community Park. • Park Restroom Expansion, Renovations and ADA Improvements - $780,000 to augment funding allocated in a prior year for the renovation and installation of new restroom facilities at various parks throughout the City. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 14 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget • Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail Extension and Interconnect - $957,709 to augment grant funding allocated in a prior year for the design and construction of the extension of the existing trail from Ynez Road to the Murrieta Creek Multi -Purpose Trail. General Services (29%) The Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) has historically been funded with voter -approved Measure C funding and program -related revenue. Measure S funding is used to augment Measure C, in order to maintain the award -winning programs, activities and events TCSD provides to the citizenry. • TCSD Operations contribution - $7,989,182 • Library contribution - $921,203 • Service Level B — Residential Streetlights - $71,037 • Enhanced Custodial Services - $78,539 The Ending Fund Balance within the Measure S Fund is projected to be $1,670,169, which will carry - forward to the ensuing fiscal year. MAJOR SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Special Revenue Funds are used to account for activities paid for by taxes or other designated revenue sources that have specific limitations on use according to law. The City has eleven Special Revenue Funds. The major Special Revenue funds are highlighted below. Fund 100 - Gas Tax: Gas Tax revenue is projected to be $2,956,887, which reflects an increase of 23% due to higher volumes of gasoline sales over the prior year. These funds are transferred to the General Fund to support street and road maintenance. Fund 102 — Road Maintenance Rehabilitation Account (RMRA): Per the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 (SB1-Beall), increased gas tax and vehicle registration fees were imposed to fund street and road projects and other transportation uses Statewide. RMRA revenue is projected to be $1,875,831 for FY2019-20, to be allocated to the Pavement Rehabilitation Capital Improvement Project. Fund 103 — Street Maintenance Fund: This fund was established in FY2018-19 to accumulate resources for the future replacement of streets and roads throughout the City. Funding of $1.5 million from Measure S is programmed for Fiscal Year 2019-20. Fund 120 — Development Impact Fees: DIF revenue is projected to be $6,204,021, which reflects an increase of 34%. DIF revenue varies from year-to-year as it is based on anticipated development projects. The majority of DIF Revenues are transferred to the CIP to fund capital projects. Fund 125 — Public, Education & Government (PEG): PEG Fund revenues are received from local cable operators for the sole purpose of supporting the access facilities within the City. PEG Revenues are projected to be $214,723, which will be spent on various technology equipment used to support the broadcast of City Council meetings and events. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 15 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Fund 140 — Community Development Block Grant (CDBG): CDBG revenue is projected to be $559,111, which reflects the reimbursement for operations and Capital projects expected to be completed during the fiscal year. Fund 170 — Measure A: Measure A revenue is projected to be $3,251,000, which reflects a 0.2% increase over the prior year. This revenue is restricted for use on local streets and roads, and is programmed to support street and road maintenance. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Internal Service Funds are used to account for the funding of goods and services provided by one department to other benefitting departments on a cost -reimbursement basis. Additionally, the City maintains several Replacement Funds designed to accumulate resources for the future replacement of City equipment, technology and facilities. Fund 300 — Insurance: Projected expenses total $1,026,259, which covers the cost of administering the City's liability and property insurance programs. The projected Fund Balance is $621,999, which exceeds the desired balance of $450,000. Fund 305 — Workers' Compensation: Projected expenses total $255,779, which covers the cost of administering the City's self -insured Workers' Compensation program. The projected Fund Balance is $1,759,398, which exceeds the desired balance of $1.5 million. Fund 310 — Vehicles and Equipment: Projected expenses total $380,000 to replace several vehicles and heavy equipment that have reached the end of their useful life. The projected Fund Balance is $3,783,659. Fund 320 — Information Technology: Projected expenses total $4,112,021, which provides for the management of the City's computer and telephone systems. The projected Fund Balance is $488,092. Fund 325 — Technology Replacement: Projected expenses total $1,138,534 for the replacement of technology -related equipment that has surpassed its useful life, including an upgrade to the City's financial software system. The projected Fund Balance is $1,635,145. Fund 330 — Support Services: Projected expenses total $413,551, which provides for the management of the City's central receptionist, printing and mail activities. The projected Fund Balance is $4,170. Fund 335 — Support Services Replacement: Projected expenses total $50,000, which provides for the replacement of the City's duplicating machines. The projected Fund Balance is $435,814. Fund 340 — Facilities: Projected expenses total $1,359,094, which provide for the operations and maintenance of the City's buildings and parking structure. The projected Fund Balance is $508,564. Fund 350 — Facility Replacement: Projected expenses total $201,714, which provide for the replacement of equipment, systems and fixtures within City -owned facilities. The projected Fund Balance is $388,335. 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 ID City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget SUCCESSOR AGENCY TO THE REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY (SARDA) Fund 380 — SARDA: Projected expenses total $7,530,321, which reflects an increase of $10,649 in accordance with the debt service schedule on the outstanding Redevelopment Agency Tax Allocation Bonds. TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT (TCSD) The Temecula Community Services District was established as an assessment district to provide a comprehensive neighborhood and community park system, as well as a complement of recreational and cultural programs and events. Combined revenue for TCSD totals $24,461,642, which reflects an increase of 11.3% due primarily to the contributions from the Measure S Fund to fill the funding gap in the TCSD Operations Fund, as well as an increase in Service Level D — Refuse/Recycling Fund, due to the "extra -ordinary" charge imposed by CR&R to compensate for market constraints on recycled products. Combined expenditures total $24,807,774, which reflects an increase of 7.0% due to higher costs in the TCSD Operations Fund as a result of the 3% cost of living adjustment provided to all employees, the reclassification of three employees, and increased allocations from the Information Technology department due to a higher number of computer devices than in the prior year. Expenditures in Service Level D — Refuse/Recycling Fund also increase, due to the aforementioned "extra -ordinary" charge. As noted in the adjacent chart, TCSD's Special Tax (Measure C) funds $240.00 approximately 33% of the District's Parks and Recreation budget. The $200.00 remaining 67% comes from Measure S $160.00 and programmatic revenues. $120.00 $80.00 Additionally, Measure S contributes to the funding of the Library Fund $40.00 ($921,203) and Service Level B — $000 Residential Streetlight Fund ($71,037). TCSD Per Capita Funding CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (CIP) The City's five-year Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is presented to the City Council under separate cover. This program provides a five-year plan for capital improvements that is updated annually to ensure compliance with the program. The impact of capital projects on maintenance and operating costs were taken into consideration in the development of the operating budget. Circulation, infrastructure, parks, affordable housing, and other various projects are identified in the CIP budget. Overall, the Proposed Fiscal Years 2020-24 CIP includes 68 separate projects with total cost to complete estimated at $435,270,888, as outlined in the table below. Revenue from various identified sources for the Five -Year Capital Improvement Program is projected to be $334,305,104. This amount includes a pending $50 million INFRA grant to fund the French Valley Parkway Phase II project. Staff is aggressively 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 17 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget pursuing this vital funding source. The City of Temecula's CIP is a project planning and delivery document which includes several projects with unidentified funding sources in the third, fourth, and fifth years of the five-year program, totaling $102,797,737. The City is continually exploring and applying for federal, state and regional funding opportunities to enable the delivery of these currently unfunded projects. The five-year CIP is updated annually and newly secured revenues are programmed toward prioritized projects that may be shown as unfunded at this time. Type of Project Number of Projects Cost of Projects Circulation 22 $345,956,136 Infrastructure/ Other 34 61,363,635 Parks and Recreation 11 15,097,397 SARDA/ Housing TOTAL 1 12,853,720 2019-20 AUTHORIZED STAFFING RPM Pr Total authorized Full Time Equivalent (FTE) positions total 176.45 authorized positions, which reflects an increase of 4.75 positions compared to the prior year. Two of the authorized positions (Office Specialist and Community Services Manager) are associated with the Margarita Recreation Center and will remain unfunded until the facility has been rehabilitated. The following positions have been added to the list of Authorized Positions: • Office Aide III (Part-time) — City Manager's Office • Office Specialist II — Public Works-CIP Department • IT Technician I (Media) — Information Technology Department • Management Aide I — TCSD Human Services Department • Park Ranger I — TCSD Park Rangers Department Additionally, the FY2019-20 Operating Budget includes a 3% cost of living adjustment for all employees and the reclassification of 6 positions, per the provisions of the City's labor agreements. Total Authorized Positions total 176.45, which remains below the peak in 2007-08 by 34.3 positions. In addition to the Authorized Positions, the City employs a significant number of part- time, non-benefitted Project employees, primarily to assist with the multitude of programs offered by the Temecula Community Services District. For FY2019-20, an estimated 61.5 full-time equivalent (FTE) will be hired as seasonal and part-time support. kulhorired ftAiu. 2sao m0 2sau iaa0 50.0 City of Temecula Authorized Positions Trend 1995 - 2020 General Fund Budget S9u,000000 seB,0000w $70,0001000 $KOD01 oo s5RODDIM $40,�. 0 $3goog000 $10, o ,000 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 18 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 w Annual Operating Budget The H�� o€ 4z4aero .Gail Public Safety personnel is supplied through contracts with Riverside County and CalFire. A total of 112 Sworn Police Officers and 17 Community Service Officers are included in the Police Budget, and a total of 71 Fire personnel are reflected in the Fire Department Budget for FY2019-20. 2019-20 BUDGET POLICIES Two new Budget Policies are recommended to be added in FY2019-20, including the following: • XIII: Signature Delegation Policy — to provide the City Manager the ability to delegate his signature authority for certain contracts and agreements to Executive Staff members and the Purchasing Manager, in order to expedite the procurement process. Additionally, this policy delegates negotiating authority for personal injury and property damage settlements to the Risk Manager, up to $8,000. XV: Emergency Appropriation Policy — to authorize the City Manager to appropriate budgetary funds for the emergency purchase of goods and services to address and respond to emergencies. CONCLUSION In conclusion, the City is in a strong fiscal position with the General Fund balanced and all reserves fully - funded not only in Fiscal Year 2019-20, but throughout the ensuing five-year period. I would like to express my appreciation to the City Council for providing the direction and support crucial to achieving the City's goals. I would also like to recognize the contributions of the City staff for not only creating a successful operating budget, but also for their commitment to providing top quality services to all who live, work and play in Temecula. I would like to give special thanks to: Greg Butler, Assistant City Manager, Jennifer Hennessy, Director of Finance; Rudy Graciano, Fiscal Services Manager; Pascale Brown, Fiscal Services Manager; and Patricia Hawk, Budget Manager for their long hours and dedication to the City and this budget process. Sincerely, Aaron Adams City Manager 41000 Main Street, Temecula, CA 92590 ♦ Phone (951) 694-6444 ♦ Facsimile (951) 694-6479 19 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIRECTORY EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT: City Manager...................................................................................... Aaron Adams Assistant City Manager..........................................................................Greg Butler CityClerk..................................................................................................RandiJohl City Attorney................................................................................ Peter M. Thorson Director of Finance..................................................................... Jennifer Hennessy Director of Community Development ................................................ Luke Watson Director of Public Works/City Engineer .......................................... Patrick Thomas Director of Community Services .......................................................Kevin Hawkins Director of Information Systems ......................................................Michael Heslin Human Resources Manager............................................................... Isaac Garibay Chief of Police.................................................................................. Lisa McConnell FireChief................................................................................................. Jodie Gray CITY OF TEMECULA BUDGET TEAM: Director of Finance..................................................................... Jennifer Hennessy Fiscal Services Manager....................................................................Rudy Graciano Fiscal Services Manager....................................................................Pascale Brown Budget Manager................................................................................... Tricia Hawk Annual Operating Budget 20 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY ORGANIZATIONAL CHART Citizens of Temecula City Council City Attorney i i I Commissions City Manager City Clerk Community Development Information Finance Technology/Support Services Public Works Community Services Human Resources Police / Fire* [Contract] Economic I I I Emergency Development Management *Police and Fire services are contracted through Riverside County. Annual Operating Budget 21 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the City of Temecula is to maintain a safe, secure, clean, healthy, and orderly community; to balance the utilization of open space, parks, trail facilities, quality jobs, public transportation, diverse housing, and adequate infrastructure; and to enhance and revitalize historic areas. The City will encourage programs for all age groups, utilize its human resources, and preserve its natural resources while stimulating technology, promoting commerce, and utilizing sound fiscal policy. It is the City Council's resolve that this mission will instill a sense of pride and accomplishment in its citizens and that the City will be known as a progressive, innovative, balanced, and environmentally sensitive community. VALUE STATEMENT irTEAMWORK among all employees EENHANCEMENT of the work environment through open lines of communication ImMUTUAL respect of others EEDUCATION of employees and citizens about the operations and accomplishments of the City CCUSTOMER service is our most important product VUNLIMITED potential for continued personal growth and organizational development LLEADERSHIP in local government AASSUMING 100% responsibility for projects and assignments Annual Operating Budget 22 —(e 0Z �-4 CITYWIDE LONG TERM GOALS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CORE VALUES: The Quality of Life Master Plan (QLMP) provides the framework for the City's Strategic Budgeting activities. The City Council has set priorities and guided staff in developing six (6) core values upon which to focus time and resources (as identified in the QLIVIP). These areas include: 1. Healthy and Livable City 2. Economic Prosperity 3. A Safe and Prepared Community 4. A Sustainable City 5. Transportation Mobility and Connectivity 6. Accountable and Responsive City Government CITYWIDE LONG TERM GOALS: City of Temecula Executive Staff met during the budget process to develop Citywide Long Term Goals based on the Core Values. These goals serve as a five year roadmap for departments in developing their budgets and Short Term Objectives for the upcoming fiscal year. 1. Healthy and Livable City: • Promote high quality parks and recreation programs and cultural services • Provide signature special events and cultural opportunities • Attract high quality medical facilities • Provide housing for all income types in the community • Maintain a safe and family oriented environment • Foster an "educated community" through a wide variety of opportunities • Maintain the natural beauty of the community 2. Economic Prosperity: • Continue to pursue high quality employment opportunities for Temecula residents • Create a business friendly regulatory environment • Promote a jobs/housing balance • Improve delivery of technology services to attract businesses • Continue to promote the Temecula Valley as a destination • Fill gaps and diversify market sectors that increase sales tax revenue • Retention and expansion of existing businesses 3. A Safe and Prepared Community • Remain within the federal ranking of the top 25 safest cities • Encourage community participation in public safety and emergency preparedness • Promote high quality animal control services • Continue to aggressively mitigate graffiti and vandalism • Utilize social media to keep the community informed and involved • Proactively address traffic improvements • Minimize the impact to life, property, and the environment from natural hazards and emergency situations Annual Operating Budget 23 —(e 0Z �-4 CITYWIDE LONG TERM GOALS (continued) 4. A Sustainable City City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget • Continue to reduce solid waste diversion to landfills • Promote and encourage mixed use infill developments along major transportation corridors • Preserve and promote open space • Encourage alternative transportation options • Promote a "walkable" community • Promote energy efficient operations and development • Actively maintain and preserve city assets and infrastructure 5. Transportation Mobility and Connectivity • Utilize effective traffic enforcement, traffic monitoring, and planning processes to ensure the safety of Temecula motorists • Continue to maintain local roads and streets • Connect the city through a series of trails and walkways • Identify a location and develop a multi modal transit center • Connect major commercial districts through circulation improvements 6. Accountable and Responsive City Government • Provide transparency to the public for all government transactions • Foster an organizational structure that aligns resources with demands • Diversify the city's revenue base to ensure stability in any economic climate • Promote community involvement • Maintain overall sound fiscal policies to ensure long term solvency • Provide highly functional and sustainable city facilities and infrastructure SHORT TERM OBJECTIVES: In order to ensure meaningful financial priorities, each department develops Short Term Objectives rooted in the Citywide Long Term Goals and the Core Values. Each Short Term Objective is a department's incremental step toward achieving the overall Citywide Long Term Goals. Within the Departmental Information Section of this budget, each Department provides their Short Term Objectives for the ensuing fiscal year. Annual Operating Budget 24 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget GOVERNMENT FINANCE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION AWARD The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented an award of Distinguished Budget Presentation to the City of Temecula for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2018. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets programs criteria as policy document, operations guide, financial plan, and communication device. The award is valid for a period of one year only. The City of Temecula has received this award every year since 2001. We believe our current budget continues to conform to program requirements and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award. (D GOVERNMENT FINANCE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION Distinguished Budget Presentation Award PRESENTED TO City of Temecula California For the Fiscal Year Beginning July 1, 2018 OA-4�7 P. 7 nt':.0 Executive Director Annual Operating Budget 25 i.I City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget California Society of Municipal Finance Officers Award CaCfbmia Society of -AfunicipaCFinance Officers Certificate ofA ward Excellence Award for Fiscal Year 2018-2019 Operating Budget Presented to the City of Temecula For meeting the criteria established to achieve the C SMFO Excellence Award for Budgeting. December 19, 2018 Margaret Moggia Sara Roush, Chair CSMFO President Recognition Conanittee Dedicated Excellence in Municipal l:inancial Reporting The California Society of Municipal Finance Officers (CSMFO) recognizes those entities with highly professional budget documents with two levels of certificates. The first level is the "Meritorious Budget Award," which requires the entity to meet a very specific list of criteria defined by CSMFO. The second level is the "Operating Budget Excellence Award," which requires that the organization meet even higher criteria which effectively enhances the usability of the document. In preparing the ensuing Fiscal Year budget, staff has once again followed CSMFO's criteria. This document will be submitted to the CSMFO for the Fiscal Year 2019-20 budget award program. Annual Operating Budget 26 Demo�ra�hics Fiscal Highlights Median Housing Values 2018: $487,500 err 2019: $475,000 Population 2018: 113,181 2019: 113,826 13t" Safest City in US Business Insider, Dec. 1, 2017 Median Age 35.3 Number of Jobs 55,100 av Avg. Household Income $116,464 ` M 3.6% General Fund Operating Revenue: $80,127,628 Operating Expenditures: $78,148,553 Fund Balance: $26,476,568 Capital Improvement Program $435,270,888 ` � 68 Projects 54,659 176.5 112 41 # of Parks 322 Miles of Streets 71 Fire Personnel Ranked loth Education K-12 Schools: 32*'� TVUSD Test Scores rank �== =- Students: 27,991 loth in Riverside, Orange - -� —� Teachers: 1,392 and San Diego Counties ---- *12 schools recognized as "California Distinguished Schools" NAN of Life �!j 1�t/, re ac�� �� Qo�S InterPsh�'00, t ���� ��� G�� �atie��P Qro9�a�s unities quat�os s Recreation/Classes 4 PSPo�s\09Ue Family Friendly Human Services 8.75% Sales Tax Rate $724M+ Tourism .1ndustry-��A General Law City Ift ... Council -Manager Form. of Government Incorporated December 1, 1989 �r 26% Percentage of residents with a College Degree Local Economy Annual Sales Tax Revenue Promenade Mall Area = $10.9M Motor Car Parkway = $6.3M Business Park = $4.OM Temecula Pkwy = $4.5M Regional Shopping = $5.6M Old Town Temecula = $03M City Motto: "Old Traditions, New Opportunities" 27 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget UNDERSTANDING THE BUDGET DOCUMENT This budget document provides the public with concise and readable information about City government, and displays the objectives and budget of the City of Temecula for the Fiscal Year 2019-20. The budget document is divided into the following sections: INTRODUCTION The budget document begins with the transmittal letter by the City Manager, which provides an overview of the Fiscal Year 2019-20 Operating Budget by highlighting programs, major projects and changes in revenue and expenditure allocations for the upcoming fiscal year. There is an analysis of the impact of legislation on the City budget, as well as recent economic indicators. The introduction section details Temecula's Mission and Value Statements. The Long Term Goals and Objectives provide further detail into the policies and the goals and objectives which drive the budget process. These are linked to each Department's long term goals and objectives. The City Directory outlines the Executive Management and Budget Team staff members who work on a daily basis implementing the goals and strategies outlined in the Annual Operating Budget. The Citywide Organization Chart displays City Departments and reporting structure. This section also includes copies of budget awards for the previous fiscal year budgets. GUIDE TO THE BUDGET DOCUMENT In addition to this document, the Guide to the Budget Document Section contains the Budgetary Fund Structure, which provides a quick graphic overview of the City's budgetary fund structure and includes all funds that are subject to appropriation. The Description of Funds provides a narrative description of these funds which are graphically depicted in the Fund Use by Department section. The Summary of Accounting Principles explains the basis of accounting or all appropriated funds. The Budget Process and Budget Calendar describe the City's process for preparing this year's Annual Operating Budget. FIVE YEAR FORECAST This section outlines the City of Temecula's five year strategic planning tool which allows the City to project the impacts of proposed programs, operating costs, and capital improvement projects in the future. This forecast assists in long range planning and policy development by ensuring that resources will be available to meet the needs of our community into the future. FINANCIAL SUMMARIES The Financial Summaries section provides a complete overview and analysis of the total resources budgeted by the organization. There is detail on each specific fund, fund balance changes, and a complete budget picture for the current and previous two fiscal years. This section includes summaries of revenues and expenditures for all appropriated Operating Budget funds. Fund balance, revenue and expenditure changes are explained in this section as well. Historical and categorical data are provided for comparative purposes. Annual Operating Budget 29 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget UNDERSTANDING THE BUDGET DOCUMENT (continued) DEPARTMENTAL INFORMATION The Department Information Section includes the department/program description, mission statements, and quantifiable short term objectives and performance measures for each operating program in the General Fund, Temecula Community Services District, and Internal Service Funds. Budget information is organized by department and/or cost center and a short narrative is provided which analyzes expenditure changes from the previous year. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM This section summarizes the budgeted capital expenditures which are further detailed in the separate Capital Improvement Budget. This section provides a summary of all projected Capital Improvement revenues and descriptions of those sources, as well as a description of all Capital Improvement Program projects. This section also includes forecasts of operating costs associated with Capital Improvement projects which have been included as part of the operating budget. BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES The General Financial policies outline the City's policies related to budget preparation, staffing, debt management, fund/district purposes and financial reporting requirements. APPENDIX This section provides supplemental financial statistical information such as, property tax information, and comparative City information. There is also a glossary of acronyms and terms to guide the reviewer in understanding this document. Additional information on the City's fiscal affairs is available in the following documents which are available at: http://temecuIaca.gov/309/Financia1-Reports Quarterly Financial Statements ❖ Comprehensive Annual Financial Report For further information, please contact the Temecula Finance Department at (951) 694-6430. Annual Operating Budget 30 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGETARY FUND STRUCTURE GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS • General (Fund 001) GENERAL FUNDS • Measure S (Fund 002) • Gas Tax (Fund 100) SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS • Road Maintenance Rehabilitation Account (RMRA) (Fund 102) • Street Maintenance (Fund 103) • NPDES In Lieu Fees (Fund 105) • Development Impact Fees (DIF) (Fund 120) • Public, Education & Government (PEG) Fees (Fund 125) • Community Development Block Grant (Fund 140) • Temecula Energy Efficiency Asset Management (Fund 145) • AB 2766 Motor Vehicle Subvention (Fund 150) • Supplemental Law Enforcement Services (Fund 160) • Temecula Major Crimes Reward Fund (Fund 161) • Affordable Housing (Fund 165) • Measure A (Fund 170) • Public Art (Fund 198) TEMECULA COMMUNITY • Parks and Recreation Citywide Operations (Fund 190) SERVICES (TCSD) FUNDS •Service Level B -Street Lighting (Fund 192) • Service Level C - Landscape/Slope Maintenance (Fund 501-530) • Service Level D - Refuse and Recycling (Fund 194) • Service Level R - Street/Road Maintenance (Fund 195) • Service Level L - Harveston Lake Park Maintenance (Fund 196) • Library (Fund 197) DEBT SERVICE FUND • 2011 Financing Lease for Civic Center (Fund 395) • Capital Financing (Fund 396) • Capital Improvement Fund* (Fund 210) C AL PROJECTS FUNDS . Community Facilities District Funds* (Fund 273-278) Annual Operating Budget 31 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGETARY FUND STRUCTURE (continued) PROPRIETARY FUNDS C ERNAL SERVICES NDS 4 1 PRIVATE - PURPOSE TRUST FUNDS • Insurance (Fund 300) • Workers' Compensation (Fund 305) • Vehicle and Equipment (Fund 310) • Information Technology (Fund 320) • Technology Replacement (Fund 325) • Support Services (Fund 330) • Support Services Replacement (Fund 335) • Facilities (Fund 340) • Facilities Replacement (Fund 350) • Successor Agency to the Redevelopment Agency (SARDA) Debt Service (Fund 380) *Denotes funds which are subject to appropriation and included in audited financial statements, but are summarized and adopted separately and/or as part of the Capital Improvement Program budget. Annual Operating Budget 32 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DESCRIPTION OF FUNDS The City of Temecula revenues and expenditures are accounted for in a series of funds. Each fund is an autonomous accounting entity, established in accordance with legal and professional accounting standards. Funds are used to segregate the various financial activities of a governmental entity and to demonstrate compliance with specific regulations, restrictions or limitations, (i.e., demonstrating that restricted revenues are spent only for allowed purposes). Funds used in government are classified into three broad categories: governmental, proprietary and fiduciary. Governmental funds include activities usually associated with the operations of a typical state or local government (public safety, general government activities, etc.). Proprietary funds are used in government to account for activities often found in the private sector (utilities, stadiums, and golf courses are prime examples). Fiduciary funds are utilized in situations where the government is acting in a fiduciary capacity as a trustee or agent. The appropriated funds utilized by the City of Temecula, governmental, fiduciary, and proprietary, are detailed below. The City of Temecula details the Capital Improvement Funds in a separate document, although the Capital Improvement program and its operating impacts are outlined in this budget document in the Capital Improvement Program section. ACCOUNTING BASIS All governmental funds are accounted for and budgeted using the modified accrual basis of accounting. Their revenues are recognized when they become "measurable" and "available." Revenues are considered measurable when they are reasonably estimable. Revenues are considered available when they will be collected either during the current period or soon enough after the end of the period to pay current year liabilities. The primary revenue sources susceptible to accrual are property and sales taxes, franchise fees, transient occupancytaxes, investment income, fines and forfeitures collected by County courts, and motor vehicle -in -lieu subventions. Expenditures are generally recognized under the modified accrual basis of accounting when the related fund liability is incurred. An exception to this general rule is principal and interest due on general long- term debt which is recognized when due. Proprietary and Fiduciary funds are accounted for and budgeted using the full accrual basis of accounting, i.e., revenues are recognized in the period earned and expenses are recognized in the period incurred. Encumbrance accounting, under which purchase orders, contracts, and other commitments for the expenditure of funds are recorded in order to reserve that portion of the applicable appropriation, is employed in the governmental funds. Outstanding encumbrances at the end of the fiscal year are recorded as reservation of fund balance since the commitments will be paid in the subsequent year. Encumbrances do not constitute expenditures or liabilities. GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS Governmental Funds: Governmental Funds are used to account for most governmental functions and focus on the near -term inflows and outflows of spendable resources. Annual Operating Budget 33 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DESCRIPTION OF FUNDS (continued) General Fund (001) - This is the general operating fund for the City, utilized to account for all resources not required to be accounted for in another fund. Measure S Fund (002) - This fund is used to track the uses of the one -cent Transactions Use Tax, known as Measure S, approved by Temecula voters on November 8, 2016. This revenue source is discretionary and is to be used in accordance with the Council's Appropriation Guidelines, noted in the City's Budget and Fiscal Policies. Special Revenue Funds: Special Revenue Funds are used to account for specific resources that are legally restricted to expenditure for particular purposes. Gas Tax Fund (100) — The City maintains this fund to account for the Highway User's Tax revenues received from the State of California under Sections 2013, 2105, 2107, and 2107.5 of the Streets and Highways Code. Road Maintenance Rehabilitation Account (RMRA) Fund (102) — This fund is to account for gasoline and vehicle taxes pursuant to the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 (SB1 Beall). Monies are collected by the State of California and allocated to local agencies for streets and roads projects and other transportation uses. Street Maintenance Fund (103) — This fund was established to accumulate resources for the future replacement of streets and roads throughout the City. NPDES In Lieu Fees Fund (105) —This fund was established to account for the collection of fees to fund, or partially fund, alternative compliance projects in -lieu of meeting certain requirements of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit onsite. Development Impact Fees Fund (120) — Used to account for activity generated and funded by development applications in order to offset the effect of development. Mitigation projects include infrastructure, fire protection, public facilities and services, libraries, roads, schools, parks, traffic signal mitigation and open space. This fund is appropriated through the Capital Improvement Program budget. Public, Education & Government (PEG) Fees Fund (125) — Public Education and Government Access programming is supported by the PEG fee that is assessed to each cable subscriber. According to state law, these funds must be used only for the production of PEG Access programming. Business Incubator Resource Fund (135) — This fund was set up to account for all activity at the City of Temecula Entrepreneur's Exchange Business Incubator. $150,000 was transferred from the General Fund in Fiscal Year 2012-13 to initially fund this activity. Beginning in Fiscal Year 2017-18, this fund will be dissolved and the Business Incubator activities will be reflected as a separate division within the General Fund's Economic Development department. Annual Operating Budget 34 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DESCRIPTION OF FUNDS (continued) Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Fund (140) — This fund is used to account for grants received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The grants are used for the redevelopment of a viable community by providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and expanding economic opportunities, principally for persons of Temecula Energy Efficiency Asset Management (TEEM) Fund (145) — This fund was created to capture energy efficiency rebates and reimbursements as well as expenditure savings resulting from energy efficiency projects completed at various City facilities. AB 2766 Motor Vehicle Subvention Fund (150) — This fund is used to account for State funds that are used to implement programs and projects that reduce air pollution from motor vehicles. This fund is used for Capital projects and to account for operational costs such as the Natural Gas operated Harveston Trolley, which provides free transportation within the Temecula business district. Supplemental Law Enforcement Services Fund (160) — The City maintains this fund to account for the Supplemental Law Enforcement Services (SLESF) monies which are exclusively expended to provide front line law enforcement services provided by the State of California. These monies supplement existing services and are unable to be used to supplant any existing funding for law enforcement services provided by the City. Temecula Major Crimes Reward Fund (161) — This fund was set up to account for a reward for information that leads to the capture and conviction of the person(s) responsible for the murder of Larry Robinson and Justin Triplett. The General Fund contributed $25,000 and the public can also contribute to this fund. Affordable Housing Fund (165) — The Affordable Housing fund contains the assets as well as loan and rental income from the former Redevelopment Agency which have been transferred to the City of Temecula. MeasureA Fund (170) —This fund was established to account for the City's share of the County of Riverside's additional one-half percent sales tax allocation. These monies are restricted for use on local streets and roads. Measure A was approved by the Riverside County voters originally in 1988 and was extended in 2002. The funds are administered by the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) and will continue to fund transportation improvements through 2039. Public Art Fund (198) —This fund was established pursuant to Temecula Municipal Code Section 5.08.040, whereby the fund serves as a depository for the fees paid in lieu of art as well as monetary donations for public art. The Public Art In Lieu fee is one -tenth of one percent of an eligible development project in excess of $100,000. Eligible uses of this fund include the design, acquisition, installation, improvement, maintenance and insurance of public artwork; offering of performing arts programs on City property for the community; and art education programs on City property for the community. Annual Operating Budget 35 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DESCRIPTION OF FUNDS (continued) Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) Funds (190-198, 501-530) — Upon incorporation of the City of Temecula, effective December 1, 1989, voters approved the formation of the Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) to provide specified services to properties within its jurisdiction. TCSD is a separate legal entity than the City and operates under the authority of Community Services District Law. Benefit assessments, and a special tax (Measure C) are charged to property owners within the District, are received to provide specified services identified below: ❖ Parks and Recreation - Facility operations and maintenance, community recreation programs ❖ Service Level "B" - Residential street lights ❖ Service Level "C" - Perimeter landscaping and slope maintenance ❖ Service Level "D" - Refuse collection, recycling, and street sweeping ❖ Service Level "R" - Street and road maintenance ❖ Service Level "L" - Harveston Lake Park maintenance ❖ Library Fund - Services at the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library on Pauba Road Debt Service Funds: Debt Service funds are used to account for the accumulation of resources and payment of all general long- term debt obligations of the City and related entities. 2011 Financing Lease for Civic Center (395) — This fund was established to account for the payment of interest and principal of the refunding of both the 2001 and 2008 Certificates of Participation (COPS). The 2001 COPS were originally issued to finance the construction of the Community Recreation Center and the 2008 COPS were originally issued to finance the construction of the Civic Center. Capital Financing (396)—This fund was established to account for the payments of interest and principal related to the financing of capital projects, including the acquisition of the City's streetlights from Southern California Edison. PROPRIETARY FUNDS Internal Service Funds: Internal Services Funds are used to account for the financing of goods or services by one department to other departments of the City on a cost reimbursement basis. Insurance (300) - This fund was established to fund and account for the City's liability and property insurance costs. Workers -'Compensation (305) -This fund was established to accumulate resources for Workers' Compensation liabilities. Vehicles and Equipment (310) - This fund was established to accumulate resources for the purchase of future replacement vehicles and equipment. Annual Operating Budget 36 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DESCRIPTION OF FUNDS (continued) Information Technology (320) - This fund was established to account for the City's Information Technology activities. Technology Replacement (325) - This fund was established to account for computer, software and telephone equipment and to accumulate resources for replacement of this equipment. Support Services (330) - This fund was established as a cost center for the City's central duplicating, printing, and mailing activities. Support Services Replacement (335) - This fund was established to account for the City's copy and duplicating equipment and to accumulate resources for replacement of this equipment. Facilities (340) - This fund was established to account for the cost of the Civic Center, Business Incubator, City Maintenance Facility, and Civic Center Parking Structure operations and maintenance. Facilities Replacement Fund (350) - This fund was established to accumulate resources for the future replacement of equipment, systems and fixtures within City -owned facilities. FIDUCIARY FUNDS Private -Purpose Trust Funds: Private -Purpose Trust Funds are used to account for resources held and administered by the reporting government when it is acting in a fiduciary capacity for other governments. Successor Agency to the Redevelopment Agency (SARDA) Debt Service Fund (380) — This fund is used to account for payment obligations of the successor agency as a result of the State's dissolution of Redevelopment Agencies. Annual Operating Budget CITY T ECULA 37 FUNDS AND DEPARTMENTS Quick Guide City of Temecula City Funds 001 General 002 Measure S 100 Gas Tax 102 Road Maintenance Rehabilitation Act (RMRA) 103 Street Maintenance Fund 105 NPDES In Lieu Fees 120 Development Impact Fees 125 Public, Education & Government (PEG) 135 Business Incubator Resource 140 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) 145 Temecula Energy Efficiency Asset Management 150 AB 2766 Motor Vehicle Subvention 160 Supplemental Law Enforcement Services 161 Temecula Major Crimes Reward Fund General Fund Departments 001.100 City Council 001.101 Community Support 001.110 City Manager 001.111 Economic Development 001.115 Emergency Management 001.120 City Clerk 001.130 City Attorney 001.140 Finance 001.150 Human Resources 001.161 Planning Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) TCSD Funds 190 TCSD Citywide Operations 192 Service Level B — Street Lighting 194 Service Level D — Refuse and Recycling TCSD Departments 190.180.999 General Operations 190.181.164 Senior Center Maintenance 190.181.999 Senior Center Operations 190.182.164 Community Rec Center Maintenance 190.182.999 Community Rec Center Operations 190.183.999 Special Events 190.184.164 Temecula Community Center Maint. 190.184.999 Temecula Community Center Ops. 190.185.164 History Museum Maintenance 190.185.999 History Museum Operations 190.186.164 Aquatics Maintenance 190.186.999 Aquatics Operations 190.187.999 Sports 190.188.164 Children's Museum Maintenance City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 165 Affordable Housing 170 Measure A 198 Public Art 300 Insurance 305 Workers' Compensation 310 Vehicles and Equipment 320 Information Technology 325 Technology Replacement 330 Support Services 335 Support Services Replacement 340 Facilities 350 Facilities Replacement 380 SARDA Debt Service 395 2011 Financing Lease 396 Capital Financing 001.162 Building & Safety 001.163 Land Development 001.164 Public Works 001.165 CIP Public Works 001.167 Parks Maintenance 001.170 Police 001.171 Fire 001.172 Animal Control 001.199 Non Departmental 195 Service Level R — Emergency Road Maintenance 196 Service Level L— Harveston Lake Park Maintenance 197 Library 501-530 Service Level C— Landscape/Slope Maintenance 190.188.999 Children's Museum Operations 190.189.164 Theater Maintenance 190.189.999 Theater Operations 190.190.999 Cultural Arts 190.194.999 Human Services 190.195.164 Margarita Recreation Center Maintenance 190.195.999 Margarita Recreation Center Operations 190.196.164 Jefferson Rec. Center Maintenance 190.196.999 Jefferson Rec. Center Operations 190.197.999 Contract Classes 190.198.999 Park Rangers 190.201.164 Responsible Compassion Maintenance 190.201.999 Responsible Compassion Annual Operating Budget 38 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget FUNDING SOURCES BY DEPARTMENT perating Fund Fund 001: General Fund * E o Ou v s - E om r E E ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 002: Measure S Fund * ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Special Revenue Funds Fund 100: Gas Tax ✓ Fund 102: Road Maintenance Rehab. Account (RMRA) ✓ Fund 103: Street Maintenance ✓ Fund 105: NPDES In Lieu Fees ✓ Fund 120: Development Impact Fees (DIF) Fund 125: Public, Education & Government (PEG) Fees ✓ Fund 135: Business Incubator Resource Fund 140: Community Development Block Grant ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 145: Temecula Energy Efficiency Asset Mgmt ✓ ✓ Fund 150: AB 2766 Motor Vehicle Subvention ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 160: Supplemental Law Enforcement Services ✓ Fund 161: Temecula Major Crimes Reward ✓ Fund 165: Affordable Housing * ✓ ✓ Fund 170: Measure A * ✓ ✓ Fund 198: Public Art ✓ ✓ Debt Service Fund Fund 395: 2011 Financing Lease ✓ • Fund 396: Capital Financing ✓ ✓ Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) Fund 190: Citywide Operations * ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 192: Service Level B - Street Lighting * ✓ Funds 501-530: Service Level C - Landscape/Slope Maint.* ✓ Fund 194: Service Level D - Refuse and Recycling * ✓ Fund 195: Service Level R - Road Maintenance * ✓ Fund 196: Service Level L- Harveston Lake Park Maint. * ✓ ✓ Fund 197: Library * ✓ ✓ ✓ Capital Pro'ects Fun Fund 210: Capital Improvement Fund Fund 273-278: Community Facilities District Funds i Successor Agency to the Temecula RDA (SARDA) Fund 380: Debt Service ✓ Internal Service Funds Fund 300: Insurance ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 305: Workers' Compensation ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 310: Vehicles and Equipment ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 320: Information Technology ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 325: Technology Replacement ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 330: Support Services ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 335: Support Services Replacement ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 340: Facilities ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fund 350: Facilities Replacement ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ * Denotes the Chy's Major Funds Annual Operating Budget 39 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET PROCESS The annual budget process begins in February of each year. The budget team, which includes the City Manager, Assistant City Manager, Finance Director, Fiscal Services Managers, and Budget Manager, reviews the fiscal policies and procedures and prepares five year projections for the General Fund, Measure S Fund and Temecula Community Services District. The budget team uses these projections to develop spending priorities and department expenditure targets for the upcoming fiscal year. In February, a Budget Kickoff Workshop is held with the City Manager, Department Directors, and Department Analysts. This workshop includes a briefing on the status of the current fiscal year budget, a review of the budget process calendar, the impacts of the current economic conditions, and a discussion of elements of the budget process. The budget preparation guidelines and department targets used in preparing department budget requests are distributed. A coordinated kickoff workshop ensures that the fiscal policies and priorities that guide expenditure considerations are incorporated into the proposed budget prior to formal submission to the community and the City Council. Preparation of budget requests includes comparative analysis of historic and current expenditure levels. Department revenue estimates are compiled from projections of activity for the upcoming fiscal year. The Executive Team, which consists of Department Directors and the City Manager, meets shortly after requests are submitted to outline and prioritize requests. This includes a review of the following: ❖ Expenditure requests above the established department target; ❖ Requests for new equipment (greater than $5,000) or vehicles; Requests for information technology; ❖ Personnel requests, including temporary personnel, and any proposed reclassifications. The budget team holds meetings with each department to discuss their budget requests and to obtain additional information to assist in the resolution of the requests. Following this review, department staff performs a final adjustment to their line item submissions. In May, a public City Council budget workshop is held to receive public comment and to review the components of the Proposed Budget and any modifications to fiscal policies, prior to formal consideration for adoption. Any changes based on this review are incorporated prior to adoption at the following City Council meeting, which occurs in early June. All appropriations lapse at year-end, except for those relating to encumbrances approved for carryover to the following fiscal year. The City Council has the legal authority to amend the budget at any time during the fiscal year. Budgetary controls are maintained to ensure compliance with the budget as approved by the City Council. Adjustments between departments or requests for additional funding require the approval of the City Council. As referenced in the Budget Resolution, the City Manager has the authority to make changes within departmental budgets. The level of budgetary control (that is, the level at which expenditures cannot legally exceed the appropriated amount) is at the department level. Annual Operating Budget 40 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET PROCESS (continued) The City has a formalized midyear budget review process which is used to update the appropriations and revenue projections halfway through the fiscal year. The City begins this process in December by analyzing revenue projections, service contracts, new City Council priorities, and the impacts of legislation from the State and Federal Government. This information is compiled into an updated five year projection. In early January, departments review their individual budgets to identify any savings or to request additional funds to meet the needs of new programs or spending priorities. The result is a final balanced budget document that ensures that sufficient funding is available to meet the updated objectives and priorities for the remainder of the fiscal year. This document is taken to the City Council for adoption in February. e: + d? 1ZZ, r Annual Operating Budget 41 j City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET PROCESS (continued) Process begins with Meeting with City Manager, City Manager and Executive Team analysis of prior year Finance Director and Budget brainstorm on longterm priorities Update calendar, standard forms and activity and update team to review prior year III for spending, revenue management, procedures, calculate budget targets of five year performance and identify projections upcoming budget goals and project priorities Deliverables to Departments • Report of Prior Year Spending Review City financial • Target (Not to Exceed) Amount Kickoff Meeting with Department policies, recommend List of Citywide Long Term Goals Heads and Department Analysts changes • Budget Calendar Create detailed expenditure and Meet with department staff to revenue projections develop annual objectives based on Citywide long term goals Deliverables from Departments • Revenue projections, expenditure requests • Over target requests • Request for Equipment/Vehicle Compile citywide budget requests • Information Technology Request and revenues for review • Project staffing request • Personnel changes • Department objectives and performance measures Less than $30,000 and intradepartmental City Manager approval Adjustment City Council approval Greater than 30 000 or interdepartmental City Manager and Executive Team review requests and set priorities for spending City Manager and Budget team meet with departments to further refine requests Public City Council workshop presentation to outline budget requests and policy recommendations to City Council and the community have any changes? Yes No Budget Requests, Revenues, Goals, Performance Measures, and Policiesyyg all adopted at one City Council meeting Final published budget document prepared for review by public and distributed on City website Departments review and adjust budgets throughout the year ❑ City Manager/Budget Team Executive Team Finance Staff Department Analysts Legend Annual Operating Budget 42 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget FISCAL YEAR 2019-20 Budget Calendar Date Item Responsible Department 1/23/19 Update General Fund and TCSD Revenue & Expenditure Five -Year Forecast Finance 2/4/19 Capital Improvement Program Kick -Off Meeting All Departments 2/20/19 Annual Operating Budget Kick -Off Meeting All Departments 3/4/19 CIP Project Requests due All Departments 3/18 — 3/22 AOB Review Meetings with ACM & Finance Director All Departments 4/1/19 Preparation of Internal Service Fund Allocations Finance 4/8/19 Department Narratives for AOB due All Departments 4/10/19 City Manager review of Operating Requests City Manager/Finance 4/15-4/19 CIP Review Meetings with ACM & Finance Director All Departments 4/16/19 Appendices due All Departments 4/19/19 Finalize Budget Policies City Manager/Finance 4/25/19 Public/Traffic Safety Commission review of CIP Public Works 5/13/19 Community Services Commission review of CIP TCSD 5/14/19 Strategic Finance Ad Hoc Subcommittee Meeting City Manager/Finance 5/10/19 CIP and AOB Document Distribution Finance 5/16/19 City Council Budget Workshop All Departments 6/5/19 Planning Commission review of CIP Community Development 6/11/19 City Council Meeting — Budget Adoption All Departments Annual Operating Budget 43 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget LONG RANGE FINANCIAL PROJECTION In addition to the Annual Operating Budget and Capital Improvement Program, the City of Temecula also prepares a Five -Year Financial Projection for the General Fund, Measure S Fund and Temecula Community Services District Funds. The long-range forecast serves as a strategic planning tool to help evaluate the City's ability to meet its long-term obligations. The benefit of long-range planning is to alert decision - makers of trends in time to implement changes, if necessary. REVENUE General Fund Revenue is projected by line item using a combination of known information and anticipated trends for the coming five year period. The City's Budget Team works in tandem with Community Development to identify future projects that could affect revenue levels, such as the addition of new housing developments and commercial establishments. The City also utilizes Sales and Property Tax consultants to assist with identifying statewide trends that may impact City revenues. General Fund Revenue Forecasting Assumptions • Tax revenues — projected based on recent growth trends combined with known changes in the economy, such as the addition of new businesses or hotels. • Licenses, Permits and Service Charges — projected based on development projects for which the City has received a planning application and is actively pursuing building permits. • Intergovernmental revenues — projected based on the growth in the City's overall assessed valuation, as this revenue source reflects Property Tax in Lieu of Vehicle License Fees. • Reimbursements — this revenue source primarily reflects the transfer of funds from the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) to reimburse the Public Works department for the administration of the CIP program. • Operating Transfers In — Gas Tax/SLESF —projected based on assumed inflationary growth factors. • Operating Transfers In — Measure S —projected based on the General Fund expenditures eligible for Measure S funding, in accordance with the Appropriation Guidelines noted in the Budget and Fiscal Policies. Public Safety personnel and equipment are the primary recipients of Measure S Transfers. EXPENDITURES General Fund Expenditure trends are developed using a number of economic assumptions that are applied to the category of expenditures. For Salary and Benefit projections, the City's Budget Team reflects any anticipated changes in staffing levels, CaIPERs contribution rates, negotiated terms from the City's employment contracts, and Public Safety Contract projections received from the County of Riverside. Non - salary expenditure projections were targeted to remain flat compared to the prior year's budget, except for any known future contractual increases. General Fund Expenditure Forecasting Assumptions Salaries — projected using current employee salary levels, plus eligible merit and/or cost of living increases for the ensuing fiscal years, plus newly authorized positions, less any known decreases to authorized positions. Annual Operating Budget 45 City of Temecula w Q Fiscal Year 2019-20 C Annual Operating Budget • Benefits — projected using information from CalPERs related to pension cost projections, plus any changes pursuant to any approved employment contracts. • Operations and Maintenance Costs — projected utilizing recent trends, adjusted for one-time expenditures and other known anomalies, plus known contractual increases. • Internal Service Fund Allocations - projected utilizing recent trends, adjusted for one-time expenditures and other known anomalies, plus known contractual increases. GENERAL FUND ANALYSIS The Fiscal Year 2019-20 General Fund Forecast over the coming five years is balanced with both the Reserve for Economic Uncertainty and the Secondary Reserve fully -funded in all five years. Ending Fund Balance for FY2019-20 is projected to be $26,476,568. Total Reserves, at 25% of Expenditures, totals $19,537,138, with another $460,305 assigned to cover costs committed for FY2020-21 including future Capital Projects and the Police Officer funded by the Pechanga Tribe, leaving an Unassigned (available) Fund Balance of $6,479,125. FY2019-20 General Fund Revenue is projected to increase by 0.8% over the prior year with a total of $80,127,628, of which $5,735,418 was transferred in from the new Measure S Fund to cover the costs associated with additional Public Safety personnel. Total FY2019-20 General Fund Operating Expenditures totals $78,148,553, which represents a 3.8% increase over the prior fiscal year. The majority of the increase is reflected in the Police and Fire departments, due to contractual increases, in addition to a 3% cost of living adjustment provided to City employees on July 1, 2019, in accordance with the City's labor agreements. As illustrated below, General Fund Revenues are projected to continually exceed Operating Expenditures over the ensuing five years. 100,000,000 95,000,000 90,000,000 85,000,000 80,000,000 75,000,000 70,000,000 65,000,000 60,000,000 55,000,000 General Fund 5-Year Projections Revenues over Expenditures FY12-13 FY13-14 FY14-15 FY15-16 FY16-17 FY17-18 FY18-19 FY19-20 FY20-21 FY21-22 FY22-23 FY23-24 Annual Operating Budget Expenditures —Revenues 46 T44-e d 0 f WwfnnKr GENERAL FUND - FIVE YEAR FINANCIAL PROJECTION City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 FY 23-24 % Revised % Proposed % Projected % Projected % Projected % Projected % Actuals Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Revenue: Property Tax 8,131,035 5.5% 8,364,543 2.9% 8,706,389 4.1% 8,967,581 3.0% 9,236,608 3.0% 9,513,706 3.0% 9,799,118 3.0% Sales and Use Tax 37,497,300 3.9% 37,845,104 0.9% 37,981,346 0.4% 39,570,786 4.2% 41,153,618 4.0% 42,799,763 4.0% 44,511,753 4.0% Less: Sales Tax Sharing Agmt (821,804) 109.1% (1,301,469) 58.4% (1,379,024) 6.0% (1,447,976) 5.0% (1,520,375) 5.0% (1,596,393) 5.0% (1,676,213) 5.0% Franchise Fees 3,363,832 2.3% 3,336,935 -0.8% 3,351,304 0.4% 3,418,330 2.0% 3,486,697 2.0% 3,556,431 2.0% 3,627,559 2.0% Transient Occupancy Tax 3,344,984 0.7% 3,241,613 -3.1% 3,338,860 3.0% 3,405,637 2.0% 3,507,806 3.0% 3,613,041 3.0% 3,721,432 3.0% Special Tax (Measure C) 1,877,254 1.0% 1,876,279 -0.1% 1,876,279 0.0% 1,885,660 0.5% 1,895,089 0.5% 1,904,564 0.5% 1,914,087 0.5% Licenses, Permits and Service Charges 4,417,404 -4.4% 5,296,952 19.9% 4,335,071 -18.2% 3,609,043 -16.7% 3,400,495 -5.8% 3,159,205 -7.1% 3,165,539 0.2% Fines and Forfeitures 756,471 -2.6% 831,823 10.0% 849,620 2.1% 866,612 2.0% 883,945 2.0% 901,624 2.0% 919,656 2.0% Use of Money and Property 148,560 -340.9% 477,606 221.5% 451,850 -5.4% 460,887 2.0% 470,105 2.0% 479,507 2.0% 489,097 2.0% Intergovernmental Revenues 7,899,231 5.4% 8,166,963 3.4% 8,503,309 4.1% 8,757,854 3.0% 9,020,025 3.0% 9,290,049 3.0% 9,568,162 3.0% Reimbursements 2,395,733 6.7% 3,060,010 27.7% 3,027,238 -1.1% 1,026,608 -66.1% 1,118,197 8.9% 1,172,585 4.9% 1,223,704 4.4% Miscellaneous 259,655 24.8% 182,251 -29.8% 198,081 8.7% 202,043 2.0% 206,083 2.0% 210,205 2.0% 214,409 2.0% Subtotal - Operating Revenues 69,269,655 3.1% 71,378,610 3.0% 71,240,323 -0.2% 70,723,066 -0.7% 72,858,293 3.0% 75,004,285 2.9% 77,478,303 3.3% Operating Transfers In - Gas Tax/SLESF 1,627,022 -28.0% 2,592,659 59.3% 3,151,887 21.6% 3,211,025 1.9% 3,271,345 1.9% 3,332,872 1.9% 3,395,630 1.9% Operating Transfers In - Measure 5 4,994,180 304.0% 5,496,813 10.1% 5,735,418 4.3% 9,369,264 63.4% 11,559,209 23.4% 14,696,457 27.1% 16,013,144 9.0% Total Revenues & Transfers In 75,890,856 7.4% 79,468,082 4.7% 80,127,628 0.8% 83,303,354 4.0% 87,688,847 5.3% 93,033,614 6.1% 96,887,077 4.1% Prior Version (FY18-19 Adopted Budget) 78,359,478 80,811,449 86,038,099 90,652,368 94,758,600 n/a Expenditures by Dept: City Council 392,479 2.3% 519,909 32.5% 572,843 10.2% 588,182 2.7% 603,944 2.7% 620,141 2.7% 636,786 2.7% Community Support 107,000 31.3% 125,000 16.8% 125,000 0.0% 127,500 2.0% 130,050 2.0% 132,651 2.0% 135,304 2.0% City Manager 1,428,765 6.9% 1,502,302 5.1% 1,541,796 2.6% 1,585,945 2.9% 1,631,377 2.9% 1,678,129 2.9% 1,726,239 2.9% Economic Development 1,291,888 28.9% 1,513,299 17.1% 1,572,660 3.9% 1,615,006 2.7% 1,658,525 2.7% 1,703,252 2.7% 1,749,219 2.7% Emergency Management 124,536 2.2% 254,186 104.1% 157,271 -38.1% 161,854 2.9% 166,571 2.9% 171,428 2.9% 176,427 2.9% City Clerk 1,104,483 -4.0% 1,390,869 25.9% 1,433,320 3.1% 1,473,774 2.8% 1,515,390 2.8% 1,558,203 2.8% 1,602,247 2.8% City Attorney 977,221 32.2% 942,300 -3.6% 942,300 0.0% 961,146 2.0% 980,369 2.0% 999,976 2.0% 1,019,976 2.0% Finance 2,327,775 5.0% 2,582,167 10.9% 2,753,604 6.6% 2,833,948 2.9% 2,916,656 2.9% 3,001,800 2.9% 3,089,451 2.9% Human Resources 979,538 33.2% 1,187,016 21.2% 1,263,313 6.4% 1,296,964 2.7% 1,331,540 2.7% 1,367,066 2.7% 1,403,570 2.7% Planning 2,057,156 14.6% 2,509,664 22.0% 2,590,197 3.2% 2,661,212 2.7% 2,734,223 2.7% 2,809,288 2.7% 2,886,466 2.7% Building & Safety 2,457,644 9.0% 3,220,139 31.0% 3,291,297 2.2% 3,384,865 2.8% 3,481,137 2.8% 3,580,191 2.8% 3,682,110 2.8% Land Development 1,666,614 15.8% 1,761,657 5.7% 1,898,973 7.8% 1,954,200 2.9% 2,011,049 2.9% 2,069,568 2.9% 2,129,807 2.9% Public Works 5,119,183 -2.6% 6,334,747 23.7% 6,250,315 -1.3% 6,153,750 -1.5% 6,311,257 2.6% 6,472,947 2.6% 6,638,935 2.6% CIPAdmin 1,861,739 3.7% 2,506,189 34.6% 2,417,537 -3.5% 2,489,271 3.0% 2,563,141 3.0% 2,639,211 3.0% 2,717,547 3.0% Parks Maintenance 3,790,123 12.1% 4,006,777 5.7% 3,958,507 -1.2% 4,048,884 2.3% 4,141,404 2.3% 4,236,121 2.3% 4,333,090 2.3% Police 31,061,517 16.6% 33,001,394 6.2% 34,860,437 5.6% 36,953,000 6.0% 39,143,760 5.9% 41,877,724 7.0% 44,352,941 5.9% Fire 7,607,685 39.9% 9,569,369 25.8% 10,260,935 7.2% 10,506,167 2.4% 11,238,043 7.0% 12,009,784 6.9% 12,844,397 6.9% Animal Control 460,280 -0.6% 425,572 -7.5% 475,235 11.7% 479,987 1.0% 484,787 1.0% 489,635 1.0% 494,531 1.0% Non -Departmental 3,837,738 -46.1% 1,908,661 -50.3% 1,783,013 -6.6% 1,924,463 7.9% 1,975,944 2.7% 2,078,945 5.2% 2,135,531 2.7% Total Expenditures 68,653,363 4.8% 75,261,216 9.6% 78,148,553 3.8% 81,200,118 3.9% 85,019,169 4.7% 89,496,062 5.3% 93,754,573 4.8% Revenue Over Expenditures 7,237,493 4,206,866 1,979,075 2,103,236 2,669,678 3,537,553 3,132,503 Prior Version (FY18-19Adopted Budget) 2,303,739 899,250 2,497,122 3,228,185 3,696,867 n/a 47 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 ., Annual Operating Budget T%e �er�ui GENERAL FUND - FIVE YEAR FINANCIAL PROJECTION FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 FY 23-24 % Revised % Proposed % Projected % Projected % Projected % Projected % Actuals Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Transfers Out and One Time Payments: Information Technology Fund (77,028) Technology Replacement Fund (125,000) Transfer to Capital Improvement Fund (3,130,036) (642,077) (100,000) (1,000,000) (1,000,000) Citywide Streetlight Acquisition and LED Retrofit (2,503,311) 1-15 Congestion Relief (400,000) (200,000) (100,000) Sidewalks - DLR Drive (442,077) General Plan Update (1,000,000) (1,000,000) Traffic Signal Park & Ride Access Improvements (226,725) 2018 Financing Lease (Civic Center) (2,135,231) (2,087,124) (2,075,512) (2,077,467) (1,962,107) (1,603,835) (1,609,180) 2018 Financing Lease (MRC) (416,855) (555,807) (555,808) (555,808) ■ (555,807) (555,808) Section 115 Pension Trust (8,000,000) (1,404,941) Total Transfers Out/One-Time Pmts (10,212,259) (7,163,956) (3,273,396) (2,733,275) (3,517,915) (3,159,642) (2,164,987) Revenues Over/(Under) Expenditures (2,974,766) (2,957,090) (1,294,321) (630,038) (848,237) 377,911 967,516 Beginning Fund Balance 33,702,744 30,727,979 27,770,889 26,476,568 25,846,530 24,998,293 25,376,204 Ending Fund Balance 30,727,979 27,770,889 26,476,568 25,846,530 24,998,293 25,376,204 26,343,720 Prior Version (FY18-19Adopted Budget) 26,994,625 24,068,646 1 22,277,653 I 22,087,270 22,748,787 23,878,986 n/a Desired Reserve Balance (25%) 17,163,341 18,815,304 19,537,138 20,300,029 0 21,254,792 22,374,015 23,438,643 Reserve Balance % Funded 17,163,341 100% 18,815,304 100% 19,537,138 100% 20,300,029 100% 21,254,792 100% 22,374,015 100% 23,438,643 100% Fund Balance Components Committed to: Economic Uncertainty (20%) 13,730,673 15,052,243 15,629,711 16,240,024 17,003,834 17,899,212 18,750,915 Secondary Reserve (5%) 3,432,668 3,763,061 3,907,428 4,060,006 4,250,958 4,474,803 4,687,729 Pechanga IGA 342,164 343,148 360,305 378,321 397,237 417,099 397,237 Nonspendable: Inventory/Prepaids/Deposits 4,383 4,383 Assigned to: Capital Projects 3,130,036 642,077 100,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 - - Unassigned: 10,088,055 7,965,977 6,479,125 4,168,180 2,346,264 2,585,090 2,507,840 Total Fund Balance as of 6/30 30,727,979 27,770,889 26,476,568 25,846,530 24,998,293 25,376,204 26,343,720 Unassigned Fund Balance as %of Operating Expenditures 14.7% 10.6% 8.3% 5.1% 2.8% 2.9% 2.7% 48 PLANNING BUILDING LAND DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC WORKS PARKS & FACILITIES MAINTENANCE Special Tax (Measure C) Lease Income Plan Check and Inspection Fees POLICE Parking Citations Miscellaneous Vehicle Impound Fees Reimbursements FIRE Various Grants NON -DEPARTMENTAL Residual RPTTF Distribution Property Tax (Secured) Property Tax (Unsecured) Supplemental Tax -AB 2345 Property Transfer Tax Franchise Fees Transient Occupancy Tax Sales and Use Tax - State of Calif. Less: Sales Tax Sharing Agreement Homeowner Exemption MVLF- property tax in lieu Motor Vehicle in Lieu- State Vehicle Code Fines Bids & Proposals Business Licenses City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Proposed Budget GENERAL FUND REVENUE - FIVE YEAR PROJECTIONS FY 17-18 FY 18-19 % Chg FY 19-20 % Chg FY 20-21 % Chg FY 21-22 % Chg FY 22-23 % Chg FY 23-24 % Chg Revised From From From From From From Actuals Budget Prior Yr Proposed Prior Yr Estimates Prior Yr Estimates Prior Yr Estimates Prior Yr Estimates Prior Yr 524,272 705,248 34.5% 635,140 -9.9% 634,269 -0.1% 634,269 0.0% 634,269 0.0% 634,269 0.0% 1,647,986 1,478,743 -10.3% 1,738,340 17.6% 1,302,009 -25.1% 1,087,374 -16.5% 839,874 -22.8% 839,874 0.0% 1,080,842 1,896,731 75.5% 795,548 -58.1% 568,466 -28.5% 568,466 0.0% 568,466 0.0% 568,466 0.0% 5,068 700 -86.2% - -100.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% 1,877,254 1,876,279 -0.1% 1,876,279 0.0% 1,885,660 0.5% 1,895,089 0.5% 1,904,564 0.5% 1,914,087 0.5% 49,642 62,262 25.4% 64,200 3.1% 65,484 2.0% 66,794 2.0% 68,130 2.0% 69,492 2.0% 19,694 2,000 -89.8% 2,000 0.0% 2,040 2.0% 2,081 2.0% 2,122 2.0% 2,165 2.0% 73,397 80,000 9.0% 80,000 0.0% 81,600 2.0% 83,232 2.0% 84,897 2.0% 86,595 2.0% 117,272 135,701 15.7% 135,701 0.0% 138,415 2.0% 141,183 2.0% 144,007 2.0% 146,887 2.0% 119,357 97,300 -18.5% 97,300 0.0% 99,246 2.0% 101,231 2.0% 103,256 2.0% 105,321 2.0% 156,957 136,500 -13.0% 136,500 0.0% 139,230 2.0% 142,015 2.0% 144,855 2.0% 147,752 2.0% 854,120 917,230 7.4% 867,617 -5.4% 799,904 -7.8% 799,904 0.0% 799,904 0.0% 799,904 0.0% 11,114 0 -100.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% 155,767 100,000 -35.8% 100,000 0.0% 103,000 3.0% 106,090 3.0% 109,273 3.0% 112,551 3.0% 6,678,472 7,005,717 4.9% 7,304,861 4.3% 7,524,007 3.0% 7,749,727 3.0% 7,982,219 3.0% 8,221,685 3.0% 298,123 312,731 4.9% 326,085 4.3% 335,868 3.0% 345,944 3.0% 356,322 3.0% 367,012 3.0% 174,817 135,000 -22.8% 139,000 3.0% 143,170 3.0% 147,465 3.0% 151,889 3.0% 156,446 3.0% 747,683 731,190 -2.2% 753,126 3.0% 775,720 3.0% 798,991 3.0% 822,961 3.0% 847,650 3.0% 3,363,832 3,336,935 -0.8% 3,351,304 0.4% 3,418,330 2.0% 3,486,697 2.0% 3,556,431 2.0% 3,627,559 2.0% 3,344,984 3,241,613 -3.1% 3,338,860 3.0% 3,405,637 2.0% 3,507,806 3.0% 3,613,041 3.0% 3,721,432 3.0% 37,497,300 37,845,104 0.9% 37,981,346 0.4% 39,570,786 4.2% 41,153,618 4.0% 42,799,763 4.0% 44,511,753 4.0% (821,804) (1,301,469) 58.4% (1,379,024) 6.0% (1,447,976) 5.0% (1,520,375) 5.0% (1,596,393) 5.0% (1,676,213) 5.0% 76,173 79,905 4.9% 83,317 4.3% 85,817 3.0% 88,391 3.0% 91,043 3.0% 93,774 3.0% 7,762,740 8,107,384 4.4% 8,447,894 4.2% 8,701,331 3.0% 8,962,371 3.0% 9,231,242 3.0% 9,508,179 3.0% 58,441 59,579 1.9% 55,415 -7.0% 56,523 2.0% 57,654 2.0% 58,807 2.0% 59,983 2.0% 563,717 654,523 16.1% 672,320 2.7% 685,766 2.0% 699,482 2.0% 713,471 2.0% 727,741 2.0% 6,675 6,300 -5.6% 6,426 2.0% 6,555 2.0% 6,686 2.0% 6,819 2.0% 6,956 2.0% 278,747 290,000 4.0% 290,000 0.0% 295,800 2.0% 301,716 2.0% 307,750 2.0% 313,905 2.0% 49 Right of way advertising Miscellaneous Investment Interest Rental Income Reimbursements - Miscellaneous Reimbursements - Roripaugh Services CFD Reimbursements - Cypress Ridge CFD Reimbursements - Capital Improvement Program Reimbursements - Pechanga IGA Operating Transfer In - Gas Tax Operating Transfer In - COPS Operating Transfer In - Measure S Fund Lease Income State Mandated Cost Reimbursement WRCOG BEYOND Grant SB1186 Reimbursement AB1379 Collection State Imposed $4 Fee Change in Fair Value of Investments GENERAL FUND REVENUE - FIVE YEAR PROJECTIONS FY 17-18 FY 18-19 % Chg FY 19-20 % Chg FY 20-21 % Chg FY 21-22 % Chg FY 22-23 Revised From From From From Actuals Budget Prior Yr Proposed Prior Yr Estimates Prior Yr Estimates Prior Yr Estimates 22,680 23,400 3.2% 25,200 7.7% 25,704 2.0% 26,218 119,703 23,150 -80.7% 37,180 60.6% 37,924 2.0% 38,682 311,056 300,000 -3.6% 270,000 -10.0% 275,400 2.0% 280,908 105,460 107,844 2.3% 110,000 2.0% 112,200 2.0% 114,444 165,768 45,000 -72.9% 83,604 85.8% 85,276 2.0% 86,982 0.0% 22,750 0.0% 45,500 100.0% 68,250 0.0% 37,503 0.0% 75,006 100.0% 113,435 319,779 2,474,844 673.9% 2,345,933 -5.2% 263,490 -88.8% 271,395 1,733,247 342,164 -80.3% 343,148 0.3% 360,305 5.0% 378,321 1,127,249 2,405,859 113.4% 2,956,887 22.9% 3,016,025 2.0% 3,076,345 236,456 186,800 -21.0% 195,000 4.4% 195,000 0.0% 195,000 4,994,180 5,496,813 10.1% 5,735,418 4.3% 9,369,264 63.4% 11,559,209 7,501 7,500 0.0% 7,650 2.0% 7,803 2.0% 7,959 17,117 29,000 69.4% 29,000 0.0% 29,000 0.0% 29,000 66,936 -100.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 2,865 3,702 29.2% - -100.0% - 0.0% - - 28,800 0.0% 28,800 0.0% 28,800 0.0% 28,800 (325,099) 0 -100.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Proposed Budget % Chg FY 23-24 % Chg From From Prior Yr Estimates Prior Yr 2.0% 26,742 2.0% 27,277 2.0% 2.0% 39,456 2.0% 40,245 2.0% 2.0% 286,526 2.0% 292,257 2.0% 2.0% 116,733 2.0% 119,068 2.0% 2.0% 88,721 2.0% 90,496 2.0% 50.0% 91,000 33.3% 109,200 20.0% 51.2% 113,435 0.0% 113,435 0.0% 3.0% 279,537 3.0% 287,923 3.0% 5.0% 397,237 5.0% 417,099 5.0% 2.0% 3,137,872 2.0% 3,200,630 2.0% 0.0% 195,000 0.0% 195,000 0.0% 23.4% 14,696,457 27.1% 16,013,144 9.0% 2.0% 8,118 2.0% 8,281 2.0% 0.0% 29,000 0.0% 29,000 0.0% 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% 0.0% 28,800 0.0% 28,800 0.0% 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% 50 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget � Fke �tG� SoveSe.. Goa �� iw44:4�j' GENERAL FUND 5 - YEAR EXPENDITURE PROJECTIONS 18-19 17-18 % Revised % 19-20 % 20-21 % 21-22 % 22-23 % 23-24 % Actuals Change Budget Change Budget Change Projection Change Projection Change Projection Change Projection Change City Council: Salaries 121,829 3.6% 138,870 14.0% 137,610 -0.9% 141,738 3.0% 145,990 3.0% 150,370 3.0% 154,881 3.0% O&M 125,070 -5.8% 169,641 35.6% 184,641 8.8% 188,334 2.0% 192,100 2.0% 195,943 2.0% 199,861 2.0% ISF 145,580 9.2% 211,398 45.2% 250,592 18.5% 258,110 3.0% 265,853 3.0% 273,829 3.0% 282,044 3.0% 572,843 10.2% 588,182 2.7% 603,944 2.7% 620,141 2.7% 636,786 2.7% 392,479 2.3% 519,909 32.5% Community Support 107,000 31.3% 125,000 16.8% 125,000 0.0% 127,500 2.0% 130,050 2.0% 132,651 2.0% 135,304 2.0% 0.0% City Manager: Salaries 991,503 8.3% 944,820 -4.7% 1,025,680 8.6% 1,056,450 3.0% 1,088,144 3.0% 1,120,788 3.0% 1,154,412 3.0% Project Salaries 22,938 25.8% 38,101 66.1% 12,300 -67.7% 12,669 3.0% 13,049 3.0% 13,441 3.0% 13,844 3.0% O&M 210,056 -0.1% 268,451 27.8% 210,451 -21.6% 214,660 2.0% 218,953 2.0% 223,332 2.0% 227,799 2.0% ISF 204,268 6.7% 250,930 22.8% 293,365 16.9% 302,166 3.0% 311,231 3.0% 320,568 3.0% 330,185 3.0% 1,428,765 6.9% 1,502,302 5.1% 1,541,796 2.6% 1,585,945 2.9% 1,631,377 2.9% 1,678,129 2.9% 1,726,239 2.9% Economic Dev. Salaries 470,483 -7.0% 649,327 38.0% 684,442 5.4% 704,975 3.0% 726,125 3.0% 747,908 3.0% 770,346 3.0% Project Salaries 51,722 317.5% 26,742 -48.3% 16,948 -36.6% 17,456 3.0% 17,980 3.0% 18,520 3.0% 19,075 3.0% O&M 448,330 21.7% 428,402 -4.4% 483,401 12.8% 493,069 2.0% 502,930 2.0% 512,989 2.0% 523,249 2.0% ISF 321,353 178.6% 408,828 27.2% 387,869 -5.1% 399,505 3.0% 411,490 3.0% 423,835 3.0% 436,550 3.0% 1,572,660 3.9% 1,615,006 2.7% 1,658,525 2.7% 1,703,252 2.7% 1,749,219 2.7% 1,291,888 28.9% 1,513,299 17.1% Emerg Mgmt Salaries 87,104 -14.4% 158,443 81.9% 61,662 -61.1% 63,512 3.0% 65,417 3.0% 67,380 3.0% 69,401 3.0% Project Salaries 11,665 4057.0% 29,614 153.9% 29,888 0.9% 30,785 3.0% 31,708 3.0% 32,659 3.0% 33,639 3.0% O&M 8,783 132.0% 13,533 54.1% 13,533 0.0% 13,804 2.0% 14,080 2.0% 14,361 2.0% 14,649 2.0% ISF 16,985 5.7% 52,596 209.7% 52,188 -0.8% 53,754 3.0% 55,366 3.0% 57,027 3.0% 58,738 3.0% 124,536 2.2% 254,186 104.1% 157,271 -38.1% 161,854 2.9% 166,571 2.9% 171,428 2.9% 176,427 2.9% City Clerk: Salaries 738,764 2.3% 814,934 10.3% 838,607 2.9% 863,765 3.0% 889,678 3.0% 916,369 3.0% 943,860 3.0% Project Salaries 13,579 0.0% 12,030 -11.4% 13,023 8.3% 13,414 3.0% 13,816 3.0% 14,231 3.0% 14,658 3.0% O&M 89,678 -50.2% 254,594 183.9% 254,594 0.0% 259,686 2.0% 264,880 2.0% 270,177 2.0% 275,581 2.0% ISF 262,462 5.6% 309,311 17.8% 327,096 5.7% 336,909 3.0% 347,016 3.0% 357,427 3.0% 368,149 3.0% 1,433,320 3.1% 1,473,774 2.8% 1,515,390 2.8% 1,558,203 2.8% 1,602,247 2.8% 1,104,483 -4.0% 1,390,869 25.9% City Attorney (Contract) 977,221 32.2% 942,300 -3.6% 942,300 0.0% 961,146 2.0% 980,369 2.0% 999,976 2.0% 1,019,976 2.0% Finance Salaries 1,747,133 8.1% 1,806,202 3.4% 1,881,750 4.2% 1,938,203 3.0% 1,996,349 3.0% 2,056,239 3.0% 2,117,926 3.0% Project Salaries 14,485 -52.3% 70,746 388.4% 131,196 85.4% 135,132 3.0% 139,186 3.0% 143,361 3.0% 147,662 3.0% O&M 133,114 -15.5% 242,485 82.2% 226,454 -6.6% 230,983 2.0% 235,603 2.0% 240,315 2.0% 245,121 2.0% ISF 433,043 4.8% 462,734 6.9% 514,204 11.1% 529,630 3.0% 545,519 3.0% 561,885 3.0% 578,741 3.0% 2,753,604 6.6%1 2,833,948 2.9% 2,916,656 2.9% 3,001,800 2.9% 3,089,451 2.9% 2,327,775 5.0% 2,582,167 10.9%1 51 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ke: GENERAL FUND 5 - YEAR EXPENDITURE PROJECTIONS 18-19 17-18 % Revised % 19-20 % 20-21 % 21-22 % 22-23 % 23-24 % Actuals Change Budget Change Budget Change Projection Change Projection Change Projection Change Projection Change HR Salaries 566,958 27.8% 640,415 13.0% Project Salaries 128 -99.6% 19,431 15075.7% O&M 245,009 58.0% 405,823 65.6% ISF 167,443 57.5% 121,347 -27.5% 979,538 33.2% 1,187,016 21.2% Planning: Salaries 1,304,228 16.3% 1,380,524 5.8% Project Salaries 6,725 -83.0% 12,638 87.9% O&M 287,185 35.2% 646,456 125.1% ISF 459,018 8.9% 470,046 2.4% 2,057,156 14.6% 2,509,664 22.0% Code Enforcement Salaries 486,500 11.3% 633,826 30.3% O&M 107,512 196.2% 159,399 48.3% ISF 122,051 10.5% 158,484 29.9% 716,063 22.6% 951,709 32.9% Building & Safety Salaries 1,208,657 7.3% 1,509,498 24.9% Project Salaries 51,250 -12.8% 42,753 -16.6% O&M 247,321 -3.3% 415,669 68.1% ISF 234,354 2.1% 300,510 28.2% 1,741,582 4.2% 2,268,430 30.3% Land Development: Salaries 1,281,069 15.3% 1,262,218 -1.5% Project Salaries 28,877 -43.2% 39,482 36.7% O&M 46,936 48.3% 174,686 272.2% ISF 309,731 26.2% 285,271 -7.9% 1,666,614 15.8% 1,761,657 5.7% Public Works: Salaries 2,309,995 -1.5% 2,364,381 2.4% Project Salaries 3,250 2.7% 52,453 1513.9% O&M 2,094,008 -7.8% 2,931,607 40.0% Capital Outlay 185,078 ISF 711,930 12.2% 801,228 12.5% 5,119,183 -2.6% 6,334,747 23.7% 649,117 1.4% 668,591 3.0% 688,648 3.0% 709,308 3.0% 730,587 3.0% 19,046 -2.0% 19,617 3.0% 20,206 3.0% 20,812 3.0% 21,436 3.0% 424,823 4.7% 433,319 2.0% 441,986 2.0% 450,826 2.0% 459,842 2.0% 170,327 40.4% 175,437 3.0% 180,700 3.0% 186,121 3.0% 191,705 3.0% 1,263,313 6.4% 1,296,964 2.7% 1,331,540 2.7% 1,367,066 2.7% 1,403,570 2.7% 1,373,823 -0.5% 1,415,038 3.0% 1,457,489 3.0% 1,501,213 3.0% 1,546,250 3.0% 21,000 66.2% 21,630 3.0% 22,279 3.0% 22,947 3.0% 23,636 3.0% 669,129 3.5% 682,512 2.0% 696,162 2.0% 710,085 2.0% 724,287 2.0% 526,245 12.0% 542,032 3.0% 558,293 3.0% 575,042 3.0% 592,293 3.0% 2,590,197 3.2% 2,661,212 2.7% 2,734,223 2.7% 2,809,288 2.7% 2,886,466 2.7% 632,684 -0.2% 651,665 3.0% 671,214 3.0% 691,351 3.0% 712,091 3.0% 158,364 -0.6% 161,531 2.0% 164,762 2.0% 168,057 2.0% 171,418 2.0% 173,117 9.2% 178,311 3.0% 183,660 3.0% 189,170 3.0% 194,845 3.0% 964,165 1.3% 991,506 2.8% 1,019,636 2.8% 1,048,578 2.8% 1,078,354 2.8% 1,612,356 6.8% 1,660,727 3.0% 1,710,548 3.0% 1,761,865 3.0% 1,814,721 3.0% - -100.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% 358,720 -13.7% 365,894 2.0% 373,212 2.0% 380,677 2.0% 388,290 2.0% 356,056 18.5% 366,738 3.0% 377,740 3.0% 389,072 3.0% 400,744 3.0% 2,327,132 2.6% 2,393,359 2.8% 2,461,501 2.8% 2,531,613 2.8% 2,603,755 2.8% 1,359,041 7.7% 1,399,812 3.0% 1,441,807 3.0% 1,485,061 3.0% 1,529,613 3.0% 25,559 -35.3% 26,326 3.0% 27,116 3.0% 27,929 3.0% 28,767 3.0% 174,205 -0.3% 177,689 2.0% 181,243 2.0% 184,868 2.0% 188,565 2.0% 340,168 19.2% 350,373 3.0% 360,884 3.0% 371,711 3.0% 382,862 3.0% 1,898,973 7.8% 1,954,200 2.9% 2,011,049 2.9% 2,069,568 2.9% 2,129,807 2.9% 2,444,089 3.4% 2,517,412 3.0% 2,592,934 3.0% 2,670,722 3.0% 2,750,844 3.0% 43,772 -16.6% 45,085 3.0% 46,438 3.0% 47,831 3.0% 49,266 3.0% 2,657,415 -9.4% 2,710,563 2.0% 2,764,775 2.0% 2,820,070 2.0% 2,876,471 2.0% 250,000 855,039 6.7% 880,690 3.0% 907,111 3.0% 934,324 3.0% 962,354 3.0% 6,250,315 -1.3%1 6,153,750 -1.5% 6,311,257 2.6% 6,472,947 2.6% 6,638,935 2.6% 52 CIP Admin: Parks Maint Fire `-3 City of Temecula 41 Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget iw44:4�j' GENERAL FUND 5 - YEAR EXPENDITURE PROJECTIONS 18-19 17-18 % Revised % 19-20 % 20-21 % 21-22 % 22-23 % 23-24 % Actuals Change Budget Change I Budget Change Projection Change Projection Change Projection Change Projection Change Contract Contract Salaries Project Salaries O&M ISF Salaries Project Salaries O&M ISF Salaries Project Salaries Contract O&M -contract Capital Outlay ISF O&M Capital outlay Grants Salaries Project Salaries Fire Suppression Fire Prevention O&M ISF Animal Control Animal Control - Debt Service 1,401,002 -9.2% 2,140,784 52.8% 22,997 0.0% 56,174 144.3% 197,986 831.6% 79,829 -59.7% 239,754 3.2% 229,402 -4.3% 1,861,739 3.7% 2,506,189 34.6% 792,867 27.2% 938,139 18.3% 58,160 321.0% 89,817 54.4% 2,711,945 6.7% 2,778,282 2.4% 227,152 12.7% 200,539 -11.7% 3,790,123 12.1% 4,006,777 5.7% 46,023 -8.3% 58,817 27.8% 61,154 15.0% 67,065 9.7% 29,249,722 17.0% 31,306,990 7.0% 646,314 5.8% 682,941 5.7% 121,740 8.9% 140,366 15.3% 422,816 38.0% 385,401 -8.8% 513,747 -0.4% 359,814 -30.0% 31,061,517 16.6% 33,001,394 6.2% 9,343 0.0% --100.0% 10,643 -25.1% 124,514 1069.9% 425,394 58.2% 448,661 5.5% 15,672 -44.7% 17,599 12.3% 5,736,295 44.2% 6,873,471 19.8% 581,048 17.2% 836,044 43.9% 582,531 29.4% 754,157 29.5% 246,758 22.7% 514,923 108.7% 7,607,685 39.9% 9,569,369 25.8% 120,000 0.0% 319,545 166.3% 340,280 -0.8% 106,027 -68.8% 460,280 -0.6% 425,572 -7.5% 2,075,995 -3.0% 2,138,275 3.0% 2,202,423 3.0% 2,268,496 3.0% 2,336,551 3.0% 6,512 -88.4% 6,707 3.0% 6,909 3.0% 7,116 3.0% 7,329 3.0% 79,214 -0.8% 80,798 2.0% 82,414 2.0% 84,063 2.0% 85,744 2.0% 255,816 11.5% 263,490 3.0% 271,395 3.0% 279,537 3.0% 287,923 3.0% 2,417,537 -3.5% 2,489,271 3.0% 2,563,141 3.0% 2,639,211 3.0% 2,717,547 3.0% 853,035 -9.1% 878,626 3.0% 904,985 3.0% 932,134 3.0% 960,098 3.0% 46,895 -47.8% 48,302 3.0% 49,751 3.0% 51,243 3.0% 52,781 3.0% 2,837,847 2.1% 2,894,604 2.0% 2,952,496 2.0% 3,011,546 2.0% 3,071,777 2.0% 220,730 10.1% 227,352 3.0% 234,172 3.0% 241,198 3.0% 248,434 3.0% 3,958,507 -1.2% 4,048,884 2.3% 4,141,404 2.3% 4,236,121 2.3% 4,333,090 2.3% 42,249 -28.2% 43,094 2.0% 43,956 2.0% 44,835 2.0% 45,732 2.0% 88,220 31.5% 89,984 2.0% 91,784 2.0% 93,620 2.0% 95,492 2.0% 32,872,339 5.0% 34,892,405 6.1% 37,032,297 6.1% 39,713,983 7.2% 42,135,469 6.1% 750,041 9.8% 771,892 2.9% 794,440 2.9% 817,708 2.9% 841,721 2.9% 57,000 -59.4% 80,000 40.4% 80,000 0.0% 80,000 0.0% 80,000 0.0% 402,474 4.4°%a 414,548 3.0% 426,985 3.0% 439,794 3.0% 452,988 3.0% 648,114 80.1% 661,076 2.0% 674,298 2.0% 687,784 2.0% 701,539 2.0% 34,860,437 5.6% 36,953,000 6.0% 39,143,760 5.9% 41,877,724 7.0% 44,352,941 5.9% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% 20,642 -83.4% - -100.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% 483,576 7.8% 498,083 3.0% 513,026 3.0% 528,417 3.0% 544,269 3.0% 18,581 5.6% 19,138 3.0% 19,713 3.0% 20,304 3.0% 20,913 3.0% 7,580,271 10.3% 7,791,426 2.8% 8,425,139 8.1% 9,094,936 7.9% 9,823,668 8.0% 836,044 0.0% 836,044 0.0% 877,846 5.0% 921,739 5.0% 967,825 5.0% 745,462 -1.2% 767,826 3.0% 790,861 3.0% 814,586 3.0% 839,024 3.0% 576,359 11.9% 593,650 3.0% 611,459 3.0% 629,803 3.0% 648,697 3.0% 10,260,935 7.2% 10,506,167 2.4% 11,238,043 7.0% 12,009,784 6.9% 12,844,397 6.9% 352,255 10.2% 355,778 1.0% 359,335 1.0% 362,929 1.0% 366,558 1.0% 122,980 16.0% 124,210 1.0% 125,452 1.0% 126,706 1.0% 127,973 1.0% 475,235 11.7%1 479,987 1.0% 484,787 1.0% 489,635 1.0% 494,531 1.0% 53 iw44 Non -Departmental: Audi Reimbursement Retiree Medical Contribution PERs Replacement Benefit Capital Project O&M Costs Staffing Continuity Reserve Prop. Tax Admin Total General Fund Expenditures Prior Version (FY18-19 Adopted Budget) GENERAL FUND 5 - YEAR EXPENDITURE PROJECTIONS 18-19 17-18 % Revised % Actuals Change Budget Change 285,393 0.0% --100.0% 3,329,927 114.2% 1,627,325 -51.1% 112,962 36.8% 97,484-13.7°A 0.0% - 0.0% 39,827 0.0% 100,000 151.1% 69,628 -11.1% 83,852 20.4% 3,837,738 -58.6% 1,908,661 -50.3% 68,653,363 75,261,216 9.6% 19-20 % Budget Change - 0.0% 1,500,000 -7.8% 97,484 0.0% - 0.0% 100,000 0.0% 85,529 2.0% 1,783,013 -6.6% 78,148,553 3.8% 79,912,198 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 20-21 % 21-22 % 22-23 % 23-24 % Projection Change Projection Change Projection Change Projection Change - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% 1,545,000 3.0% 1,591,350 3.0% 1,639,091 3.0% 1,688,263 3.0% 99,434 2.0% 101,422 2.0% 103,451 2.0% 105,520 2.0% 91,934 0.0% 92,434 0.5% 142,944 54.6% 145,484 1.8% 100,000 0.0% 100,000 0.0% 100,000 0.0% 100,000 0.0% 88,095 3.0% 90,738 3.0% 93,460 3.0% 96,264 3.0% 1,924,463 7.9% 1,975,944 2.7% 2,078,945 5.2% 2,135,531 2.7% 81,200,118 3.9% 85,019,169 4.7% 89,496,062 5.3% 93,754,573 4.8% 83,540,977 87,424,183 91,061,733 91,061,733 54 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget i�rE ��L#ry MEASURE S FUND - FIVE YEAR FINANCIAL PROJECTION 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Actuals Revised Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection Revenue Estimated Annual Growth Rate 2.0% 2.5% 3.0% 3.5% 3.5% Sales Tax 27,197,565 27,200,000 27,744,000 28,437,600 29,290,728 30,315,903 31,376,960 Operating Transfer In (from CIP) 503,165 Investment Interest 37,672 37,000 40,000 40,800 41,616 42,448 43,297 Total Revenue 27,235,237 27,740,165 27,784,000 28,478,400 29,332,344 30,358,352 31,420,257 % Growth over Prior Year 1.9% 0.2% 2.5% 3.0% 3.5% 3.5% Transfers Out - Operating Expenditures Public Safety Police Staffing 3,202,895 3,268,080 3,774,632 4,323,670 4,918,174 5,958,557 6,673,584 Fire Staffing 849,224 - - - - - - Fire Staffing (Station 95) 868,030 1,628,557 1,711,857 1,794,308 1,887,322 1,981,688 2,080,773 Public Safety Subsidy - - 3,000,000 4,500,000 6,500,000 7,000,000 Fire - Ladder Truck Replacement 650,000 650,000 - - - - - Fire - ISF (4 Inspect. Vehicles & Ladder Truck) 170,390 170,390 170,390 170,390 170,390 170,390 IT - Citywide Surveillance Cameras O&M 160,000 260,000 260,000 260,000 260,000 Asset Management - IT - Asset Management Software 135,251 450,000 - - - - - IT-TCSD Class Registration Software 55,000 - IT - Security Audit/Records Transparency/Office Training 40,000 - - - Reserve Fund Contribution - Fleet Replacement Fund (310) 500,000 500,000 500,000 - - - Reserve Fund Contribution - Tech. Replacement Fund (325) 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 General Services - TCSD Operations (subsidy) 5,341,503 6,211,702 7,989,182 8,069,645 8,268,946 8,473,395 8,683,134 Library (subsidy) 770,734 662,527 921,203 948,839 977,304 1,006,623 1,036,822 Service Level B-Residential Streetlights (subsidy) 360,251 62,661 71,037 73,168 75,363 77,624 79,953 MRC Operations - 265,000 545,900 562,277 579,145 Public Works - Enhanced Custodial Svcs 74,031 76,252 78,539 80,896 83,323 85,822 88,397 Total Operating Expenditures 12,346,919 14,180,169 15,876,840 19,985,916 22,186,722 25,576,377 27,152,198 Growth over Prior Year 15% 12.0% 25.9% 11.0% 15.3% 6.2% Excess of Revenues Over/(Under) Operating Expenditures 14,888,318 13,559,996 11,907,160 8,492,484 7,145,622 4,781,975 4,268,059 Amount Available for CIP 15,124,520 16,872,948 15,220,112 10,162,653 10,249,635 4,957,033 4,673,092 55 City of Temecula ,�. Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget iS�rE e.Wil�ii MEASURE S FUND - FIVE YEAR FINANCIAL PROJECTION 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Actuals Revised Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection Transfers Out - Capital Improvement Program Reserve Fund Contribution - Street Maintenance Fund (103) 1,400,000 kh 1,500,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 Reserve Fund Contribution - Facilities Replacement Fund (350) 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 Citywide Concrete Repairs 10,474 - American with Disability Transition (ADA) update 21,000 - Bike Lane and Trail Program - Temecula Creek South Side Trail 571,000 Children's Museum Enhancement Project 400,000 _ Cherry Street Extension and Murrieta Creek Low -Flow Crossing to Diaz Road - 180,000 316,000 Citywide Drainage Master Plan 720,000 Citywide Financial System Upgrade 613,184 Citywide Streetlight Acquisition LED Conversion 4,700,000 800,000 Citywide Surveillance Cameras 451,702 296,536 r 720,347 150,000 - Community Recreation Center (CRC) Pool Site Enhancement and Renovations 410,000 1,450,000 - Community Recreation Center Renovation 503,165 500,000 1,600,000 Community Services Master Plan 276,200 IF - Diaz Road Expansion (Rancho Cal to Cherry St) 82,923 80,000 3,337,077 Eagle Soar Splash Pad Control System Renovation - 300,000 Expanded Recycled Water & Plant Material Conversion Project 142,010 - - Fiber Optic Communication System Upgrades 113,000 - Fire Station 73 - Gym/Garage - 254,000 Fire Station 84 Training Room Improvement and Expansion 166,750 500,000 - - Flashing Beacons and Speed Advisory Signs 30,000 32,000 ` 32,000 32,000 32,000 32,000 32,000 French Valley Parkway / 1-15 Over -Crossing and Interchange Improvements -Phase 1 65,000 - - - French Valley Parkway / 1-15 Over -Crossing and Interchange Improvements -Phase II 227,000 227,000 0 1,971,845 1,865,640 - French Valley Parkway / 1-15 Over -Crossing and Interchange Improvements -Phase III 150,000 - - Flood Control Channel Reconstruction and Repair 280,000 517,427 ` 442,049 Interstate 15 Branding and Visioning- Conceptual Landscape Corridor Plan 100,000 341,3509 47,133 446,200 Library Parking Phase II 423,415 523,927 Or - - Margarita Recreation Center 646,773 747,735 720,000 - Median and Ornamental Safety Enhancements - Citywide 100,000 131,900 IL - 260,000 - 270,000 Overhead Street Name Sign Replacement Program -Citywide 100,000 P 100,000 - Parks Improvement Program 200,000 200,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 Park Restrooms Expansion, Renovations and ADA Improvements 197,800 - 780,000 - - Patricia H Birdsall Sports Park Synthetic Turf Enhancement 1,000,000 - - - Pedestrian Signal Equipment Upgrade - Citywide 38,000 Playground Equipment Enhancement and Safety Surfacing - 1,077,649 0 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 Ronald Reagan Sports Park Restroom Expansion and Renovation 725,000 - - - 56 City of Temecula ,�. Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ��k I-eatFl �*�xr �rvi'IW � iS�rE e.Wil�ii MEASURE S FUND - FIVE YEAR FINANCIAL PROJECTION 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Actuals Revised Projection Projection Projection Projection Projectioi Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library Enhancement Project - 164,504 Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail Extension and Interconnect 821,899 957,709 Santa Gertrudis Creek Phase II - Margarita Under -Crossing 433,000 50,000 399,300 Sam Hicks Monument Park Playground Enhancement - - - - Sidewalks -Citywide 350,000 - 658,596 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 Sidewalks -Old Town Boardwalk Enhancement 300,000 260,000 164,527 Sidewalks -Old Town Improvement Project 400,000 - Sidewalks -Sixth Street Improvements 126,264 - - - - Sports Court Resurfacing 100,000 50,000 50,000 Sports Field Lighting LED Conversion 250,000 - 280,000 Temecula Park and Ride Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau Tenant Improvements Traffic Signal Equipment Enhancement Program - Citywide Traffic Signal Installation -Citywide Traffic Signal Park and Ride Access Improvements Traffic Signal System Upgrade Utility Undergrounding - Citywide Total CIP Proiect Expenditures Excess of Revenues Over/(Under) Total Expenditures 50,000 E 55,000 435,000 285,000 210,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 50,505 80,444 244,375 - F - - - 8,443,728 15,368,051 15,109,728 7,058,640 10,074,577 4,552,000 4,342,000 6,444,590 (1,808,055) (3,202,568) 1,433,844 (2,928,955) 229,975 (73,941) Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 236,202 6,680,792 4,872,737 1,670,169 3,104,013 175,058 405,033 57 TCSD Base Revenues Measure S Contribution Total Revenues Expenditures by Division TCSD Operations Senior Center Maintenance Senior Center Operations Community Rec Center Maintenance Community Rec Center Operations Recreation TCC Maintenance TCC Operations Museum Maintenance Museum Operations Aquatics Maintenance Aquatics Operations Sports Children's Museum Maintenace Children's Museum Operations Community Theater Maintenance Community Theater Operations Cultural Arts Program Conference Center Maintenance Conference Center Operations Human Services MRC Facility Maintenance MRC Facility Operations Jefferson Recreation Center Maint. Contract Classes Park Rangers Responsible Compassion Maint. Responsible Compassion Total Expenditures Excess of Revenues Over Expenditures Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT - FIVE YEAR FINANCIAL PROJECTION FY17-18 FY18-19 FYI9-20 FY20-21 FY21-22 FY22-23 FY23-24 % Revised % Proposed % Projected % Projected % Projected % Projected % Actuals Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change Budget Change 4,476,816 1.9% 4,405,368 0.5% 4,370,301 -0.3% 4,523,262 3.5% 4,681,576 3.5% 4,845,431 3.5% 5,015,021 3.5% 5,341,503 0.0% 6,211,702 3.3% 7,989,182 31.5% 8,069,645 1.0% 8,268,946 2.5% 8,473,395 2.5% 8,683,134 2.5% 9818,319 13.3% 10,617,070 2.0% 12,359,483 18.3% 12,592,907 1.9% 12,950,522 2.8% 13,318,826 2.8% 13,698,155 2.8% r 2,242,447 8.3% 2,578,270 2.5% 3,264,526 28.8 % 3,360,210 2.9% 3,475,880 3.4% 3,595,681 3.4% 3,719,766 3.5% 107,434 18.6% 115,815 1.4 % 121,084 5.8 % 124,048 2.4% 127,088 2.5% 130,206 2.5% 133,403 2.5% 241,363 26.2°4 407,281 1.5% 361,243 -10.4% 371,802 2.9% 382,672 2.9% 393,862 2.9% 405,382 2.9% 265,373 -13.0% 313,717 0.6% 318,023 1.9% 325,349 2.3% 332,851 2.3% 340,532 2.3% 348,398 2.3% 699,991 20.2% 752,129 1.6 % 705,466 -4.7 % 725,299 2.8% 745,700 2.8% 766,686 2.8% 788,274 2.8% 843,889 43.601 1,094,979 4.5% 1,138,026 7.4% 1,165,150 2.4% 1,192,948 2.4% 1,221,436 2.4% 1,250,634 2.4% 103,958 18.5% 114,503 3.1% 118,430 6.2% 121,429 2.5% 124,506 2.5% 127,664 2.5% 130,906 2.5% 93,331 -27.9% 124,339 0.4% 253,745 104.4% 261,256 3.0% 268,991 3.0% 276,955 3.0% 285,157 3.0% 78,658 8.2% 75,866 4.4% 94,083 28.6% 96,385 2.4% 98,745 2.4% 101,165 2.5% 103,647 2.5% 285,005 13.3% 354,961 1.1 % 464,486 31.7 % 477,681 2.8% 491,256 2.8% 505,224 2.8% 519,596 2.8% 231,392 18.7% 289,312 0.0% 292,658 1.2 % 299,236 2.2% 305,967 2.2% 312,855 2.3% 319,904 2.3% 670,351 24.9% 768,399 4.3% 848,237 14.2% 860,516 1.4% 885,508 2.9% 911,233 2.9% 937,712 2.9% 292,435 -4.3% 331,977 0.8% 343,974 4.3% 353,336 2.7% 362,960 2.7% 372,853 2.7% 383,023 2.7% 112,176 21.5% 107,325 0.0% 81,223 -24.3% 83,152 2.4% 85,128 2.4% 87,153 2.4% 89,229 2.4% 158,207 -2.2% 199,499 14.1% 259,405 24.6% 223,669 5.1 % 228,972 2.4% 234,406 2.4% 239,974 2.4% 245,680 2.4% 1,104,738 7.8% 1,141,558 1.1% 1,198,587 6.0% 1,231,269 2.7% 1,264,866 2.7% 1,299,405 2.7% 1,334,911 2.7% 238,269 -15.904 246,619 0.7% 247,265 1.0% 254,240 2.8% 261,414 2.8% 268,796 2.8% 276,389 2.8% 5,344 23.7% 6,503 0.0% 1 67,149 20.1% 82,282 0.6% 175,756 4.1 °,(1 218,541 0.2 % 207,475 -4.9 % 213,064 2.7% 218,808 2.7% 224,711 2.7% 230,778 2.7% 65,501 11.6% 68,130 2.3% 68,687 3.0% 70,302 2.4% 71,956 2.4% 73,651 2.4% 75,387 2.4% 57,180 776.5% 91,167 1.3% 91,044 0.7% 93,724 2.9% 96,484 2.9% 99,325 2.9% 102,251 2.9% 33,800 25.60/ 52,571 0.0% 54,709 4.1% 56,015 2.4% 57,353 2.4% 58,724 2.4% 60,130 2.4% 932,016 19.4°/� 854,681 0.0% 878,815 2.9% 898,388 2.2% 918,413 2.2% 938,900 2.2% 959,860 2.2% 175,293 -26.3% 216,215 0.0% 385,434 78.3% 396,851 3.0% 408,608 3.0% 420,714 3.0% 433,181 3.0% 80,864 0.0% 141,079 0.0% 166,201 17.8% 169,687 2.1% 173,248 2.1% 176,884 2.1% 180,599 2.1% 468,028 460.0% 682,851 1.3% 386,567 -42.5% 355,547 -8.0% 364,767 2.61/6 374,236 2.6% 383,959 2.6% 10,029,447 17.1% 11,490,475 2.3% 12,313,657 9.1% 12,592,906 2.3% 12,950,521 2.8% 13,318,826 2.8% 13,698,155 2.8% (211,128) -306.1% (873,405) 11.8% 45,826 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% - 0.0% % 1,138,707 927,579 54,174 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 927,579 54,174 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 58 Ask 7`13-1 C4, The Heart of 5-th.,. C.hf-w Wine Country FUND BALANCE SUMMARY - ALL FUNDS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Beginning Revenues/ Expenditures/ Beginning Revenues/ Expenditures/ Ending Balance Transfers In Transfers Out Balance Transfers In Transfers Out Balance 2018-19 2018-19 2018-19 2019-20 2019-20 2019-20 2019-20 GENERAL FUNDS 001: GENERAL FUND 30,727,978 79,468,082 82,425,165 27,770,895 80,127,628 81,421,948 26,476,575 002: MEASURE S FUND 6,680,793 27,740,165 29,548,220 4,872,738 27,784,000 30,986,568 1,670,170 TOTAL GENERAL FUNDS 37,408,771 107,208,247 111,973,385 32,643,633 107,911,628 112,408,516 28,146,745 SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 100: GAS TAX - 2,405,859 2,405,859 - 2,956,887 2,956,887 - 102: ROAD MAINTENANCE REHABILITATION 512,997 1,797,213 2,310,210 - 1,875,831 1,875,831 - ACCOUNT (RMRA) 103: STREET MAINTENANCE - 1,405,000 - 1,405,000 1,505,000 - 2,910,000 120: DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES 10,417,022 4,639,311 8,173,855 6,882,478 6,204,021 13,086,501 (2) 125: PUBLIC EDUCATION & GOVERNMENT (PEG) 357,357 231,939 364,995 224,301 214,723 305,000 134,024 140: COMMUNITY DEV BLOCK GRANT - 1,036,090 1,036,090 - 559,111 559,111 (0) 145: TEMECULA ENERGY EFFICIENCY ASSET TEAM 190,274 3,000 - 193,274 2,500 - 195,774 150: AB 2766 MOTOR VEHICLE SUBVENTION 132,593 147,530 236,353 43,770 149,455 193,225 - 160: SUPPLEMENTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES - 186,800 186,800 - 195,000 195,000 - 161: TEMECULA MAIOR CRIMES REWARD 26,012 400 - 26,412 300 - 26,712 165: AFFORDABLE HOUSING 10,819,638 424,110 545,625 10,698,123 354,052 561,380 10,490,795 170: MEASURE A 4,243,589 3,244,000 6,066,209 1,421,380 3,251,000 4,672,380 - 198: PUBLIC ART 25,968 74,511 4,026 96,453 158,928 - 255,381 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 26,725,450 15,595,763 21,330,022 20,991,191 17,426,808 24,405,316 14,012,683 DEBT SERVICE FUNDS 395:2018 FINANCING LEASE (CIVIC CENTER) - 2,087,124 2,087,124 - 2,075,512 2,075,512 - 396: 2018 FINANCING LEASE (MRC) - 516,855- 516,855 462,233154,622 555,808 555,808 555,808 54,622 54,622555,808 TOTAL DEBT SERVICE FUNDS - 2,603,979 2,549,357 54,622 2,631,320 2,631,320 54,622 TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT 190: TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT 927,584 10,617,070 11,490,480 54,174 12,359,483 12,313,658 99,999 192: TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "B" STREET LIGHTS 261,188 705,245 789,201 177,232 712,004 789,853 99,383 194: TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "D" REFUSE/RECYCLING 294,489 8,014,790 8,078,891 230,388 8,514,541 8,574,356 170,573 195: TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "R" STREET/ROAD MAINT 26,791 5,932 29,663 3,060 5,832 5,532 3,360 196: TCSD SERVICE LEVEL"L" LAKE PARK MAINT. 402,667 251,570 247,276 406,961 252,489 259,032 400,418 197: TEMECULA LIBRARY 343,072 775,287 994,140 124,219 1,030,063 1,042,277 112,005 501-530: TCSD SERVICE LEVEL"C" ZONES 1-30 1,655,790 1,605,430 1,553,144 1,708,076 1,587,230 1,823,065 1,472,241 TOTALTCSD 3,911,581 21,975,324 23,182,795 2,704,110 24,461,642 24,807,774 2,357,978 SUCCESSOR AGENCY TO THE TEMECULA REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY (SARDA) 380: SARDA DEBT SERVICE (33,301,655) 7,069,672 7,519,672 (33,751,655) 5,455,731 7,530,321 (35,826,245) TOTAL SARDA (33,301,655) 7,069,672 7,519,672 (33,751,655) 5,455,731 7,530,321 (35,826,245) INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 300:INSURANCE 51,958 1,154,525 995,137 211,346 1,436,913 1,026,259 622,000 305: WORKERS' COMPENSATION 1,386,621 710,333 422,778 1,674,176 341,000 255,779 1,759,397 310: VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT 2,587,693 1,532,426 858,125 3,261,994 901,666 380,000 3,783,660 320: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 472,739 3,994,594 4,292,381 174,952 4,425,165 4,112,021 488,096 325: TECHNOLOGY REPLACEMENT 1,249,447 1,036,723 310,000 1,976,170 797,509 1,138,534 1,635,145 330: SUPPORT SERVICES 444,102 368,966 813,068 - 417,721 413,551 4,170 335: SUPPORT SERVICES REPLACEMENT 462619 18,735 443,884 41,930 50,000 435,814 340: FACILITIES 521,052 1,335:888 1,352,145 504,795 1,362,862 1,359,094 508,563 350: FACILITY REPLACEMENT - 540,725 506,000 34,725 555,324 201,714 388,335 TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 6,713,612 11,136,799 9,568,369 8,282,042 10,280,090 8,936,951 9,625,181 Grand Total 117,077,795 165,589,784 176,123,600 106,543,979 168,167,219 180,720,197 93,991,000 59 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget MAJOR REVENUE SOURCES All revenue estimates are developed using historical trend data and estimates of commercial and residential construction, assessed valuation, retail sales, population, changes in consumer price indexes, and general economic factors. Property tax revenue estimates are derived with input from an outside consultant, and considers estimated changes on the tax levy, property sales, appeals, and real property improvements. Sales tax revenue estimates are also derived with the input from an outside consultant, and considers factors such as new and closed retailers, business types, population changes, price fluctuations and the general economy. Licenses, permits, and service charges are estimated using building forecasts of the development community, changes in consumer price indexes, established fees for services and program, and historical trend data. The revenue estimates for Transient Occupancy Taxes are derived using average room rates, projected changes in room occupancy, special events, and feedback from Visit Temecula Valley. Taxes and Franchises — 59.2% of Total Revenue Sales and Use Tax: The largest revenue source for the City of Temecula is Sales and Use Tax, contributing 39% of the City's overall revenue base (including the City's Transactions and Use Tax, Measure S). In accordance with the California Revenue and Taxation Code, the State of California imposes a 7.25% sales and use tax on all taxable sales in the City, of which 1% is allocated to the City of Temecula. In 2016, City residents approved Measure S to establish a new one percent Transactions and Use Tax revenue. This new tax became effective April 1, 2017. The City established the Measure S Fund to account for the fiscal activities related to this new revenue source. In addition, Riverside County voters approved Measure A in 1988, and again in 2002, to establish a half -cent Sales Tax dedicated to transportation funding. Measure A revenue is recorded in a separate Special Revenue Fund, and is categorized as Intergovernmental Revenues. Currently, the total Sales Tax rate within the City is 8.75% The City of Temecula serves as a regional shopping hub with the Promenade Mall, Old Town and an expanding Auto Mall. While Sales and Use Tax revenue is projected to increase by 0.4% from the prior fiscal year to $37,981,346. The local economy remains strong, however certain sectors have leveled off after several years of expansive growth, including the Business and Industry and Auto and Transportation sectors of the economy. The City continues to maintain a strong and diverse sales tax base by promoting economic development in areas such as manufacturing, light industrial, and retail businesses. Temecula continues to exceed the State, County, and surrounding areas with respect to sales per capita. The new Measure S Transactions and Use Tax is estimated to yield $27,744,000 in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Originally, it was anticipated that this new tax would generate $23,000,000 annually; however, over the past year, it is evident that Measure S revenue will continue to exceed the original projections. Property Tax: Per Proposition 13, passed by California voters in 1978, the ad valorem Property Tax is assessed at 1% of the assessed valuation of real property, as determined by the County Assessor's Office. The City is projecting Property Tax revenues to increase by 4.1% in Fiscal Year 2019-20 for a total of Annual Operating Budget 60 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget MAJOR REVENUE SOURCES (continued) $8,706,389. Home values continue to rise as the market rebounds from the Great Recession, causing an increase in assessed valuations. Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT): The City of Temecula collects an 8% tax on the amount of transient (30 days or less) lodging rentals. As the economy improved over the past few fiscal years, the City's tourism sector strengthened and both occupancy rates and average rental rates increased. Two new hotels have opened in the City within the past year, and several more have begun the planning process to build within the City. TOT is projected to grow by 3.0% over the prior year to a total of $3,338,860 in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Licenses, Permits and Service Charges — 15.8% of Total Revenue The California Government Code and State Constitution authorize the City to assess certain license and permit fees as a means of recovering the cost of regulating various activities. Examples include building permits and business licenses. The City also assesses service charges for the Community Services District on recreation programs and facility rentals. Charges for Services also reflect the allocation of costs to departments from the Internal Service Funds, which include Workers' Compensation, Vehicle and Equipment Replacement, Information Technology, Technology Replacement, Support Services, Support Services Replacement, Facility Operations, and Facility Replacement. In Fiscal Year 2019-20 Licenses, Permits and Service Charges revenue of $26,593,088. This category varies from year-to-year, primarily due to development -related revenue. Intergovernmental Revenues — 7.6% of Total Revenue Intergovernmental Revenues reflect revenue received from other governmental agencies, including: Property Tax distributions from the County for the Successor Agency to the Redevelopment Agency for administration ($250,000); Vehicle License Fees ($55,415); Property Tax in Lieu of Vehicle License Fees ($8,447,894); Public Safety, Recycling, and Community Development Block Grants ($559,111); and Measure A transportation revenue ($3,211,000). The estimated intergovernmental revenue for Fiscal Year 2019-20 is projected to be $12,867,575. Operating Transfers —14.3% of Total Revenue This category consists of operating transfers between funds. The estimated operating transfers for Fiscal Year 2019-20 totals $24,084,651. Significant transfers from the Measure S Fund include $7,989,182 to TCSD, $5,735,418 to the General Fund and $921,203 to the Library Fund, to support operations within these three funds. Additionally, Measure S transfers include deposits into the City's Asset Management Funds in the amount of $3,000,000 to supplement the existing balances in these replacement funds. Other significant transfers include transfers to the Debt Service Fund pursuant to lease agreements in the amount of $2,631,320 and transfers from the Gas Tax Fund in the amount of $2,956,887. Gas tax revenues are required to be recorded in a Special Revenue Fund and then transferred to support street and road maintenance costs reflected in the General Fund. Similarly, the Supplemental Law Enforcement Services grant revenue of $195,000 is transferred to the General Fund to support police service expenditures. Total Revenue Sources for Fiscal Year 2019-20 are projected to be $168,629,838 across all funds. Annual Operating Budget 61 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget MAJOR REVENUE SOURCES - ALL FUNDS Measure S Service Funds SARDA DebtFunds Operations Fines & Forfeitures 849,620 849,620 8,503,309 4,364,266 149,155 69,100 69,100 918,720 918,720 12,867,575 149,155 FINES & FORFEITURES Intergovernmental Revenues AB2766 MOTOR VEHICLE SUBVENTION AGENCY TRUST CONTRIBUTION 250,000 250,000 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT 559,111 559,111 MEASURE A 3,211,000 3,211,000 PROPERTY TAX IN LIEU OF VLF 8,447,894 8,447,894 SLESF GRANT 195,000 195,000 VEHICLE LICENSE FEES 55,415 4,459,772 8,597,105 157,928 2,386,724 10,991,559 55,415 26,593,088 Licenses, Permits and Service Charges AQUATICS 179,327 179,327 ASSESSMENTS 10,969,359 10,969,359 BUILDING 1,814,217 1,814,217 BUSINESS LICENSES 290,000 290,000 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 8,597,105 8,597,105 CLASSES/ACTIVITIES 36,739 36,739 CONTRACT CLASSES 1,000,000 1,000,000 DAY CAMPS 109,480 109,480 DEVELOPMENT FEES 325,995 325,995 FACILITY RENTALS 363,518 363,518 FIRE 752,328 752,328 HARVESTON LAKE BOAT REVENUE 4,200 4,200 LAND DEVELOPMENT 548,978 548,978 MUSEUM ADMISSIONS 75,500 75,500 PARKS MAINTENANCE 1,000 1,000 PLANNING 576,715 576,715 POLICE 144,113 144,113 PRINTING & COPIES 21,860 21,860 PUBLIC ART 157,928 157,928 PUBLIC WORKS 6,426 6,426 RECYCLING PROGRAM 18,000 18,000 SPORTS LEAGUES & TOURNAMENTS 241,888 241,888 THEATER ADMISSIONS 55,380 358,412 122,058 358,412 177,438 Miscellaneous MISCELLANEOUS 55,380 8,887,305 1,660,000 4,131,320 122,058 8,910,385 71,037 177,438 23,660,047 Operating Transfers In CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES 5,735,418 1,660,000 1,500,000 8,910,385 71,037 17,876,840 OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 3,151,887 3,027,238 2,345,933 2,631,320 5,783,207 3p027,238 Reimbursements CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 2,345,933 OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS 338,157 338,157 PECHANGA IGA 343,148 81,637,154 18,000 5,155,731 11,160,962 5,912,609 343,148 99,830,126 5,930,609 Taxes and Franchises DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES FRANCHISE FEES 3,351,304 3,351,304 GAS TAX 4,826,218 4,826,218 PEG FEES 210,723 210,723 PROPERTY TAX 8,706,389 8,706,389 QUIMBY FEES 211,412 211,412 REDEVELOPMENT PROPERTY TAX FUND DISTRIBUTION 5,155,731 5,155,731 SALES TAX 37,981,346 37,981,346 SALES TAX SHARING AGREEMENT (1,379,024) (1,379,024) SPECIALTAX (MEASURE C) 1,876,279 1,876,279 3,752,558 TRANSACTIONS AND USE TAX 27,744,000 27,744,000 TRANSIENT OCCUPANCY TAX 3,338,860 491,850 310,000 61,000 300,000 61,000 300,000 243,652 149,600 25,000 10,000 9,500 9,500 3,338,860 1,131,002 840,100 Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST LEASE/RENTAL INCOME 181,850 93,496 15,000 290,346 OTHER 556 556 Total Revenue 107,911,628 i 0• 62 AS lit ?r7n0: a. City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget MAJOR REVENUE SOURCES - ALL FUNDS Internal Special TCSD TCSD General Service Revenue/ Citywide Service Total % of Fund Funds SARDA Debt Funds Operations Levels Revenues Total Taxes and Franchises 81,637,154 - 5,155,731 11,160,962 1,876,279 - Licenses, Permits and Service Charges 4,459,772 8,597,105 - 157,928 2,386,724 10,991,559 Fines and Forfeitures 849,620 - - - 69,100 - Use of Money and Property 491,850 61,000 300,000 243,652 25,000 9,500 Intergovernmental Revenues 8,503,309 - - 4,364,266 - - Reimbursements 3,027,238 - - - - Operating Transfers In* 8,887,305 1,660,000 4,131,320 8,910,385 71,037 Miscellaneous Revenue 55,380 - - 122,058 - Total Revenues and Other Sources $ 107,911,628 $ 10,318,105 $ 5,455,731 $ 20,058,128 $ 13,389,546 $ 11,072,096 Total Revenues lesslnterfund Transfers * Note: Interfund Transfers are eliminated at the Citywide Level 99,830,126 59% 26,593,088 16% 918,720 1% 1,131,002 1% 12,867,575 8% 3,027,238 2% 23,660,047 14% 177,438 0% 168,205,234 144,545,187 City of Temecula Major Revenue Sources Licenses, Permits and Service Charges 16% Taxes and Franchises 59% Fines and Forfeitures 0% Use of Money and Property 1% Intergovernmental Revenues 8% Reimbursements 2% Miscellaneous Revenue 0% Operating Transfers In* 14% 63 Alft -.more- a The Heart of Southern California Wine Country General Fund The General Fund is the main operating fund for the City of Temecula. It is used to account for all financial resources for the City that are not restricted to a special purpose and otherwise required to be accounted for in another fund. The General Fund provides the resources necessary to sustain the day-to-day activities and pays for all administrative and operating expenditures. ilw 64 Alk fill The Heat of soy✓Iir W ,e Co"t'Y REVENUE BY SOURCE 001 - GENERAL FUND City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 2018- 2019- 2017- 2019 2020 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Taxes and Franchises PROPERTY TAX 8,131,035 8,364,543 8,706,389 341,846 4.1% SALES TAX 37,497,300 37,845,104 37,981,346 136,242 0.4% SALES TAX SHARING AGREEMENT (821,804) (1,301,469) (1,379,024) (77,555) -6.0% FRANCHISE FEES 3,363,832 3,336,935 3,351,304 14,369 0.4% TRANSIENT OCCUPANCY TAX 3,344,984 3,241,613 3,338,860 97,247 3.0% SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 1,877,254 1,876,279 1,876,279 - 0.0% DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES - 18,000 18,000 0.0% Licenses, Permits and Service Charges BUSINESS LICENSES 278,747 290,000 290,000 0.0% LAND DEVELOPMENT 1,007,032 1,748,805 548,978 (1,199,827) -68.6% PUBLIC WORKS 6,675 6,300 6,426 126 2.0% PARKS MAINTENANCE 1,897 1,000 1,000 - 0.0% BUILDING 1,711,051 1,514,273 1,814,217 299,944 19.8% PLANNING 461,357 526,603 576,715 50,112 9.5% POLICE 134,900 163,513 144,113 (19,400) -11.9% FIRE 769,723 782,288 752,328 (29,960) -3.8% DEVELOPMENT FEES 182,812 348,071 325,995 (22,076) -6.3% Fines & Forfeitures FINES & FORFEITURES 756,708 831,823 849,620 17,797 2.1% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST (34,895) 300,000 270,000 (30,000) -10.0% LEASE/RENTAL INCOME 162,603 115,344 181,850 66,506 57.7% OTHER 22,781 - - - 0.0% Intergovernmental Revenues PROPERTY TAX IN LIEU OF VLF 7,762,740 8,107,384 8,447,894 340,510 4.2% VEHICLE LICENSE FEES 58,441 59,579 55,415 (4,164) -7.0% GRANTS 78,050 60,000 - (60,000) -100.0% Reimbursements CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 1,733,247 2,537,106 2,345,933 (191,173) -7.5% PECHANGA IGA 319,779 342,164 343,148 984 0.3% OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS 342,707 243,202 338,157 94,955 39.0% Operating Transfers In OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 1,627,022 2,592,659 3,151,887 559,228 21.6% CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES 4,994,180 5,496,813 5,735,418 238,605 4.3% Miscellaneous MISCELLANEOUS 120,697 20,150 55,380 35,230 174.8% Total Revenues and Other Sources 75,890,855 79,468,082 80,127,628 659,546 0.8% 65 Alk The Heart of Southern Calfornia Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget REVENUE DETAIL 001 - GENERAL FUND 2017_ 2018- 2019- ° �O Fund Description 2018 2019 2020 Increase/ Increase/ 001 Actuals Current Proposed (Decrease) Decrease Budget Budget 161 - PLANNING 524,272 705,248 635,140 (70,108) -9.9% 162 - BUILDING & SAFETY 1,647,985 1,478,743 1,738,340 259,597 17.6% 163 - LAND DEVELOPMENT 1,080,842 1,896,731 795,548 (1,101,183) -58.1% 164 - PUBLIC WORKS 5,068 700 - (700) -100.0% 167 - PARKS MAINTENANCE 1,946,590 1,940,541 1,942,479 1,938 0.1% 170 - POLICE 466,983 449,501 449,501 - 0.0% 171 - FIRE 865,233 917,230 867,617 (49,613) -5.4% 199-NON-DEPARTMENTAL 4008 RESIDUAL RPTTF DISTRIBUTION 155,767 100,000 100,000 - 0.0% 4010 PROPERTY TAX - SECURED 6,678,472 7,005,717 7,304,861 299,144 4.3% 4012 PROPERTY TAX - UNSECURED 298,123 312,731 326,085 13,354 4.3% 4013 SUPPLEMENTAL TAX - AB 2345 174,817 135,000 139,000 4,000 3.0% 4016 PROPERTY TRANSFER TAX 747,683 731,190 753,126 21,936 3.0% 4018 FRANCHISE FEES 3,363,832 3,336,935 3,351,304 14,369 0.4% 4020 TRANSIENT OCCUPANCY TAX 3,344,984 3,241,613 3,338,860 97,247 3.0% 4024 SALES & USE TAX - STATE 37,497,300 37,845,104 37,981,346 136,242 0.4% 4026 SALES TAX SHARING AGREEMENT (821,804) (1,301,469) (1,379,024) (77,555) -6.0% 4028 HOMEOWNER PROPERTY TAX RELIEF 76,173 79,905 83,317 3,412 4.3% 4043 PROPERTY TAX IN LIEU OF VLF 7,762,740 8,107,384 8,447,894 340,510 4.2% 4046 MOTOR VEHICLE IN LIEU -STATE 58,441 59,579 55,415 (4,164) -7.0% 4047 VEHICLE CODE FINES 563,717 654,523 672,320 17,797 2.7% 4053 BIDS & PROPOSALS 6,675 6,300 6,426 126 2.0% 4056 BUSINESS LICENSE 278,747 290,000 290,000 - 0.0% 4059 FINGER PRINTING FEE - 23,400 - (23,400) -100.0% 4060 MISCELLANEOUS NON TAXABLE 19,757 3,000 7,000 4,000 133.3% 4061 RETURNED CHECK FEE 180 150 180 30 20.0% 4062 RECOVERY OF PRIOR YEAR EXPENSE 94,516 20,000 30,000 10,000 50.0% 4064 RIGHT OF WAY ADVERTISING 22,680 - 25,200 25,200 100.0% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 288,276 300,000 270,000 (30,000) -10.0% 4070 CASH OVER & SHORT 1,928 - - - 0.0% 4075 RENTAL INCOME 105,180 107,844 110,000 2,156 2.0% 4076 REIMBURSEMENTS 165,768 45,000 143,857 98,857 219.7% 4078 REIMBURSEMENT-PECHANGA IGA 319,779 342,164 343,148 984 0.3% 4084 REIMBURSEMENTS FROM CIP 1,733,247 2,474,844 2,345,933 (128,911) -5.2% 4089 OPERATING TRANSFER IN MEASURE S 4,994,180 5,496,813 5,735,418 238,605 4.3% 4090 OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 1,627,022 2,592,659 3,151,887 559,228 21.6% 4094 LEASE INCOME 7,501 7,500 7,650 150 2.0% 4100 STATE MANDATED COST 17,117 29,000 29,000 - 0.0% 4274 FACILITIES RENTALS 280 - - 0.0% 66 Alk The Heart of Southern California Wine Country Fund Description 001 REVENUE DETAIL 001 - GENERAL FUND 2017- 2018- 2018 2019 Actuals Current Budget City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 2019- % 2020 Increase/ Increase/ Proposed (Decrease) Decrease Budget 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS (325,099) 4550 GAIN ON DISPOSAL OF ASSETS 22,781 4653 UNCLAIMED FUNDS 3,321 - 4658 WRCOG BEYOND FRAMEWORK PROGRAM 66,936 - 4940 SB 1186 COLLECTION STATE $1 FEE 2,865 3,702 - 4941 AB1379 COLLECTION STATE $4 FEE - 28,800 28,800 TOTAL GENERAL FUND 75,890,855 79,468,082 80,127,628 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% (3,702)-100.0% 0.0% 659,546 0.80/0 67 ' City of Temecula Wo Fiscal Year 2019-20 iLiii Annual Operating Budget Fund: 001 GENERAL FUND Description 2017-18 Actuals 2018-19 Current Budget 2019-20 Proposed Budget Increase/ (Decrease) % Increase (Decrease) Revenues by Category Taxes and Franchises 53,392,601 53,381,005 53,893,154 512,149 1.0% Licenses, Permits and Service Charges 4,554,194 5,380,853 4,459,772 (921,081) -17.1% Fines and Forfeitures 756,708 831,823 849,620 17,797 2.1% Use of Money and Property 150,489 415,344 451,850 36,506 8.8% Intergovernmental Revenues 7,899,231 8,226,963 8,503,309 276,346 3.4% Reimbursements 2,395,733 3,122,472 3,027,238 (95,234) -3.0% Operating Transfers In 6,621,202 8,089,472 8,887,305 797,833 9.9% Miscellaneous Revenue 120,697 20,150 55,380 35,230 174.8% Total Operating Revenues 75,890,855 79,468,082 80,127,628 659,546 0.80/0 Expenditures by Department City Council 392,479 519,909 572,843 52,934 10.2% Community Support 107,000 125,000 125,000 - 0.0% City Manager 1,428,763 1,502,302 1,541,796 39,494 2.6% Economic Development 1,291,887 1,513,299 1,572,660 59,361 3.9% Emergency Management 124,538 254,185 157,271 (96,914) -38.1% City Clerk 1,104,483 1,390,868 1,433,319 42,451 3.1% City Attorney 977,221 942,300 942,300 - 0.0% Finance 2,327,774 2,582,165 2,753,604 171,439 6.6% Human Resources 979,538 1,187,017 1,263,313 76,296 6.4% Planning 2,057,155 2,509,664 2,590,198 80,534 3.2% Building & Safety 2,457,653 3,220,139 3,291,298 71,159 2.2% Land Development 1,666,613 1,761,655 1,898,973 137,318 7.8% Public Works 5,119,183 6,334,747 6,250,315 (84,432) -1.3% CIP Admin 1,861,738 2,506,189 2,417,537 (88,652) -3.5% Parks Maintenance 3,790,123 4,006,775 3,958,507 (48,268) -1.2% Police 31,061,517 33,001,394 34,860,436 1,859,042 5.6% Fire 7,607,683 9,569,368 10,260,935 691,567 7.2% Animal Control 460,280 425,572 475,235 49,663 11.7% Non Departmental: Property Tax Admin 69,628 83,852 85,529 1,677 2.0% Audi Reimbursement 285,393 - - - 0.0% Retiree Medical Contribution 3,329,927 1,627,325 1,500,000 (127,325) -7.8% PERs Replacement Benefit 112,962 97,484 97,484 0.0% Staffing Continuity Reserve 39,827 100,000 100,000 - 0.0% Total Operating Expenditures 68,653,365 75,261,209 78,148,553 2,887,344 3.8% Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures 7,237,490 4,206,873 1,979,075 (2,227,798) -53.0% Fund Description The General Fund is the main operating fund for the City of Temecula. It is used to account for all financial resources for the City that are not restricted to a special purpose and otherwise required to be accounted for in another fund. The General fund provides the resources necessary to sustain the day-to-day activities and pays for all administrative and operating expenditures. 68 Fund: 001 GENERAL FUND Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures Operating Transfers Out / One Time Payments Capital Improvement Fund Citywide Streetlight Acquisition and LED Retrofit I-15 Congestion Relief Sidewalks-DLR Drive Traffic Signal Park & Ride Access Improvements Section 115 Pension Trust Information Technology Fund Technology Replacement Fund 2018 Financing Lease - Civic Center 2018 Financing Lease - MRC Total Transfers Out / One Time Payments Fund Balance, Beginning of Year Fund Balance, End of Year Details of Fund Balance Nonspendable: Inventory Deposits Committed To: Economic Uncertainty Reserve (20%) Secondary Reserve (5%) Pechanga IGA Assigned To: Capital Projects Unassigned: City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 2017-18 2018-19 Current 2019-20 Increase/ % Increase Actuals Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) 7,237,490 4,206,873 1,979,075 (2,227,798) -53.0% (3,130,036) (642,077) 2,487,959 -79.5% (2,503,311) (400, 000) (200, 000) (442, 077) (226,725) (8,000,000) (1,404,941) 1,404,941 -100.0% (77,028) - 0.0% - (125,000) 125,000 -100.0% (2,135,231) (2,087,124) (2,075,512) 11,612 -0.6% - (416,855) (555,807) (138,952) 33.3% (10,212,259) (7,163,956) (3,273,396) 1,402,601 -54.3% 33,702,744 30,727,975 27,770,892 (2,957,083) -9.6% 30,727,975 27,770,892 26,476,571 (1,294,321) -4.7% 3,058 3,058 1,325 1,325 13,730,673 15,052,242 15,629,711 3,432,668 3,763,060 3,907,428 342,164 343,148 360,305 (3,058) -100.0% (1,325) -100.0% - 0.0% 577,469 3.8% 144,367 3.8% 17,157 5.0% 2,730,036 100,000 100,000 0.0% 10,488,051 8,608,059 6,479,128 (2,128,931) -24.7% 30,727,975 27,770,892 26,476,571 (1,294,321) -4.7% 69 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 002 - MEASURE S FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Taxes and Franchises TRANSACTIONS AND USE TAX 27,197,565 27,200,000 27,744,000 544,000 2.0% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 37,673 37,000 40,000 3,000 8.1% Operating Transfers In CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES - 503,165 - (503,165) -100.0% Revenues/Other Sources 27,235,238 27,740,165 27,784,000 43,835 0.2% Expenditures by Category TRANSFERS 20,790,647 29,548,220 30,986,568 1,438,348 4.9% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 20,790,647 29,548,220 30,986,568 1,438,348 4.9% Net Revenues 6,444,591 (1,808,055) (3,202,568) (1,394,513) 2.6% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 236,203 6,680,794 4,872,739 (1,808,055) -27.1% Fund Balance, End of Year 6,680,794 4,872,739 1,670,171 (3,202,568) -65.7% Fund Description Measure S, approved by the voters on November 8, 2016, established a one -cent Transactions and Use Tax for the City. The measure was approved based on the commitment to maintain 9-1-1 emergency response times, prevent cuts to local paramedic/police/fire protection, school safety patrols, youth/after-school, senior and disabled services; improve freeway interchanges/reduce traffic and provide for other general services. Analysis/Comments Measure S revenue continues to exceed projections, and is expected to be $27.7 million for FY19-20. Expenditures are appropriated in accordance with Council priorities, with $5.8 million dedicated to Public Safety, $3 million dedicated to Asset Management, $13.1 million dedicated for Capital Improvement Projects, and $9.0 million dedicated to General Services, including the Temecula Community Services District, Service Level B, and the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library. 70 Alft a The Heart of Southern California Wine Country Special Revenue and Debt Service Fund Summaries Special Revenue Funds are used to account for activities paid for by taxes or other designated revenue sources that have specific limitations on use according to law. Debt Service Funds are used to account for the resources necessary to pay principle and interest payments on general long-term debt obligations of the City and related entities. UZ, 5;= -1 O 71 Wlne Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget REVENUE BY DETAIL SPECIAL REVENUE & DEBT SERVICE FUNDS Rio 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease 100 - GAS TAX FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 2,671 5,500 4,000 (1,500) -27.3% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 96 - - 0.0% 4700 GAS TAX 2106 374,390 395,874 393,490 (2,384) -0.6% 4701 GAS TAX 2105 592,112 633,438 629,651 (3,787) -0.6% 4702 GAS TAX 2107 786,687 831,931 826,823 (5,108) -0.6% 4704 GAS TAX 2107.5 10,000 10,000 10,000 - 0.0% 4706 GAS TAX 2103 435,078 401,481 965,288 563,807 140.4% 4708 GAS TAX LOAN REPAYMENT 126,215 127,635 127,635 - 0.0% TOTAL GAS TAX FUND 2,327,249 2,405,859 2,956,887 551,028 22.9% 102 - ROAD MAINTENANCE REHABILITATION ACCOUNT (RMRA) FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 929 2,500 2,500 - 0.0% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 286 - - - 0.0% 4709 RMRA-ROAD MAINTENANCE REHABILITATION ACT 511,782 1,794,713 1,873,331 78,618 4.4% TOTAL ROAD MAINTENANCE REHABILITATION ACCOUNT 512,997 1,797,213 1,875,831 78,618 4.4% (RMRA)FUND 103 - STREET MAINTENANCE FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 5,000 5,000 - 0.0% 4089 OPERATING TRANSFER IN MEASURE S 1,400,000 1,500,000 100,000 7.1% TOTAL STREET MAINTENANCE FUND 1,405,000 1,505,000 100,000 7.1% 120 - DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES FUND 4051 OPEN SPACE AND TRAILS 96,579 180,232 137,453 (42,779) -23.7% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 65,902 70,000 80,000 10,000 14.3% 4240 DIF-QUIMBY 20,770 675,343 211,412 (463,931) -68.7% 4242 DIF-STREET IMPROVEMENTS 1,653,044 1,983,148 3,902,741 1,919,593 96.8% 4243 DIF-TRAFFIC SIGNALS 207,216 282,601 559,968 277,367 98.1% 4244 DIF-PARK & REC IMPROVEMENTS 331,346 618,336 471,570 (146,766) -23.7% 4245 DIF-CORPORATE FACILITIES 145,508 249,406 307,416 58,010 23.3% 4246 DIF-FIRE PROTECTION FACILITIES 120,796 139,761 185,321 45,560 32.6% 4247 DIF- LIBRARY FACILITIES 88,253 282,062 172,005 (110,057) -39.0% 4256 DIF -POLICE FACILITIES 65,139 158,422 176,135 17,713 11.2% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 107 - - - 0.0% TOTAL DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES FUND 2,794,660 4,639,311 6,204,021 1,564,710 33.7% 125 - PUBLIC EDUCATION 8, GOVERNMENT (PEG) FUND 4039 PEG FEES REVENUES 253,263 226,939 210,723 (16,216) -7.1% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 4,579 5,000 4,000 (1,000) -20.0% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 96 - - 0.0% TOTAL PUBLIC EDUCATION & GOVERNMENT (PEG) FUND 257,938 231,939 214,723 (17,216) -7.4% 140 - COMMUNITY DEV BLOCK GRANT FUND 4081 COMM DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT 955,538 1,036,090 559,111 (476,979) -46.0% TOTAL COMMUNITY DEV BLOCK GRANT FUND 955,538 1,036,090 559,111 (476,979) -46.0% 72 Wlne Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget REVENUE BY DETAIL SPECIAL REVENUE & DEBT SERVICE FUNDS Rio 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease 145 - TEMECULA ENERGY EFFICIENCY ASSET (TEAM) FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 2,548 3,000 2,500 (500) -16.7% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 29 - - - 0.0% TOTAL TEMECULA ENERGY EFFICIENCY ASSET (TEAM) 2,577 3,000 2,500 (500) -16.7% FUND 150 - AB 2766 MOTOR VEHICLE SUBVENTION FUND 4048 AB 2766 REVENUES 140,467 146,230 149,155 2,925 2.0% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 889 1,300 300 (1,000) -76.9% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 70 - - - 0.0% TOTAL AB 2766 MOTOR VEHICLE SUBVENTION FUND 141,426 147,530 149,455 1,925 1.3% 160 - SUPPLEMENTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 362 800 - (800) -100.0% 4085 SUPPLEMENTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES 236,073 186,000 195,000 9,000 4.8% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 21 - - - 0.0% TOTAL SUPPLEMENTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES 236,456 186,800 195,000 8,200 4.4% FUND 161 - TEMECULA MAJOR CRIMES REWARD FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 313 400 300 (100) -25.0% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 37 - - - 0.0% TOTAL TEMECULA MAIOR CRIMES REWARD FUND 350 400 300 (100) -25.0% 165 - AFFORDABLE HOUSING FUND 4002 RESIDUAL RECEIPT PAYMENT 25,973 37,222 (37,222) -100.0% 4060 MISCELLANEOUS NON TAXABLE 10 - - 0.0% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 9,679 12,000 10,000 (2,000) -16.7% 4066 LOAN INTEREST 987 597 556 (41) -6.9% 4068 LOAN REPAYMENT 31,075 - - - 0.0% 4075 RENTAL INCOME 29,224 122,593 93,496 (29,097) -23.7% 4076 REIMBURSEMENTS - 1,698 - (1,698) -100.0% 4092 CONTRIBUTIONS AGENCY TRUST 250,000 250,000 250,000 0.0% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 188 - - 0.0% TOTAL AFFORDABLE HOUSING FUND 347,136 424,110 354,052 (70,058) -16.5% 170 - MEASURE A FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 34,165 60,000 40,000 (20,000) -33.3% 4076 REIMBURSEMENTS 35,483 - - 0.0% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS (341) - - - 0.0% 4725 MEASURE"A" ALLOCATIONS 3,173,344 3,184,000 3,211,000 27,000 0.8% TOTAL MEASURE A FUND 3,242,651 3,244,000 3,251,000 7,000 0.2% 198 - PUBLIC ART FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 1,031 1,000 1,000 - 0.0% 4251 PUBLIC ART 38,566 73,511 157,928 84,417 114.8% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS (33) - - - 0.0% TOTAL PUBLIC ART FUND 39,564 74,511 158,928 84,417 113.3% City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget Wlne Country REVENUE BY DETAIL SPECIAL REVENUE & DEBT SERVICE FUNDS Rio 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease 395 - 2018 FINANCING LEASE (CIVIC CENTER) FUND 4090 OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 2,135,231 2,087,124 2,075,512 (11,612) -0.6% TOTAL 2018 FINANCING LEASE (CIVIC CENTER) FUND 2,135,231 2,087,124 2f075,512 (11,612) -0.6% 396 - 2018 FINANCING LEASE (MRC) FUND 4090 OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 416,855 555,808 138,953 33.3% 4663 2018 FINANCING LEASE MRC 100,000 - (100,000)-100.0% TOTAL 2018 FINANCING LEASE (MRC) FUND 516,855 555,808 38,953 7.5% 74 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 100 - GAS TAX FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Taxes and Franchises GAS TAX 2,324,482 2,400,359 2,952,887 552,528 23.0% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 2,767 5,500 4,000 (1,500) -27.3% Revenues/Other Sources 2,327,249 2,405,859 2,956,887 551,028 22.9% Expenditures by Category TRANSFERS 2,327,249 2,405,859 2,956,887 551,028 22.9% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 2,327,249 2,405,859 2,956,887 551,028 22.9% Net Revenues - - - - 22.9% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 0.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 0.0% Fund Description This fund was established to account for the tax per gallon on the purchase of motor vehicle fuel imposed by the State of California. A portion is allocated to the City of Temecula as specified in the California Streets and Highways Code (SHC) (Sections 2013, 2105, 2107 and 2107.5). Gas Tax monies are restricted to the repair, maintenance and upkeep of City streets and roads, and the purchase of equipment used to maintain roads. Analysis/Comments Gas Tax revenue is increasing over the prior year due to a projected increase in the Section 2103 Excise Tax calculation. Expenditures are transferred to the General Fund to augment the Public Works budget for street and road maintenance. 75 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 102 - ROAD MAINTENANCE REHABILITATION ACCOUNT (RMRA) FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Taxes and Franchises GAS TAX 511,782 1,794,713 1,873,331 78,618 4.4% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 1,215 2,500 2,500 - 0.0% Revenues/Other Sources 512,997 1,797,213 1,875,831 78,618 4.4% Expenditures by Category TRANSFERS - 2,310,210 1,875,831 (434,379) -18.8% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses - 2,310,210 1,875,831 (434,379) -18.80/0 Net Revenues 512,997 (512,997) - 512,997 -8.7% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year - 512,997 (512,997)-100.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 512,997 - 0.0% Fund Description This fund is to account for gasoline and vehicle registration taxes pursuant to the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 (SBI Beall). Monies are collected by the State of California and allocated to local agencies for streets and roads projects and other transportation uses. Analysis/Comments RMRA revenue is projected to increase by 4.4%. Expenditures reflect the transfer of funds to the Capital Improvement Program to fund the Pavement Rehabilitation Project. 76 Alk The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 103 - STREET MAINTENANCE FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 5,000 5,000 - 0.0% Operating Transfers In CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES 1,400,000 1,500,000 100,000 7.1% Revenues/Other Sources - 1,405,000 1,505,000 100,000 7.1% Net Revenues 1,405,000 1,505,000 100,000 7.1% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year - 1,405,000 1,405,000 100.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 1,405,000 2,910,000 1,505,000 107.1% Fund Description This fund was established to accumulate resources for the future replacement of streets and roads throughout the City. Analysis/Comments Street Maintenance contribution from Measure S increased by $100,000 in FY19-20 in order to begin building Fund Balance for the future replacement of the City's street and road network. 77 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 120 - DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Taxes and Franchises DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES 2,707,881 3,893,968 5,912,609 2,018,641 51.8% QUIMBY FEES 20,770 675,343 211,412 (463,931) -68.7% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 66,009 70,000 80,000 10,000 14.3% Revenues/Other Sources 2,794,660 4,639,311 6,204,021 1,564,710 33.7% Expenditures by Category OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 11,790 - - - 0.0% TRANSFERS 3,123,748 8,173,855 13,086,501 4,912,646 60.1% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 3,135,538 8,173,855 13,086,501 4,912,646 60.1% Net Revenues (340,878) (3,534,544) (6,882,480) (3,347,936) 50.6% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 4,336,042 3,995,164 6,882,480 2,887,316 72.3% Adjustment to Fund Balance - 6,421,860 - (6,421,860) -100.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 3,995,164 6,882,480 (6,882,480) -100.0% Fund Description This fund accounts for the development impact fees received as a result of development activity within the City. The fees are primarily used to fund Capital Improvement Projects designed to mitigate the impacts of development projects. Analysis/Comments Development Impact Fees vary from year-to-year, based on the anticipated transfer of funds to the Capital Improvement Program to fund a variety of capital projects. Unexpended funds from FY18-19 will carry -forward to FY19-20, and are reflected in the Adjustment to Fund Balance. 78 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 125 - PUBLIC EDUCATION & GOVERNMENT (PEG) FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Taxes and Franchises PEG FEES 253,263 226,939 210,723 (16,216) -7.1% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 4,675 5,000 4,000 (1,000) -20.0% Revenues/Other Sources 257,938 231,939 214,723 (17,216) -7.4% Expenditures by Category CAPITAL OUTLAY 210,490 364,995 305,000 (59,995) -16.4% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 210,490 364,995 305,000 (59,995) -16.4% Net Revenues 47,448 (133,056) (90,277) 42,779 -12.9% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 309,909 357,357 224,301 (133,056) -37.2% Fund Balance, End of Year 357,357 224,301 134,024 (90,277) -40.2% Fund Description This fund was established to account for Public Education and Government (PEG) fees. Fees received from local cable operators for the sole purpose of supporting the access facilities and activities within the City. Analysis/Comments PEG revenue is projected to decline by 7.1% in FY19-20 due to fewer cable subscribers than in the prior year. Expenditures of PEG Funds are programmed by the Information Technology Department for the replacement and upgrade of the audio-visual equipment in the Conference Center and various production equipment. 79 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 140 - COMMUNITY DEV BLOCK GRANT FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Intergovernmental Revenues COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK 955,538 1,036,090 559,111 (476,979) -46.0% GRANT Revenues/Other Sources 955,538 1,036,090 559,111 (476,979) -46.0% Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 103,055 109,385 111,685 2,300 2.1% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 140,974 113,880 123,766 9,886 8.7% TRANSFERS 711,509 812,825 323,660 (489,165) -60.2% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 955,538 1,036,090 559,111 (476,979) -46.0% Net Revenues - - - -46.0% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 0.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 100.0% Fund Description This fund was established to account for grants received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The grants are used for the redevelopment of a viable community by providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and for expanding opportunities, principally for persons of low and moderate income. Analysis/Comments CDBG revenue fluctuates year -over -year based on the projected capital expenditures. 20% of CDBG is allocated to the administration of the program, 15% is allocated toward Public Services and 65% is allocated to fund capital projects. 80 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 145 - TEMECULA ENERGY EFFICIENCY ASSET TEAM FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 2,577 3,000 2,500 (500) -16.7% Revenues/Other Sources 2,577 3,000 2,500 (500) -16.7% Expenditures by Category TRANSFERS 10,000 - - - 0.0% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 10,000 - - - 0.00/0 Net Revenues (7,423) 3,000 2,500 (500) -16.7% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 197,697 190,274 193,274 3,000 1.6% Fund Balance, End of Year 190,274 193,274 195,774 2,500 1.3% Fund Description This fund was established to capture energy efficiency rebates and reimbursements as well as expenditure savings resulting from energy efficiency projects completed at various City facilities. Revenue collected in this fund will be utilized on future energy efficiency projects. Analysis/Comments TEEM Fund revenue reflects the accrual of interest only. Expenditures of these funds will occur as energy efficiency projects are identified. 81 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 150 - AB 2766 MOTOR VEHICLE SUBVENTION FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 959 1,300 300 (1,000) -76.9% Intergovernmental Revenues AB2766 MOTOR VEHICLE SUBVENTION 140,467 146,230 149,155 2,925 2.0% Revenues/Other Sources 141,426 147,530 149,455 1,925 1.3% Expenditures by Category OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 10,000 10,000 10,000 - 0.0% TRANSFERS 135,000 226,353 183,225 (43,128) -19.1% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 145,000 236,353 193,225 (43,128) -18.2% Net Revenues (3,574) (88,823) (43,770) 45,053 -10.7% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 136,167 132,593 43,770 (88,823) -67.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 132,593 43,770 - (43,770) -100.0% Fund Description This fund was established to account for State funds that are used to implement programs and projects that reduce air pollution from motor vehicles. This fund is used for Capital projects and the City's share of WRCOG's Clean Cities Coalition. Analysis/Comments AB2766 revenue is projected to increase by 2% in FY19-20. Expenditures are allocated to fund the Clean Cities Coalition, and the remainder is transferred to the Capital Improvement Program. 82 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 160 - SUPPLEMENTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT SERVICES FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 383 800 - (800)-100.0% Intergovernmental Revenues SLESF GRANT 236,073 186,000 195,000 9,000 4.8% Revenues/Other Sources 236,456 186,800 195,000 8,200 4.4% Expenditures by Category TRANSFERS 236,456 186,800 195,000 8,200 4.4% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 236,456 186,800 195,000 8,200 4.4% Net Revenues - - - - 4.4% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 0.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 0.0% Fund Description This fund was established to account for the Supplemental Law Enforcement Services grant monies from the State of California which are provided to assist cities in delivering front line law enforcement services. These monies supplement existing services and may not be used to supplant any existing funding for law enforcement services provided by the City. Analysis/Comments Supplemental Law Enforcement Services (SLESF) revenues are projected to increase 4.8% to reflect changes in population. Expenditures reflect the transfer of these funds to the General Fund to supplement the Police budget. 83 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 161 - TEMECULA MAJOR CRIMES REWARD FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 350 400 300 (100) -25.0% Revenues/Other Sources 350 400 300 (100) -25.0% Net Revenues 350 400 300 (100) -25.0% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 25,662 26,012 26,412 400 1.5% Fund Balance, End of Year 26,012 26,412 26,712 300 1.1% Fund Description This fund was established to account for a reward for information that leads to the capture and conviction of the person(s) responsible for the murder of Larry Robinson and Justin Triplett. The General Fund contributed $25,000 and the public can also contribute to this fund. The fund was established in accordance with Resolution Nos. 13-25 and 15-37. In April of 2018, Council adopted Resolution No. 18-24 for the continuation of the reward for an additional three years to assist the Sheriff in the investigation since no person has been arrested for the Larry Robinson murder. Analysis/Comments Interest accrues on the Fund Balance each year. Expenditures will be programmed when directed by the Sheriffs office. 84 Alk The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 165 - AFFORDABLE HOUSING FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Miscellaneous MISCELLANEOUS 25,973 37,222 (37,222) -100.0% Licenses, Permits and Service Charges POLICE 10 - - 0.0% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 9,867 12,000 10,000 (2,000) -16.7% LEASE/RENTAL INCOME 29,224 122,593 93,496 (29,097) -23.7% OTHER 32,062 597 556 (41) -6.9% Intergovernmental Revenues AGENCY TRUST CONTRIBUTION 250,000 250,000 250,000 - 0.0% Reimbursements OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS - 1,698 - (1,698) -100.0% Revenues/Other Sources 347,136 424,110 354,052 (70,058) -16.5% Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 180,681 260,716 270,553 9,837 3.8% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 122,865 252,407 252,407 - 0.0% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 35,757 32,502 38,420 5,918 18.2% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 339,303 545,625 561,380 15,755 2.9% Net Revenues 7,833 (121,515) (207,328) (85,813) -5.6% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 10,811,804 10,819,637 10,698,122 (121,515) -1.1% Fund Balance, End of Year 10,819,637 10,698,122 10,490,794 (207,328) -1.9% Fund Description The Affordable Housing fund contains the assets as well as loan and rental income which have been transferred to the City of Temecula from the former Redevelopment Agency . Analysis/Comments Affordable Housing revenue is projected to decrease by 16.5% due to less Residual Receipts revenue (categorized as Miscellaneous) and less Rental Income. Expenditures are increasing by 2.9%, due primarily to the 3% cost of living adjustment provided to employees in accordance with the City's labor agreements. 85 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 170 - MEASURE A FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 33,824 60,000 40,000 (20,000) -33.3% Intergovernmental Revenues MEASURE A 3,173,344 3,184,000 3,211,000 27,000 0.8% Reimbursements OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS 35,483 - - - 0.0% Revenues/Other Sources 3,242,651 3,244,000 3,251,000 7,000 0.2% Expenditures by Category OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 795,372 2,008,541 2,008,541 - 0.0% TRANSFERS 4,455,221 4,057,668 2,663,839 (1,393,829) -34.4% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 5,250,593 6,066,209 4,672,380 (1,393,829) -23.0% Net Revenues (2,007,942) (2,822,209) (1,421,380) 1,400,829 -14.9% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 6,251,531 4,243,589 1,421,380 (2,822,209) -66.5% Fund Balance, End of Year 4,243,589 1,421,380 - (1,421,380) -100.0% Fund Description This fund was established to account for the City's allocation of the County of Riverside's additional one-half percent sales tax for transportation. These monies are restricted for use on local streets. In 2002, Measure A was extended by Riverside County voters. Measure A will continue to fund transportation improvements through 2039. Analysis/Comments Measure A revenue is projected to increase slightly, however because the fund balance is being spent down, Investment Interest is projected to decrease in FY19-20. Expenditures of Measure A include transfers to fund the Pavement Rehabilitation project in the Capital Improvement Program and ongoing street and road maintenance. 86 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 198 - PUBLIC ART FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 998 1,000 1,000 - 0.0% Licenses, Permits and Service Charges PUBLIC ART 38,566 73,511 157,928 84,417 114.8% Revenues/Other Sources 39,564 74,511 158,928 84,417 113.3% Expenditures by Category OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE - 4,026 - (4,026) -100.0% TRANSFERS 82,200 - 0.0% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 82,200 4,026 - (4,026) -100.00/0 Net Revenues (42,636) 70,485 158,928 88,443 102.4% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 68,605 25,969 96,454 70,485 271.4% Fund Balance, End of Year 25,969 96,454 255,382 158,928 164.8% Fund Description This fund was established pursuant to Temecula Municipal Code Section 5.08.040, whereby the fund serves a a depository for the fees paid in lieu of art as well as monetary donations for public art. The Public Art In Lieu fee is one -tenth of one percent of an eligible development project in excess of $100,000. Eligble uses of this fund include the design, acquisition, installation, improvement, maintenance and insurance of public artwork; offering of performing arts programs on City property for the community; and art education programs on City property for the community. Analysis/Comments The Public Art Fund revenue is projected to increase as a result of development activity. There are no expenditures of Public Art programmed at this time. 87 ({/hi.l�Z'ki� The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 395 - 2018 FINANCING LEASE (CIVIC CENTER) FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Operating Transfers In OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 2,135,231 2,087,124 2,075,512 (11,612) -0.6% Revenues/Other Sources 2,135,231 2,087,124 2,075,512 (11,612) -0.6% Expenditures by Category OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 2,135,231 2,087,124 2,075,512 (11,612) -0.6% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 2,135,231 2,087,124 2,075,512 (11,612) -0.6% Net Revenues Fund Balance, Beginning of Year Fund Balance, End of Year Fund Description - -0.6% - 0.0% 0.0% This fund was established to account for the payment of interest and principal of the refunding of the 2001 and 2008 Certificates of Participation (COPs). The 2001 COPs were originally issued to finance the construction of the Community Recreation Center and the 2008 COPS were originally issued to finance the construction of the Civic Center. In Fiscal Year 2018-19, the terms of the lease were refinanced, lowering the interest rate from 3.75% to 3.42%. The term of the lease expires September 1, 2033. Analysis/Comments The Financing Lease revenue reflects a transfer in from the General Fund to cover the costs of the Lease payments related to the Civic Center. 88 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 396 - 2018 FINANCING LEASE (MRC) FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Reimbursements CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 100,000 - (100,000) -100.0% Operating Transfers In OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 416,855 555,808 138,953 33.3% Revenues/Other Sources - 516,855 555,808 38,953 7.S% Expenditures by Category OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 462,233 555,808 93,575 20.2% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses - 462,233 555,808 93,575 20.2% Net Revenues 54,622 - (54,622) 13.5% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year - 54,622 54,622 100.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 54,622 54,622 - 0.0% Fund Description This fund was established to account for the payments of interest and principal related to the financing of the rehabilitation of the Margarita Recreation Center (MRC). The Lease Agreement, dated August 1, 2018, generated $6.5 million in proceeds at an interest rate of 3.42%. The Term of the lease expires September 1, 2033, Analysis/Comments The Financing Lease revenue reflects a transfer in from the General Fund to cover the costs of the Lease payments associated with the renovation of the Margarita Recreation Center. 89 ]] a The Heart of Southern California Wine Country Temecula Community Services District Summaries The Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) was established as an assessment district to provide a comprehensive neighborhood and community park system, as well as a complement of recreational and cultural programs, community and human services and special events activities aimed at enhancing the high quality of life of our youth, teens, adults, seniors and special needs population. The District also provides street lighting, median and slope maintenance, refuse hauling and a recycling program, emergency dirt road maintenance, library services and an intern fellowship program. .o] Alk City of Temecula �-� Fiscal Year 2019-2020 eatofSo he, CaF Annual Operating Budget The H Wine Country REVENUE BY SOURCE 190 - TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT FUND 2018- 2019- 2017- 2019 2020 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Taxes and Franchises SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 1,873,305 1,876,280 1,876,279 (1) 0.0% Licenses, Permits and Service Charges CONTRACT CLASSES 1,008,764 950,000 1,000,000 50,000 5.3% CLASSES/ACTIVITIES 48,692 36,614 36,739 125 0.3% FACILITY RENTALS 351,410 364,970 363,518 (1,452) -0.4% AQUATICS 199,925 179,327 179,327 - 0.0% MUSEUM ADMISSIONS 199,198 72,500 75,500 31000 4.1% THEATER ADMISSIONS 316,256 358,412 358,412 - 0.0% SPORTS LEAGUES & 198,648 231,388 241,888 101500 4.5% TOURNAMENTS DAY CAMPS 121,308 109,480 109,480 0.0% Fines & Forfeitures FINES & FORFEITURES 50 100 100 0.0% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 17,217 15,000 7,000 (8,000) -53.3% Intergovernmental Revenues GRANTS 6,997 55,000 - (55,000) -100.0% Reimbursements OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS 28,415 40,000 - (40,000) -100.0% Operating Transfers In CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES 5,341,503 6,211,702 7,989,182 1,777,480 28.6% Miscellaneous MISCELLANEOUS 106,636 116,297 122,058 51761 5.0% Total Revenues and Other Sources 9,818,324 10.617.070 12.359.483 1,742,413 16.4% 91 ���r ` the H Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget REVENUE DETAIL TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT FUND 2017- 0/0 2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease 180 - OPERATIONS 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 451,784 208,664 423,237 214,573 102.8% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 15,777 15,000 7,000 (8,000) -53.3% 4076 REIMBURSEMENTS 4,726 - - 0.0% 4089 OPERATING TRANSFER IN MEASURE S 5,341,503 6,211,702 7,989,182 1,777,480 28.6% 181 - TCSD - SENIOR CENTER 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 53,482 99,527 86,706 (12,821) -12.9% 4658 WRCOG BEYOND FRAMEWORK PROGRAM 6,997 5,000 - (5,000) -100.0% 4980 CLASSES/ACTIVITIES 1,870 3,660 3,660 0.0% 4983 TRANSPORTATION 974 1,000 1,000 0.0% 4986 EXCURSIONS 1,230 2,163 2,163 0.0% 4990 INDOOR RENTALS 2,626 1,000 1,000 0.0% 182 - TCSD - COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 149,187 202,317 176,254 (26,063) -12.9% 4070 CASH OVER & SHORT 44 - - 0.0% 4966 OPEN GYM RESIDENT/NONRESIDENT 9,544 12,000 12,000 0.0% 4984 DAY CAMP 121,308 109,480 109,480 0.0% 4989 PICNIC SHELTER RENTALS 8,374 10,000 10,000 0.0% 4990 INDOOR RENTALS 38,773 24,267 14,267 (10,000) -41.2% 4992 SPECIAL EVENTS 5,763 10,239 11,000 761 7.4% 4998 SKATE PARK 3,180 3,220 3,220 - 0.0% 183 - TCSD - SPECIAL EVENTS 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 191,550 187,809 163,615 (24,194) -12.9% 4062 RECOVERY OF PRIOR YEAR EXPENSE 150 - - 0.0% 4070 CASH OVER & SHORT (1) - - 0.0% 4161 SPECIAL EVENT PERMITS 1,600 1,200 1,200 0.0% 4990 INDOOR RENTALS (335) - - 0.0% 4992 SPECIAL EVENTS 76,206 78,578 78,578 0.0% 184 - TCSD - TEMECULA COMMUNITY CENTER 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 22,794 46,307 40,342 (5,965) -12.9% 4990 INDOOR RENTALS 70,229 48,353 48,353 0.0% 185 - TCSD - MUSEUM 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 66,844 81,985 71,423 (10,562) -12.9% 4058 MISCELLANEOUS 308 - - 0.0% 4088 DONATIONS - 50 50 0.0% 4507 PHOTO REPRODUCTIONS 125 125 - 0.0% 4508 GIFT SHOP - - 5,000 5,000 100.0% 4951 TOURS 711 1,500 1,500 - 0.0% 4953 FIELD TRIPS 4,192 2,375 2,500 125 5.3% 4980 CLASSES/ACTIVITIES 5,900 1,010 1,010 - 0.0% 4990 INDOOR RENTALS - 900 3,400 2,500 277.8% 4991 ADMISSIONS 12,730 12,000 15,000 3,000 25.0% 92 City of Temecula ���r ` Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget the H Wine Country REVENUE DETAIL TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT FUND 2017- 0/0 2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease 186 - TCSD - AOUATICS 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 144,458 198,416 173,108 (25,308) -12.8% 4970 SWIM LESSONS 162,303 145,000 145,000 0.0% 4971 LAP SWIM 9,971 11,327 11,327 0.0% 4972 PUBLIC SWIM 13,761 15,000 15,000 0.0% 4973 FAMILY NIGHT SWIM 1,140 2,000 2,000 - 0.0% 4974 POOL RENTALS 16,786 15,000 21,048 6,048 40.3% 4976 NON RESIDENT SWIM 12,750 6,000 6,000 - 0.0% 4980 CLASSES/ACTIVITIES 30t831 23,700 23,700 0.0% 187 - TCSD - SPORTS 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 75,166 64,020 55,772 (8,248) -12.9% 4959 ADULT BASKETBALL LEAGUE - 6,615 9,615 3,000 45.4% 4960 ADULT SOFTBALL 50,992 70,192 70,192 - 0.0% 4962 HOCKEY 19,819 17,500 30,000 12,500 71.4% 4963 TOURNAMENTS 94,910 109,641 104,641 (5,000) -4.6% 4964 ADULT SOFTBALL NON-RESIDENT 10,355 12,220 12,220 0.0% 4965 YOUTH LEAGUES - NON RESIDENT 9,595 - - 0.0% 4988 FIELD RENTALS/LIGHTS 134,413 145,000 145,000 0.0% 4994 TENNIS 253 - - 0.0% 4997 CONCESSIONS 16,171 15,375 15,375 0.0% 188 - TCSD - CHILDRENS MUSEUM 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 38,712 20,732 18,062 (2,670) -12.9% 4991 ADMISSIONS 123,073 - - 0.0% 189 - TCSD - COMMUNITY THEATER 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 242,390 258,742 225,410 (33,332) -12.9% 4058 MISCELLANEOUS 500 - - 0.0% 4070 CASH OVER & SHORT (20) - - 0.0% 4088 DONATIONS - 500 500 0.0% 4901 FRONT OF HOUSE FEES 7,498 10,000 10,000 0.0% 4906 THEATER -STAGEHAND LABOR REIMB. 111,485 105,012 105,012 0.0% 4907 THEATER -TICKET SERVICES REIMB. 38,131 39,900 39,900 0.0% 4910 THEATER-TEMECULA PRESENTS 159,142 203,500 203,500 0.0% 4990 INDOOR RENTALS 39,272 76,000 76,000 0.0% 4991 ADMISSIONS 62,684 59,000 59,000 0.0% 4997 CONCESSIONS 1,576 1,400 1,400 0.0% 4999 THEATER -EQUIPMENT RENTALS 12,620 19,250 19,250 0.0% 190 - TCSD - CULTURAL ARTS 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 51,628 59,272 51,637 (7,635) -12.9% 4992 SPECIAL EVENTS 300 300 300 0.0% 193 - TCSD-CONFERENCE CENTER 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 19,200 16,014 13,951 (2,063) -12.9% 4990 INDOOR RENTALS 28,652 25,200 25,200 0.0% 93 Al Heard of Sout�fornis Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget REVENUE DETAIL TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT FUND 20170/0 - 2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease 194 - TCSD- HUMAN SERVICES 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 39,435 42,160 36,729 (5,431) -12.9% 4980 CLASSES/ACTIVITIES 2,095 1,506 1,506 0.0% 4992 SPECIAL EVENTS 3,266 5,690 5,690 0.0% 4995 HIGH HOPES 2,396 4,040 4,040 0.0% 195 - TCSD-MARGARITA RECREATION CENTER 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 9,666 30,336 26,428 (3,908) -12.9% 196 - TCSD-JEFFERSON RECREATION CENTER 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) - 10,155 8,847 (1,308) -12.9% 197 - TCSD-CONTRACT CLASSES 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 185,968 163,834 142,728 (21,106) -12.9% 4982 CONTRACTED CLASSES 1,008,764 950,000 1,000,000 50,000 5.3% 198 - TCSD-PARK RANGERS 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 41,714 41,976 36,569 (5,407) -12.9% 4257 PARK RANGER CITATIONS 50 100 100 0.0% 201 - TCSD-RESPONSIBLE COMPASSION 4004 SPECIAL TAX (MEASURE C) 89,327 144,014 125,461 (18,553) -12.9% 4076 REIMBURSEMENTS 23,689 40,000 - (40,000) -100.0% 4658 WRCOG BEYOND FRAMEWORK PROGRAM - 50,000 (50,000) -100.0% 199 - NON -DEPARTMENTAL 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 1,417 - - - 0.0% TOTAL TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT FUND 9,818,324 10,617,070 12,359,483 1,742,413 16.4% 94 ���r ` the H Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget REVENUE DETAIL TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT FUND 2017- % 2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease 192 - TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "B" STREET LIGHTS FUND 4005 ASSESSMENTS 640,812 641,384 640,767 (617) -0.1% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 2,728 1,200 200 (1,000) -83.3% 4089 OPERATING TRANSFER IN MEASURE S 360,251 62,661 71,037 8,376 13.4% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 114 - - - 0.0% TOTAL TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "B" STREET LIGHTS 1,003,905 705,245 712,004 6,759 1.00/0 FUND 5XX - TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "C" SLOPE MAINTENANCE FUNDS 4005 ASSESSMENTS 1,591,716 1,586,430 1,587,230 800 0.1% 4062 RECOVERY OF PRIOR YEAR EXPENSE 11,650 - - - 0.0% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 17,263 19,000 (19,000) -100.0% 4076 REIMBURSEMENTS 131 - 0.0% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 455 - 0.0% TOTAL TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "B" STREET LIGHTS 1,621,215 1,605,430 1,587,230 (18,200) -1.10/0 FUND 194 - TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "D" REFUSE/RECYCLING FUND 4005 ASSESSMENTS 7,680,091 7,991,790 8,491,541 499,751 6.3% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 14,142 5,000 5,000 - 0.0% 4096 RECYCLING PROGRAM 17,906 18,000 18,000 0.0% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS (2,923) - - - 0.0% TOTAL TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "D" REFUSE/RECYCLING FUND 7,709,216 8,014,790 8,514,541 499,751 6.2% 195 - TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "R" STREET/ROAD MAINT FUND 4005 ASSESSMENTS 5,619 5,532 5,532 - 0.0% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 604 400 300 (100) -25.0% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 4 - - - 0.0% TOTAL TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "R" STREET/ROAD MAINT FUND 6,227 5,932 5,832 (100) -1.7% 196 - TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. FUND 4005 ASSESSMENTS 4007 HARVESTON LAKE BOAT REVENUE 4062 RECOVERY OF PRIOR YEAR EXPENSE 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 4076 REIMBURSEMENTS 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS TOTAL TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. FUND 239,939 241,870 244,289 2,419 1.0% 4,150 4,200 4,200 - 0.0% 1,473 - - 0.0% 4,423 5,500 4,000 (1,500) -27.3% 18 - - 0.0% 104 0.0% 250,107 251,570 252,489 919 0.4% 95 Al Heard of Sout�fornis Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget REVENUE DETAIL TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT FUND 20170/0 - 2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease 197 - TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND 4062 RECOVERY OF PRIOR YEAR EXPENSE 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 4076 REIMBURSEMENTS 4089 OPERATING TRANSFER IN MEASURE S 4271 FINES & FEES 4272 LOST DAMAGED MATERIALS 4273 PRINTING & COPIES 4274 FACILITIES RENTALS 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS TOTAL TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND 3,762 - - 0.0% 2,571 5,000 3,000 (2,000) -40.0% 168 - - - 0.0% 770,734 662,527 921,203 258,676 39.0% 78,582 69,000 69,000 - 0.0% (494) - - 0.0% 21,107 23,760 21,860 (1,900) -8.0% 4,830 15,000 15,000 0.0% 292 - - - 0.0% 881,552 775,287 1,030,063 254,776 32.9% `­7 96 AUL �1 City of Temecula �r Fiscal Year 2019-2020 (he Heart of SouthernCalifor� Annual Operating Budget Wine Country TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT (TCSD) ALL FUNDS COMBINED Description 2017-2018 Actuals 2018-2019 Current Budget 2019-2020 Proposed Budget Increase/ (Decrease) Increase/ Decrease Revenues by Fund 190 - Temecula Community Services District Fund 9,818,324 10,617,070 12,359,483 1,742,413 16.4% 192 - TCSD Service Level "B" Street Lights Fund 1,003,905 705,245 712,004 6,759 1.0% 194 - TCSD Service Level "D" Refuse/Recycling Fund 7,709,216 8,014,790 8,514,541 499,751 6.2% 195 - TCSD Service Level "R" Street/Road Maint Fund 6,227 5,932 5,832 (100) -1.7% 196 - TCSD Service Level "L" Lake Park Maint. Fund 250,107 251,570 252,489 919 0.4% 197 - Temecula Library Fund 881,552 775,287 1,030,063 254,776 32.9% 501-530 Service Level C 1,621,679 1,605,430 1,587,230 (18,200) -1.1% Total Revenues and Other Sources 21,291,010 21,975,324 24,461,642 2,486,318 11.3% Expenditures by Fund 190 - Temecula Community Services District Fund 10,029,447 11,490,480 12,313,658 823,178 7.2% 192 - TCSD Service Level "B" Street Lights Fund 911,766 789,201 789,853 652 0.1% 194 - TCSD Service Level "D" Refuse/Recycling Fund 7,843,263 8,078,891 8,574,356 495,465 6.1% 195 - TCSD Service Level "R" Street/Road Maint Fund 2,847 29,663 5,532 (24,131) -81.4% 196 - TCSD Service Level "L" Lake Park Maint. Fund 231,793 247,276 259,032 11,756 4.8% 197 - Temecula Library Fund 783,315 994,140 1,042,277 48,137 4.8% 501-530 Service Level C 1,406,394 1,553,144 1,823,065 269,921 17.4% Total Expenditures and Other Financial Uses 21,208,825 23,182,795 24,807,774 1,624,979 7.0% Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures 82,185 (1,207,471) (346,132) 861,339 9.1% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 3,837,080 3,919,265 2,711,794 (1,207,471) -30.8% Fund Balance, End of Year 3,919,265 2,711,794 2,365,662 (346,132) -12.8% Fund Description The Temecula Community Services District is a separate governmental entity created to provide Parks and Recreation services as well as the maintenance of parks and facilities, residential street lights, slopes, refuse and recycling, maintenance of rural roads, lake park maintenance, and library services. 97 Ak _1 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 ( Annual Operating Budget The Heart of Southern California CI110- TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT (TCSD) OPERATIONS SUMMARY Fund: 190 - TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT FUND Description 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ % Increase/ Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Department OPERATIONS 5,813,790 6,435,366 8,419,419 1,984,053 30.8% SENIOR CENTER 67,179 112,350 94,529 (17,821) -15.9% COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER 336,173 371,523 336,221 (35,302) -9.5% SPECIAL EVENTS 269,170 267,587 243,393 (24,194) -9.0% TEMECULA COMMUNITY CENTER 93,023 94,660 88,695 (5,965) -6.3% MUSEUM 90,685 99,945 100,008 63 0.1% AQUATICS 392,000 416,443 397,183 (19,260) -4.6% SPORTS 411,674 440,563 442,815 2,252 0.5% CHILDRENS MUSEUM 161,785 20,732 18,062 (2,670) -12.9% COMMUNITY THEATER 675,278 773,304 739,972 (33,332) -4.3% CULTURAL ARTS 51,928 59,572 51,937 (7,635) -12.8% CONFERENCE CENTER 47,852 41,214 39,151 (2,063) -5.0% HUMAN SERVICES 47,192 53,396 47,965 (5,431) -10.2% MARGARITA RECREATION CENTER 9,666 30,336 26,428 (3,908) -12.9% JEFFERSON RECREATION CENTER - 10,155 8,847 (1,308) -12.9% CONTRACT CLASSES 1,194,732 1,113,834 1,142,728 28,894 2.6% PARK RANGERS 41,764 42,076 36,669 (5,407) -12.9% NON -DEPARTMENTAL 1,417 - - 0.0% RESPONSIBLE COMPASSION 113,016 234,014 125,461 (108,553) -46.4% Total Revenues and Other Sources 9,818,324 10,617,070 12,359,483 1,742,413 16.4% Expenditures by Department OPERATIONS 2,242,443 2,968,333 3,264,528 296,195 10.0% SENIOR CENTER 348,799 453,462 482,327 28,865 6.4% COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER 965,363 970,767 1,023,489 52,722 5.4% SPECIAL EVENTS 843,888 996,235 1,138,026 141,791 14.2% TEMECULA COMMUNITY CENTER 197,289 228,887 372,175 143,288 62.6% MUSEUM 363,662 525,181 558,568 33,387 6.4% AQUATICS 901,744 1,058,707 1,140,895 82,188 7.8% SPORTS 292,435 333,290 343,974 10,684 3.2% CHILDRENS MUSEUM 270,383 107,325 81,223 (26,102) -24.3% COMMUNITY THEATER 1,304,237 1,418,818 1,422,256 3,438 0.2% CULTURAL ARTS 238,270 257,657 247,265 (10,392) -4.0% CONFERENCE CENTER 72,494 109,383 - (109,383) -100.0% HUMAN SERVICES 175,757 180,356 207,475 27,119 15.0% MARGARITA RECREATION CENTER 122,682 186,219 159,731 (26,488) -14.2% JEFFERSON RECREATION CENTER 33,800 52,569 54,709 2,140 4.1% CONTRACT CLASSES 932,016 867,373 878,815 11,442 1.3% PARK RANGERS 175,293 288,876 385,434 96,558 33.4% RESPONSIBLE COMPASSION 548,892 487,042 552,768 65,726 13.5% Total Expenditures and Other Financial Uses 10,029,447 11,490,480 12,313,658 823,178 7.2% Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures (211,123) (873,410) 45,825 919,235 11.6% 98 Aft City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget The Heart of Southern California Wine Country TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT (TCSD) OPERATIONS SUMMARY Fund: 190 - TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT FUND 2017-2018 Description 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 1,138,708 927,585 54,175 (873,410) -94.2% Fund Balance, End of Year 927,585 54,175 100,000 45,825 84.6% Fund Description Citywide Operations reflects the collection of the Special Tax (Measure C) charged to households for recreation programs as well as fees for classes and activities. Accounts for facility operations, maintenance, and community recreation programs. Measure C was approved by residents in 1997 at a rate of $74.44 per parcel for the purpose of maintaining the City's parks, recreation facilities, arerial street lighting and traffic signals. The Special Tax revenue is allocated equally between TCSD and the General Fund to fund both recreation programs and parks maintenance. Analysis/Comments TCSD revenue is projected to increase in FY19-20 due to a higher contribution from Measure S to cover the higher level of expenditures. Expenditures are projected to increase by 7.2% due to a combination of the cost of living adjustment provided to employees, per the City's labor agreements, plus the conversion cost of two positions from part-time project to fully-benefitted, authorized employees. 99 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 192 - TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "B" STREET LIGHTS FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges ASSESSMENTS 640,812 641,384 640,767 (617) -0.1% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 2,842 1,200 200 (1,000) -83.3% Operating Transfers In CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES 360,251 62,661 71,037 8,376 13.4% Revenues/Other Sources 1,003,905 705,245 712,004 6,759 1.00/0 Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 17,329 21,451 22,103 652 3.0% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 894,437 767,750 767,750 - 0.0% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 911,766 789,201 789,853 652 0.10/0 Net Revenues 92,139 (83,956) (77,849) 6,107 0.5% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 169,049 261,188 177,232 (83,956) -32.1% Fund Balance, End of Year 261,188 177,232 99,383 (77,849) -43.9% Fund Description Service Level B reflects the collection of benefit assessments charged to property owners. Service Level B includes only those parcels within residential subdivisions that receive residential street lighting services. This service level includes operational, administrative, maintenance and utility costs of residential street lights. Analysis/Comments Service Level B revenue is projected to increase by 1% in FY19-20, due primarily to the transfer in of Measure S funds to cover the increased expenditures and use of prior year fund balance. 100 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 194 - TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "D" REFUSE/RECYCLING FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges ASSESSMENTS 7,680,091 7,991,790 8,491,541 499,751 6.3% RECYCLING PROGRAM 17,906 18,000 18,000 - 0.0% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 11,219 5,000 5,000 - 0.0% Revenues/Other Sources 7,709,216 8,014,790 8,514,541 499,751 6.2% Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 112,552 70,247 71,892 1,645 2.3% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 7,730,711 8,008,644 8,502,464 493,820 6.2% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 7,843,263 8,078,891 8,574,356 495,465 6.1% Net Revenues (134,047) (64,101) (59,815) 4,286 6.2% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 428,536 294,489 230,388 (64,101) -21.8% Fund Balance, End of Year 294,489 230,388 170,573 (59,815) -26.0% Fund Description Service Level D Fund is used to collect benefit assessments charged to property owners for the purpose of providing refuse collection, recycling, and street sweeping throughout the City, which is provided by CR&R. In addition, Service Level D has received grants to increase recycling efforts Citywide. Analysis/Comments Service Level D revenue is projected to increase by 6.2% due to a combination of the contractually -obligated inflation tied to the Consumer Price Index and County tipping fees, plus an "extra -ordinary" charge by CR&R to cover the economic impact of the constrained recycling market. The "extra -ordinary" charge makes up approximately half of the rate increase for FY19-20. 101 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 195 - TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "R" STREET/ROAD MAINT FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges ASSESSMENTS 5,619 5,532 5,532 - 0.0% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 608 400 300 (100) -25.0% Revenues/Other Sources 6,227 5,932 5,832 (100) -1.7% Expenditures by Category OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 2,847 29,663 5,532 (24,131) -81.4% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 2,847 29,663 5,532 (24,131) -81.4% Net Revenues 3,380 (23,731) 300 24,031 -68.1% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 23,411 26,791 3,060 (23,731) -88.6% Fund Balance, End of Year 26,791 3,060 3,360 300 9.8% Fund Description Service Level R Fund reflects the operational, administrative, construction and maintenance costs for certain unpaved roads that become inaccessible after inclement weather. Zone R-1 provides service in the Nicolas/Liefer Road area. The maximum rate that can be charged for Zone R-1 for an improved parcel is $115.26 and for an unimproved parcel is $57.62. Analysis/Comments Service Level R revenue is projected to remain constant in FY19-20, as all homes in the service area are assessed. Expenditures are projected to decline due to excessive storm activity occurring in FY18-19 causing emergency repairs to the Liefer Road area. 102 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 196 - TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges ASSESSMENTS 239,939 241,870 244,289 2,419 1.0% HARVESTON LAKE BOAT REVENUE 4,150 4,200 41200 - 0.0% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 4,527 5,500 4,000 (1,500) -27.3% Reimbursements OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS 18 - - 0.0% Miscellaneous MISCELLANEOUS 1,473 - - - 0.0% Revenues/Other Sources 250,107 251,570 252,489 919 0.4% Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 18,921 17,706 26,101 8,395 47.4% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 212,872 229,570 232,931 3,361 1.5% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 231,793 247,276 259,032 11,756 4.8% Net Revenues 18,314 4,294 (6,543) (10,837) 2.5% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 384,354 402,668 406,962 4,294 1.1% Fund Balance, End of Year 402,668 406,962 400,419 (6,543) -1.6% Fund Description Service Level L Fund reflects the benefit assessments charged to property owners for the purpose of maintaining the Harveston Lake Park. Expenditures include operational, administrative and maintenance costs. Analysis/Comments Service Level L revenue is projected to increase by 1% in FY19-20. Expenditures are projected to increase due to rising costs of landscape maintenance. 103 AWA 73 (((//The Heart of 5o�t�alifornia wi a ca. t,y 501 - 530 SERVICE LEVEL "C" FUNDS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget Description 2017- 2018 2018-2019 Actuals Current Budget 2019-2020 Proposed Budget Increase/ (Decrease) % Increase/ Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges ASSESSMENTS 1,591,716 1,586,430 1,587,230 800 0.1% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 18,182 19,000 - (19,000) -100.0% Reimbursements OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS 131 - 0.0% Miscellaneous MISCELLANEOUS 11,650 - - 0.0% Revenues/Other Sources 1,621,679 1,605,430 1,587,230 (18,200) -1.10/0 Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 88,801 67,424 62,453 (4,971) -7.4% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 1,317,593 1,485,720 1,760,612 274,892 18.5% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 1,406,394 1,553,144 1,823,065 269,921 17.4% Net Revenues 215,285 52,286 (235,835) (288,121) -551.0% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 1,440,507 1,655,792 1,708,078 52,286 3.2% Fund Balance, End of Year 1,655,792 1,708,078 1,472,243 (235,835) -13.8% Fund Description Service Level C Fund reflects the collection of benefit assessments charged to property owners for the purpose of providing perimeter landscaping and slope maintenance throughout the City. Service Level C assesses only those parcels within residential subdivisions receiving TCSD perimeter landscaping and slope maintenance and are separated into 32 zones. The rate levels for Zones 6 and 29, are subject to a Consumer Price Index -Urban Consumers (CPI- U) annual inflator while all other rate levels will not increase. Zones 30-32 will not be assessed, as the property owners have elected to have the landscaping maintained by the respective Homeowner's Associations (HOAs). 104 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 197 - TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges PRINTING & COPIES 21,107 23,760 21,860 (1,900) -8.0% Fines & Forfeitures FINES & FORFEITURES 78,582 69,000 69,000 0.0% LOST AND DAMAGED MATERIALS (494) - - 0.0% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 2,863 5,000 3,000 (2,000) -40.0% LEASE/RENTAL INCOME 4,830 15,000 15,000 0.0% Reimbursements OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS 168 - - - 0.0% Operating Transfers In CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES 770,734 662,527 921,203 258,676 39.0% Miscellaneous MISCELLANEOUS 3,762 - - - 0.0% Revenues/Other Sources 881,552 775,287 1,030,063 254,776 32.9% Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 82,408 88,004 114,116 26,112 29.7% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 455,683 521,397 518,744 (2,653) -0.5% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 245,224 372,739 403,342 30,603 8.2% CAPITAL OUTLAY - 12,000 6,075 (5,925) -49.4% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 783,315 994,140 1,042,277 48,137 4.8% Net Revenues 98,237 (218,853) (12,214) 206,639 17.1% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 244,833 343,070 124,217 (218,853) -63.8% Fund Balance, End of Year 343,070 124,217 112,003 (12,214) -9.8% Fund Description The Library Fund is used to account for the maintenance and operations of the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library on Pauba Road. Analysis/Comments The Library Fund revenue is projected to increase by 32.9% due to the higher allocation of Measure S funding towards the Library Fund. The increased contribution is needed to cover the use of Fund Balance in the prior year, and to cover the 4.8% increase in operating expenditures for FY19-20, which are driving by increased personnel costs due to the cost of living adjustment and higher Internal Service charges for technology. 105 ]] a The Heart of Southern California Wine Country Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency Summary The Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency, known as SARDA, was established in 2012, per Assembly Bill 1x26, which dissolved all California Redevelopment Agencies. SARDA activities are limited to those necessary to pay the outstanding debts and obligations of the former Redevelopment Agency. 106 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 380 - SARDA DEBT SERVICE FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Taxes and Franchises REDEVELOPMENT PROPERTY TAX FUND 6,769,672 5,155,731 (1,613,941) 23.8% DISTRIBUTION Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 165,744 300,000 300,000 0.0% Reimbursements OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS 155,176 - - 0.0% Operating Transfers In OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 6,403,710 - - 0.0% Revenues/Other Sources 6,724,630 7,069,672 5,455,731 (1,613,941) -22.8% Expenditures by Category OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 820,634 1,181,490 1,181,490 - 0.0% DEBT SERVICE -PRINCIPAL - 2,300,000 2,370,000 70,000 3.0% DEBT SERVICE - INTEREST 3,576,330 3,288,182 3,228,831 (59,351) -1.8% TRANSFERS 256,938 750,000 750,000 - 0.0% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 4,653,902 7,519,672 7,530,321 10,649 0.1% Net Revenues 2,070,728 (450,000) (2,074,590) (1,624,590) -11.0% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year (39,070,297) (36,999,569) (37,449,569) (450,000) -1.2% Fund Balance, End of Year (36,999,569) (37,449,569) (39,524,159) (2,074,590) -5.5% Fund Description The Successor Agency to the Redevelopment Agency (SARDA) Debt Service Fund was established to account for payment obligations of the Successor Agency as a result of the State's dissolution of Redevelopment Agencies. This is a private -purpose trust fund that is used to account for resources held and administered by the SARDA acting in a fiduciary capacity for other governments. Analysis/Comments SARDA revenue is correlated with the former Redevelopment Agency's Recognized Obligation Payment Schedule (ROPS), and varies based on the obligations for each given fiscal year. Debt Service expenditures are in accordance with the 2017A and 2017E Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds. 107 ]] a The Heart of Southern California Wine Country Internal Service Fund Summaries Internal Service Funds (ISFs) are used to account for the funding of goods and services provided by one department to other benefitting departments on a cost -reimbursement basis. 108 dwA %City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget REVENUE DETAIL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS %o 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease 300 - INSURANCE FUND 4062 RECOVERY OF PRIOR YEAR EXPENSE - 157,788 - (157,788) -100.0% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 4,421 4,600 3,000 (1,600) -34.8% 4176 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 1,172,356 992,137 1,433,913 441,776 44.5% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 117 - - - 0.00/0 TOTAL INSURANCE FUND 1,176,894 1,154,525 1,436,913 282,388 24.5% 305 - WORKERS' COMPENSATION FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 13,329 20,000 13,000 (7,000) -35.0% 4176 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 693,485 690,333 328,000 (362,333) -52.5% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 403 - - 0.00/0 TOTAL WORKERS' COMPENSATION FUND 707,217 710,333 341,000 (369,333) -52.0% 310 - VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 23,774 35,000 24,000 (11,000) -31.4% 4089 OPERATING TRANSFER IN MEASURE S 650,000 1,150,000 500,000 (650,000) -56.5% 4176 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 64,204 347,426 377,666 30,240 8.7% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 617 - - - 0.0% TOTAL VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT 738,595 1,532,426 901,666 -41.2% FUND(630,760) 320 - INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FUND 4062 RECOVERY OF PRIOR YEAR EXPENSE 1,045 - - 0.0% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 2,981 2,000 1,000 (1,000) -50.0% 4089 OPERATING TRANSFER IN MEASURE S 230,251 450,000 160,000 (290,000) -64.4% 4090 OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 77,028 - - - 0.00/0 4176 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 3,088,791 3,497,594 4,264,165 766,571 21.9% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS (57) - - - 0.0% 4556 LUCA OPERATION CENSUS 2020 - 45,000 - (45,000) -100.0% TOTAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 3,400,039 3,994,594 4,425,165 430,571 10.80/0 FUND 325 - TECHNOLOGY REPLACEMENT FUND 4062 RECOVERY OF PRIOR YEAR EXPENSE 3,613 - - - 0.0% 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 8,216 11,000 8,000 (3,000) -27.3% 4089 OPERATING TRANSFER IN MEASURE S - 500,000 500,000 0.00/0 4090 OPERATING TRANSFERS IN - 125,000 - (125,000) -100.0% 4176 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 213,932 400,723 289,509 (111,214) -27.8% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 20 - - 0.00/0 TOTAL TECHNOLOGY REPLACEMENT 225,781 1,036,723 797,509 (239,214) -23.1% FUND 109 dwA %City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget REVENUE DETAIL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS %° 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Current Budget Proposed Budget (Decrease) Decrease 330 - SUPPORT SERVICES FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 5,457 6,000 5,000 (1,000) -16.7% 4176 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 344,267 362,966 412,721 49,755 13.7% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS 8 - - - 0.0% TOTAL SUPPORT SERVICES FUND 349,732 368,966 417,721 48,755 13.2% 335 - SUPPORT SERVICES REPLACEMENT FUND 4090 OPERATING TRANSFERS IN - 424,604 - (424,604) -100.0% 4176 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 38,015 41,930 3,915 10.3% TOTAL SUPPORT SERVICES - 462,619 41,930 (420,689) -90.9% REPLACEMENT FUND 340 - FACILITIES FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST 5,700 7,000 6,000 (1,000) -14.3% 4176 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 1,251,887 1,328,888 1,356,862 27,974 2.1% 4545 GASB 31 - FMV ON INVESTMENTS (49) - - - 0.0% TOTAL FACILITIES FUND 1,257,538 1,335,888 1,362,862 26,974 2.0% 350 - FACILITY REPLACEMENT FUND 4065 INVESTMENT INTEREST - 1,000 1,000 - 0.0% 4089 OPERATING TRANSFER IN MEASURE S 500,000 500,000 - 0.0% 4176 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 39,725 54,324 14,599 36.8% TOTAL FACILITY REPLACEMENT FUND - 540,725 555,324 14,599 2.70/0 EM The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 300 - INSURANCE FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges CHARGES FOR SERVICES 1,172,356 992,137 1,433,913 441,776 44.5% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 4,538 4,600 3,000 (1,600) -34.8% Miscellaneous MISCELLANEOUS - 157,788 - (157,788) -100.0% Revenues/Other Sources 1,176,894 1,154,525 1,436,913 282,388 24.5% Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 29,742 35,642 66,764 31,122 87.3% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 1,400,391 959,495 959,495 - 0.0% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 1,430,133 995,137 1,026,259 31,122 3.1% Net Revenues (253,239) 159,388 410,654 251,266 14.6% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 305,196 51,957 211,345 159,388 306.8% Fund Balance, End of Year 51,957 211,345 621,999 410,654 194.3% Fund Description The Insurance Fund was established to account for the City's liability and property insurance costs. Fund Balance is a combination of both spendable and non spendable assets. These costs are allocated to each department based on the total number of Full Time Equivalent positions assigned to those departments. The City has a Self -Insured Retention (SIR) of $150,000 per incident, and strives to maintain a fund balance equal to three times the SIR. Analysis/Comments The Insurance Fund revenue is projected to increase due to the higher Internal Service Fund allocation charges to all departments, necessary to raise the Insurance Fund Balance to meet the desired reserve. Expenditures are projected to increase due to higher personnel costs as a result of the cost of living adjustment provided in accordance with the City's labor agreements. EW The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 305 - WORKERS' COMPENSATION FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges CHARGES FOR SERVICES 693,485 690,333 328,000 (362,333) -52.5% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 13,732 20,000 13,000 (7,000) -35.0% Revenues/Other Sources 707,217 710,333 341,000 (369,333) -52.0% Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 113,885 35,642 49,691 14,049 39.4% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 137,208 387,136 206,088 (181,048) -46.8% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 251,093 422,778 255,779 (166,999) -39.5% Net Revenues 456,124 287,555 85,221 (202,334) -47.3% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 930,498 1,386,622 1,674,177 287,555 20.7% Fund Balance, End of Year 1,386,622 1,674,177 1,759,398 85,221 5.1% Fund Description The Workers' Compensation Fund was established in Fiscal Year 2014-15 as the City transitions to a self -insured status for Workers' Compensation liabilities. Departments are charged based on each position allocated on a Full Time Equivalent basis, with a cost assigned to each position based on job duties and potential for risk. The desired Net Position for this fund is $1.5 million, which represents three -times the City's Self -Insured Retention amount of $500,000. Analysis/Comments The Workers' Compensation Fund revenue is decreasing due to the reduction in the Internal Service Fund charge to all departments, as the reserve in this fund has reached its desired level. Departments were charged 2% of salary in FY19-20, compared to 4.5% in prior years. Expenditures are projected to decrease due to the correction of a budgeting error that occurred in FY18-19. 112 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 310 - VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges CHARGES FOR SERVICES 64,204 347,426 377,666 30,240 8.7% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 24,391 35,000 24,000 (11,000) -31.4% Operating Transfers In CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES 650,000 1,150,000 500,000 (650,000) -56.5% Revenues/Other Sources 738,595 1,532,426 901,666 (630,760) -41.2% Expenditures by Category OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 81,660 - - 0.0% CAPITAL OUTLAY - 858,125 380,000 (478,125) -55.7% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 81,660 858,125 380,000 (478,125) -55.70/o Net Revenues 656,935 674,301 521,666 (152,635) -46.4% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 1,930,757 2,587,692 3,261,993 674,301 26.1% Fund Balance, End of Year 2,587,692 3,261,993 3,783,659 521,666 16.0% Fund Description The Vehicles and Equipment Fund was established to account for the depreciation of vehicles and capital equipment over their estimated useful lives, and to accumulate resources for the purchase of future replacement vehicles and equipment. Fund Balance is a combination of both spendable and non spendable assets. Departments are charged based on the replacement costs for each asset benefitting the department. Analysis/Comments The Vehicles and Equipment Fund revenue is decreasing due to a reduced contribution of funds from Measure S, as the replacement of vehicles has reduced. The previous two years' contribution included $650,000 in each year for the replacement of a Fire Ladder Truck. Expenditures for FY19-20 include the replacement of a Vactron, Skid Steer and Pontoon Boat for the Public Works Department in addition to vehicles for the City Manager's Office (pool vehicle), Public Works and Police. 113 Alk The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 320 - INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges CHARGES FOR SERVICES 3,088,791 3,497,594 4,264,165 766,571 21.9% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 2,924 2,000 1,000 (1,000) -50.0% Operating Transfers In OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 77,028 - - 0.0% CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES 230,251 450,000 160,000 (290,000) -64.4% Miscellaneous MISCELLANEOUS 1,045 45,000 - (45,000) -100.0% Revenues/Other Sources 3,400,039 3,994,594 4,425,165 430,571 10.80/0 Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 1,756,080 1,877,012 1,909,778 32,766 1.7% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 1,410,195 2,367,069 2,198,943 (168,126) -7.1% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS - 3,300 3,300 0.0% CAPITAL OUTLAY - 45,000 - (45,000) -100.0% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 3,166,275 4,292,381 4,112,021 (180,360) -4.2% Net Revenues 233,764 (297,787) 313,144 610,931 3.0% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 238,971 472,735 174,948 (297,787) -63.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 472,735 174,948 488,092 313,144 179.0% Fund Description The Information Technology Fund was established to fund and account for computer and telephone system operating and maintenance expenses. Fund Balance is a combination of both spendable and non spendable assets. Adjustments are made to Fund Balance to include additional spendable resources available for expenditure. Departments are charged based on the number of electronic devices assigned. The Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library facility is charged directly for all IT expenditures and personnel costs related to the facility. Analysis/Comments The Information Technology Fund revenue is increasing by 10.8% due to the increase Internal Service Fund charges to all departments. Increased investment in technology, surveillance and software systems has caused higher allocations in FY19-20. 114 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 325 - TECHNOLOGY REPLACEMENT FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges CHARGES FOR SERVICES 213,932 400,723 289,509 (111,214) -27.8% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 8,236 11,000 8,000 (3,000) -27.3% Operating Transfers In OPERATING TRANSFERS IN - 125,000 - (125,000) -100.0% CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES - 500,000 500,000 0.0% Miscellaneous MISCELLANEOUS 3,613 - - 0.0% Revenues/Other Sources 225,781 1,036,723 797,509 (239,214) -23.1% Expenditures by Category OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 232,801 - - - 0.0% CAPITAL OUTLAY 22,000 310,000 375,000 65,000 21.0% TRANSFERS - - 763,534 763,534 100.0% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 254,801 310,000 1,138,534 828,534 267.3% Net Revenues (29,020) 726,723 (341,025) (1,067,748) 43.8% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 1,278,467 1,249,447 1,976,170 726,723 58.2% Fund Balance, End of Year 1,249,447 1,976,170 1,635,145 (341,025) -17.3% Fund Description The Technology Replacement Fund was established in Fiscal Year 2014-15 in order to accumulate resources for computer and telephone equipment and software to fund future equipment replacement. Fund Balance is a combination of both spendable and non spendable assets. Contributions to this fund are made by departments utilizing the assets in an amount equivalent to the estimated cost to replace the item at the end of its useful life. Analysis/Comments The Technology Replacement Fund revenue is decreasing in FY19-20 due to lower annual contribution levels needed to fund the future replacement of technology assets for the City. Expenditures for FY19-20 include the replacement of the City's financial system, conference room audio-visual equipment, various switch replacements and the computer life -cycle replacements. 115 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 330 - SUPPORT SERVICES FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges CHARGES FOR SERVICES 344,267 362,966 412,721 49,755 13.7% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 5,465 6,000 5,000 (1,000) -16.7% Revenues/Other Sources 349,732 368,966 417,721 48,755 13.2% Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 205,990 224,439 231,009 6,570 2.9% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 166,767 144,527 182,542 38,015 26.3% TRANSFERS - 444,102 - (444,102) -100.0% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 372,757 813,068 413,551 (399,517) -49.1% Net Revenues (23,025) (444,102) 4,170 448,272 -29.7% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 467,127 444,102 - (444,102) -100.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 444,102 - 4,170 4,170 100.0% Fund Description The Support Services Fund was established as a cost center for the City's central receptionist, duplicating, printing, and mailing activities. It is also used to depreciate all related copying and mailing equipment over their useful lives, and to accumulate resources for the purchase of future equipment. Fund Balance is a combination of both spendable and non spendable assets. Departments are charged based on a count of copies made in the previous fiscal year. Analysis/Comments The Support Services Fund revenue is increasing by 13.2% due to the higher allocation to all departments, necessary to cover the costs of increased personnel costs due to the cost of living adjustment provided to employees in accordance with the City's labor agreements. 116 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 335 - SUPPORT SERVICES REPLACEMENT FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges CHARGES FOR SERVICES 38,015 41,930 3,915 10.3% Operating Transfers In OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 424,604 - (424,604) -100.0% Revenues/Other Sources - 462,619 41,930 (420,689) -90.9% Expenditures by Category CAPITAL OUTLAY 18,735 50,000 31,265 166.9% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses - 18,735 50,000 31,265 166.9% Net Revenues 443,884 (8,070) (451,954) -80.9% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year - 443,884 443,884 100.0% Fund Balance, End of Year 443,884 435,814 (8,070) -1.8% Fund Description The Support Services Replacement Fund was established to accumulate resources for the future replacement of the City's duplicating equipment. Analysis/Comments The Support Services Fund reflects the annual replacement charges to all departments to support the future replacement of the City's duplicating equipment. Expenditures for FY19-20 include the replacement of 10 copiers Citywide that have exceeded their useful lives. 117 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 340 - FACILITIES FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges CHARGES FOR SERVICES 1,251,887 1,328,888 1,356,862 27,974 2.1% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 5,651 7,000 6,000 (1,000) -14.3% Revenues/Other Sources 1,257,538 1,335,888 1,362,862 26,974 2.0% Expenditures by Category SALARIES & BENEFITS 394,347 395,627 394,928 (699) -0.2% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 839,590 956,518 964,166 7,648 0.8% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses 1,233,937 1,352,145 1,359,094 6,949 0.50/0 Net Revenues 23,601 (16,257) 3,768 20,025 1.3% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year 497,452 521,053 504,796 (16,257) -3.1% Fund Balance, End of Year 521,053 504,796 508,564 3,768 0.7% Fund Description The Facilities Fund was established to account for the cost of the Civic Center, Former City Hall Facility, City Maintenance Facility, Field Operations Center, and Civic Center Parking Structure operations and maintenance. Fund Balance is a combination of both spendable and non spendable assets. Departments are charged based on square footage allotted as well as full time staff equivalents assigned. Analysis/Comments The Facilities Fund revenue is increasing by 2% due to a higher allocation to all departments to cover the increased costs of operations and maintenance in FY19-20. 118 The Heart of Southern California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Annual Operating Budget 350 - FACILITY REPLACEMENT FUND SUMMARY 2017- 2018-2019 2019-2020 0/0 2018 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Description Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) Decrease Revenues by Source Licenses, Permits and Service Charges CHARGES FOR SERVICES 39,725 54,324 14,599 36.8% Use of Money and Property INVESTMENT INTEREST 1,000 1,000 - 0.0% Operating Transfers In CONTRIBUTION FROM MEASURES 500,000 500,000 - 0.0% Revenues/Other Sources - 540,725 555,324 14,599 2.7% Expenditures by Category CAPITAL OUTLAY 362,336 201,714 (160,622) -44.3% TRANSFERS 143,664 - (143,664) -100.0% Expenditures/Other Financing Uses - 506,000 201,714 (304,286) -60.1% Net Revenues - 34,725 353,610 318,885 -27.7% Fund Balance, Beginning of Year - - 34,725 34,725 100.0% Fund Balance, End of Year - 34,725 388,335 353,610 1018.3% Fund Description The Facility Replacement Fund was established to accumulate resources for the future replacement of equipment, systems and fixtures within City -owned facilities. Analysis/Comments The Facilities Replacement Fund revenue is increasing 2.7% to cover the costs of future replacement of facility -related assets. FY19-20 expenditures include the replacement of Theater audio-visual equipment, Fire Station 73 generator and epoxy coating on the floors of Fire Station Nos. 84, 92 and 95. ME City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DEPARTMENTAL INFORMATION The following section includes an expenditure summary with narrative account of the General Fund Operating Budget. Each Department section includes the short term objectives staff has developed for the upcoming fiscal year which has been used to develop their operating budgets. These objectives are linked to the Citywide long term goals presented in the Introduction section of the budget. The long term goals are then linked to the Core Values as identified in the City's Quality of Life Master Plan. Each Department's objectives are measurable and include performance measures which demonstrate the progress made in the recent fiscal years toward their objectives. General Fund Overview The General Fund serves as the City Council's primary operating fund used to finance the majority of City services including; Public Safety, Public Works, Community Development and City Administration. The primary sources of revenue for the General Fund include Sales Tax, Property Tax, Transient Occupancy Tax, Development -related revenue, and other revenues that are not specifically designated to be accounted for in another fund. General Fund revenue may be appropriated by the City Council on any expenditure that serves a public purpose. DEPARTMENTS City Council ...................... City Manager .................... City Clerk .......................... City Attorney .................... Finance ............................. Human Resources ............ Community Development Public Works .................... Police................................ Fire................................... Non -Departmental ........... Fund/Dent. Number .............................................................. 001.100 ............................................... 001.11011111115 .............................................................. 001.120 .............................................................. 001.130 .............................................................. 001.140 .............................................................. 001.150 ...................................................... 001.161/162 ....................................... 001.1631164/165/167 .............................................................. 001.170 .............................................................. 001.171 .............................................................. 001.199 Annual Operating Budget 120 A R The Heart of Souther California wine Cnuet,y CITY COUNCIL MISSION City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget The City Council is elected by the citizens of Temecula to adopt laws and set overall policy decisions for the City of Temecula. The City Council gives direction to the City Manager to ensure effective and efficient operation of the City and to identify the types and levels of programs and services that will maintain and enhance Temecula's high quality of life which is consistent with the City's adopted Quality of Life Master Plan (QLMP) Core Values as follows: (1) A Healthy and Livable City; (2) Economic Prosperity; (3) A Safe and Prepared Community; (4) A Sustainable City; (5) Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity; and (6) An Accountable and Responsive City Government. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART CITIZENS OF TEMECULA ZAK MARYANN MIKE MATT SCH WANK EDWARDS NAGGAR RAHN Council Member Council Member Mayor Council Member v JAMES"STEW" STEWART Mayor Pro Tern Annual Operating Budget 121 A City of Temecula R Fiscal Year 2019-20 The Hea.to{� „A.".-r-",t,y Annual Operating Budget CITY COUNCIL EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) GENERAL FUND 001 CITY COUNCIL 100 SALARIES & BENEFITS 121,829 138,870 137,610 (1,260) -0.91% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 125,070 169,641 184,641 15,000 8.84% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 145,580 211,398 250,592 39,194 18.54% Division Total 392,479 519,909 572,843 52,934 10.18% COMMUNITY SUPPORT 10� OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE Division Total 107,000 125,000 125,000 0 0.0% 107,000 125,000 125,000 0 0.0% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS City Council: Expenditures are expected to increase by 10.18% due to an appropriation for Community Support which will allow staff to accomplish City Council projects that benefit the community and an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocations for Insurance and Information Technology. Community Support: Expenditures are expected to remain flat. CITY COUNCIL Council Members Total PERSONNEL ALLOCATION Adopted 2017-18 Current 2018-19 Proposed 2019-20 Inc/(Decr) from Prior Yr 5.00 5.00 5.00 - 5.00 5.00 5.00 - Annual Operating Budget 122 The Heat of Sourl+e�� Calclo���a W.- CITY COUNCIL SERVICES City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget • Serve as a five -member voice on behalf of the City of Temecula as elected by the citizens. • Adopt laws and regulations that govern Temecula. • Set City fiscal policy and provide direction to the City Manager to balance a high quality of life with fiscally sustainable decisions. • Represent the interests of the City of Temecula in local, regional, State, Federal, tribal and international affairs in addition to serving as members (or commissioners) for related agencies or organizations for the benefit of the City of Temecula. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Protected the City's financial strength with fiscal policies and a balanced budget. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies to Ensure Long Term Solvency; An Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Protected the City's long-term financial strength and public safety needs by analyzing future cost trends, including public safety costs and increasing public safety services as appropriate for the City's population. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies To Ensure Long Term Solvency; An Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Opened the City's fifth Fire Station in January 2018 allowing for improved fire protection and additional emergency first responder coverage citywide. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property and the Environment; A Safe and Prepared Community) • Maintained a community oriented, and family friendly, SAFE City with community events and programs that incorporated the Mayor's theme "Temecula SAFE". Engaged residents in special events including Coffee with Mayor and several mini State of the City meetings hosted by the Mayor. Developed a Citywide emergency preparedness program that delivered Emergency Preparedness 3-Minute-Bags to all doorsteps in the City with information related to Citywide emergencies. Interwove Temecula SAFE in all Community Services and Citizen events, such as Trick or Trunk at Halloween, to promote public safety, interaction with the public, and a safe community. (Maintain a Safe and Family Oriented Environment; A Healthy and Livable City) • Continued to engage the region including local cities, hospitals, medical professionals and nonprofit community in a Task Force to analyze and provide an overall cancer -related services healthcare assessment of the region. Created awareness of excellent cancer -related services and resources that are within Southwest Riverside County while understanding areas of specialized cancer -related services that may not be located in the region yet. (Continue to support a region of excellent healthcare that is expanding with population growth; A Healthy and Livable City) Continued to engage the region including local cities, transportation agencies, and county/regional, state and federal representatives in a Task Force to increase capacity along 1-15 through Temecula Valley. Obtained commitment from Caltrans to construct additional auxiliary lanes to Interstate 15. (Expand and Enhance the Transportation Network; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity) Annual Operating Budget 123 R T�P Nea � of S�uP+e�� Calclo���a LViite Counlr� CITY COUNCIL City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR (Continued) • Supported higher education and economic development growth opportunities in the City for businesses, including new retail, to invest in Temecula and the opening of Mt. San Jacinto College (MSJC) Temecula campus at the former Abbott building. (Fill Gaps and Diversify Market Sectors that Increase Sales Tax Revenue; Economic Prosperity) • Maintained continued public outreach to citizens with a community -wide Temecula SAFE Brochure; in addition to social media, e-blasts, and the Guide to Leisure Activities published in spring/summer and fall/winter. (Promote Community Involvement; An Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Participated on various local, regional, statewide, and national boards and commission meetings to support and represent the City of Temecula's interests. (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Maintained public safety as a top priority for Temecula citizens, businesses and tourists. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property and the Environment; A Safe and Prepared Community) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Continue to make public safety a top priority by leveraging new revenue and a newly expanded police and fire department to enhance public safety services. (Minimize the Impact of Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations; A Safe and Prepared Community) • Enhance Citywide emergency preparedness communications plan to ensure immediate assistance and mobilization of resources to aid city residents in the event of a Citywide emergency. (Minimize the Impact of Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations; A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue to pursue regional, state and federal agencies to expand capacity and make operational improvements to Interstate 15 through Temecula Valley. (Expand and Enhance the Transportation Network; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity) • Implement policies that prioritize new revenue sources, as designated for asset management: ■ Street Maintenance ■ Infrastructure ■ Parks & Facilities (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continue public outreach as a priority, engaging with citizens and businesses via social media, e-blasts, Citywide newsletters and the Guide to Leisure Activities published in spring/summer and fall/winter. (Promote Community Involvement; An Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continue to engage citizens and businesses in programs with information related to the Mayor's theme "LOVE Temecula" by creating kindness awareness and involving the community in areas of public safety, traffic safety, emergency preparedness, and fire inspection programs. (Maintain a Safe and Family Oriented Environment, A Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 124 R T�P Nea � of S�uP+e�� Calclo���a LViite Counlr� CITY COUNCIL City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long FY FY FY FY Performance Measure 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Actuals Actuals Target Target Promote Number of newsletters or Community outreach information 86,000 86,000 86,000 86,000 o Involvement community -wide }, a c v °C Promote Number of press releases = c Community sent community -wide 140 140 140 140 Involvement M > a, o -Z Q Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Number of City Council Policies to Ensure Committee assignments 55 58 58 58 QLong Term Solvency Number of Agenda Items supported by City Council Support Enhanced related to Traffic Transportation Operations for Improved 38 44 38 40 Network roadways or connections a CJ °J Number of Task Force or Regional public meetings Maintain a Safe held by elected council = and members: Family -Oriented (b) 3 s +� Environment; a) Local Youth & Famil ( y (a) 6 (c) 3 (b) 2 °J Expand and Task Force (b) 4 (d) 1 (c) 3 n/a _ Enhance the (b) Regional Cancer Task Transportation Network Force (c) Regional Move 1-15 Through Temecula Valley (d) Regional Public Safety Annual Operating Budget 125 R T�P Nea � of S�uP+e�� Calclo���a LViite Counlr� CITY COUNCIL DIVISION/PROGRAM: COMMUNITY SUPPORT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget SERVICES • Review annual funding applications from nonprofit organizations that provide services or programs to Temecula residents. Enter into agreements to disburse financial assistance, up to $5,000, for each selected nonprofit organization in return for services that benefit the residents of Temecula. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Provided financial assistance, in an amount up to $125,000, to non-profit agencies for community programs that benefit citizens of Temecula. (Maintain A Safe and Family Oriented Environment; A Healthy and Livable City) Funded non-profit organizations that will assist and provide service to the citizens of Temecula through Community Service Funding and City Council Grant Program. (Maintain A Safe and Family Oriented Environment, A Healthy and Livable City) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Continue to provide financial assistance to non-profit agencies for community programs that benefit citizens of Temecula in an amount up to $125,000. (Maintain A Safe and Family Oriented Environment, A Healthy and Livable City) • Fund non-profit organizations that will assist and provide service to the citizens of Temecula through Community Service Funding and City Council Grant Program. (Maintain A Safe and Family Oriented Environment; A Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 126 (7 � R The Heart of wur6er California ."me Coomry AlkW4141Sh10144 DIVISION/PROGRAM: COMMUNITY SUPPORT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Value Five -Year Long Term Goal Performance Measures FY 2016-17 Actuals FY 2017-18 Actuals FY 2018-19 Target FY 2019-20 Target Number of nonprofit organizations funded through the Community Service Funding and the 25 25 25-30 25-30 v City Council Grant MMaintain a Safe Program and Family Oriented c�c Environment Total funding provided to s support nonprofit o aD programs through the $81,508 $125,000 $125,000 $125,000 x Community Service Program and City Council Grant Program Annual Operating Budget 127 � City of Temecula ((( Gt Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY MANAGER MISSION The City Manager Department serves as the City's executive office responsible to the City Council for implementing their priorities and objectives; to effectively deliver exceptional services, projects and programs to the citizens of Temecula; providing timely and accurate dissemination of City news and information to the community; and serve as the City's primary public liaison to all community stakeholders as well as intergovernmental relations with local, regional, State, Federal, tribal and international governments. The City Manager Department provides organizational leadership to City staff and operations, oversees the preparation and administration of a balanced annual budget, and implements all City Council policies, as guided by the Quality of Life Master Plan (QLMP). ORGANIZATIONAL CHART CITY MANAGER Aaron Adams GENERAL ECONOMIC L EMERGENCY ADMINISTRATION DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT Intergovernmental Business Attraction Training QLMP I Business Retention J I Emergency Operations Center Legislation Mark et in g Emergency Operations Plan Workforce Special Projects I IN Youth Employment Business Ombudsman Community Liaison Temecula Valley Entrepreneur's Exchange Local Hazard Mitigation Plan Annual Operating Budget 128 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 e"e °E5°°` e.°`C Annual Operating Budget CITY MANAGER EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) GENERAL FUND 001 LI I Y IVIAIVNVtR 110 SALARIES & BENEFITS 1,014,439 982,921 1,037,980 55,059 5.6% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 210,056 210,451 210,451 0 0.0% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 204,268 250,930 293,365 42,435 16.91% Division Total 1,428,763 1,444,302 1,541,796 97,494 6.75% ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 111 SALARIES & BENEFITS 291,097 440,266 458,853 18,587 4.22% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 387,900 357,944 412,944 55,000 15.37% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 136,328 159,012 157,144 (1,868) -1.17% Division Total 815,325 957,222 1,028,941 71,719 7.49% ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT- BUSINESS INCUBATOR RESOURCE SALARIES & BENEFITS 79,215 94,001 98,235 4,234 4.5% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 10,044 12,826 12,826 0 0.0% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 185,025 249,816 230,725 (19,091) -7.64% Division Total 274,284 356,643 341,786 (14,857) -4.17% ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT- WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT SALARIES & BENEFITS 151,891 141,803 144,302 2,499 1.76% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 50,387 57,631 57,631 0 0.0% Division Total 202,278 199,434 201,933 2,499 1.25% EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 115 SALARIES & BENEFITS 98,769 188,056 91,550 (96,506) -51.32% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 8,784 13,533 13,533 0 0.0% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 16,985 52,596 52,188 (408) -0.78% Division Total 124,538 254,185 157,271 (96,914) -38.13% Annual Operating Budget 129 � City of Temecula ((( Gt Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY MANAGER ANALYSIS/COMMENTS City Manager: Expenditures are expected to increase by 6.75% due to the addition of one Part -Time Equivalent employee and an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocations for Insurance and Information Technology. Economic Development: Expenditures are expected to increase by 4.57% due to continued support of existing businesses to encourage their continued growth. Emergency Management: Expenditures are expected to decrease over the prior year due to a reallocations of personnel costs to the Human Resources division from the Emergency Management division. Annual Operating Budget 130 Alk 7e,�Z,' w- c..„ y CITY MANAGER City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERSONNEL ALLOCATION Adopted Current Proposed Inc/(Decr) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 from Prior Yr CITY MANAGER City Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Assistant City Manager 0.75 0.75 0.80 0.05 Assistant to the City Manger - - 1.00 1.00 Executive Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Office Aide III - - 0.75 0.75 Risk Manager - - 0.05 0.05 Senior Management Analyst 1.00 1.00 - (1.00) 3.75 4.60 Total 3.75 0.85 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Administrative Assistant (Confidential) 0.90 1.00 1.00 - Assistant City Manager - - 0.10 0.10 Economic Development Analyst I - - - - Economic Development Manager - 1.00 1.00 - Management Aide III - 0.50 0.50 - Management Analyst - Economic Dev. 2.90 1.00 1.00 - Senior Management Analyst 1.00 1.00 - 4.50 4.60 Total 3.80 0.10 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Fiscal Services Manager - - - - Risk Manager 0.40 0.70 0.25 (0.45) 0.70 0.25 Total 0.40 (0.45) Grand Total 7.95 0.50 8.95 9.45 Annual Operating Budget 131 AOL City of Temecula (.( Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY MANAGER DIVISION/PROGRAM: GENERAL ADMINISTRATION SERVICES • Ensure the QLMP goals and citizen priorities adopted by the City Council are achieved through Citywide strategic planning, policy implementation and budget development. • Keep the City Council informed about City operations and important community issues that impact the City. • Responsible for implementing City Council's long term and short term directives. • Provide prudent leadership and clear policy direction to City executives concerning organizational decisions in order to efficiently provide the highest quality of public services and maintain the Core Values of the QLMP. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Implemented fiscal policies and a balanced budget. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies To Ensure Long Term Solvency; Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implemented "Temecula SAFE" Mayor's citywide theme that supports a safe and prepared community in terms of public safety, traffic safety, emergency preparedness, and in keeping Temecula ranked as one of the safest cities. (Maintain a Safe and Family Oriented Environment; A Healthy and Livable City) • Planned and implemented Mayor's State of the City in order to provide information about the City to the local business community and citizens. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions; Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Planned and implemented City's annual holiday event, Pechanga Pu'eska Mountain Day, to provide cultural awareness and appreciation of Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians. (Provide Signature Special Events and Cultural Opportunities; A Healthy and Livable City) • Provided ongoing research and updates regarding proposed state and federal legislative issues and funding to protect the interests of the City of Temecula, including French Valley Interchange and Murrieta Creek. (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Planned and implemented public outreach to effectively communicate City information and activities to citizens and businesses. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies To Ensure Long Term Solvency; Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 132 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 1.41WI►&1_1O1_TC":1 DIVISION/PROGRAM: GENERAL ADMINISTRATION ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR (Continued) • Developed and implemented FY18-19 Capital Improvement Program with projects to maintain and enhance City facilities and infrastructure. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Finalized the Regional Cancer Treatment Task Force with the goal of creating awareness of excellent cancer services and resources that are within Southwest Riverside County while attracting additional medical and cancer -related services/resources to the region including the creation of a regional magazine and professionally produced regional video. (Attract High Quality Medical Facilities; A Healthy and Livable City) • Implemented "Move 1-15 Through Temecula Valley Regional Task Force" engaging local Cities, Tribes, Camp Pendleton, CHP, transportation agencies, and county/regional, state and federal representatives to address 1-15 traffic congestion. Secured commitment from Caltrans to construct additional auxiliary lanes along Interstate 15 through Temecula. (Expand and Enhance the Transportation Network; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Implement fiscal policies and Council priorities regarding fiscal year revenue stream, while maintaining a balanced budget. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies To Ensure Long Term Solvency; Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Introduce and implement "LOVE Temecula," the Mayor's Citywide theme that supports family - friendly City events, engages citizens and businesses, promotes the special needs inclusive community within the workforce, and celebrates the City's 301h year of cityhood. (Maintain a Safe and Family Oriented Environment; A Healthy and Livable City) • Develop and plan the Mayor's State of the City in order to provide information about the City to the local business community and citizens. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, An Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Plan and implement the City's annual holiday event, Pechanga Pu'eska Mountain Day, to provide cultural awareness and appreciation of local Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians. (Provide Signature Special Events and Cultural Opportunities, A Healthy and Livable City) • Conduct Community Surveys to gauge citizen desires related to projects or citywide satisfaction. (Promote Community Involvement; Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 133 � City of Temecula ((( Gt Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY MANAGER DIVISION/PROGRAM: GENERAL ADMINISTRATION OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR (Continued) • Implement Citywide emergency preparedness communications plan including obtaining a city emergency broadcast FEMA license and testing reverse 911 system with public to ensure needed communication, assistance and mobilization of resources to aid city residents in the event of a City-wide emergency. (Minimize the Impact of Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue to pursue regional, state and federal agencies to expand capacity and make operational improvements to Interstate 15 through Temecula. (Expand and Enhance the Transportation Network; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity) • Prioritize revenue sources, as designated for asset management: ■ Street Maintenance ■ Infrastructure ■ Parks & Facilities (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continue to public outreach as a priority engaging with citizens and businesses via social media, and providing e-blasts, citywide newsletters and the Guide to Leisure Activities published in spring/summer and fall/winter. (Promote Community Involvement; An Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 134 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY MANAGER DIVISION/PROGRAM: GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long Performance FY FY FY FY Value Term Goal Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Actuals Actuals Target Target Promote Number of newsletters or Community outreach information 2 2 2 2 Involvement mailed community -wide c a, E c Provide at least one > 0 Promote social media post or C9 Community eblast every business 365+ 365+ 825 900 u Involvement day, citywide a Number of local business 0 representatives and Provide attendees learning of City °C Transparency to of Temecula's -0 the Public for All accomplishments, 600 700 880 700 °J Government budget, development and Transactions future plans at State of c the City event 0 U U Q Provide Number of attendees Signature and participants learning Special Events of local Pechanga Culture 500-1000 500-1000 500-1000 500-1000 and Cultural at Pechanga Pu'eska Opportunities Mountain Day holiday Annual Operating Budget 135 _jjo CITY MANAGER City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES • Support existing businesses and encourage their continued prosperity and growth. • Manage an ongoing marketing/branding program to attract commercial and industrial development. • Manage an ongoing marketing/branding program to attract entrepreneurs and innovative startups. • Administer the business incubator and resource center facility to foster new business formation and provide resources to new and existing businesses. • Provide enrichment, education, employment, and resources for youth and young adults. • Work to attract new industries that bring an enhanced tax base, quality jobs, and new capital into the community. • Maintain strong relationships with educational, business, and community leaders to continue to maximize opportunities. • Facilitate smooth processing and problem solving for local businesses and businesses looking to expand in or relocate to Temecula. • Manage and create content for the City's social media channels. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Produced a new vocational workforce culinary program by December 2018. (Foster an "Educated Community" Through a Wide Variety of Opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Created a business attraction program focused on the Uptown Temecula corridor by June 2019. (Retention and Expansion of Existing Businesses, Economic Prosperity) • Provided 50 workshops and 300 business consultations at TVE2 by June 2019. (Foster an "Educated Community" Through a Wide Variety of Opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • As online shopping becomes more popular, continued to work with retail consultant, Buxton, on strategic retail recruitment efforts Citywide. (Retention and Expansion of Existing Businesses, Economic Prosperity) • Re -launched Temecula Eats luncheons. (Retention and Expansion of Existing Businesses, Economic Prosperity) • Launched the first annual Start -Up Week by September 2018. (Foster an "Educated Community" Through a Wide Variety of Opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Created a senior workforce development program. (Foster an "Educated Community" Through a Wide Variety of Opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Launched 1 Million Cups program by April 2019. (Foster an "Educated Community" Through a Wide Variety of Opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 136 _jjo CITY MANAGER City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Create a Communications Plan for Citywide Use to drive cohesive messaging and city identity across City departments. (Foster an "Educated Community" Through a Wide Variety of Opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Produce a new vocational manufacturing program geared towards creating a pathway to manufacturing jobs working directly with local companies. (Continue to pursue high quality employment opportunities for Temecula residents, Economic Prosperity) • Expand SBDC presence at the TVE2 to ensure incubator companies and local businesses have access to tools and resources. (Continue to pursue high quality employment opportunities for Temecula residents, Economic Prosperity) • Work with Temecula Valley Hospital to create/produce a VIP medical professional recruitment luncheon geared toward recruiting general practice doctors to the Valley. (Continue to pursue high quality employment opportunities for Temecula residents, Economic Prosperity) • Create/produce an Economic Development focused Bus Tour to educate out of town commercial brokers and bankers the opportunities available. (Continue to promote the Temecula Valley as a destination, Economic Prosperity) • Produce a Top 25 Sales Tax Producer Luncheon geared towards connecting with the City's Top 25 sales tax producers. (Retention and expansion of existing businesses, Economic Prosperity) PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Term Performance Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Goal Actuals Actuals Target Target Create a Business Number of local business Friendly Regulatory site visits (to foster 90 100 102 100 cEnvironment business relationships) L a u Retention and Number of TVE2 Clients 10 10 10 11 Expansion c Number of graduated c of Existing LU Businesses TVE2 Clients 1 1 1 1 Number of attendees for Temecula Ambassador 50 60 60 60 'a >. Foster an "Educated *' U Community program }sT,CU 2 Through a Wide Number of interns 115 125 130 135 Variety of Number of colleges at = J Opportunities College Fair 270 275 300 250 Annual Operating Budget 137 UP CITY MANAGER City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT SERVICES Emergency Management is the creation and maintenance of plans in order to reduce vulnerability to natural and manmade hazards and disasters. In addition, Emergency Management implements, monitors, and coordinates California's Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) within the City as well as the City's Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in support of public safety and emergency readiness. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR Hosted a regional Emergency Management Summit to bring together regional first responders, emergency managers, elected officials, businesses, and the general public to discuss issues related to emergency preparedness, homeland security, and all -hazards events such as earthquakes, floods, droughts, fires, terrorism, and hazardous waste incidents that affect our region. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) Hosted the City's second annual Youth Emergency Preparedness Program (YEPP). In addition to educating youth about emergency preparedness and all -hazards events that affected the region (i.e. earthquakes, floods, droughts, fires, terrorism, etc.), participants of the program received hands on experience managing the City's Emergency Operations Center (EOC) via a simulated tabletop exercise. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Updated the City's Emergency Operation Plan for 2019 (EOP) to ensure the most effective allocation of resources for protection of people and property in time of a Citywide emergency. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Completed the City's Emergency Communications Plan to ensure immediate assistance and mobilization of resources to aid city residents in the event of a Citywide emergency. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) Annual Operating Budget 138 UP CITY MANAGER DIVISION/PROGRAM: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Work with neighboring cities to organize a regional Emergency Management Summit to bring together regional first responders, emergency managers, elected officials, businesses, and the general public to discuss issues related to emergency preparedness, homeland security, and all - hazards events such as earthquakes, floods, droughts, fires, terrorism, and hazardous waste incidents that affect our region. This project is expected to be completed by June of 2020. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Host the City's third annual Youth Emergency Preparedness Program (YEPP). In addition to educating youth about emergency preparedness and all -hazardous events that affect the region (i.e. earthquakes, floods, droughts, fires, terrorism, etc.), participants of the program will receive hands on experience managing the City's Emergency Operations Center (EOC) via a simulated tabletop exercise. This project is expected to be completed by June of 2020. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Update the City's Emergency Operation Plan (EOP) for 2020 to ensure the most effective allocation of resources for protection of people and property in time of a Citywide emergency. This project is expected to be completed by June of 2020. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue to develop and implement the City's Emergency Communications Plan to ensure immediate assistance and mobilization of resources to aid city residents in the event of a Citywide emergency. This project is expected to be completed by June of 2020. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Incorporate the City's Local Hazard Mitigation Plan into the City's General Plan (Safety Element). This will allow the city to be eligible to obtain public assistance funding provided by the state through the California Disaster Assistance Act (CDAA). This project is expected to be completed by June of 2020. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) Annual Operating Budget 139 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY MANAGER DIVISION/PROGRAM: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Performance Value Term Goal Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Actuals Actuals Target Target Number of tabletop functional exercises provided to allow staff to become more familiar 2 2 2 2 >, with procedures, facilities, and systems used during E an actual emergency. E Minimize the u Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Percentage of staff trained Natural Hazards on Emergency 85% 90% 90% 90% a and Emergency Management ca Situations a� ca Q Number of Emergency Management summits to educate the public about N/A 2 2 2 "all hazards" that affect the region. Annual Operating Budget 140 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY CLERK MISSION The City Clerk's office is committed to serving the needs of the citizens of our community in a neutral and ethical manner by providing equal access to open and transparent government, ensuring the integrity of the participatory process, bridging internal and external communication pathways, and enhancing the public's trust in local government. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART CITY CLERK RandiJohl OPEN MEETINGS ELECTIONS RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTIONS air Political Practices Commissions (FPPQ Filings Records Services And Programs Legislative Operations Boards And Commissions Annual Operating Budget 141 �3 J City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY CLERK DIVISION/PROGRAM: OPEN MEETINGS, ELECTIONS AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) GENERAL FUND 001 CITY CLERK 120 SALARIES & BENEFITS 7S2,342 826,964 851,630 24,666 2.98% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 89,679 254,593 254,593 0 0.0% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 262,462 309,311 327,096 17,785 5.75% Division Total 1,104,483 1,390,868 1,433,319 42,451 3.05% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS City Clerk: Expenditures are expected to increase by 3.05% due to a cost of living adjustment (COLA) of 3% which will be provided to all eligible employees, according to labor agreements, on July 1, 2019 and an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocation for insurance. PERSONNEL ALLOCATION rlTv rl rmv Administrative Assistant Director of Legislative Affairs/City Clerk Management Aide III Office Specialist Office Specialist II Records Manager Records Technician Total Adopted 2017-18 Current 2018-19 Proposed 2019-20 Inc/(Decr) from Prior Yr 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 6.00 1 6.00 1 6.00 - Annual Operating Budget 142 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY CLERK DIVISION/PROGRAM: OPEN MEETINGS, ELECTIONS AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT SERVICES • Conduct regular and special general municipal elections in consolidation with the County of Riverside for the election of City Council members and local initiatives, referendums and recalls. • Administer Political Reform Act requirements related to campaign disclosure statements, conflict of interest filings and AB 1234 ethics training. • Administer Brown Act requirements ensuring meetings, agendas, minutes, reports, public notices, resolutions and ordinances are prepared, posted and published pursuant to law. • Ensure open and transparent access through records -related services including records management, retention, and Public Records Act programs. • Administer board and commission programs related to vacancies, orientation, commission handbook and Maddy Act compliance. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Conducted first district -based general municipal election for officeholders and/or local measures that were on the November 2018 ballot. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Conducted biennial review and update of Citywide Conflict of Interest Code pursuant to the Political Reform Act. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implemented Citywide Agenda Management System and conduct related trainings for appointed and elected officials and employees. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Conduct Request for Proposal process for State and Federal Legislative Consultant Services, implement agreements consistent with the City's Legislative Platform and ensure appropriate advocacy on City's behalf at the state and federal levels of government. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Conduct online voter registration drives utilizing iPads at City events, including the annual College Fair at Promenade Mall, to register and pre -register Temecula residents. (Promote Community Involvement, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Provide online access to top requested documents from the Public Works Department through the City's website and online records portal. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 143 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CITY CLERK DIVISION/PROGRAM: OPEN MEETINGS, ELECTIONS AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long performance Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Actuals Actual Target Target Percentage of Electronic c� Delivery of Agenda and 100% 100% 100% 100% Promote Energy Materials Efficient Operations and Development H Number of Electronic 788 798 800 800 N WebQA Requests Foster An = Organizational Percentage of Positions Structure That Aligns Cross -Trained for 100% 100% 100% 100% c Resources With Departmental Coverage L Demands 0 Percentage of Public Records Act Requests 100% 100% 100% 100% u Processed In Statutory Time > •N Period C a Provide Number of Annual Conflict Transparency To The of Interest Filings for Public For All Council, Boards, 78 76 75 75 Government Commissions, and ai Transactions Employees Percentage of Open co c 0 Meeting / Public Notices Published On or Before 100% 100% 100% o 100% Qv Statutory Time Period Annual Operating Budget 144 CITY ATTORNEY MISSION City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget The mission of the City Attorney's Office is to provide quality, timely, and cost-effective legal analysis, opinion, and advice to the City's elected officials, departments, appointed commissions and boards on a broad range of legal, administrative, legislative, and procedural matters, including application of constitutional, statutory, administrative, and local government law. The City Attorney's Office strives to effectively provide timely research, analysis, evaluation, and drafting of legal and other documents necessary to the accomplishment of the City's municipal functions and goals. The City Attorney's mission includes representation of the City in judicial, administrative, and appellate proceedings in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The City contracts with Richards, Watson & Gershon to provide City Attorney and public law services. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART CITY ATTORNEY Peter M. Thorson CITY COUNCIL CITY MANAGER Aaron Adams Annual Operating Budget 145 7.] 111 � R CITY ATTORNEY EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY GENERAL FUND 001 CITY ATTORNEY 130 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE Division Total City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) 977,221 942,300 942,300 0 0.0% 977,221 942,300 942,300 0 0.0% ANALYSIS City Attorney: Expenditures are projected to stay flat compared to the prior fiscal year. SERVICES • Serves as legal advisor to the City Council, City Manager, and the various City departments, Commissions, Committees, and Boards. • Prepares and approves the majority of proposed City ordinances, resolutions, contracts, and other legal documents. • Represents the City of Temecula in all litigation. Annual Operating Budget 146 A] a Cwnpp FINANCE MISSION City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Primary responsibilities of the Finance Department include cash and investment management, financial reporting, coordination and preparation of the Annual Operating Budget and Capital Improvement Program, internal audit, payroll, accounts receivable, financial oversight, business licensing, purchasing and contracting, financial management of Police, Animal Control and Fire contracts, and administration of all City funds and accounts. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART FINANCE DIRECTOR Jennifer Hennessy FINANCE SUPPORT BUDGETING FINANCIAL REVENUE SERVICES REPORTING MANAGEMENT Accounts perating Procurement �ro Payable Treasury and Investments Debt Capital Accounts Administration Receivable Business License and Cashier Animal Control General Ledger Contract Five Year Forecasting Maintenance Administration Grants Administration Police and Fire Annual Reports Contract Administration Payroll Annual Operating Budget 147 A] a Cwnpp FINANCE EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY GENERAL FUND 001 FINANCE 140 SALARIES & BENEFITS OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS CAPITAL OUTLAY Division Total ANIMAL CONTR^l ") OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE Division Total City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) 1,761,617 1,833,245 2,012,946 179,701 9.8% 133,114 242,483 226,454 (16,029) -6.61% 433,043 462,734 514,204 51,470 11.12% 0 43,703 0 (43,703) -100.0% 2,327,774 2,582,165 2,753,604 171,439 6.64% 460,280 425,572 475,235 49,663 11.67% 460,280 425,572 475,235 49,663 11.67% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Finance: Expenditures are projected to increase by 6.64% due to an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocations for Insurance and Information Technology, the addition of one full-time project employee to support the upgrade of the City's financial software system and the reallocation of personnel costs from the Police division to the Finance division. Animal Control: Expenditures are increasing by 11.67% due to an increase in the cost of shelter operations. Annual Operating Budget 148 A] a Cwnpp FINANCE PERSONNEL ALLOCATION FINANCE Administrative Assistant Accountant I (Confidential) Accounting Assistant Accounting Assistant - Cashier Accounting Manager Accounting Specialist Accounting Specialist- Payroll Accounting Technician I Accounting Technician II Business License Specialist/Cashier Business License Technician Director of Finance Fiscal Services Manager Management Analyst Payroll Coordinator (Confidential) Purchasing Coordinator II Purchasing Manager Revenue Manager Senior Debt Analyst Senior Management Analyst Total COMMUNITY FACILITY DISTRICTS Accountant I (Confidential) Director of Finance Senior Management Analyst Total Grand Total Annual Operating Budget City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Adopted Current Proposed Inc/(Decr) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 from Prior Yr 1.00 - - - 1.00 0.83 0.83 - 1.00 2.00 2.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 0.92 0.93 0.01 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 0.40 0.60 0.75 0.15 12.40 12.35 12.51 0.16 - 0.17 0.17 - - 0.08 0.07 (0.01) 0.22 - - - 0.22 0.25 0.24 (0.01) 12.62 12.60 12.75 0.15 149 FINANCE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: FINANCE SUPPORT SERVICES SERVICES • Oversee the Citywide coordination of the City's Annual Operating Budget and Capital Improvement Program Budgets. • Manage and develop annual and five year forecasts for City funds and programs, provide oversight of City's internal controls and manage audit requirements. • Provide front-line customer service to the public and manage the issuance and renewal of business licenses for businesses operating within the City limits. • In accordance with Investment Policy, manage cash and investments focusing on safety and liquidity, as well as return on investment. • Prepare Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, Single Audit Reports, State Reports and Quarterly Financial reports. • Process Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable, biweekly Payroll and yearly W-2, 1098 and 1099 reporting. • Maintain and update general ledger accounts for budget preparation and financial reports. • Review all City contracts and insurance certificates to ensure compliance with State law, Public Contract Code and the Temecula Municipal Code. • Administer the City's purchasing process in accordance with the Temecula Municipal Code. • Administer the City's debt obligations, including Community Facility District bonds, Tax Allocation bonds, and the Financing Lease. • Coordinate the annual update of the rates and charges of the City's eligible Service Levels. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Received awards for the City's Annual Operating Budget, Capital Improvement Program and Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Achieved clean audit opinions on all financial and program audits for FY2017-18. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implemented new Budgeting software and new Timekeeping system to enhance efficiency, improve data integrity and reduce staffing costs. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Finalized the Citywide Indirect Cost Allocation Plan and Cost of Services Study. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Developed implementation team and staffing structure in anticipation of implementing a new Citywide financial accounting software system. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 150 FINANCE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: FINANCE SUPPORT SERVICES OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Apply for and receive awards for the City's Annual Operating Budget, Capital Improvement Program and Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Develop needs assessment and implementation plan for the future replacement of the City's financial accounting software system. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implement Cost of Services Study recommendations, pending Council approval. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implement the upgraded Business License software, Citizen Self Service (CSS) module, to allow for an improved online Business License application and renewal process. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Increase online Business License renewal participation utilizing CSS, with a target goal of 50% of renewals processed online. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Develop Purchasing Administrative Guidelines, and establish emergency/mutual aid agreements as part of Emergency Operations Planning. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 151 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget FINANCE DIVISION/PROGRAM: FINANCE SUPPORT SERVICES PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Term Performance Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Goal Actuals Actuals Target Target Purchase orders 2,500 2,112 2,500 2,300 processed c a Maintain Overall Sound Bids processed online 50 40 50 45 to v Fiscal Policies to Ensure Long Term Solvency L Purchase orders M o processed within two 100% 100% 100% 100% v days V Provide Transparency Monthly Treasurer's u to the Public For All Report completed and u Q Government distributed within 30 days 100% 100% 100% 100% Transactions of month -end Number of business 8,500 7,895 8,300 8,300 E '� Create a Business licenses issued a Friendly Regulatory Number of on-line 2,000 2,700 2,700 2,700 LA C o "' Environment a business license renewals Annual Operating Budget 152 �z �...... f�f� HUMAN RESOURCES MISSION City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget The Human Resources Department is dedicated to providing quality service to our internal and external customers, and specifically to the City of Temecula employees of the past, present, and future by attracting, developing, and retaining a highly -qualified, diverse, positive, and productive workforce. The Human Resources staff is committed to fostering an environment of trust, objectivity, mutual respect, collaboration, innovation, open communication, safety, health, compassion, and well-being. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER Isaac Garibay HUMAN RESOURCES II II RISKMANAGEMENT Administration I I Insurance Classification and General Liability Compensation Employee Benefits I Workers' Compensation Recruitment, Selection I Employee Safety and Retention l Claims LAdministration Organizational Development and Training Risk Exposure Employee Relations Employee Wellness Program Labor Relations Cost Recovery Annual Operating Budget 153 City of Temecula � Fiscal Year 2019-20 ((i Annual Operating Budget HUMAN RESOURCES EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) GENERAL FUND 001 HUMAN RESOURCES 150 SALARIES & BENEFITS 567,085 641,347 668,163 26,816 4.18% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 245,010 424,323 424,823 500 0.12% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 167,443 121,347 170,327 48,980 40.36% Division Total 979,538 1,187,017 1,263,313 76,296 6.43% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Human Resources: Expenditures are expected to increase by 6.43% due to a cost of living adjustment (COLA) of 3% which will be provided to all eligible employees, according to labor agreements, on July 1, 2019 and an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocations for Insurance and Information Technology. PERSONNEL ALLOCATION HUMAN RESOURCES Administrative Assistant (Confidential) Assistant City Manager Fiscal Services Manager Human Resources Manager Human Resources Technician I Office Specialist (Confidential) Risk Manager Senior Human Resources Analyst Senior Management Analyst Senior Office Specialist (Confidential) Total Adopted 2017-18 Current 2018-19 Proposed 2019-20 Inc/(Decr) from PriorYr 0.10 - - - 0.25 0.25 0.05 (0.20) 0.90 0.90 0.80 (0.10) 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 0.10 0.10 0.50 0.40 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 4.35 1 4.25 1 4.35 1 0.10 Annual Operating Budget 154 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION/PROGRAM: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SERVICES • Administration: Review, update, and develop policies and procedures to ensure compliance with public sector labor and employment laws and alignment with Citywide operations and objectives; prepare and monitor the department's budget and expenditures; manage and oversee Federal and State government -mandated compliance programs including Department of Transportation (DOT) drug/alcohol testing, Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) pull notice, Department of Justice (DOJ) LiveScan fingerprinting, and professional license/certificate verifications; maintain employee files and personnel records; and maintain the City's Personnel System as outlined in the City's Municipal Code. • Classification and Compensation: Conduct objective studies of classifications and labor markets to ensure City staff is appropriately classified and equitably compensated; and develop and revise classification specifications to accurately reflect required qualifications, job duties, and scope of responsibility. • Employee Benefits: Administer retirement plans, health insurance plans, and other City benefits; update and maintain employee data in HRIS/payroll system; interpret and apply CalPERS regulations; evaluate and address unemployment insurance claims; and administer COBRA benefits for separated employees. • Recruitment, Selection and Retention: Coordinate with department managers to conduct recruitment and testing processes for vacant positions to ensure the hiring of highly qualified individuals; evaluate recruitment and turnover trends and develop strategies to effectively staff the organization; assist with organizational restructuring and succession planning efforts; conduct new employee orientation sessions; and develop and implement retention strategies. • Organizational Development and Training: Coordinate and implement employee training programs to foster personal and professional development; and manage compliance training programs in accordance with legal requirements and best practices. • Employee Relations: Administer performance evaluation process and advise management on performance management issues; counsel and advise employees on personnel matters; oversee disciplinary actions and appeals; manage and resolve employee grievances; conduct employee investigations to address and resolve personnel issues; and plan and implement employee recognition programs. • Labor Relations: Meet and confer with represented employee organizations regarding wages, hours and other terms and conditions of employment; interpret and apply provisions of the City's Personnel Rules and labor contracts; and maintain effective working relationships with employees and collective bargaining units. Annual Operating Budget 155 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION/PROGRAM: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Developed and Implemented the Citywide Employee Development Training Program. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Developed the City's Workforce Strategic Plan to maximize organizational effectiveness and address current and future workforce needs. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Updated and published the City's Personnel Policies and Administrative Guidelines. (Provide Transparency to the Public for all Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implemented the City's electronic applicant tracking system for all hiring managers to use in the recruitment process. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implemented an online onboarding system for new City employees. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implemented the City's online testing system to test job applicants. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Developed and implemented an automated workflowfor personnel status change approvals. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Participated in regional career fair events to attract qualified candidates to meet staffing needs. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implemented a dynamic service award program to foster a satisfied, productive and motivated workforce. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Ensure all City employees attend customer service training by June 2020. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implement the City's electronic performance management system for all City employees by June 2020. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Provide public access to the City's class specifications through the online recruitment portal. (Provide Transparency to the Public for all Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Train all hiring managers to use the City's electronic applicant tracking system. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Incorporate knowledge, skills and abilities testing in the recruitment process. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 156 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget I:01►&1_11L1C4*119111:Z"I DIVISION/PROGRAM: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long Performance FY FY FY FY Value Term Goal Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Actuals Actuals Target Target Percentage of employees completing the City of N/A N/A 30% 100% Temecula's Customer Service Training Program Percentage of hiring managers using the City's N/A N/A 50% 100% electronic applicant tracking system Foster an Percentage of au Organizational performance evaluations 0N/A Structure that completed using the N/A N/A o 100% Aligns Resources City's electronic u with Demands performance > management system c Percentage of job aapplicant testing N/A N/A o 100/ 0 100/ a, conducted via the City's online testing system M Percentage of new employees using the N/A N/A o 30/ 0 100/ City's online Onboard c portal u Percentage of Personnel Q Policies updated and o 0/ 0 0/ 0 100/ N/A made available electronically Provide Percentage of Transparency to Administrative Guidelines the Public for all � 0/ 25% 100% N/A updated and made Government available electronically Transactions Percentage of Class Specifications made N/A N/A N/A 100% available to the public online Annual Operating Budget 157 HUMAN RESOURCES City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: RISK MANAGEMENT SERVICES • Insurance: Coordinate with insurance brokers to secure lines of insurance for the City's liability and property in excess of the City's self -insured retention limits. • General Liability: Coordinate with third -party administrators and legal counsel for the cost- effective resolution of general liability claims and lawsuits. • Workers' Compensation: Coordinate with third -party administrators and legal counsel to manage workers' compensation claims and facilitate the proper treatment and resolution of employee illnesses and injuries; confer with managers to provide light duty or modified duty as appropriate; and, assist employees with issues related to workplace injuries and illnesses. • Employee Safety and Training: Establish and maintain a safe and healthy work environment by maintaining open lines of communication throughout the organization, complying with established federal, state and local regulations, and implementing best practices in preventing safety risk. • Claims Administration: Work in unison with Third Party Administrators to process both liability and workers' compensation claims against the City. • Cost Recovery: Coordinate with various City departments for the recovery of costs associated with damage to City -owned property. • Wellness Program: Develop and implement educational and interactive employee wellness programs designed to prevent workplace injury and illnesses. • Risk Exposure: Administer the City's general liability program by investigating and evaluating risk exposure and providing strategies for decreasing the City's general liability ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Continued to develop, implement and/or update Citywide safety training programs. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) Annual Operating Budget 158 �z City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION/PROGRAM: RISK MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Continue to develop, implement and/or update City-wide safety training programs (to prevent workplace injury and illnesses) through June 2020. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Streamline the City's certificate of insurance management system for internal and external customers by implementing a web -based approach by June 2020. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implement the City's Employee Wellness Program (designed to prevent workplace injury and illnesses) for all City employees by June 2020. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continue to develop and implement the City's Cost Recovery program (for costs associated with damage to City -owned property) for all affected City departments by June 2020. (Diversify the city's revenue base to ensure stability in any economic climate, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 159 �z �...... f�f� I:01 /L'IlIM*1911L'1"l DIVISION/PROGRAM: RISK MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long Performance FY FY FY FY Value Term Goal Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Actuals Actuals Target Target Minimize the Number of "all -hazards" M v L Impact to Life, evacuation drills at N/A 1 2 1 a Property, and applicable City facilities °J 'c the Environment a Percentage of City- -0 E c E from Natural related safety training r 0 Hazards and programs available to N/A N/A N/A 100% Emergency prevent workplace injury in Situations a and illnesses Percentage of agreement related certificates of v E insurance managed N/A N/A N/A o 75% L through the City's web - Foster an based approach c Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources Number of employee ai � with Demands wellness programs c designed to prevent N/A N/A N/A 3 a workplace injury and v illness c °J Diversify the Percentage of applicable f° city's revenue cost recovery cases base to ensure initiated for costs o stability in any associated with damage N/A N/A N/A 100% Q economic to City -owned property climate Annual Operating Budget 160 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MISSION Community Development is a multi -disciplinary department providing planning, development services, Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), and affordable housing to citizens, elected officials, appointed boards, commissions, and City departments. The department guarantees all development is consistent with the General Plan, Municipal Codes, and Building Codes. Community Development ensures that the goals of the community are met, with regards to health, life safety, public welfare, and neighborhood preservation. The department also conducts activities related to the winding down of redevelopment through the Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LUKE WATSON LONG RANGETE PLANNINGR ENT PLANNING/ MR CENTER BUILDING AND SAFETY CODE ENFORCEMENT SARDA/HOUSING MMUNITY DEVELOPM NT BLOCK GRANT ADMINISTRATION General Plan NG PERMIT CENTER Inspection Services Nuisance Abatement ROPS/LRPMP Consolidated Plan Implementation Operating Budget Zoning Ordinance Developmentiew Plan Processing Plan Review Weed Aba AfbrdaMe Housing HUD Grant ministratbn and CIP Budget DevebpmentProcessing Compliance Compliance Procurement a nd CEQA ManagementPermit Issuance on Sign Abatement ub-recipient Contract Contract Administration Administration p Ik Acquisition and Information Disposition Community ent Publk Information Engagement Abandoned Vehide Ik Information Abatement Capital Projects Administration Solid Waste & noel Recydirg Administration Community Engagement JIWnlm" ministmfion Energy Conservation P ograms Annual Operating Budget 161 Ak • or so��a�br COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) GENERAL FUND 001 PLANNING 161 SALARIES & BENEFITS 1,310,952 1,393,162 1,394,823 1,661 0.12% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 287,185 646,456 669,130 22,674 3.51% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 459,018 470,046 526,245 56,199 11.96% Division Total 2,057,155 2,509,664 2,590,198 80,534 3.21% BUILDING & SAFETY 162 SALARIES & BENEFITS 1,259,910 1,552,251 1,612,356 60,105 3.87% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 247,323 415,669 358,720 (56,949) -13.7% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 234,354 300,510 356,056 55,546 18.48% Division Total 1,741,587 2,268,430 2,327,132 58,702 2.59% BUILDING & SAFETY - CODE ENFORCEMENT SALARIES & BENEFITS 486,502 633,826 632,684 (1,142) -0.18% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 107,513 159,399 158,364 (1,035) -0.65% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 122,051 158,484 173,117 14,633 9.23% Division Total 716,066 951,709 964,165 12,456 1.31% AFFORDABLE HOUSING FUND 165 ivviJ-UtPAK I IVItIV IAL 1- SALARIES & BENEFITS 180,681 260,716 270,553 9,837 3.77% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 122,865 252,407 252,407 0 0.0% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 35,757 32,502 38,420 5,918 18.21% Division Total 339,303 545,625 561,380 15,755 2.89% COMMUNITY DEV BLOCK GRANT FUND 140 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 SALARIES & BENEFITS 103,055 109,385 111,685 2,300 2.1% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 140,974 113,880 123,766 9,886 8.68% TRANSFERS 711,509 812,825 323,660 (489,165) -60.18% Division Total 955,538 1,036,090 559,111 (476,979) -46.04% Annual Operating Budget 162 R 91k&IL/1110Ir]ui IRl EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY (continued) SARDA DEBT SERVICE FUND 380 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE TRANSFERS Division Total City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) 4,396,964 6,769,672 6,780,321 10,649 0.16% 256,938 750,000 750,000 0 0.0% 4,653,902 7,519,672 7,530,321 10,649 0.14% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Planning: Expenditures are expected to increase by 3.21% due to an increase in staff training and education as well as an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocation for Insurance and Information Technology. Building & Safety: Expenditures are expected to increase by 3.9% due to a cost of living adjustment (COLA) of 3% which will be provided to all eligible employees, according to labor agreements, on July 1, 2019 and an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocation for Insurance and Information Technology. Affordable Housing: Expenditures are expected to increase by 2.89% due to a cost of living adjustment (COLA) of 3% which will be provided to all eligible employees, according to labor agreements, on July 1, 2019 and an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocation for Insurance and Information Technology. CDBG: Expenditures are expected to decline by 46% due to a reduction in the transfer of CDBG funds to Capital Projects, which vary greatly from one year to the next, based on project activity. SARDA: Expenditures are expected to remain flat over the prior fiscal year. Annual Operating Budget 163 � of Sauthem Caf( COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERSONNEL ALLOCATION Adopted I Current ProposedLomPriorYr Inc/(Decr) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT- PLANNING Administrative Assistant 0.65 0.75 0.75 - Assistant Planner 1.00 1.75 1.75 - Associate Planner 1 2.00 2.00 2.00 - Associate Planner II - 0.40 0.40 - Community Development Technician - - - - Community Dev. Processing Supervisor 0.25 0.10 0.10 - Community Development Technician 1 0.66 0.44 0.20 (0.24) Community Development Technician II 0.50 0.20 0.20 - Development Processing Coordinator - - - - Director of Community Development 0.50 0.45 0.45 - Economic Development Analyst I - - - - Management Analyst - Economic Dev. 0.10 - - - Office Specialist 11 - 0.50 0.50 - Planning Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Principal Management Analyst 0.50 0.35 0.35 - Principal Planner 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Senior Management Analyst - - Senior Planner 1.00 0.60 0.60 - 9.54 9.30 (0.24) Total 9.16 0.10 0.10 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT- BUILDING & SAFETY Administrative Assistant 0.10 Building Inspector I - 1.00 1.00 - Building Inspector 11 3.00 3.00 3.00 - Building Official 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Code Enforcement Officer 1 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Code Enforcement Officer II 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Community Dev. Processing Supervisor 0.75 0.90 0.90 - Community Development Technician - - - - Community Development Technician 1 0.68 1.23 1.80 0.57 Community Development Technician II 1.50 1.80 1.80 - Development Processing Coordinator - - - - Director of Community Development 0.25 0.25 0.25 - Office Specialist II - 0.50 0.50 - Principal Management Analyst 0.10 0.20 0.20 - Senior Building Inspector 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Senior Code Enforcement Officer 1.00 0.95 0.95 - Senior Management Analyst - - - Senior Office Specialist 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 15.93 16.50 0.57 Total 13.38 Annual Operating Budget 164 � of Sauthem Caf( COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERSONNEL ALLOCATION (continued) Adopted Current Proposed Inc/(Decr) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 from Prior Yr CDBG Associate Planner - - - - Principal Management Analyst 0.13 0.20 0.20 - 0.20 0.20 Total 0.13 1 - AFFORDABLE HOUSING Administrative Assistant 0.25 0.15 0.15 - Assistant Planner - 0.25 0.25 - Associate Planner II 0.25 0.35 0.35 - Director of Community Development 0.25 0.25 0.25 - Principal Management Analyst 0.27 0.20 0.20 - Senior Planner - 0.35 0.35 - 1.55 1.55 Total 1.02 - SERVICE LEVEL D Associate Planner II 0.75 0.25 0.25 - Director of Community Development - 0.05 0.05 - Principal Management Analyst - 0.05 0.05 - Senior Planner - 0.05 0.05 - 0.40 0.40 Total 0.75 - Grand Total Annual Operating Budget 24.44 27.62 27.95 0.33 165 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: LONG RANGE PLANNING SERVICES • Provide planning related analysis and recommendations to community, City staff, City Commissions and City Council for issues related to current and future development. • Provide environmental review services for future development projects. • Provide oversight, analysis, and implementation of the goals of the City's General Plan to ensure consistency with the objectives of the City Council, the community, and economic trends as the community matures. • Conduct legislative analysis and implementation to maintain compliance with all applicable State and Federal laws. • Engage in all planning processes regarding future development of the City and region. • Administer solid waste agreement to ensure efficient solid waste removal and recycling. • Conduct public outreach efforts. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Updated the Uptown Temecula Specific Plan and Sidewalk Guidelines. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) • Updated the City's Massage Ordinance in accordance with State legislation. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) • Completed and adopted an Affordable Housing Overlay Zone and Density Bonus Ordinance in accordance with State legislation by June 2019. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) • Completed the community outreach process on short-term rentals and draft an ordinance defining regulations on the issue. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) • Implemented the 2017 State Housing Package Legislation. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • In compliance with state legislation, adopted an Outdoor Vendor Cart ordinance. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) Annual Operating Budget 166 I� Q COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: LONG RANGE PLANNING City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR (Continued) • Completed the 2018 annual Housing Element Report and submitted it to the State Department of Housing and Community Development. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Adopted a Collection Container Ordinance. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Successful at securing technical and financial assistance from the Southern California Association of Governments for the implementation of SB 743. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies to Ensure Long Term Solvency, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Coordinated charrettes with staff and Mount San Jacinto for the future planning of the higher education campus. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Held the 7t" annual Bike to Work Day. (Provide Signature Special Events and Cultural Opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • In coordination with TCSD, held a National Trails Day event at the Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve. (Provide Signature Special Events and Cultural Opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • In coordination with Public Works, completed design of a Bicycle Pump Track at Ronald Reagan Sports Park. (Maintain a Safe and Family Friendly Oriented Environment, Healthy and Livable City) • Completed a small cell wireless facility urgency ordinance. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Complete and adopt a Valet Ordinance, establishing regulations to allow valet parking throughout the City by June 2020. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) • Amend Citywide Design Guidelines. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continue to implement the 2017 State Housing Package Legislation. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • In coordination with Public Works, complete the construction of the Bicycle Pump Track at Ronald Reagan Sports Park. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Complete the Old Town Parking Study. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) • Apply for funding under Senate Bill 2 to update the City's Housing Element. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies to Ensure Long Term Solvency, Accountable and Responsible City Government) Annual Operating Budget 167 I� Q COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: LONG RANGE PLANNING City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Value Five -Year Long Term Goal Performance Measures FY 2016-17 Actuals FY 2017-18 Actuals FY 2018-19 Target FY 2019-20 Target a, c� J � T Provide Housing For All Number of Housing *= c� Income Types In The Element Programs 5 5 5 5 s V Community completed 4E �a v 2 c o '> Connect The City C Z., Through Number of miles of 10 10 10 10 a = A Series Of Trails And bike lanes striped i 0 0 Walkways H Annual Operating Budget 168 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 91k&IL/111110Ir]ui IRl DIVISION/PROGRAM: CURRENT PLANNING AND PERMIT CENTER SERVICES • Provide development and environmental review services for development projects. • Provide planning related analysis and recommendations to Planning Commission and City Council for issues related to development applications. • Process building permits, including initial application, plan check, issuance, and records retention. • Guide and educate customers on building permit requirements, and the residential development code to ensure code compliance and a seamless permitting process for the applicants. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • In coordination with developers, completed the entitlement process for the proposed Promenade Mall Transit Center to expand transit services. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • Continued to provide free pre -application services for potential developments in the community. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • Held quarterly coordination meetings with Pechanga to discuss on -going projects. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • In coordination with the developer, completed the entitlement process for five residential projects — including Temecula Village Apartments, Paseo del Sol, Roripaugh Ranch, Seraphina, and Vine Creek for a total of 1065 housing units. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • In coordination with the developer, completed the entitlement process for three hotels. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • In coordination with the developer, completed the entitlement process for Town Square Market Place, a Development Plan to allow for the construction of an approximately 87,280 square foot commercial center. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • In coordination with the developer, completed the entitlement process for a Development Plan for the construction of a two-story, approximately 18,621 square foot office building. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • In coordination with the developer, completed the entitlement process for a Development Plan for the construction of an approximately 30,978 square foot industrial building. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • Conducted approximately 35 public hearings. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • Assisted approximately 11,000 visitors at the Permit Center. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) Annual Operating Budget 169 Ak or so�ca�uro Win, C—t'le COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: CURRENT PLANNING AND PERMIT CENTER OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Continue to provide free pre -application services for potential developments in the community. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • Continue to hold quarterly coordination meetings with Pechanga to discuss on -going projects. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • In coordination with the developer, complete the entitlement process for a proposed luxury car dealership. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) • In coordination with the developer, complete the home product review for Sommers Bend (former Roripaugh Ranch). (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity.) Annual Operating Budget 170 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: CURRENT PLANNING AND PERMIT CENTER PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Performance 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Measures Actuals Actuals Target Target Percentage of applicants receiving approval letter and Conditions of Approval 100% 100% 100% 100% within 3 business days of project approval Percentage of Building v Department plan checks E c completed within 12 business days for first 100% 100% 100% 100% 0 submittals and within 7 business days for subsequent submittals v >_ Provide Transparency c To The Public For All Percentage of plan checks 0 Government reviewed for Land v Transactions Development by Planning °C completed within 15 business days for first 100/ 0 0 100/ 100/ 0 0 100/ v submittals and within 10 business days for subsequent submittals 0 U U Q Percentage of Notice of Exemption and Notice of Determination filings sent to the Riverside County 100% 100% 100% 100% Recorder within 3 business days of project approval for CEQA exempt projects Annual Operating Budget 171 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: BUILDING & SAFETY SERVICES • Promote life, health, and fire safety standards adopted through California Building Codes. • Provide plan examinations and building inspections to applicants seeking to improve their property. • Facilitate timely and efficient plan check and permitting services for businesses, residents, and developers, allowing customers to handle development services in one convenient location. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Continued to improve and promote the online building inspection request program. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Increased public awareness and educate developers by holding a developer workshop on California Energy Code changes and ADA regulations. (Promote Community Involvement, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • In coordination with the developer, completed plan check and inspections for the development of: o iA- Robotics, a 31,000 square foot industrial building; o Three hotels including Best Western, Home 2 Suites, and Hilton Garden Inn o Gateway to Temecula o Cheesecake Factory o RTA Transit Center (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • In coordination with the developer, completed plan check for the development of: o Temecula Medical Office Building II o Mexico Cafe o Three story commercial building for Subaru (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Conducted approximately 19,000 inspections, issued approximately 3,000 permits, and issued approximately 400 certificates of occupancy. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) Annual Operating Budget 172 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: BUILDING & SAFETY OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Certify an additional building inspector as a California Certified Accessibility Specialist to assist developers in ADA compliance. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue to coordinate with IT to increase the number of permits that can be applied for online through our Citizen Access Portal (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Increase public awareness and educate developers by holding a developer workshop on California Energy Code changes and ADA regulations. (Promote Community Involvement, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • In coordination with the developer, complete the plan check for the following: o Cypress Ridge, a 245 residential development. o Pedestrian Bridge at Roripaugh Ranch Phase II o America's Tire Depot 0 2-story Medical Office Building on 43980 Margarita Rd. o New Facade Upgrade at Palomar Village 0 29 Room Hotel at Galway House o Temecula Health Care Building on Campanula (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Update the Temecula Municipal Code to include the 2019 Building Code Update. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) Annual Operating Budget 173 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: BUILDING & SAFETY PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long Term FY FY FY FY Performance Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Goal Actuals Actuals Target Target >. Complete all photo -voltaic u Provide Transparency To plan checks within 72 100% 100% 100% 100% The Public For All hours c o +, Government Number of workshops Q v Transactions provided for active 2 1 1 1 developers in the City cu 20 per 20 per 20 per 20 per p Number of inspections per person/ person/ person/ person/ .� Foster An Organizational person, per day Structure That Aligns day day day day Length of time customers 72 48 48 48 3 Resources With Q Demands must wait for next hours hours hours hours available inspection Annual Operating Budget 174 -+ City of Temecula R Fiscal Year 2019-20 I 7�A he"e"`°'S°°`he'°`a' 'y Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: CODE ENFORCEMENT SERVICES • Provide commercial and residential neighborhood preservation to ensure a high quality standard of living and sustainability in communities. • Identify substandard housing to promote life, health, and safety standards. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Decreased the number of non -operable vehicles in the City. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Increased public awareness of nuisance issues via the City website, social media, and public outreach. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Collaborated with Community Services and Law Enforcement on the implementation of the Responsible Compassion Program. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Conducted 3,300 inspections and opened approximately 1,500 cases. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Continue to decrease the number of non -operable vehicles in the City. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue to increase public awareness of nuisance issues via the City website, social media, and public outreach. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continue to collaborate with Community Services and Law Enforcement on the implementation of the Responsible Compassion Program. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 175 I 7�A The HeartM Southern C.M.,nia wee C..n y COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: CODE ENFORCEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Term Goal Performance Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Actuals Actuals Target Target c v cu E Provide Transparency To The Number of brochures > Public For All Government created for common code 0 1 1 1 _ violations, in order to create 0 > o a o Transactions public awareness U Q � Continue To Aggressively Number of hours for Mitigate Graffiti And turnaround time for graffiti 48 48 48 48 E Vandalism abatement E 0 U Percentage of weed v abatement cases a Minimize The Impact To Life, successfully resolved prior 95% 95% 95% 95% v a Property, And The to placing a lien on the Environment From Natural property M Hazards And Emergency •� Situations Percentage of code cases cn that are resolved and closed 80% 80% 80% 80% Q within 3 weeks Annual Operating Budget 176 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: SARDA/HOUSING SERVICES • Administer the affordable housing compliance program to ensure compliance at all affordable housing developments monitored by the City. • Identify, negotiate, and enter into funding agreements for the construction of affordable housing units. • Administer the Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency to wind down the obligations of the former Temecula Redevelopment Agency. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Completed successful turnover of oversight of the Successor Agency to the Redevelopment Agency to the County of Riverside. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Partnered with BRIDGE Housing to execute a Solar Agreement for Madera Vista residents, reducing their utility costs. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Partnered with Affirmed Housing for the re -syndication, rehabilitation, and refinancing of Mission Village Apartments. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Submitted the Recognized Obligation Payment Schedule (ROPS) and budget to the Riverside County Oversight Board. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • In conjunction with Current Planning and the developer, partnered with Pacific West Communities to complete the entitlement process for 60 affordable housing units. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Enter into a disposition and development agreement with one or more developers for the construction of affordable housing. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies to Ensure Long Term Solvency, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Submit the Recognized Obligation Payment Schedule (ROPS) and budget to the Riverside County Oversight Board. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 177 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: SARDA/HOUSING PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Term performance Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Goal Actuals Actuals Target Target Number of agreements with I v Provide Housing For All an affordable housing CU Income Types In The developer for the use of 0 0 1 1 io > Community available Tax Allocation _ Bond proceeds Annual Operating Budget 178 Ift City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT SERVICES • Administer the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program which provides funding for community based services and capital infrastructure projects. • Complete compliance and documentation requirements for U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). • Implement the goals of the Federal Community Development Block Grant program. Develop viable communities by providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and opportunities to expand economic opportunities, principally for low and moderate -income persons. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Funded public service providers including the Assistance League of California, Boys and Girls Clubs of Southwest County, Fair Housing Council of Riverside County, Hospice of the Valleys, Safe Alternatives for Everyone, Voices for Children, Canine Support Team, City of Temecula Homeless Diversion Program, and VNW Circle of Care. (Maintain a Safe and Family Oriented Environment, Healthy and Livable City) • Funded CIP projects such as Critical Home Maintenance and Repairs Program and ADA Transition Plan implementation projects. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive Government) • Completed the 2017-18 Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) and submit to HUD. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Completed and adopted the 2019-20 Annual Action Plan and submitted to HUD. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Satisfied HUD's timeliness requirement. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 179 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Fund public service providers including the Assistance League of California, Boys and Girls Clubs of Southwest County, Fair Housing Council of Riverside County, Hospice of the Valleys, Safe Alternatives for Everyone, Voices for Children, Canine Support Team and City of Temecula Homeless Diversion Program. (Maintain a Safe and Family Oriented Environment, Healthy and Livable City) • Fund CIP projects such as Critical Home Maintenance and Repairs Program and ADA Transition Plan implementation projects. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive Government) • Satisfy HUD's timeliness requirement. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Update the Citizen Participation Plan. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Complete the 2018-19 Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) and submit to HUD. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Complete and adopt the 2020-21 Annual Action Plan and submit to HUD. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Value Five -Year Long Term Goal Performance Measures FY 2016-17 Actuals FY 2017-18 Actuals FY 2018-19 Target FY 2019-20 Target Number of objectives completed for the Five- 3 1 1 3 M U Year Consolidated Plan Provide Transparency M .� L To The Public For All Government o C o U C7 Transactions Number of HUD timeliness tests met. 1 0 1 1 Annual Operating Budget 180 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: ADMINISTRATION SERVICES • Review all department contracts to ensure compliance with Public Contract Code and City Municipal Code and internal financial policies. • Manage department purchasing, contract administration, and procurement. • Provide support to Planning Commission and Old Town Local Review Board by managing and noticing agendas and reports. • Prepare department's Annual Operating Budget, Capital Improvement Program, and Five Year Forecast. • Provide external agencies with quarterly, monthly, and annual development and fee reports. • Liaison to Human Resources for personnel responsibilities such as recruitment and evaluations. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Completed all reports for external agencies on time. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive city Government) • Prepared balanced department Annual Operating Budget and Capital Improvement Program. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Processed all agenda packets for Director's Hearings, Old Town Local Review Board, Planning Commission, and Oversight Board for the Successor Agency to the Redevelopment Agency in accordance with their established and required deadlines. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Posted all notices for public hearings in accordance to legal requirements. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Coordinated with IT on the implementation of the Citizens Access Portal to streamline the permitting and application process. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) • Responded to approximately 900 public inquiries through MyCivic App. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) • Processed approximately 230 public records requests. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) Annual Operating Budget 181 Q City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION/PROGRAM: ADMINISTRATION OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Complete all reports for external agencies on time. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Prepare balanced department Annual Operating Budget and Capital Improvement Program. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Process all agenda packets for Director's Hearings, Old Town Local Review Board, Planning Commission, and Oversight Board for the Successor Agency to the Redevelopment Agency in accordance with their established and required deadlines. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Post all notices for public hearings in accordance to legal requirements. (Provide Transparency to the Public for All Government Transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continue to coordinate with IT on the implementation of the Citizens Access Portal to streamline the permitting and application process. (Create a Business Friendly Regulatory Environment, Economic Prosperity) PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Value Five -Year Long Term Goal Performance Measures FY 2016-17 Actuals FY 2017-18 Actuals FY 2018-19 Target FY 2019-20 Target Provide Transparency To The Public For All Percentage of reports c Government completed on time for 100% 100% 100% 100% v> Transactions external agencies Z r L 0 > a Foster And EA 0 v Organizational Percentage of performance U u Structure That Aligns evaluations given within 30 100% 100% 100% 100% Resources With days of the review period Demands Annual Operating Budget 182 The H—t of S—th— California Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PUBLIC WORKS MISSION The mission of the Public Works Department is to provide quality services that support the infrastructure demands of the City of Temecula and enhance the safety, welfare and aesthetic environment of the residents, businesses and visitors. This is accomplished through the development and maintenance of City streets, sidewalks, traffic systems, bike lanes, parks, buildings, trails and drainage facilities; professional engineering oversight of public and private improvement projects; and implementation of erosion/sediment controls and storm water quality measures. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS / CITY ENGINEER Patrick Thomas ENGINEERING MAINTENANCE LAND TRAFFIC 7 IF —CAPITAL PROJECTS STREET FACILIT PARKAND DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE LANDSCAPE AINTENANCE Permits and Traffic/S y roject Asphalt/Concrete Building Par/TrailDevelopment Commission lopment, Maintenance Maintenance andMaintenance Inspection ment, and Rehab ectionSpeed SurveysSigning/Striping edian and Slope FEMA Project and OldTownFacilitiesFy Maintenance Flood an pplicationAdministration Traffic Si nal inistrationg Tree Tdmming and Maintenance andWeed Abatement Custodial Services acility landscape TimingBond Maintenance Administration ns andand I Map Recordation ificationsTraffic AnalysisarndDrainage Channels/ Public Service pIanCheckReview Census Catch Basins Requestsests forNPDESCompliance lsand PublicCIP Special EventsRequestsRequests Projects and Inspection Public Service dding Public Service and Graffiti and Emergency Removal Response Development Plans ssmentCheck Emergency Service and Review Traffic Impact D Districts Responses Cond'Rions Analysis/Review Special Events and Emergency Service MeasureAand Response Planning Commission Traffic Control Plans TUMF FAdm in, stration Annual Operating Budget 183 City of Temecula [[[[ v R Fiscal Year 2019-20 The "e°`°°f5°"`""reCountry '°'° Wine Country Annual Operating Budget PUBLIC WORKS EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) GENERAL FUND 001 LAND DEVELOPMENT 163 SALARIES & BENEFITS 1,309,946 1,301,699 1,384,600 82,901 6.37% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 46,936 174,685 174,205 (480) -0.27% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 309,731 285,271 340,168 54,897 19.24% Division Total 1,666,613 1,761,655 1,898,973 137,318 7.79% PUBLIC WORKS 164 PUBLIC WORKS - NPDES COMPLIANCE SALARIES & BENEFITS 316,382 302,644 298,742 (3,902) -1.29% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 467,051 866,340 751,371 (114,969) -13.27% CAPITAL OUTLAY 0 150,000 250,000 100,000 66.67% Division Total 783,433 1,318,984 1,300,113 (18,871) -1.43% PUBLIC WORKS - OLD TOWN MAINTENANCE SALARIES & BENEFITS 32,905 28,508 59,837 31,329 109.89% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 155,707 194,937 187,237 (7,700) -3.95% Division Total 188,612 223,445 247,074 23,629 10.57% PUBLIC WORKS - STREETS MAINTENANCi SALARIES & BENEFITS 1,290,500 1,311,353 1,335,756 24,403 1.86% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 1,217,452 1,540,572 1,389,049 (151,523) -9.84% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 711,930 801,228 855,039 53,811 6.72% CAPITAL OUTLAY 0 35,078 0 (35,078) -100.0% Division Total 3,219,882 3,688,231 3,579,844 (108,387) -2.94% PUBLIC WORKS - TRAFFIC SALARIES & BENEFITS 673,455 774,329 793,526 19,197 2.48% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 253,801 329,758 329,758 0 0.0% Division Total 927,256 1,104,087 1,123,284 19,197 1.74% CIP PUBLIC WORKS 165 SALARIES & BENEFITS 1,423,998 2,196,958 2,082,507 (114,451) -5.21% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 197,986 79,829 79,214 (615) -0.77% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 239,754 229,402 255,816 26,414 11.51% Division Total 1,861,738 2,506,189 2,417,537 (88,652) -3.54% Annual Operating Budget 184 R The Heart California Wine Country PUBLIC WORKS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY (continued) 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) GENERAL FUND 001 PARKS MAINTENANCE 167 SALARIES & BENEFITS 851,026 1,027,956 899,930 (128,026) -12.45% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 2,711,945 2,778,280 2,837,847 59,567 2.14% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 227,152 200,539 220,730 20,191 10.07% Division Total 3,790,123 4,006,775 3,958,507 (48,268) -1.2% MEASURE A FUND 170 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 795,372 2,008,541 2,008,541 0 0.0% TRANSFERS 4,455,221 4,057,668 2,663,839 (1,393,829) -34.35% Division Total 5,250,593 6,066,209 4,672,380 (1,393,829) -22.98% DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES FUND 120 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 11,790 0 0 0 0.0% TRANSFERS 3,123,748 8,173,855 13,086,501 4,912,646 60.1% Division Total 3,135,538 8,173,855 13,086,501 4,912,646 60.1% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Land Development: Expenditures are expected to increase by 7.79% due to a cost of living adjustment (COLA) of 3% which will be provided to all eligible employees, according to labor agreements, on July 1, 2019 and an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocations for Insurance and Information Technology. Public Works: Expenditures are expected to increase by 7.94% due to a cost of living adjustment (COLA) of 3% which will be provided to all eligible employees, according to labor agreements, on July 1, 2019 and the increase of Capital Outlay over the prior year due to the purchase and install of 150 storm drain inlet filters. CIP Administration: Expenditures are expected to decrease by 3.54% due to two retirement vacancies that were subsequently budgeted at a lower step rate and the addition of one full-time benefitted Office Specialist II. Parks Maintenance: Expenditures are expected to decrease by 1.2% due to the reallocation of personnel costs from Parks Maintenance to Service Levels. Annual Operating Budget 185 R The Heart of S-th- California Wi- C-tq PUBLIC WORKS ANALYSIS/COMMENT (Continued) City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Measure A: Expenditures are expected to decrease by 22.98% due to a reduction in the transfer of Measure A funds, which can vary greatly from one year to the next based on capital project activity. Development Impact Fees: Expenditures are expected to increase by 60.1% due to an increase in the transfer of DIF funds, which can vary greatly from one year to the next based on capital project activity. PERSONNEL ALLOCATION PUBLIC WORKS - LAND DEVELOPMENT Administrative Assistant Assistant Engineer II Associate Civil Engineer Associate Engineer I Associate Engineer II Community Development Technician Community Development Technician I Community Development Technician II Junior Engineer Maintenance Supervisor Office Specialist Office Specialist I Principal Civil Engineer- (Underfill as Senior Civil Engineer) Director of Public Works Public Works Inspector I Public Works Inspector II Senior Civil Engineer Senior Management Analyst Principal Management Analyst Senior Public Works Inspector Special Projects Engineer Total Annual Operating Budget Adopted 2017-18 Current 2018-19 Proposed 2019-20 Inc/(Deer) from PriorYr 0.25 0.25 0.25 - 1.00 - - - 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 0.66 0.33 - (0.33) 0.05 - - - 0.65 0.60 0.60 - 0.90 1.00 1.00 - 0.15 0.15 0.15 - 0.90 0.90 - (0.90) - - 0.90 0.90 - 1.00 - (1.00) 0.10 0.10 - (0.10) - - 0.10 0.10 1.40 0.70 0.70 - 9.06 j 8.03 j 8.70 j 0.67 186 R The Heart of S-th.- California PUBLIC WORKS PERSONNEL ALLOCATION (Continued) PUBLIC WORKS Administrative Assistant Assistant Engineer II Associate Civil Engineer Associate Engineer Associate Engineer I Associate Engineer II Custodian I Custodian II Director of Public Works Field Supervisor- Facilities Lead Maintenance Worker Lead Maintenance Worker -Facilities Maintenance Manager Maintenance Supervisor Maintenance Worker Maintenance Worker Maintenance Worker II Management Assistant Office Specialist Office Specialist I Office Specialist II Principal Management Analyst Principal Civil Engineer Public Works Inspector Public Works Inspector I Public Works Inspector II Senior CIP Specialist Senior Engineer Senior Management Analyst Senior Office Specialist Senior Public Works Inspector Senior Signal Technician Signal Technician I Total Annual Operating Budget City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Adopted 2017-18 Current 2018-19 Proposed 2019-20 Inc/(Decr) from Prior Yr 0.40 0.40 0.40 - - 1.00 1.00 - - - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - - - 2.00 2.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.10 0.05 0.05 - - 0.05 0.05 - 0.40 0.40 0.40 - - 0.10 0.10 4.00 2.92 2.96 0.04 0.10 0.10 0.10 - 1.05 0.98 0.98 - 0.50 0.05 1.05 1.00 3.00 2.88 1.92 (0.96) 2.00 2.00 2.00 - - 0.25 0.25 - 0.35 0.40 - (0.40) 0.80 0.80 1.20 0.40 - - 0.40 0.40 0.10 - - - 0.10 0.10 - (0.10) - - 0.10 0.10 0.40 0.40 - (0.40) 1.00 1.15 1.15 - 0.50 0.25 0.25 - 2.00 1.00 1.00 - - 1.00 1.00 - 19.80 18.18 j 18.36 j 0.18 187 R The Heart of S-th- California Wi- C-tq I1I 1 1.11 MY191►i PERSONNEL ALLOCATION (Continued) PUBLIC WORKS - CIP ADMINISTRATION Administrative Assistant Assistant Engineer Associate Civil Engineer Associate Engineer Associate Engineer I Associate Engineer II Construction Manager Director of Public Works Maintenance Supervisor Office Specialist Office Specialist Principal Civil Engineer Principal Engineer Principal Management Analyst Public Works Inspector 11 Senior CIP Specialist Senior Civil Engineer Senior Engineer Senior Management Analyst Senior Public Works Inspector Total PARKS MAINTENANCE Director of Public Works Facility Services Manager Landscape Inspector Landscape Inspector II Lead Maintenance Worker Maintenance Manager Maintenance Supervisor Maintenance Worker Maintenance Worker II Management Assistant Office Specialist Office Specialist II Park/Landscape Maintenance Supervisor Senior CIP Specialist Senior Landscape Inspector Senior Office Specialist Total Grand Total Annual Operating Budget City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Adopted Current Proposed Inc/(Decr) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 from Prior Yr 0.30 0.30 0.30 - 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 1.00 - - 1.00 3.00 3.00 - 1.00 1.00 - (1.00) 0.25 0.25 0.25 - 0.05 - - - - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - - - 0.45 0.45 - 1.00 1.00 - 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 0.45 0.45 (0.45) 1.10 1.05 1.05 - 10.15 12.05 12.05 - 0.10 0.10 0.10 - - - 0.75 0.75 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 0.40 - 0.95 0.95 - 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 (1.00) 0.50 0.25 0.25 - 0.20 0.20 0.20 - 0.72 1.80 - (1.80) 0.60 0.60 0.60 - 0.35 0.15 0.15 - 6.87 7.10 7.00 (0.10) 45.88 45.36 46.11 0.75 188 R The Heart of S—th— California Wi- C—t,y PUBLIC WORKS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: LAND DEVELOPMENT SERVICES • Provide plan check and engineering review and approval of parcel maps, subdivision maps and improvement plans as required by the Subdivision Map Act. Review planning applications to enforce the implementation of proper mitigation measures, conditions and code requirements. Ensure National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and code compliance with applicable engineering and City standards. • Provide NPDES engineering reviews, inspections and oversight for the development community to ensure proper measures are considered during the development (planning/construction) process to meet State and Federal NPDES regulations and requirements. • Provide inspection oversight services for private development construction activity for all streets, drainage facilities, parks and slopes to be included within City right-of-way and maintenance areas. • Review and issue permits for encroachments into the public right-of-way including private and public capital improvement construction activities, utility installation, repair work, special events, haul routes, etc. • Review of legal descriptions for property transactions and/or right-of-way acquisition, abandonment and easement requests. • Provide community outreach and education related to pollution prevention and water quality management; specifically, to address and meet NPDES compliance standards. • Provide for the administration and management of the NPDES permit for construction activities and the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) permit to ensure compliance with local, State and Federal mandates. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Updated the City specific WQMP Guidelines and template to be consistent with the MS4 permit. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Established benefits and costs associated with possible implementation of a City Vertical Control Network. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Reviewed fee structure and procedures of the Encroachment Permit application and process. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continued updating the JRMP to meet requirements of the 2015 MS4 Permit. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 189 R The Heart of S—th— Califo Wi- C ­rnia tq PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION/PROGRAM: LAND DEVELOPMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR (Continued) • Continue meeting with Co-Permittees of the MS4 permit to determine most cost-effective means of implementation of requirements of the WQIP for the City of Temecula. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies, Accountable and Responsive City Government) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Continue to update the City specific WQMP Guidelines and template to be consistent with the MS4 permit. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Establish plan of implementation and standards for a City Vertical Control Network as part of the development process. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implement updated procedures of the Encroachment Permit application and process. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continue updating the JRMP to meet requirements of the 2015 MS4 Permit. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continue meeting with Co-Permittees of the MS4 permit to determine most cost-effective means of implementation of requirements of the WQIP for the City of Temecula. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Revise the Engineering and Construction Manual to meet current processes. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implement the electronic review process for engineering submittals, establish standards and guidelines for electronic review and develop processes to be followed. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continue working with City Clerk's Office on "Top Requested Documents" project and implement "self-service" access to online record drawings, plans, maps and other public documents. (Provide transparency to the public for all government transactions; Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 190 R The Heart of S—th— Califo Wi- C ­rnia t'y PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION/PROGRAM: LAND DEVELOPMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long Performance FY FY FY FY 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Measures Actuals Actuals Target Target Percentage of development reviews completed within the 100% 100% 100% 100% established Community Development turn -around time c Percentage of plan checking E = reviews completed within the established City turn -around time for legal documents, final 100% 100% 100% 100% maps, Water Quality u Management Plans, grading and Provide Highly improvement plans. vA Functional And o Sustainable City Percentage of onsite inspections CL Facilities And completed timely and effectively 100% 100% o 100% 0 100% oC Infrastructure for private development and NPDES ca Percentage of permits issued a� within a reasonable time for 100% 100% 100% 100% 3 grading, haul routes and v encroachment activities v Q Percentage of timely assistance provided to the general public at 100% 100% 100% 100% the public counter and phone inquiries Annual Operating Budget 191 W-c-t,y PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION/PROGRAM: TRAFFIC ENGINEERING City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget SERVICES • Maintain the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Network to provide for the efficient progression of traffic on the City's primary corridors. • Conduct an effective preventative maintenance program for traffic signal and communication equipment to minimize signal equipment failures. • Review proposed development plans to ensure consistency with the City's General Plan, Circulation Element and QLMP goals. • Review and respond to citizen requests for traffic control devices and traffic calming measures; with input from the Public/Traffic Safety Commission. • Ensure neighborhood and school areas traffic safety by providing education through the Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program. • Monitor traffic conditions and develop proactive measures to provide for the safe and efficient movement of traffic on City arterials. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Implemented Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Improvements including bike lanes, bike lane buffers and marked pedestrian crossings at controlled intersections. (Connect the City through a Series of Trails and Walkways; Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Installed Traffic Signal Improvements at various intersections including protected/permissive traffic signal operation. (Proactively Address Traffic Improvements; A Safe and Prepared Community). • Upgraded City's Closed Circuit Television Camera and Communication Infrastructure including PTZ cameras and surveillance cameras at 25 locations, fiber optic cable reconfiguration, and modifications to Traffic Operations Center (TOC). (Proactively Address Traffic Improvements; A Safe and Prepared Community). • Implemented High Visibility Pedestrian Crossing Signage at mid -block uncontrolled intersection adjacent to Great Oak High School. (Proactively Address Traffic Improvements; A Safe and Prepared Community). • Utilized the City's Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program to Implement Traffic Calming Measures to improve traffic safety in various neighborhoods to include residential stop signs, V-Calm signs and traffic striping. (Proactively Address Traffic Improvements; A Safe and Prepared Community). Annual Operating Budget 192 W-c-t,y PUBLIC WORKS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: TRAFFIC ENGINEERING OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Implement additional Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Improvements. (Proactively Address Traffic Improvements, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Install Traffic Signal Improvements at Various Intersections Citywide. (Proactively Address Traffic Improvements, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Utilizing the Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) Cycle 7 Funding, upgrade Traffic Signal Controllers, Closed Circuit Television Cameras and Communication Equipment. (Provide Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Utilizing the Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) Cycle 9 Funding upgrade Pedestrian Signal Devices, including the installation of pedestrian countdown signal heads, ADA compliant pedestrian pushbutton equipment and upgrades to traffic signal controllers to improve safety and operations at signalized intersections Citywide. (Provide Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Utilizing the Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) Cycle 9 Funding upgrade and modify Traffic Signal Operation and install protected/permissive traffic signal heads, on new signal poles and signal mast arms, relocate existing equipment and modify existing striping and raised medians traffic lights at various intersections by June 2020. (Proactively Address Traffic Improvements, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Implement High Visibility Pedestrian Crossing Signage at high volume mid -block and uncontrolled intersections. (Proactively Address Traffic Improvements, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Utilize the City's Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program to implement additional Traffic Calming Measures, including stop signs, traffic striping and V-Calm signs. (Utilize Effective Traffic Enforcement, Traffic Monitoring, and Planning Processes to Ensure the Safety ofTemecula Motorists; Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Complete conversion to new Advanced Traffic Management System (ATMS) "Transparity" and enter into Data Sharing Agreement for traffic signal timing data. (Utilize Effective Traffic Enforcement, Traffic Monitoring, and Planning Processes to Ensure the Safety of Temecula Motorists; Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Prepare traffic signal equipment data for use in Asset Management Program. (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) Annual Operating Budget 193 1� �~ R The H—, of Saud,— Cake+Dana Wine Country PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION/PROGRAM: TRAFFIC ENGINEERING City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Performance 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Measures Actuals Actuals Target Target Number of days to respond to citizen generated 7 8 6 6 investigations Number of minutes to E respond to traffic signal 45 45 30 30 V Proactively complaints during business Min. Min. Min. Min. Address Traffic hours ai L Improvements Q aNumber of hours to respond to after hour call outs for 1 1 1 1 traffic signal malfunctions a� Q Number of neighborhood traffic calming measures 8 4 3 4 implemented Utilize Effective Traffic .T '� Enforcement, Number of days to complete *, oJ Traffic Monitoring plan check and reviews of _ Q And Planning traffic control plans 7 7 6 6 r_ Process To Ensure u Safety Of Temecula Motorists Annual Operating Budget 194 it...,45 PUBLIC WORKS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM SERVICES • Project management and administration of all activities related to the City's Capital Improvement Program (CIP) involving design and construction contracts for roadways, bridges, flood control and drainage improvements, parks, buildings, and other improvements. • Administration of assessment and special district design and construction projects. • Coordination with Federal, State, regional and local agencies related to design and construction of CIP projects. • Application for and administration of funding and grants from Federal, State, regional, and local sources for CIP projects. • Monitor regional, State, and Federal transportation initiatives to ensure City transportation interests are met. • Administration of right-of-way acquisitions, including negotiations, appraisal reviews, title and escrow services, and management of right-of-way consulting services. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Completed the construction of the Interstate 15 / State Route 79 South (Temecula Parkway) Ultimate Interchange Improvements. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Completed the construction of the Temecula Park and Ride facility on Temecula Parkway at La Paz Road. (Encourage Alternative Transportation Options; A Sustainable City). • Completed the Pavement Rehabilitation Program — Citywide for Rancho California Road from Jefferson Avenue to the Westerly City Limits. (Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity). • Completed the construction of Overland Drive Extension (Commerce Center Drive to Enterprise Circle West). (Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity). • Completed the Fiscal Year 2018/19 Citywide Slurry Seal Project at various locations. (Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity). • Completed the construction of the Fallen Heroes Memorial at the Temecula Duck Pond. (Provide Signature Special Events and Cultural Opportunities; Healthy and Livable City). • Completed the construction of the Traffic Signal Installation on Vail Ranch Parkway at Tehachapi Pass/El Chimisal Road. (Proactively Address Traffic Improvements; A Safe and Prepared Community). Annual Operating Budget 195 it...,45 II 1 1.11 MY191►i DIVISION/PROGRAM: CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR (Continued) • Completed the design and construction of multiple sidewalk improvements. (Connect the City Through a Series of Trails and Walkways, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) o Old Town Sidewalks (east side of Mercedes from Sam Hicks Park to Fourth Street) o North side of Third Street between Old Town Front Street and Mercedes Street • Completed the Community Recreation Center (CRC) Pool Site Enhancements and Renovations Project. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs and Cultural Services; Healthy and Livable City). • Completed the design and started construction of Butterfield Stage Road, Phase III, and the Pechanga Parkway Widening. (Connect Major Commercial Districts through Circulation Improvements; Transportation Mobility and Connectivity). • Completed the design and started construction of the Library Parking — Phase II on Pauba Road. (Provide Highly functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Completed the Reconstruction of South Side Parking Lot in Old Town by June 2020. (Provide Highly functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Initiated and continued to renovate public restrooms during Fiscal Year 2018-2019. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs and Cultural Services; Healthy and Livable City). • Initiated the design/design-build process for the Margarita Recreation Center at Margarita Community Park, and the Old Town Parking Structure. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs and Cultural Services; Healthy and Livable City). • Completed the design of Ynez Road Improvements (Rancho Vista to La Paz) and initiated the design of Diaz Road Widening (Cherry Street to Rancho California Road). (Connect Major Commercial Districts through Circulation Improvements; Transportation Mobility and Connectivity). • Initiated the federal environmental document, right of way acquisition, and the redesign of the Murrieta Creek Bridge at Overland Drive. (Connect Major Commercial Districts through Circulation Improvements; Transportation Mobility and Connectivity). • Initiated the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition Plan Implementation by doing priority improvements to City facilities and public right of ways. This will become an annual program. (Maintain A Safe and Family Friendly Environment; Healthy and Livable City). Annual Operating Budget 196 it...,45 PUBLIC WORKS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Complete the construction of the Roundabout Improvements on Ynez Road at La Paz Road. (Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity). • Complete the design and construction of the Old Town Boardwalk Enhancement project. (Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets; Transportation Mobility and Connectivity and Promote a `walkable' community; A Sustainable City). • Complete preparation of bridging documents for Margarita Recreation Center (MRC) and solicit proposals for "design/build" project delivery team. Award contract for design/build services and initiate preparation of working drawings. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government). • Initiate preparation of Drainage Master Plan and prepare updated inventory of Citywide storm drain facilities for use in Asset Management Program. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government). • Complete the construction of the Library Parking — Phase II on Pauba Road. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government). • Complete the Pavement Rehabilitation Program — Citywide at the following locations during Fiscal Year 2019-2020: (Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity). 0 Meadowview Loop (Via Norte, Del Rey and Avenida Barca) 0 Commerce Center Drive, Enterprise Circle South and West, and Rider Way 0 Rancho Vista (Paseo Goleta to Butterfield Stage Road 0 Ynez Road (Winchester Road To Equity Drive)/Equity Drive/ County Center Drive 0 Pauba Road (Margarita Road to Via Rami) 0 Avenida Alvarado/Rio Nedo/Aqua Vista Way/ Tierra Alta Way 0 Winchester Road (Nicolas Road to Eastern City Limits) 0 Nicolas Road (Winchester Road to North General Kearny) 0 Rancho California Road (Humber Drive To Margarita Road) 0 Santiago Road (1-15 To Ynez Road) • Complete the construction of the Pump Track at Ronald Reagan Sports Park. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs and Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City). Annual Operating Budget 197 it...,45 PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION/PROGRAM: CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR (Continued) • Complete the construction of Pechanga Parkway Widening, and the construction of Butterfield Stage Road, Phase III. (Connect Major Commercial Districts through Circulation Improvements; Transportation Mobility and Connectivity). • Complete the design and initiate construction of the Traffic Signal and Park & Ride access improvements at Temecula Parkway and Wabash Lane. (Proactively Address Traffic Improvements; A Safe and Prepared Community). • Complete the design, environmental document and initiate construction of the Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian Bicycle Trail Extension (Ynez to Diaz). (Connect the City through a Series of Trails and Walkways; Transportation Mobility and Connectivity). • Complete the environmental document and initiate construction of the Flood Control Channel Reconstruction and Repair at Pala Park. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property; and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community). • Complete the acquisition of the streetlights from Southern California Edison (SCE) and retrofit LED lighting fixtures. (Promote Energy Efficient Operations and Development; A Sustainable City). • Initiate the design and the environmental document for the Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian Bicycle Trail Extension, Phase 11, at Margarita Road Undercrossing (Connect the City through a Series of Trails and Walkways; Transportation Mobility and Connectivity). • Complete the design and construct sidewalks at the following locations. (Promote a 'Walkable' Community; A Sustainable City). 0 Ynez Road (west side, Rancho Highland to Tierra Vista) 0 Third Street (north side, between Old Town Front and Mercedes) 0 Dealer Drive loop (west side) • Continue working on the Project Report and the Environmental Document for 1-15 Congestion Relief (adding an auxiliary Lane on the east side of 1-15 between Temecula Parkway and Rancho California Road. (Connect Major Commercial Districts through Circulation Improvements; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity). • Continue the process of the design and the environmental document for the 1-15/SR 79 South Interchange Enhanced Landscaping. (Maintain the natural beauty of the community; Healthy and Livable City). • Conduct a feasibility study to extend Cherry Street west of Adams Avenue and construct a low -flow crossing of Murrieta Creek. (Connect Major Commercial Districts through Circulation Improvements; Transportation, Mobility and Connectivity). Annual Operating Budget 198 Ali PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION/PROGRAM: CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Performance Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Actuals Actuals Target Target a U v Z M Actively Maintain And Total annual value of Capital C Preserve City Assets $7.5M $42.8M $52M $42M M And Infrastructure Projects completed H Q U v Maintain Overall Projects completed within y Sound Fiscal Policies budget 8 19 24 30 c O Q � � O tY i 4J 9p Provide Transparency To The Public For All Projects completed on Government schedule $ 19 20 30 Transactions O u u Q Annual Operating Budget 199 The He to{ s.A« C.hf, Wine Caunt,y PUBLIC WORKS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: STREET MAINTENANCE SERVICES • Provide well maintained right-of-way areas for the safety and mobility of motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians, including traffic signing and striping as directed by the Traffic Engineering Division. • Maintain City -owned storm drains, catch basins, and surface drainage facilities, and monitor illegal dump areas in support of the City's NPDES program. • Proactively mitigate graffiti vandalism from the right-of-way and expedite transmission of relevant graffiti information to police investigators. • Respond to emergency situations and natural disasters, provide special event support and perform weed abatement and litter control. • Administer the Trees for Temecula Program to replace missing or damaged street trees within residential neighborhoods. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Completed various Citywide projects to improve and enhance safety of City sidewalks and public right-of-ways. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Completed installation of 5,900,000 square feet of slurry and crack fill to improve City roadways. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Completed installation of 20,000 square feet of concrete sidewalk, drive approaches, ADA access ramps, curb and gutter, and cross gutters within City right of way. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Removed silt and debris, and completed repairs and maintenance of various channels throughout the city. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) Annual Operating Budget 200 iHeart o{ So�C�ern Cain Wine Country PUBLIC WORKS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: STREET MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Install 6,000,000 square feet of slurry and crack fill on various streets and roadways within the City limits. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Install 300 bicycle sharrows to enhance bike lanes along various roadways throughout the City. (Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Remove and replace 175,000 square of asphalt concrete to repairs sections of deteriorated roadway. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Implement various citywide projects to improve and enhance safety of City sidewalks and public right of ways. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government& Continue to Maintain Local Roads and Streets, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Convert pavement management and sign inventory data prepared by IMS for use in Asset Management Program. (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; ASustainable City) Annual Operating Budget 201 The He to{ s.A« C.hf­ Wine C..&'y PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION/PROGRAM: STREET MAINTENANCE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long Performance FY FY FY FY Value Term Goal Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Actuals Actuals Target Target v Maintain A Safe And Service order Family Oriented request / response 1,135 812 761 900 Environment J T V Street trees planted or t Maintain The replaced 30 12 0 0 +� Natural Beauty Of 2 The Community Street trees trimmed 3,000 1,987 1724 2,000 Legends stenciled 2,700 3,648 2,500 3,500 > Street signs replaced, 1290 1,167 1,061 1,500 repaired and installed o• 2 Linear Feet of Traffic c U c Continue To Lanes, Bike Lanes and 2 400 000 2 400 000 76 800 2 400 000 , Maintain Local Curbs Painted L V Roads And Streets o Q- Centerline miles of street 17 64 10 20 crack/slurry sealed L Sq. ft. of asphalt 95,000 151,325 167,000 175,000 repairs Continue To cu Aggressively Sq. ft. of graffiti removed 57,000 38,239 23,615 40,000 Mitigate Graffiti And from public right -of way Q- >Vandalism cu — a Minimize The Impact -0 E To Life, Property, o And The Storm drains V Environment From inspected/cleaned 2,300 2,419 745 1,500 vA Natural Hazards And Q Emergency Situations Annual Operating Budget 202 Aft The H—t of 5-th— Udo , Wine Country PUBLIC WORKS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: FACILITY MAINTENANCE SERVICES • Administer the maintenance, repairs, and cleaning of all City -owned or leased buildings and aquatics facilities through in-house personnel and administration of outside contract services. • Manage scheduled inspections and license/permit requirements associated with the operation of facility fire prevention and elevator systems, kitchen equipment, emergency generators, and pool facility water quality/chemistry systems. • Respond to routine and emergency work order requests. • Provide Council Chamber and meeting set-ups at various City facilities. • Provide special event support and day porter services to ensure a safe and clean environment for all users. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Completed comprehensive study to access water intrusion under CRC gym floor, remediated damage and replaced, refinished and restriped sections of flooring. (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) Painted exterior of Temecula Valley Entrepreneurs' Exchange (TVE'), business incubator and regional resource center, and Jefferson Recreation Center (JRC). (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) Installed additional card readers at the Facilities Operation Center (FOC) and Community Recreation Center (CRC) buildings to improve access and enhance security. (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Performed major rehabilitation of the Community Recreation Center pool to include new concrete deck, sports lighting, LED pool lights and re -plaster, and storage facility. (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) Removed, replaced and installed new rain gutters at the History Museum to improve runoff and protect structure from water damage. (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Completed various rehabilitation projects to include roof repairs, flooring, painting, concrete repairs, perimeter fencing, HVAC upgrades, and installed energy efficient lighting, fixture upgrades and security lighting at Library, Theater, History Museum, CRC, PBSP, Civic Center, Sixth Street Restrooms, and CRC Amphitheater and Multi -Purpose Room. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) Annual Operating Budget 203 Aft The H—t of Southern Udo , Wine Country I a I 1 1.11 MY191►i DIVISION/PROGRAM: FACILITY MAINTENANCE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR (continued) • Completed interior reconfigurations of recreational and community services facilities to improve workspace, public access and functionality at the Community Recreation Center (CRC), the Help Center Barn, Traffic Operations Center (TOC), Emergency Operations Center (EOC), and History Museum. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Installed security panels at concession building at Patricia H. Birdsall Sports Park, and installed perimeter fencing at the Old Town Temecula Community Theater. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Completed rehabilitation and replacement of roof at Temecula Elementary School pool facility. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Installation of fencing along third floor perimeter of Civic Center Parking Garage, adjacent to HVAC systems, to improve safety and enhance security. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Integrate the Police Store Front and Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau with the Citywide HVAC management control system to improve efficiency and reduce energy costs. (Promote Energy Efficient Operations and Development; A Sustainable City). • Prepare inventory of City maintained facilities for use in Asset Management Program. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Install upgrades to HVAC controllers at Civic Center to enhance operations and improve energy efficiencies. (Promote Energy Efficient Operations and Development; A Sustainable City). • Repaint exterior of the community S.A.F.E. House, Facilities Operation Center (FOC) and Community Recreation Center (CRC). (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Complete rehabilitation projects to include flooring, painting, concrete repairs, perimeter fencing, HVAC upgrades, energy efficient lighting, slurry seal facility parking lots, install fixture upgrades, add interior restrooms, and expand classrooms at various facilities throughout the City. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government & Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) Annual Operating Budget 204 Aft The H—t of 5-th— C,I,fo , Wine Country PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION/PROGRAM: FACILITY MAINTENANCE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long Performance FY FY FY FY Value Term Goal Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Actuals Actuals Target Target Number of facilities improved with roofing system replacements and 1 1 1 1 energy efficiency +� upgrades V a� Promote Energy -0 Efficient Number of facility HVAC c Operations And system replacements and 1 1 1 Development energy efficiency 3 upgrades Q Number of facility lighting system 1 1 1 replacement and energy 8 efficiency upgrades Number of swimming pool system repairs, 1 1 1 replacements and 2 L upgrades d Number of facility parking lots repaired and u resurfaced 1 1 1 1 Provide Highly Functional And o Sustainable City CL Facilities And Number of custodial fY Infrastructure service order requests/response 36 40 50 40 c �a a� Number of facility service v and repair 553 724 800 800 v Q requests/response Annual Operating Budget 205 (T6� Heart of S—thorn C.1h, na Wine Country II 1 1.11 MY191ki City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: PARKS MAINTENANCE SERVICES • Administer the ongoing maintenance, repair and cleaning of all City parks, trails, open space areas, landscaped medians and applicable slope areas. • Administer and oversee landscape water use for all City parks, landscaped medians, applicable slope areas, and recreation/administrative facility properties. • Manage the urban forest within City parks, open space areas, landscaped medians, applicable slope areas, and recreation/administrative facility properties. • Respond to routine and emergency work order requests, and provide support services for City-wide programs and special events. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Responded to and resolved 750 Service Order Requests from citizens and staff. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment. Healthy and Livable City) • Citywide tree trimming - trimmed 2,981 trees in parks, facilities, slopes and right-of-ways (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment. Healthy and Livable City) • Implemented the re -design and enhancement of playground equipment and safety surfacing at Riverton Park, Rotary Park, and Temeku Hills Sports Park. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Completed construction of Rotary Park playground, Temeku Hills Park and Meadows Park safety surfacing replacement. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreational Programs and Cultural Services; Healthy and Livable City) • Purchased and Installed Musco sports field lighting - Light Emitting Diode (LED) conversion for Pala Sports Park soccer field. (Promote Energy Efficient Operations and Development & Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Completed the Harveston Lake Infrastructure Improvement project. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs and Cultural Services/Maintain the Natural Beauty of the Community; Healthy and Livable City and Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Repaired and resurfaced parking lots at Harveston Community Park, Long Canyon Creek Park, Pauba Ridge Park, Meadows Park, Crown Hill Park and Butterfield Stage Park. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 206 (T6� Heart of S—thorn C.1h, na Wine Country PUBLIC WORKS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: PARKS MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Implement the re -design and enhancement of playground equipment and safety surfacing at John Magee Park (playground replacement), Pauba Ridge Park, Crown Hill Park, and Paseo Gallante Park (safety surfacing) (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Complete the replacement and installation of playground equipment at Riverton Park. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure; Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Repair and resurface various park site parking lots and community trails throughout the City. (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Install Musco sports field lighting - Light Emitting Diode (LED) conversion for Paloma Del Sol Sports Park and Temecula Elementary School sports field. (Promote Energy Efficient Operations and Development & Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) • Renovate various park site public restroom facilities to include new floor epoxy, anti -graffiti coating, energy efficient lighting upgrades, and repair and replacement of plumbing fixtures and equipment. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Complete the construction of the Ronald Reagan Sports Park Restroom Expansion and Renovation project. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs and Cultural Services; Healthy and Livable City). • Repair and resurface various sports courts throughout the City. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Initiate preparation of Urban Forest Master Plan and Citywide tree inventory for use in Asset Management Program. (Actively Maintain and Preserve City Assets and Infrastructure; A Sustainable City) Annual Operating Budget 207 (T6� Heart of S—thorn C.1h, na Wine Country PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION/PROGRAM: PARKS MAINTENANCE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Performance Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Actuals Actuals Target Target Number of irrigation system efficiency upgrades 20 2 6 6 a Number of City landscaped u v Promote Energy -0 Efficient areas to be renovated with c Operations And drought tolerant "California 2 4 10 6 .W Development Friendly Landscape" to 3 Number of park sites energy N Q efficiency lighting system 2 6 4 4 conversions M u Maintain The Number of trees trimmed in Natural Beauty Of parks, slopes and medians 3500 3500 3200 3000 io > The Community O Z J Number of play structure / Provide Highly safety surfacing replacements 0 5 3 3 _ Functional And d U r- Sustainable City Z j E Facilities And Number of City park '^ i Infrastructure rehabilitation and repair 5 6 4 5 c O projects N- O v cu QPromote Number of service order Community requests and responses 856 600 500 750 Involvement Annual Operating Budget 208 Ak The Heart of Seut�alilornia Wine Country POLICE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: POLICE ADMINISTRATION MISSION The Temecula Police Department is tasked with ensuring the safety of our community while maintaining the outstanding quality of life we all enjoy. The City contracts with the Riverside County Sheriff's Department for Police services and maintains 112 sworn officers, 17 non -sworn officers Community Service Officers (CSOs), plus an additional 17 administrative support positions. Temecula has two centrally located storefront police stations, one in Old Town Temecula at the Civic Center, and one in the Promenade Mall. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART POLICE CHIEF Lisa McConnell POLICE INVESTIGATIONS/ TRAFFIC ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL TEAMS ENFORCEMENT Administrative Support Mall / Storefronts Clerical Special Events Detectives___j Special Enforcement Team Problem Oriented Policing Volunteers School Resource Officers Traffi Unit _J Training PATROL SERVICES Patrol Officers Patrol CSOs K-9 Officer Annual Operating Budget 209 Ak The Heart of Seut�aBlornla Wine Country POLICE DIVISION/PROGRAM: POLICE ADMINISTRATION GENERAL FUND 001 POLICE 170 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) SALARIES & BENEFITS 107,178 125,882 130,469 4,587 3.64% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 30,409,783 32,349,745 34,270,493 1,920,748 5.94% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 422,816 385,401 402,474 17,073 4.43% CAPITAL OUTLAY 121,740 140,366 57,000 (83,366) -59.39% Division Total 31,061,517 33,001,394 34,860,436 1,859,042 5.63% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Police: Expenditures are expected to increase 5.63% due to an anticipated contract rate increase of 5%, the purchase of one replacement motorcycle and the purchase of one 4WD utility vehicle. I " '' i J,, Ar. - Annual Operating Budget 210 AFA City of Temecula Q Fiscal Year 2019-20 Wine Counhy Annual Operating Budget POLICE DIVISION/PROGRAM: POLICE ADMINISTRATION PERSONNEL ALLOCATION POLICE (City Employees) Senior Management Analyst Total POLICE (Contract Employees) Chief of Police Lieutenant Sergeant Captain Patrol Officers Gang Task Force Officer Mall Officers Traffic Accident Investigators Traffic Motorcycle Officers K9 Officers Special Enforcement Team Officers Problem Oriented Policing Team Officers School Resource Officers Youth Action Team (YAT) Officer Investigators Total Sworn Officers Community Service Officers Supervising Office Assistant Office Assistant Supervising Accounting Technican Senior Administrative Analyst Accounting Technican Sheriff's Service Officer Total Non -Sworn Personnel Grand Total Adopted Current Proposed Inc/(Decr) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 from Prior Yr 0.38 0.40 0.25 (0.15) 0.38 0.40 0.25 (0.15) 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 5.00 5.00 5.00 - 13.00 13.00 13.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 40.90 41.90 41.90 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 4.00 4.00 4.00 - 5.00 5.00 5.00 - 12.00 12.00 12.00 - 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 5.00 5.00 5.00 - 8.00 8.00 8.00 - 5.00 5.00 5.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 7.00 7.00 7.00 - 110.90 111.90 111.90 - 19.00 19.00 17.00 (2.00) 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 9.00 9.00 9.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 3.00 3.00 3.00 - 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 36.00 36.00 34.00 (2.00) 147.28 148.30 146.15 (2.15) Annual Operating Budget 211 Alk The H-1 of Southern CaGiornia whe r­t'y POLICE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: POLICE ADMINISTRATION SERVICES • Manage personnel and operations at two storefront locations and the Southwest Station. • Coordinate with Human Resources to ensure effective deployment of personnel. • Prepare annual budgets and ensure sufficient funds are allocated for equipment and operations. • Coordinate station logistics, ensuring tracking of all equipment, property and evidence. • Oversee law enforcement aspects of City held special events. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Upgraded the Old Town station front lobby by installing ballistic glass with two-way microphones and a ballistic entry door. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Ensured all officers are fully trained and outfitted with a personal body camera. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implemented training and ensured the Temecula Police Department is in compliance with AB 953 (Racial and Identity Profiling Act). (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Upgraded evidence and property gun storage area to allow for greater storage of handguns and rifles. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Upgrade the Southwest Station booking area to hold additional detainees and provide for quicker processing. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Recruit and fill all support level staff positions and ensure staffing levels are aligned. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Issue all officers a G-tac patrol pad and add several docking stations for easier report writing. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Ensure that the Temecula Police Department is trained on how to utilize the Citywide Surveillance System. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Relocate the Temecula Police Department Homeless Outreach Team to the Old Town station. (Provide Highly Functional and Sustainable City Facilities and Infrastructure, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 212 Alk The H-1 of Southern CaGiornia whe r—t'y POLICE DIVISION/PROGRAM: POLICE ADMINISTRATION City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Value Five -Year Long Term Goal performance Measures FY 2016-17 Actuals FY 2017-18 Actuals FY 2018-19 Target FY 2019-20 Target � T � V = � � v Z > E Promote Number of fingerprint "Live r Community scans" taken at the mall 2,431 2,350 3,000 3,200 o > 0- Involvement o 0 v � � v � Q -a Remain Within a) r_ The Federal Number of management a E Ranking Of The team with Advanced Incident 6 5 5 6 E Top 25 Safest Command System training Q a U Cities Annual Operating Budget 213 1� The Heat,f Souther Ca&P , Wi r—o'y POLICE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: INVESTIGATIONS/SPECIAL TEAMS SERVICES • Provide specialized enforcement related to gangs, narcotics, crime trends, vice, and quality of life issues. • Develop and implement anti -graffiti programs and operations. • Follow up on investigations initiated through patrol calls for service. • Supervise and perform compliance enforcement of sex registrants. • Develop and implement community outreach programs including crime prevention and youth education. • Prepare and perform business liaison programs and presentations. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Continued to expand existing Penal Code section 290 program to conduct more registered sex offender compliance checks to maintain a 100% compliance rate. (Maintain A Safe And Family Friendly Environment, Healthy and Livable City) • Broadened communication with neighboring agencies to improve investigative success regarding serial crimes which reach across communities and impact quality of life issues. (Maintain A Safe And Family Friendly Environment, Healthy and Livable City) • The Homeless Outreach Team reduced the number of homeless persons in the City through outreach, education and enforcement. Worked in conjunction with the City's Homeless Liaison and the City Net Team to improve quality of life for our citizens. (Maintain A Safe And Family Friendly Environment, Healthy and Livable City) • Special Teams continued to focus on street level narcotic crimes, as well as assisted investigations and patrol with surveillance and tracking of felony suspects. (Maintain A Safe And Family Friendly Environment, Healthy and Livable City) • The Problem Oriented Policing (POP) Team continued to focus on improving quality of life issues for the citizens of the City of Temecula. (Maintain A Safe And Family Friendly Environment, Healthy and Livable City) • Based on crime data, conducted targeted enforcement of high crime areas to reduce specific crimes. (Remain Within The Federal Ranking Of The Top 25 Safest Cities, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Worked with local retailers and businesses to reduce retail theft through presentations and education. (Maintain A Safe And Family Friendly Environment, Healthy and Livable City) • Increased the number of neighborhood watch programs to assist in reducing crime. (Maintain A Safe And Family Friendly Environment, Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 214 1� The Heat,f Souther Ca&-, Wi r—o'y City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget POLICE DIVISION/PROGRAM: INVESTIGATIONS/SPECIAL TEAMS OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • The Special Enforcement Team will continue to conduct specialized enforcement related to gangs, narcotics, crime trends, vice, and quality of life issues. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, Healthy and Livable City) • The Special Enforcement Team will continue to focus on illegal marijuana dispensaries operating throughout the City of Temecula. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, Healthy and Livable City) • The Problem Oriented Policing (POP) team will seek to develop and implement new anti -graffiti programs and operations. (Continue to aggressively mitigate graffiti and vandalism, A Safe and Prepared Community) • The Investigations Bureau will educate patrol officers to better present cases for follow-up, to improve the timely clearance rate of investigations. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, Healthy and Livable City) • The Investigations Bureau will continue to supervise sex registrants to remain at a 100% compliance rate. The Bureau also plans to increase the number of compliance checks through the city. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, Healthy and Livable City) • The newly implemented Burglary Suppression Team will actively pursue and identify burglary and robbery suspects and quickly investigate all burglaries and robberies through the City of Temecula. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, Healthy and Livable City) • The Burglary Suppression Team will conduct business liaison programs and presentations. (Foster an "educated community" through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • The Burglary Suppression Team will Identify and analyze current trends in property crimes in order to conduct directed enforcement in the City of Temecula. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, Healthy and Livable City) • The Burglary Suppression Team plans to initiate and implement community outreach programs to increase citizen awareness in preventing property crimes. (Foster an "educated community" through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • The Burglary Suppression Team has a goal to decrease residential and commercial burglaries through the City of Temecula. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 215 1� The Heat of Souther Ca &-, Wine r—o'y POLICE DIVISION/PROGRAM: INVESTIGATIONS/SPECIAL TEAMS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Value Five -Year Long Term Goal Performance Measures FY 2016-17 Actuals FY 2017-18 Actuals FY 2018-19 Target FY 2019-20 Target -a Remain Within a) r_ The Federal a) 3 4- a £ Ranking Of The Number of crime free 900 930 930 930 vmi L E Top 25 Safest housing checks Q a U Cities *= � u Maintain A Safe Number of cases z And Family closed by 650 685 700 700 Oriented (5 .> Environment investigations unit J Annual Operating Budget 216 Ak Tie Heat o� so�`�ara w- C..t,, POLICE DIVISION/PROGRAM: TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget SERVICES • Maintain the safe flow of traffic and perform investigations of traffic collisions. • Ensure the safety of Temecula streets through the enforcement of all traffic laws. • Work with Traffic Engineering to analyze traffic flow and assist with developing methods to achieve the safe and efficient movement of traffic on Temecula roadways. • Provide rapid deolovment for critical incidents. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Increased saturation patrols which has resulted in the reduction of the number of accidents and fatal accidents as well as increased the number of citations by 15%. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property and The Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Partnered with non-profit agencies such as MADD and PAL as well as TVUSD to provide seven traffic safety presentations. (Encourage Community Participation in Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continued to provide enforcement and education to meet the goal of reducing overall traffic collisions by 10%. (Utilize Effective Traffic Enforcement, Traffic Monitoring and Planning Processes to Ensure the Safety of Temecula Motorists, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Trained all traffic division staff on the new technology for traffic collision investigations. (Utilize Effective Traffic Enforcement, Traffic Monitoring and Planning Processes to Ensure the Safety of Temecula Motorists, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Partner with Traffic Engineering to analyze traffic flow and assist with developing methods to achieve the safe and efficient movement of traffic on Temecula roadways by June 2020. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue to partner with non-profit agencies such as MADD and PAL, as well as TVUSD to provide at least eight traffic safety presentations by June 2020. (Encourage Community Participation in Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue to provide enforcement and education with the goal of reducing red light violators by 20% by June 2020. (Utilize Effective Traffic Enforcement, Traffic Monitoring and Planning Processes to Ensure the Safety of Temecula Motorists, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) • Continue to provide enforcement and education with the goal of reducing modified exhaust and street racing related violations by 20% by June 2020. (Utilize Effective Traffic Enforcement, Traffic Monitoring and Planning Processes to Ensure the Safety of Temecula Motorists, Transportation Mobility and Connectivity) Annual Operating Budget 217 a W-c..t,, POLICE DIVISION/PROGRAM: TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long Performance FY FY FY FY 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Measures Actuals Actuals Target Target c Utilize Effective Number of DUI — Traffic arrests 225 349 380 400 o t Enforcement, Monitoring And r ° c Planning Processes cTo Ensure The Number of traffic a Safety Of Temecula collision 994 799 740 700 LMotorists investigations a M Maintain A Safe Number of high And Family visibility/ traffic 14 8 7 5 ' Oriented checkpoints = J Environment Annual Operating Budget 218 The Heart of 5-th— Cabl—o POLICE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: PATROL SERVICES SERVICES • Utilize two K9 Teams to aid in the search of drugs, persons, and buildings. • Serve as first responders for criminal calls and calls for service. • Evaluate and report quality of life issues which include graffiti, vandalism, and disturbing the peace. • Provide high visibility patrol throughout the City and interact with the community. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Worked closely with the Homeless Outreach Team to reduce crime and quality of life issues for citizens of Temecula. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, Healthy and Livable City) • Utilized Crime Analyst and new technology to identify areas where our resources were needed to reduce crime and quality of life issues. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, Healthy and Livable city) • Greatly increased communication with neighboring departments and entities and have improved communication to identify problem areas to reduce criminal activity. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, Healthy and Livable City) • In conjunction with our new social media team, public outreach has expanded to provide better communication with the citizens of Temecula. (Utilize social media to keep the community informed and involved, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Implemented programs, such as Coffee with a COP, to improve communication and create a feeling of security throughout our community. (Foster an "educated community" through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 219 The Heart of 5-th— Cabl—o POLICE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: PATROL SERVICE OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Reduce response times through adjusting patrol staff schedules by June 2020. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, A Healthy and Livable City) • Increase patrol officers' ability to quickly access crime data and trends through software application(s) (i.e. NC4, CLEAR) by December 2019.. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, A Healthy and Livable City) • Provide advanced mental health awareness on homeless persons, to patrol officers, through collaborative briefing training with the Homeless Outreach Team by September 2019. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, A Healthy and Livable City) • Increase patrol officers' ability to respond to and counter potential terrorist attacks by June 2020. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, A Healthy and Livable City) • Order enough AR Magazines for each patrol staff member and special teams member and send them to necessary patrol rifle courses and advanced training, as necessary. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, A Healthy and Livable City) • Send enough staff through the Terrorism Liaison Officer course to have one person on each shift to relay intelligence. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, A Healthy and Livable City) • Send patrol staff to advanced courses regarding "mass casualty events" which are free through Homeland Security Grants at the Ben Clark Training Center. These classes include, Initial Law Enforcement First Response to Suicide Bombing Attacks and Medical Preparedness & Response for Bombing Incidents, and are both excellent courses. (Maintain a safe and family oriented environment, A Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 220 C_(Th_e'H.of Sevthem Cahlomia W.- Ca t'y POLICE DIVISION/PROGRAM: PATROL SERVICE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Performance 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 201-20 Value Term Goal Measures Actuals Actuals Target Target Minimize The Impact To Life, Average response L Property And The time (in minutes) for ca a a Environment From priority 1 calls from 5.58 4.81 4.45 4.40 L c Natural Hazards And the time it is a dispatched to the � Emergency time officers arrive £ Situations .� U Remain Within The Percentage of patrol cn Federal Ranking Of officers maintaining Q The Top 25 Safest 24-hour perishable 100% 100% 100% 100% Cities skills training � T +, u Maintain A Safe And Number of overall CU Family Oriented calls for Police 88,917 85,799 85,000 84,000 io Environment service v = J a —] IIIIIII MY OF TEMECUIA POUCE Annual Operating Budget 221 Ak [[[[[[ The Heart of Southern CAN, Wine Country FIRE MISSION City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget The Temecula Fire Department maintains the highest levels of fire and disaster preparedness, prevention, and community involvement in order to ensure the safety of both our residents and visitors of Temecula. The City of Temecula contracts with the CAL FIRE/Riverside County Fire Department for Fire services. The Temecula Fire Department provides both Emergency Operation and Fire Prevention services. Fire Department Emergency Operations provides comprehensive emergency services utilizing a highly trained work force, progressive technology and modern equipment to provide fire and paramedic services. Fire Prevention involves conducting public information and education programs that emphasize fire and life safety and have a strong focus on fire prevention, determining the origin and cause of all fires, and enforcing all applicable building fire codes, regulations and standards. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART DIVISION CHIEF TEMECULA FIRE CHIEF Jodie Gray FIRE PREVENTION EMERGENCYOPERATIONS Information and 1 Fire Suppression Education Emergency Medical Planning and Services Engineering Enforcement l All Risk Responses Annual Program ) Non -Response l Activities Inspection Services Temecula Citizen Corps Permit Issuance Annual Operating Budget 222 Ak The Heart of Southern California Wine Country FIRE EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 2017-18 Actuals 2018-19 Current Budget 2019-20 Proposed Budget Increase/ (Decrease) % Increase/ (Decrease) GENERAL FUND 001 FIRE 171 SALARIES & BENEFITS 95,790 104,313 107,249 2,936 2.81% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 6,081,749 7,287,131 7,999,005 711,874 9.77% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 119,211 355,130 392,025 36,895 10.39% CAPITAL OUTLAY 9,343 0 0 0 0.0% Division Total 6,306,093 7,746,574 8,498,279 751,705 9.7% FIRE - FIRE PREVENTION SALARIES & BENEFITS 345,276 361,946 394,908 32,962 9.11% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 737,532 1,031,293 1,002,827 (28,466) -2.76% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 127,547 159,793 184,334 24,541 15.36% Division Total 1,210,355 1,553,032 1,582,069 29,037 1.87% FIRE - FIRE -PARAMEDICS OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 80,592 145,248 159,945 14,697 10.12% Division Total 80,592 145,248 159,945 14,697 10.12% FIRE - HOMELAND SECURITY/EOC MANAGEMEN' OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 10,643 124,514 20,642 (103,872) -83.42% Division Total 10,643 124,514 20,642 (103,872) -83.42% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Fire: Expenditures are expected to increase due to an increase in the Internal Service Fund allocations which reflect the annual replacement costs associated with the purchase of a new Fire Ladder Truck, six Inspection Vehicles and two Battalion Chief style vehicles. Expenditure increases for Operations and Maintenance are related to contract rate increases estimated by County Fire personnel. Annual Operating Budget 223 _Alk I he Hea4 of Sauthem CaG(ornla W.-C.-try FIRE PERSONNEL ALLOCATION FIRE (City Employees) Administrative Assistant Building Inspector II Fire Inspector I Senior Office Specialist Community Development Technician -Fire Community Development Technician I -Fire Community Development Technician II -Fir( Total FIRE (Contract Employees Battalion Chief Fire Captain Fire Captain Medic Fire Engineer Fire Engineer Medic Fire Fighter II Fire Fighter II Medic Fire Safety Supervisor Fire Safety Specialist Fire Systems Inspector Total Grand Total Annual Operating Budget City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Adopted Current Proposed Inc/(Decr) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 from Prior Yr 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 4.00 4.00 4.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 14.00 15.00 15.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 11.00 11.00 11.00 - 5.00 6.00 6.00 - 15.00 16.00 16.00 - 14.00 15.00 15.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 2.00 3.00 3.00 - 1.00 2.00 2.00 - 65.00 71.00 71.00 69.00 75.00 75.00 - 224 ( �'11 �Or The Heart of Southern Uif.r . Wine Country FIRE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: EMERGENCY OPERATIONS SERVICES • Serve as first responders for all risk emergency calls and public assist calls for service within the City. • Provide CPR/AED, Health Care Provider, and First Aid certification training. • Oversee the Temecula Citizen Corps Emergency Response Team Program. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Maintained five-minute response times to all calls for service. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Retained four person, municipal staffing on all City engine and truck companies. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Initiated advanced life support patient care within five to six minutes. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continued to grow the Temecula Citizen Corp (TCC) program to ensure our community is safe and prepared in case of an emergency. (Minimize the impact on life through community preparedness and involvement, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Upheld appropriate training levels, fire performance standards and EMS certifications. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continued support to community by attending and hosting special events, providing station personnel an opportunity to interact with the community and allow the community to get to know the men and women of the Temecula Fire Department. (Encourage Community Participation in Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, A Safe and Prepared Community). Annual Operating Budget 225 4_4__;]� The Heart of Southern Uif.r . Wine Country IaI.4A City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: EMERGENCY OPERATIONS OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Maintain five-minute response times to all calls for service. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Retain four person staffing on all City engine and truck companies. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Initiate advanced life support patient care within five to six minutes. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property, and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Renovate the Training Room and Station 84 to create a greater learning experience for the community and the Explorer Post #84. (Encourage Community Participation in Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue to increase the AED Program to manage and maintain all public and private facilities to ensure these locations are equipped with the proper devices in case of an emergency. (Minimize the impact on life through community preparedness and involvement, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Increase the amount of classes and training for the community. (Encourage Community Participation in Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Expand on the Safety Educational messages for the community by participating in Public Service Announcements. (Encourage Community Participation in Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue to train with City personnel in the Cities Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to be ready for an emergency incident within the City of Temecula. (Minimize the impact on life through community preparedness and involvement, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Work with the City and City's Police department Homeless Outreach Team (HOT) to integrate the Fire department personnel in the program to assist with the homeless outreach within our community. (Encourage Community Participation in Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue to work and train with cooperating agencies and to maintain good relationships for response to multi -jurisdictional incidents within the Temecula Valley. (Minimize the impact on life through community preparedness and involvement, A Safe and Prepared Community) Annual Operating Budget 226 ( �'III �Or The Heart of Southern Uif.r . Wine Country FIRE DIVISION/PROGRAM: EMERGENCY OPERATIONS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Performance 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Measures Actuals Actuals Target Target Minimize The Impact To Life, Property, And The Environment Average response time to 5 min 5 min 5 min 5 min = From Natural Hazards City emergency incidents 3 E And Emergency E Situations 0 U -a Number of citizens a� trained in CPR, First Aid 981 816 800 850 a and Healthcare provider L_ a Encourage CPR Community = Participation In Public ca 0) Safety And Emergency Number of citizens N Preparedness trained in Community Q Emergency Response 137 165 150 175 Team training (CERT) Annual Operating Budget 227 [[[[ The Heart of Soathern California Wine Country FIRE City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DIVISION/PROGRAM: FIRE PREVENTION SERVICES • Perform plan check and inspections of businesses and new construction to ensure fire safety code compliance. • Educate the public in fire safety and prevention strategies. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Continued inspections for all State Mandated regulated facilities, governed by the State Fire Marshal, on an annual basis for fire and life safety. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continued expanding the Annual Program to ensure the reduction of loss of property and life as well as reduce the amount of false alarm calls. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Restructured current Fire fee schedule and created an annual inspection fee during the fee study process to ensure the proper collection of revenue from the development community and business owners. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Continued to provide educational opportunities for businesses, multi -tenant apartments, condominiums, hotels, motels and schools. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Participated in City-wide special events, public safety fairs and attend community events. (Encourage community participation in public safety and emergency preparedness, A Safe And Prepared Community) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Continue inspections for all State Mandated regulated facilities, governed by the State Fire Marshal, on an annual basis for fire and life safety. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Continue expanding the Annual Program to ensure the reduction of loss of property and life as well as reduce the amount of false alarm calls. (Minimize the Impact to Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Restructure current Fire fee schedule and create an annual inspection fee during the fee study process to ensure the proper collection of revenue from the development community and business owners. (Maintain Overall Sound Fiscal Policies, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Implement a new false alarm ordinance in cooperation with the Police department to minimize the false alarm calls. (Encourage community participation in public safety and emergency preparedness, A Safe And Prepared Community) Annual Operating Budget 228 [[[[ The Heart of Soathern California Wine Country FIRE DIVISION/PROGRAM: FIRE PREVENTION City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR: Core Value Five -Year Long Term Goal performance Measures FY 2016-17 Actuals FY 2017-18 Actuals FY 2018-19 Target FY 2019-20 Target Minimize The Impact :I- To Life, Property, Number of Fire And The Department Plan Reviews 3027 2936 3000 3250 Environment From Performed E Natural Hazards And C U Emergency Situations M Q a c Minimize The Impact Number of Fire M To Life, Property, a) And The Department New M Construction & Tenant 2953 4569 2900 3500 vn Environment From Q Natural Hazards And Improvement Inspections Performed Emergency Situations Annual Operating Budget 229 `� City of Temecula C~�� Fiscal Year 2019-20 R TtieHea„of5av«e,.CAf-C.-try Annual Operating Budget Wine country NON -DEPARTMENTAL MISSION Non -Departmental is a cost center for general administrative expenditures such as the Retiree Medical Contribution, CaIPERS Replacement Benefit and Property Tax Administrative Fees. It also reflects Operating Transfers Out to the Capital Improvement Program and other City funds. EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) GENERAL FUND 001 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 3,837,737 1,908,661 1,783,013 (125,648) -6.58% TRANSFERS 10,212,259 7,163,956 3,273,396 (3,890,560)-54.31% Division Total 14,049,996 9,072,617 5,056,409 (4,016,208)-44.27% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Non -Departmental: Expenditures are declining by 44.27% due to Operating Transfers varying from the prior fiscal year and a true -up of the Retiree Medical Contribution to reflect the OPEB Actuarial Report. Annual Operating Budget 230 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT OVERVIEW The Temecula Community Services District (TCSD) was established as an assessment district to provide a comprehensive neighborhood and community park system, as well as a complement of recreational and cultural programs, community and human services and special events, and activities aimed at enhancing the high quality of life of our youth, teens, adults, seniors, and special needs population. The District also provides street lighting, median and slope maintenance, refuse hauling and a recycling program, emergency dirt road maintenance, and library services. CITYWIDE EVENTS Program: Citywide Events Old Town Signature Community Cultural Art Program: Athletics Youth Sports Adult Sports Aquatics Tournaments/Field Rentals Park Rangers Program: Community Services Recreation Programming Contract Classes Library Services Park Development Sister City Fund/Dept. Number ................190 Program: Community Theater Performances Program: Museums Children's Museum History Museum Program: Human Services Teens Special Needs Seniors and Active Adults Responsible Compassion Annual Operating Budget 231 1� (� Hears of Seathem Galilornia Wire Country TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget MISSION Provide programs that educate, entertain, and enrich the community. Host exceptional special events that foster a sense of community and pride for our residents, and raise the City's profile as a tourism destination. Arrange for services and programs to support at -risk populations, including seniors, veterans, teens, and those with special needs. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART DIRECTOR OF TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT Kevin L. Hawkins COMMUNITY RECREATION SPECIAL ARTS & HUMAN SERVICES EVENTS CULTURE SERVICES Contract Services Sports Signature Events CommunityTheater Seniors and Active Ad u Its Park Rangers Aquatics Community Events Cultural Arts Inclusion Services Outreach & Events Facility Rentals a Homelesss Outreach History Museum College and Career Sister Cities Preparation Public Art I 1 I Veterans Outreach ADMINISTRATION Park and Facility Development Strategic and Master Planning Li brary Se rvi ces City & Regional Initiatives Support Annual Operating Budget 232 %-"7 (((( The Hean of Seathem California Wine Country TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget J EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT FUND 190 CITYWIDE OPERATIONS SALARIES & BENEFITS 5,455,752 6,356,501 6,727,690 371,189 5.84% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 3,282,181 3,705,702 3,799,001 93,299 2.52% CAPITAL OUTLAY 8,494 0 34,000 34,000 100.0% INTERNAL SERVICE ALLOCATION 1,288,364 1,434,779 1,752,967 318,188 22.18% Division Total 10,034,791 11,496,982 12,313,658 816,676 7.1% TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "B" STREET LIGHTS FUND 192 OPERATIONS 180 SALARIES & BENEFITS 17,329 21,451 22,103 652 3.04% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 894,437 767,750 767,750 0 0.0% Division Total 911,766 789,201 789,853 652 0.08% SERVICE LEVEL "C" OPERATIONS 180 SALARIES & BENEFITS 88,801 67,424 62,453 (4,971) -7.37% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 1,317,593 1,485,720 1,760,612 274,892 18.5% Division Total 1,406,394 1,553,144 1,823,065 269,921 17.38% TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "D" REFUSE/RECYCLING FUND 194 OPERATIONS 180 SALARIES & BENEFITS 112,552 70,247 71,892 1,645 2.34% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 7,730,711 7,958,913 8,479,464 520,551 6.54% Division Total 7,843,263 8,029,160 8,551,356 522,196 6.5% OPERATIONS - DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION GRAN - OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 0 49,731 23,000 (26,731) -53.75% Division Total 0 49,731 23,000 (26,731) -53.75% TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "R" STREET/ROAD MAINT FUND 195 OPERATIONS 180 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 2,847 29,663 5,532 (24,131) -81.35% Division Total 2,847 29,663 5,532 (24,131) -81.35% Annual Operating Budget 233 1� �� R The Hean of Seathem California Wine Country TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY (continued) City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) TCSD SERVICE LEVEL "L" LAKE PARK MAINT. FUND 196 OPERATIONS 180 SALARIES & BENEFITS 18,921 17,706 26,101 8,395 47.42% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 212,872 229,570 232,931 3,361 1.46% Division Total 231,793 247,276 259,032 11,756 4.75% TEMECULA LIBRARY FUND 197 OPERATIONS 180 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 236,288 257,177 257,177 0 0.0% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 245,224 372,739 403,342 30,603 8.21% CAPITAL OUTLAY 0 12,000 6,075 (5,925) -49.38% Division Total 481,512 641,916 666,594 24,678 3.84% OPERATIONS - MAINTENANCE SALARIES & BENEFITS 82,408 88,004 114,116 26,112 29.67% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 219,395 264,220 261,567 (2,653) -1.0% Division Total 301,803 352,224 375,683 23,459 6.66% PUBLIC ART FUND 198 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 0 4,026 0 (4,026) -100.0% TRANSFERS 82,200 0 0 0 0.0% Division Total 82,200 4,026 0 (4,026) -100.0% Annual Operating Budget 234 1� R The Heart of S.,the California Wine Ca fty TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Citywide Operations: Expenditures are expected to increase by 7.1% due to a cost of living adjustment (COLA) of 3% which will be provided to all eligible employees, according to labor agreements, on July 1, 2019; the addition of one Full Time Equivalent position of Park Ranger I and one Full Time Equivalent position of Management Aide I; the reclassification of three employees in accordance with labor agreements; an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocations for Insurance and Information Technology and several Capital Outlay items. Service Level B: Expenditures are expected to remain relatively flat with a slight increase of .08%. Service Level C: Expenditures are expected to increase by 17.38% due to higher utility costs and contracted landscape maintenance costs. Some of the increase is offset by a reallocation of personnel costs. Service Level D: Expenditures are projected to increase by 6.5% due to higher waste hauling costs as a result of the franchise agreement with CR&R, which includes annual inflators using the Consumer Price Index and land -fill tipping fees to determine the increase/decrease in the annual assessment rate. In addition, CR&R is proposing an "extraordinary" charge to mitigate the economic impact of the constrained recycling market. Service Level R: Expenditures are expected to decrease by 81.35% due to an appropriation for emergency repairs to Leifer Rd. in the prior fiscal year, as a result of heavy storm activity in February 2019. Service Level L: Expenditures are expected to increase by 4.75% due to a reallocation of personnel costs. Library: Expenditures are expected to increase by 5.25% dues to a reallocation of personnel costs and an increase in the Internal Service Fund Allocations. Public Art: There are no expenditures projected for this fund in the current fiscal year. Annual Operating Budget 235 1� R The Heart of Saathe California Wine Ca fty PERSONNEL ALLOCATION PARKS AND RECREATION Aquatics Coordinator Aquatics Supervisor II Community Services Assistant Community Services Coordinator I Community Services Manager Community Services Superintendent Community Services Supervisor I Community Services Supervisor 11 Custodian I Custodian II Director of Community Services Field Supervisor -Facilities Lead Maintenance Worker-Street/Parks Lead Maintenance Worker -Facilities Maintenance Manager Maintenance Supervisor Maintenance Worker I -Facilities Maintenance Worker I-Streets/Parks Maintenance Worker II -Facilities Management Aide I Management Aide II Management Aide III Management Analyst Office Specialist II Park Ranger I Park Ranger II Senior Administrative Assistant Senior Code Enforcement Officer Senior Management Analyst Senior Recreation Leader Theater Technical Assistant Theater Technical Coordinator II Total City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Adopted 2017-18 Current 2018-19 Proposed 2019-20 Inc/(Decr) from Prior Yr 1.00 1.00 - (1.00) - - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 2.00 1.00 1.00 - 5.00 8.00 8.00 - 1.00 2.00 2.00 - 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 2.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.30 0.65 0.60 (0.05) - 0.65 0.60 (0.05) 1.00 1.00 1.00 - - - 0.50 0.50 - 0.08 0.04 (0.04) 1.00 1.05 0.95 (0.10) - 0.02 0.02 - 0.35 0.35 0.35 - 0.75 1.35 1.50 0.15 - 0.12 0.08 (0.04) 0.60 0.60 - (0.60) 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 - 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 1.00 - - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 (1.00) 1.00 1.00 1.00 - - 0.05 0.05 - 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1 1.00 1.00 - 36.00 1 36.92 1 38.69 1 1.77 * One Office Specialist and one Community Services Manager position are currently unfunded. The positions are associated with the Margarita Recreation Center and will remain unfunded until the facility has been rehabilitated and is open for operation. Annual Operating Budget 236 1� R The Heart of Saath- Cal .,- W- C-ft y I14u1:14111C_t4091uIL 111101kVW4'XVJ14*111&1CIA 14k1 PERSONNEL ALLOCATION (Continued) SERVICE LEVEL B Senior Office Specialist Total SERVICE LEVEL C Landscape Inspector II Parks/Landscape Maintenance Supervisor Senior Landscape Inspector Total SERVICE LEVEL L Landscape Inspector II Park/Landscape Maintenance Supervisor Senior Landscape Inspector Total I IRRARV Custodian Custodian I Custodian II Field Supervisor Lead Maintenance Worker Maintenance Superintendent Maintenance Supervisor Maintenance Worker I Maintenance Worker II -Facilities Total Grand Total City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Adopted Current Proposed Inc/(Decr) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 from Prior Yr 0.20 0.25 0.25 - 0.20 0.25 0.25 - - - 0.18 0.18 0.23 0.15 - (0.15) 0.33 0.33 0.33 - 0.56 0.48 0.51 0.03 - - 0.07 0.07 0.05 0.05 0.05 - 0.07 0.07 0.07 - 0.12 0.12 0.19 0.07 0.20 - - - - 0.10 0.15 0.05 - 0.10 0.15 0.05 - - 0.10 0.10 - 0.15 0.25 0.10 0.10 - - - - 0.10 0.10 - 0.25 0.35 0.35 - 0.10 0.10 - (0.10) 0.65 0.90 1.10 0.20 37.53 38.67 40.74 2.07 * One Office Specialist and one Community Services Manager position are currently unfunded. The positions are associated with the Margarita Recreation Center and will remain unfunded until the facility has been rehabilitated and is open for operation. Annual Operating Budget 237 1� R The Heart of S.,the California Wine Ca fty City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: COMMUNITY SERVICES SERVICES • Plan, program and implement a wide variety of leisure services and contract classes for residents of all ages and abilities. • Participate in the Capital Improvement Program with projects that include developing new and/or improving existing parks and recreational facilities. • Reserve and program numerous facilities, including the Community Recreation Center, Temecula Community Center, Temecula Skate Park, Margarita Recreation Center, Patricia H. Birdsall Sports Park, Jefferson Recreation Center, Temecula Public Library and Citywide park shelters. • Create multi -media Community Outreach collateral to increase public awareness of Community Services programs, facilities, and events. • Provide Park Rangers/Monitors to act as ambassadors to the public. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Expanded use of new recreation software to include social media, marketing, event registration, fishing permits, and reporting modules. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City, Provide transparency to the public for all government transactions, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Increased size of bi-annual Guide to Leisure Activities brochure to better promote events, programs, classes and services offered by the Community Services Department. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Developed multi -media community outreach strategy to increase reach into the community. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 238 1� R The Heart of S.,the California Wine Ca fty City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: COMMUNITY SERVICES OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Continue multiple outreach events to provide resources to local at -risk populations. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Continue collaboration with local non -profits, faith -based community, school district and Sheriff's. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Continue to increase use of features of new recreation software to better streamline processes for department staff to increase efficiency and customer satisfaction. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Continue to review current contract class and recreation offerings and expand programming options for all ages. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Provide new city vehicles to Park Rangers to ensure responsiveness and reliability. (A safe and Prepared Community, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Provide training opportunities for Park Rangers to improve quality service delivery for all park visitors. (A safe and Prepared Community, Accountable and Responsive City Government) PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long performance Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Actuals Actuals Target Target Develop and Deploy a citizen satisfaction survey n/a 50 50 50 Promote High instrument _ Quality Parks And V Recreation v Programs And Cultural Services Maintain Facility rentals n/a 8S% 85% 85% >85% of availability c c� a Foster An v "Educated = Community" Maintain 75% participation n/a n/a 75% 75% Through A Wide rate in Contract Classes Variety Of Opportunities Annual Operating Budget 239 Alk �� City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 T^°Hsar ° 5° ti­.CIif C°umry wine Annual Operating Budget Wi TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: RECREATION SERVICES • Provide a variety of recreational and competitive sporting opportunities City-wide. • Provide an all-inclusive year-round aquatics program. • Program, reserve and maintain the sports fields, pools and courts for recreation and competitive leagues and tournaments. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR Renovated teen room and programming to increase participation. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) Continued to ensure Aquatics staff is adequately trained per all applicable codes. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs and Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) Collaborated with Public Works to support renovation of CRC facility. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs and Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Increase Pickle ball opportunities with the creation of additional courts through CRC gym renovation. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Continue to ensure Aquatics staff is adequately trained per all applicable codes. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs and Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Collaborate with other municipalities to better serve our sports programs. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Collaborate with Public Works to support design phase of Roripaugh Sports Park. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs and Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 240 Alk �� City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 T^°Hsar ° 5° ti­.CIif C°umry wine Annual Operating Budget Wi TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: RECREATION PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long Performance FY FY FY FY Value Term Goal Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Actuals Actuals Target Target Encourage c Community Number of special needs aa n Participation In participants provided with 90 90 90 90 N Public Safety And swim lessons and water safety Q a Emergency programs. u Preparedness Monthly attendance of Teen 250 250 250 250 u Gym at the CRC. v Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services �' Maintain field allocation at >_ n/a 90% 90% 90% +' c� 90% of availability. a� 2 Annual Operating Budget 241 The Heart of Southern California Wl ("w'y City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: CITYWIDE EVENTS SERVICES • Organize signature City events such as the Easter Egg Hunts, Fourth of July celebration, Santa's Electric Light Parade, Rod Run, and Winterfest Events in Old Town with the seasonal Ice Rink. • Provide free family activities during the summer including movies in the park, and concert series. • Implement regional events, including Street Painting Festival, and New Year's Eve Grape Drop. • Provide co-sponsorship of funds or in -kind services to special events. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Continued to secure corporate sponsorship opportunities for signature, City-wide special events. (Diversify The City's Revenue Base To Ensure Stability In Any Economic Climate, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Organized event recognizing public safety personnel for contributions to the community. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs, Healthy and Livable City) Integrated symphony and other performing arts events into the Special Events Division, thereby promoting organizational efficiency and better service to the community. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs, Healthy and Livable City) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Successfully move Signature Temecula Rod Run to May. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs, Healthy and Livable City) • Promote safety at signature events throughout Old Town Temecula by providing pedestrian fencing. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs, Healthy and Livable City) Promote a healthy lifestyle by working with Community Development on future bike events. (Promote High Quality Parks and Recreation Programs, Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 242 The Heart of Southern California W., ("w'y TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: CITYWIDE EVENTS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Value Five -Year Long Term Goal Performance Measures FY 2016-17 Actuals FY 2017-18 Actuals FY 2018-19 Target FY 2019-20 Target -a Utilize Social Number of Facebook c to Media To Keep Contests to promote a E The Community City activities and to 8 10 10 10 (Ai L E Informed And obtain more Q a u Involved community participation Provide s Signature Special New special events u Events And and/or cultural events 3 4 6 6 _ Cultural M Opportunities Annual Operating Budget 243 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: ARTS AND CULTURE SERVICES • Enrich, educate, and entertain our community by providing cultural experiences through the fine and performing arts. • Continue to strive for excellence by bringing in professional artists and continuing the traditional and unique programming through "Temecula Presents". • Partner with local schools and studios to offer enhanced artistic and cultural experiences to youth. • Serve as a significant cultural asset to the local and regional community. • Enrich, educate, and entertain the community by providing experiences in historical preservation and children's science -based learning experiences. • Supplement public education through use of traveling exhibits, historical walking tours, museum tours, and history writing contests. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Developed children's coloring book history of Great Oak Tree in conjunction with The Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians. (Foster an "educated community' through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Expanded oral history project to include local Veterans of World War II, and Temecula Pioneers. (Foster an "educated community" through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Programed, marketed, and produced the 14th season of Temecula Presents Season and Theater 2018-2019 Season Brochure. (Continue to promote the Temecula Valley as a destination, Economic Prosperity) • Upgraded PA system for main audience chamber of Temecula Theater to avoid costly repairs and emergency maintenance. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Support the local arts community by expanding Art Off The Walls into Theater Courtyard. (Focus on Temecula as a destination for arts and culture for both visitors and residents, with events that stimulate growth and creativity, Healthy and Livable City) • Create and exhibit on the development of Old Town as specified in the Kaiser/Marston Market Assessment. (Foster an "educated community" through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Enhance the Temecula Sister City program to include local students in current student exchanges to foster an appreciation of cultural differences and similarities between Temecula and our sister city in Daisen, Japan (Foster an "educated community" through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Program, market, and produce the 15' Season of Temecula Presents and Theater 2019-2020 Season Brochure. (Continue to promote the Temecula Valley as a destination, Economic Prosperity) Annual Operating Budget 244 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: ARTS AND CULTURE OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR (continued) • Expand social media presence, views, and reach of Around & About Temecula web series and provide Public Service Announcements for community outreach. (Foster an "educated community' through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Develop Sponsorship Web Page and create custom sponsorship opportunities to support Community Services. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs and Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long Performance 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Measures Actuals Actuals Target Target Partnerships with local vendors to Continue To enhance patron £ L Promote The theater experiences = a Temecula Valley in Old Town with pre- 21 24 24 24 0 o As A Destination and post- "' a performance audience engagement techniques >, Utilize Social Media To Keep v M 3 `~ a E The Community Number of posts 10,647 13,841 15,000 15,000 ca v Informed And Q a o Involved U Number of active -a T volunteers at the 100 100 100 100 vc Temecula Valley au cu � > Promote Museum r c Community o > Involvement v N- c Number of active v v Q volunteers at 20 20 n/a n/a Pennypickle's Workshop Annual Operating Budget 245 31� Z �'- The H—t,f S-th.. C,W wine Couet'y City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: HUMAN SERVICES SERVICES • Focus on the enrichment, education, employment, and resources for youth, young adults, special needs persons, and seniors. • Establish opportunities that better engage youth in student based advisory boards which promote community and civic involvement. • Provide leadership development and training for youth and young adults. • Offer health and wellness education and social programs for seniors. • Provide resources, education and programs for all human services issues including families with special needs persons and seniors. • Build new and expand current partnerships that improve the overall quality and coordination of services and programs. • Provide training among City staff and local key constituencies that serve persons with special needs. • Coordinate Homeless Outreach efforts with staff, community partners, businesses, and public safety in support of the City's Responsible Compassion initiative. • Provide outreach to the City's military community. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Expanded workforce development programs. (Continued to pursue high quality employment opportunities for Temecula residents, Economic Prosperity; Foster an "educated community' through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Provided increased training opportunities for staff to improve quality of service delivery for teens with special needs and older adults. (Promote high quality parks and recreation programs and cultural services, Healthy and Livable City) • Developed intergenerational technology assistance programs linking youth and seniors. (Foster an "educated community" through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) Annual Operating Budget 246 31� Z �'_ The H—t,f S-th.. C,W wine Couetry City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: HUMAN SERVICES OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Expand Inclusive events to include Light It Up Yellow for Down Syndrome Awareness Day. (Promote high quality parks and recreation programs and cultural services, Healthy and Livable City) • Expand upon Youth Advisory Council to integrate Inclusive programming (Peer Buddy Program, Senior HOME program, Intergenerational College Excursion and Intergenerational Tech Program). (Promote high quality parks and recreation programs and cultural services, Healthy and Livable City) • Submit award nomination for the Intergenerational Tech Program to California Parks & Recreation Society Awards program. (Promote high quality parks and recreation programs and cultural services, Healthy and Livable City) • Expand workforce development programs through new partnerships to help identify job placement, internship and externship opportunities. (Foster an "educated community' through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Value Five -Year Long Term Goal Performance Measures FY 2016-17 Actuals FY 2017-18 Actuals FY 2018-19 Target FY 2019-20 Target Human Services workshops for 18 20 20 20 +� parents and youth V y c� Foster an "Educated > Community" J through a wide M variety of opportunities Resource 18 20 20 20 +, opportunities M d 2 Annual Operating Budget 247 �a ' I!le Hr�[ iE Sw[Ee+n i.laillllJ TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: ADMINISTRATION City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget SERVICES • Support City strategic initiatives that enhance community partnerships, optimize utilization of resources, and advance the mission of the organization. • Participate in the Capital Improvement Program with projects that include developing new and/or improving existing parks and recreational facilities. • Provide library services including collections that include books, periodicals, DVDs, CDs and resource data bases geared for adults, teens, and children; provide resources such as homework center and tutoring via a partnership between the Temecula Valley Unified School District, and Law Library Services via a partnership with the Riverside County Law Library. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Continued to collaborate with Public Works to renovate additional parks as budget permitted. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Supported Public Works/CIP Division in projects that improved existing facilities. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Promoted childhood literacy through summer reading program and other Library initiatives. (Foster an "educated community" through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Complete Community Services Master Plan to identify facility, programming, staffing, and maintenance needs over the next 20 years. (Promote High Quality Parks And Recreation Programs And Cultural Services, Healthy and Livable City) • Continue to promote childhood literacy through summer reading program and other Library initiatives. (Foster an "educated community" through a wide variety of opportunities, Healthy and Livable City) • Support the Human Resources and Finance departments in the development and rollout of new software and Workforce Strategic Plan. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 248 �a ' I!le Hr�[ iE Sw[Ee+n i.laillllJ TEMECULA COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT DIVISION/PROGRAM: ADMINISTRATION City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR FY FY FY FY Core Five -Year Long performance Measures 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Actuals Actuals Target Target Collaborate with Riverside County Law Library to offer 6 6 6 6 Foster An law related classes to the "Educated public Community Through A Wide V Variety Of Computer classes provided v Opportunities in the technology 50 50 50 50 homework center at the > Temecula Public Library J M r_ M Promote High >. t Quality Parks And Complete Departmental +� Recreation initiatives or analyses 4 5 6 6 y Programs And = Cultural Services Accountable and Support City Manager's Responsive City Office in Special Projects 3 4 4 4 Government Annual Operating Budget 249 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS OVERVIEW The following section includes an expense summary of each of the Internal Services Funds. In addition, the Information Technology and Support Services Department includes the short term objectives staff has developed for the upcoming fiscal year which have been used to develop their operating budget. These objectives are linked to the Citywide long term goals presented in the Introduction section of the budget. The long term goals are then linked to the Core Values as identified in the City's Quality of Life Master Plan. Their objectives are measurable and include performance measures which demonstrate the progress made in the recent fiscal years toward their objectives. The Internal services have been categorized and organized by fund number: Fund/ Dept. Number Insurance................................................................................................................................................... 300 Workers' Compensation........................................................................................................................... 305 Vehiclesand Equipment........................................................................................................................... 310 Information Technology and Support Services..................................................................................320/330 TechnologyReplacement......................................................................................................................... 325 Support Services Replacement................................................................................................................ 335 Facilities.................................................................................................................................................... 340 FacilityReplacement................................................................................................................................. 350 Annual Operating Budget 250 ]1 C7` INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS INSURANCE EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) INSURANCE FUND 300 NUN-DEPAnimrim i. SALARIES & BENEFITS 29,742 35,642 66,764 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 1,400,391 959,495 959,495 Division Total 1.430,133 995,137 1,026,259 31,122 87.32% 0 0.0% 31,122 3.13% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Insurance: Expenditures are projected to increase by 3.13% due to the reallocation of personnel costs from the General Fund. INSURANCE Assistant City Manager Fiscal Services Manager Human Resources Manager Office Specialist- Confidential Risk Manager Total PERSONNEL ALLOCATION Adopted 2017-18 Current 2018-19 Proposed 2019-20 Inc/(Decr) from PriorYr - - 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.10 0.05 0.10 0.10 0.10 - 0.15 0.15 0.25 0.10 Annual Operating Budget 251 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS WORKERS' COMPENSATION EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY WORKERS' COMPENSATION FUND 305 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 1 aq SALARIES & BENEFITS OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE Division Total City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) 113,885 35,642 49,691 14,049 39.42% 137,208 387,136 206,088 (181,048)-46.77% 251,093 422,778 255,779 (166,999) -39.5% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Workers' Compensation: Expenditures are expected to decrease by 39.5% due to a budgeting error in FY2018-19, which erroneously increased the Operations and Maintenance budget. WORKERS' COMPENSATION Human Resources Manager Risk Manager Total PERSONNEL ALLOCATION Adopted Current Proposed Inc/(Decr) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 from Prior Yr 0.05 0.05 0.10 0.05 0.40 0.10 0.10 - 0.45 0.15 0.20 0.05 Annual Operating Budget 252 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT FUND 310 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE CAPITAL OUTLAY Division Total City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) 81,660 0 0 0 0.0% 0 858,125 380,000 (478,125)-55.72% 81,660 858,125 380,000 (478,125)-55.72% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Vehicles and Equipment: Fiscal Year 2019-20 expenses reflect the replacement of two Park Ranger trucks, one City Manager vehicle, one Public Works CIP pool vehicle and one Police Traffic Commercial Enforcement vehicle which are past their useful lives. Purchase of one skid steer piece of equipment with a sweeper attachment and trailer to be used for channel cleaning, asphalt repairs and debris removal. Replacement of the current Vactron, used for cleaning city maintained catch basins, which is past its useful life. Replacement of a pontoon boat with an electric motor, used for Harveston Lake and Duck Pond maintenance, which is past its useful life. Annual Operating Budget 253 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 The "e°"°I5°°`he`°Ca.-fty a w��e ca��r,Annual Operating Budget INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES MISSION Information Technology and Support Services (ITSS) is charged with providing the highest quality of leadership, support, and essential services to the organization's Operating Departments to maintain service levels necessary to efficiently and effectively meet all departmental program requirements at the Civic Center and off -site facilities. These services include GIS, Enterprise Applications, Media Services, Network Infrastructure, Tech Support, and Support Services. ITSS oversees 500+ electronic devices, network infrastructure, and 500+ user accounts at the Civic Center and 20+ offsite facilities City-wide. There are currently over 35 business application systems administered and supported by staff. In addition, Media Services oversees social media and E-Government services, and produces original video content for direct communications with residents. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES Michael Heslin Director Enterprise Geographic Media Services Application Services Information Systems Support Services Tech Support Infrastructure Website & Social Application Analysis Network Networking Development & Mapping Copy Center Tier 1 Help Desk Administration Television Station Database GIS Application System Management Administration Development Mailroom Services Computer Support Administration Media Services Application GIS Copier & Printer Inventory Support Support Support Management Management Telecommunications Audio Visual Development ��portJ Data Maintenance J Cvic CenterProduction Reception Services Public Safety Suppor Jt Security Graphic Design 71ndser Training atabase Fldinistration Library Technology Support Surveillance GIS Web Services Annual Operating Budget 254 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 The "e°"°'S°°`he`°Ca.-ftY a w��e Ca��t, Annual Operating Budget INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FUND 320 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 SALARIES & BENEFITS 1,257,666 1,358,451 1,433,464 75,013 5.52% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 1,286,020 2,151,017 1,950,197 (200,820) -9.34% INTERNAL SERVICE FUND ALLOCATIONS 0 3,300 3,300 0 0.0% CAPITAL OUTLAY 0 45,000 0 (45,000) -100.0% Division Total 2,543,686 3,557,768 3,386,961 (170,807) -4.8% GIS-GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 610 SALARIES & BENEFITS 365,224 368,536 318,918 (49,618) -13.46% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 31,429 79,618 97,312 17,694 22.22% Division Total 396,653 448,154 416,230 (31,924) -7.12% LIBRARY -INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 620 SALARIES & BENEFITS 133,190 150,025 157,395 7,370 4.91% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 92,746 136,434 151,434 15,000 10.99% Division Total 225,936 286,459 308,829 22,370 7.81% TECHNOLOGY REPLACEMENT FUND 325 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 232,801 0 0 0 0.0% CAPITAL OUTLAY 22,000 310,000 375,000 65,000 20.97% Division Total 254,801 310,000 375,000 65,000 20.97% SUPPORT SERVICES FUND 330 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 SALARIES & BENEFITS 205,990 224,439 231,009 6,570 2.93% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 166,767 144,527 182,542 38,015 26.3% TRANSFERS 0 444,102 0 (444,102) -100.0% Division Total 372,757 813,068 413,551 (399,517) -49.14% SUPPORT SERVICES REPLACEMENT FUND 335 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 CAPITAL OUTLAY 0 18,735 50,000 31,265 166.88% Division Total 0 18,735 50,000 31,265 166.88% Annual Operating Budget 255 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY (Continued) PUBLIC EDUCATION & GOVERNMENT (PEG) FUND 125 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 CAPITAL OUTLAY Division Total 210,490 364,995 305,000 (59,995)-16.44% 210,490 364,995 305,000 (59,995)-16.44% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Information Technology: Expenditures are expected to decline by 4.8% due to a carry-over from the prior fiscal year of a large one-time expense related to consulting services and a reduction in capital outlay requests. GIS: Expenditures are expected to decrease by 7.12% due to a restructuring of personnel within the department. Library: Expenditures are expected to increase by 7.81% due to an increase in the cost of the annual copier lease. Technology Replacement: Expenditures for Fiscal Year 2019-20 include computer life cycle replacement, the replacement of audiovisual equipment for Civic Center conference rooms, replacement of phones and equipment, replacement of fiber channel switches, network switches and a Web filter at the Library. Support Services: Expenditures are expected to decline due to a one-time Mid -Year adjustment from the prior fiscal year to establish the new Support Services Replacement Fund. Support Services Replacement: Expenditures for Fiscal Year 2019-20 include the replacement of ten City copiers that have reached their useful lives. Public Education & Government: Expenditures for Fiscal Year 2019-20 include the purchase of Close Captioning equipment, audiovisual equipment, a shoulder -mount camera, a portable stage and the set aside funds for the future replacement of all PEG funded equipment. Annual Operating Budget 256 -_ % The H,w of 5-the- Cali+orma W _ C.-fty INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES PERSONNEL ALLOCATION Adopted Current Proposed Inc/(Decr) 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 from Prior Yr INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Administrative Assistant 0.50 0.50 0.50 - Assistant Director of IT/SS 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Support Services Supervisor - 0.10 0.10 - Director Information Technology 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Deputy Director Support Services - - - - InformationTechnologyAdministrator 2.00 1.00 - (1.00) Information Technology Manager - 1.00 1.00 - Information Technology Specialist - - - Information Technology Specialist 1 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Information Technology Specialist II - - 1.00 1.00 Information Technology Supervisor 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 Information Technology Technician - - 1.00 1.00 Senior Information Technology Specialist 4.00 4.00 3.00 (1.00) 10.60 11.60 Total 10.50 1.00 SUPPORTSERVICES Assistant Director of IT/SS - - - - Support Services Coordinator - - - - Director Information Technology - - - - Information Technology Manager - - - - Information Technology Supervisor - - - - Office Specialist -AM - - 0.60 0.60 Office Specialist - PM - - 0.60 0.60 Office Specialist 11 (Part -Time) 1.20 1.20 - (1.20) Senior Information Technology Specialist - - - - Support Services Supervisor 1.00 0.90 0.90 - Support Services Technician (Part -Time) 0.50 0.50 0.50 - 2.60 2.60 Total 2.70 - Grand Total 13.20 1.00 13.20 14.20 Annual Operating Budget 257 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 The "e°"°'S°°`he`°-a"`°'°'a w,— C—t,Y Annual Operating Budget INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES SERVICES • Provide maintenance and IT support to City staff, its facilities, and the public on all network functions which support the City's website, security systems, communications, databases, and applications. • Provide technical support, manage applications, and assess needs to assist in business process analysis. • Provide public and staff access to the City's online application for generating maps and conducting geographic analysis. • Maintain and support the City's website and utilize social media and E-Government services to provide official information to the public. • Provide technical support for emergency communications and maintain the City's emergency notification system (Reverse 911). ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Offered improvements to the maintenance, tracking, and accounting of City assets in preparation for the Asset Management System implementation. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Initiated construction and installation of new or replacement surveillance equipment at various City facilities and traffic intersections. (Minimize the Impact of Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Enabled maximum staff efficiency, productivity, and security by ensuring that applications were kept current and that infrastructure was patched appropriately. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Developed and implemented an IT Disaster Recovery Plan for business continuity during emergency operations. (Minimize the Impact of Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Provided improvements in customer service and increased staff efficiency at the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library through the replacement of book sorting equipment and public access computers. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Delivered improved transparency and civic engagement to the Citizens of Temecula through the implementation of an agenda management system. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 258 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 The Annual Operating Budget INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Improve customer service and enhance access to City services through the implementation of the EnerGov Citizen Self -Service (CSS) portal. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Maintain security, improve staff -efficiency, and address Windows end -of -life concerns, through the life -cycle replacement of desktop computers. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Support the Temecula residents, businesses, visitors, and staff by upgrading the audiovisual equipment in the Conference Center. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Offer improvements to the tracking of work orders and maintenance of City assets through the initiation of the Asset Management System implementation. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) • Offer continued enhancements to the City's Surveillance System through the installation of new or replacement surveillance equipment at various City facilities and traffic intersections. (Minimize the Impact of Life, Property and the Environment from Natural Hazards and Emergency Situations, A Safe and Prepared Community) • Provide enhanced record keeping and reporting for Finance and Human Resources with the initiation of an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) Annual Operating Budget 259 4 �4 The H—t of S-th— C--� INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Five -Year Long Performance FY FY FY FY 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Value Term Goal Measures Actuals Actuals Target Target Number of City Council meetings supported with 24 24 24 24 Promote audiovisual services a) Community tA Involvement Number of updates to the o }, Temecula Outreach 70 102 143 125 vv Channel 3 and YouTube a) E c c Percentage of computers fu p that need to be replaced in Q Foster an order to adhere to the 20% 20% 20% 20% u 3 Organizational Computer Lifecycle O Structure That Replacement Program c� Q Matches Activity to Demand Reduce the number of open Helpdesk tickets to an 45 30 30 40 average of 75 Annual Operating Budget 260 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 The "e°"°'S°°`he`°Ca.-ftY a w�e Ca��t,Annual Operating Budget INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION/PROGRAM: SUPPORT SERVICES SERVICES • Provide consistent, resourceful, and efficient customer service to the public by professionally handling phone calls and/or by servicing the needs of the visiting public. • Provide central printing services for Citywide departments and off -site facilities, mailroom services, and auxiliary services (laminating, folder/inserter, wide -format printing, binding). • Manage the Canon copier lease/maintenance/replacement for the Civic Center and off -site facilities, including the Library. • Coordinate project staffing for City departments. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM PRIOR FISCAL YEAR • Procured a copy machine for the Human Resources Division and replaced the existing copy machine within the Community Development Department. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsible City Government) • Provided Support Services for Citywide departments and off -site facilities, including mailroom and ancillary services. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsible City Government) • Provided printing equipment maintenance and replacements at City-wide facilities for staff and public use. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsive City Government) OBJECTIVES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR • Offer streamlined workflows and improved staff efficiency through the completion of the life -cycle replacement of copy machines. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsible City Government) • Coordinate managed print services for all public and staff copy machines throughout the Civic Center and all off -site facilities. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsible City Government) • Provide mailroom, copy -center, and related services (large format printing, laminating, folding/inserting, binding, etc.) for Citywide departments and off -site facilities. (Foster an Organizational Structure that Aligns Resources with Demands, Accountable and Responsible City Government) Annual Operating Budget 261 City of Temecula Q Fiscal Year 2019-20 e"e°"°"°°`tie+° w,_ ra��t,...Y Annual Operating Budget INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION/PROGRAM: SUPPORT SERVICES PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR Core Value Five -Year Long Term Goal Performance Measures FY 2016-17 Actuals FY 2017-18 Actuals FY 2018-19 Target FY 2019-20 Target v Number of City .N Council Agendas copied without 24 24 N/A N/A 0 }, a c amendments due to E Foster An misprinting L_ Organizational M > Structure That 0 C9 Matches Activity � To Demand Number of 4 4 4 4 v SharePoint updates 0 u u Q Annual Operating Budget 262 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 R Annual Operating Budget INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS FACILITIES EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) FACILITIES FUND 340 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 NON -DEPARTMENTAL - CIVIC CENTER SALARIES & BENEFITS 394,347 395,627 394,928 (699) -0.18% OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 542,533 608,378 616,026 7,648 1.26% Division Total 936,880 1,004,005 1,010,954 6,949 0.69% NON-DEPARTMFnIT" OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 66,850 75,393 75,393 0 0.0% Division Total 66,850 75,393 75,393 0 0.0% NON -DEPARTMENTAL - FACILITIES- TVE2 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 142,605 158,259 158,259 0 0.0% Division Total 142,605 158,259 158,259 0 0.0% NON -DEPARTMENTAL - FACILITIES -FIELD OPERATION CENTEI OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 76,299 87,742 87,742 0 0.0% Division Total 76,299 87,742 87,742 0 0.0% NON -DEPARTMENTAL - FACILITIES -WEST WING OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 11,303 26,746 26,746 0 0.0% Division Total 11,303 26,746 26,746 0 0.0% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Facilities: Expenditures are expected to stay relatively flat with an increase of .69% due to a slight increase in Civic Center operations and Maintenance costs. Annual Operating Budget 263 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS FACILITIES PERSONNEL ALLOCATION FACILITIES Administrative Assistant Custodian Custodian I Custodian 11 Director of Public Works Facility Services Manager Field Supervisor- Facilities Lead Maintenance Worker Lead Maintenance Worker- Facilities Maintenance Supervisor- PW Maintenance Worker Maintenance Worker I - Facilities Maintenance Worker II - Facilities Management Assistant Office Specialist Principal Management Analyst Senior Management Analyst Senior Office Specialist Total City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Adopted 2017-18 Current 2018-19 Proposed 2019-20 Inc/(Decr) from Prior Yr 0.05 0.05 0.05 - 0.40 - - - - 0.20 0.20 - - 0.20 0.20 - 0.10 0.10 0.10 - - - 0.30 0.30 0.90 0.70 0.70 - 0.50 0.50 0.50 - 1.00 0.30 0.15 (0.15) 0.30 0.30 (0.30) 0.50 0.50 0.50 - - - 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 - (0.05) 0.45 0.45 0.45 - 4.25 3.35 3.20 (0.15) Annual Operating Budget 264 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS FACILITY REPLACEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY 2018-19 2019-20 % 2017-18 Current Proposed Increase/ Increase/ Actuals Budget Budget (Decrease) (Decrease) FACILITY REPLACEMENT FUND 350 NON -DEPARTMENTAL 199 CAPITAL OUTLAY TRANSFERS Division Total 0 362,336 201,714 (160,622)-44.33% 0 143,664 143,664 0 0.0% 0 506,000 345,378 (160,622)-31.74% ANALYSIS/COMMENTS Facilities: Expenditures for Fiscal Year 2019-20 include a carry-over expense for the refurbishment of the floors at Fire Stations 84, 92 and 95, the replacement of a generator at Fire Station 73 and the replacement of the Theater's projection system which is past its useful life. Annual Operating Budget 265 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM SUMMARY The purpose of the CIP Budget is to serve as a planning tool, which coordinates the financing and scheduling of major projects undertaken by the City. The CIP Budget document is prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. This document is dynamic and, consequently, must be revised annually to address changing needs, priorities, and financial conditions. The capital improvements presented in this document are the City's major projects, which exceed $30,000 in cost, have long-term life spans, and are generally non -recurring. These projects include land and right-of-way acquisition, design, construction or rehabilitation of public buildings or facilities, public infrastructure design and construction, park design and construction, and affordable housing projects. The City's goal in providing a CIP Budget is to develop a multi -year plan for capital improvement, update it annually, and follow through with all capital improvements in accordance with the plan. In determining the relative merit of a proposed project, key management team members evaluate projects for feasibility, community enhancement, infrastructure and historic preservation, and safety. PLAN DEVELOPMENT A component of the Strategic Business Plan includes the integration of the budget with the Quality of Life Master Plan (QLMP). The Quality of Life Master Plan (QLMP) provides the framework for the City's Strategic Budgeting activities. The City Council has set priorities and guided staff in developing six Core Values upon which to focus time and resources (as identified in the QLMP). These areas include: 1. Healthy and Livable City 2. Economic Prosperity 3. A Safe and Prepared Community 4. A Sustainable City 5. Transportation Mobility and Connectivity 6. Accountable and Responsive City Government All projects presented in the CIP are carefully programmed in concurrence with the City's Quality of Life Master Plan to ensure the community's capital improvement needs are met both now and in the future. The project sheets have been updated to include the specific Core Value(s) each project satisfies. The framework for the CIP is further defined in the City's CIP fiscal policy to provide a structure within which fiscal decisions can be made and to optimize all available resources toward the accomplishment of the City's Core Values as defined in the QLMP. This CIP budget document was developed by incorporating input from key management team members based on community comments and feedback received throughout the year. Through several workshops, the team then identified and evaluated community needs in the areas of roads/streets, bridges, public buildings, parks and recreation facilities. Each proposed project was reviewed and discussed to ensure funding, timing, and necessity. All projects are evaluated by the City's Planning Commission to ensure consistency with the provisions of the City of Temecula General Plan, while considering the City's long- term vision as developed by the City Council. The proposed circulation, infrastructure, and parks and recreation projects are reviewed and approved by the Planning Commission, Public/Traffic Safety Commission, and the Parks and Recreation Commission. Annual Operating Budget 266 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM SUMMARY (continued) Projects in this document have been scheduled in each of the five fiscal years based on community needs, as determined by the City Council and availability of funding. Priority rankings in each major category (Circulation, Infrastructure/Other, Parks and Recreation, and Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency / Housing) have been assigned in accordance with the priority guidelines as follows: LEVEL I: The project is urgent and must be completed as soon as feasible. Failure to address the project may impact the health, safety, or welfare of the community or have a potential significant impact on the financial well-being of the City. The project must be initiated or financial opportunity losses may result. The project is important and addressing it is necessary. The project impacts LEVEL II: safety, law enforcement, health, welfare, economic base, quality of life, and has been identified as a priority in the Quality of Life Master Plan. The project will enhance quality of life and will provide a benefit to the LEVEL III: community. Completion of the project will improve the community by providing cultural, recreational, and/or aesthetic value, or is deemed as a necessary improvement to a public facility. FUTURE YEARS The project will be an improvement to the community, but does not necessarily PROJECTS: need to be completed within a five-year capital improvement program time frame. FISCAL YEARS 2020-24 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM SUMMARY Type of Project Number of Cost of Projects Projects Circulation 22 $345,956,136 Infrastructure/ Other 34 61,363,635 Parks and Recreation 11 15,097,397 SARDA/ Housing 1 12,853,720 TOTALi ,888 Annual Operating Budget 267 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM SUMMARY (continued) The FY2020-24 CIP document includes 68 projects totaling $435,270,888 in budgeted project costs. In addition, there is $102,797,737 in projects with unspecified funding sources. These projects have been identified as necessary infrastructure for the City, and will require that funding sources be identified before the projects can commence. The administrative costs associated with managing the development of these projects have been estimated (generally as five to ten percent of estimated construction costs), and programmed in each project budget. These projects will affect the Public Works Capital Improvement Program Division as they manage the construction of those projects. Future operations and maintenance costs that result from the projects included in the CIP budget have been estimated for each project. These incremental future operating costs have been incorporated into the five year operating budget forecast. The estimated total operating and maintenance costs relating to capital improvement projects are shown by project in the Annual Operating and Maintenance Costs Summary schedule in this section of the Operating Budget. The estimates reflect operating and maintenance costs only. The following pages include a summary of projected CIP revenues; CIP projects included in the five-year CIP budget by type of project and priority, operating and maintenance costs for each project, and a description of major CIP revenue sources. A separate CIP budget document is prepared by the City that includes complete detail for each project including project description, scope, location map, level, responsible department, sources of funding, and annual project cost with detail of administration, design, and construction. I-151SR 79 South Ultimate Interchange Project Annual Operating Budget 268 f City of Temecula C7eZFiscal Year 2019-20 D.r,..n.rs..dUd- Annual Operating Budget w..C..W PROJECT SUMMARY BY TYPE OF PROJECT Prior Years Actual Fiscal Year Expenditures Ended 2019 2019-20 2023-24 TOTAL as of Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and PROJECT COST TO PROJECT SOURCE OF FUNDS 12/31/2018 Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years COST COMPLETE 00116- CIRCULATION RPTTF- Redevelopment Property Tax Abbott Corporation Roadway Improvements Trust Fund 750,000 750,000 750,000 Butterfield Stage Road Extension CFD #03-02 (Roripaugh Ranch) 30,217,838 10,886,903 41,104,741 10,886,903 Reimbursement/Other (EMWD) 11,622 11,622 Reimbursement/Other(RCWD) 30,002 518,322 548,324 518,322 Reimbursement/Other (Shea Homes) 81,298 92,510 173,808 92,510 Reimbursement/Other (SCE) 8,537 8,537 Reimbursement/Other (County of Riverside) 164,904 164,904 164,904 TUMF 1.438.000 1.438.000 Total 31,787,297 11,662,639 43,449,936 11,662,639 Cherry Street Extension and Murrieta Creek Low -Flow Crossing To Diaz Road Measure S 180,000 316,000 496,000 496,000 Unspecified(l) 1,821,000 1,821,000 1,821,000 Total 180,000 316,000 1,821,000 2,317,000 2,317,000 Citywide Buffered Bike Lane Striping AB2766 56,700 56,700 56,700 Senate Bill 821(1) 132,300 132,300 132,300 Total 189,000 189,000 189,000 Diaz Road Expansion (Rancho California Road to Cherry Street) DIF (Street Improvements) 590 590 Measure S 2,170 80,753 80,000 3,337,077 3,500,000 3,497,830 TUM F (W RCOG)(1) 570,000 495,923 1,065,923 1,065,923 Total 2,760 650,753 80,000 3,833,000 4,566,513 4,563,753 Emergency Vehicle Pre-Emption Upgrade Program - Citywide DIF (Police Facilities) 196,455 155,545 352,000 155,545 Flashing Beacons and Speed Advisory Signs DIF (Traffic Signals) 81,284 81,284 Measure S 5,527 56,473 32,000 32,000 32,000 32,000 32,000 222,000 216,473 Total 86,811 56,473 32,000 32,000 32,000 32,000 32,000 303,284 216,473 269 ]] .1� iM n.n oF1 w..C..W PROJECT SUMMARY BY TYPE OF PROJECT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Prior Years Actual Fiscal Year Expenditures Ended 2019 2019-20 2023-24 TOTAL as of Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and PROJECT COST TO PROJECT SOURCE OF FUNDS 12/31/2018 Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years COST COMPLETE French Valley Parkway / 1-15 Improvements -Phase II General Fund (1) 3,674,862 561,312 4,236,174 561,312 CFD (Harveston) 1,005,840 1,005,840 DIF (Street Improvements) 75,360 75,360 Federal Highway Administration 8,000 8,000 Measure A (Local Streets and Roads) 1,627,914 1,627,914 Measure S 193,629 260,371 1,971,845 1,865,640 4,291,485 4,097,856 Reimbursements/ Other (Land Donation) 6,000,000 6,000,000 SAFETEA-LU 671,000 931,360 1,602,360 1,602,360 STIP Augmentation 37,600,000 37,600,000 37,600,000 STIP(2) 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 TUMF (RCTC)(3) 2,343,000 2,343,000 TUMF (WRCOG)(4) 8,552,988 2,536,872 11,089,860 2,536,872 TUMF (WRCOG)(5) 3,471,937 246,807 3,718,744 246,807 TUMF (WRCOG)(6) 59,015 1,865,985 1,925,000 1,865,985 TUMF (CETAP/WRCOG)(7) 790,995 681,514 1,472,509 681,514 INFRA(8) 50,000,000 50,000,000 50,000,000 Unspecified(9) 227,000 133,000 360,000 360,000 Total 27,803,540 6,823,861 1,971,845 50,397,000 50,227,000 133,000 137,356,246 109,552,706 French Valley Parkway / 1-15 Improvements -Phase III General Fund Measure S TUMF (WRCOG)(1) TUMF (WRCOG)(2) Unspecified(3) 30,000 150,000 30,000 30,000 150,000 150,000 9,822,980 9,822,980 9,822,980 43,480,000 43,480,000 43,480,000 SHOPP(1) 1,250, 000 1,250,000 1,250,000 Unspecified(2) 3,050,000 3,050,000 3,050,000 Total 400,000 1,450,000 100,000 3,050,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 270 1]] .� iM n.n oF1 w.. c..W PROJECT SUMMARY BY TYPE OF PROJECT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Prior Years Actual Fiscal Year Expenditures Ended 2019 2019-20 2023-24 TOTAL as of Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and PROJECT COST TO PROJECT SOURCE OF FUNDS 12/31/2018 Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years COST COMPLETE Interstate-15 / State Route 79 South Ultimate Interchange CFD (Crowne Hill) 502,211 502,211 Reimbursement/ Other (Morgan Hill) 1,190, 582 1,190,582 SAFETEA-LU (1) 1,439, 840 1,439,840 Senate Bill621 13,111,737 1,146,783 120,000 80,000 80,000 14,538,520 1,426,783 STP (RCTC) (2) 11,165,698 1,810,302 12,976,000 1,810,302 TUMF (RCTC/Region)(3) 4,452,000 4,452,000 TUMF (RCTC/CETAP)(4) 5,400,000 5,400,000 TUMF (WRCOG)(5) 8,576,872 1,448,372 10,025,244 1,448,372 Reimbursement/RCW D(6) 280,560 280,560 Reimbursement/EMW D(7) 415,000 415,000 Reimbursement/Lease(8) 737,700 737,700 737,700 Total 46,534,500 5,143,157 120,000 80,000 80,000 51,957,657 5,423,157 Medians and Parkways -Citywide DIF (Street Improvements) 666,838 188,000 100,000 954,838 288,000 Murrieta Creek Bridge at Overland Drive DIF (Street Improvements) 38,751 1,729,668 1,508,515 850,000 4,126,934 4,088,183 HBP(1) 309,855 265,590 88,530 7,543,641 8,207,616 8,207,616 Unspecified(2) 1,972,844 1,972,844 1,972,844 CFD #16-01 (Roripaugh Ranch) Overhead Street Name Sign Replacement Program - Citywide Measure S Pavement Rehabilitation Program -Citywide General Fund Gas Tax RMRA (1) - S131 Measure A Measure S 6,585,898 6,585,898 6,585,898 Total 11, 639,788 11,639,788 11,639, 788 100,000 100,000 200,000 200,000 2,385,412 3,307,202 5,692,614 3,307,202 1,200, 000 1,200,000 1,251,263 1,105,403 1,873,331 1,918,154 1,956,517 1,995,647 2,034,777 12,135,092 10,883,829 16,646,857 2,304,196 3,397,313 1,283,089 1,325,135 1,368,387 1,412,829 27,737,806 11,090,949 644 Citywide DIF (Traffic Signals) 525,284 16,504 541,788 16,504 Measure S 456,237 458,763 435,000 285,000 210,000 150,000 260,000 2,255,000 1,798,763 Total 981,521 475,267 435,000 285,000 210,000 150,000 260,000 2,796,788 1,815,267 Traffic Signal Installation -Citywide Developer Contributions 250,000 250,000 DIF (Traffic Signals) 528,415 197,423 300,000 280,000 1,305,838 777,423 Measure S 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 Total 778,415 197,423 600,000 580,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 3,055,838 2,277,423 271 1]] .� iM n.n oF1 w..C..W PROJECT SUMMARY BY TYPE OF PROJECT Prior Years Actual Fiscal Year Expenditures Ended 2019 2019-20 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget 2023-24 TOTAL as of Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and PROJECT COST TO PROJECT SOURCE OF FUNDS 12/31/2018 Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years COST COMPLETE Traffic Signal Park and Ride Access Improvements Developer Contributions (1) 175,000 175,000 175,000 General Fund 226,725 226,725 226,725 Measure S Settlement Proceeds 50,505 80,444 130,949 130,949 Total 952,230 80,444 1,032,674 1,032,674 Traffic Signal System Upgrade HSIP(1) 489,510 489,510 489,510 Measure S 38,000 54,390 92,390 92,390 Total 38,000 543,900 581,900 581,900 Ynez Road Improvements DIF (Street Improvements) 115,097 504,384 3,952,285 4,571,766 4,456,669 TOTAL CIRCULATION PROJECTS $ 133,249,998 $ 52,149,363 $ 16,879,223 $ 55,929,773 $ 72,351,137 $ 143,857,034 $ 4,789,606 $ 479,206,134 $ 345,956,136 272 1]] .� iM n.n oF1 w.. c..W PROJECT SUMMARY BY TYPE OF PROJECT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Prior Years Actual Fiscal Year Expenditures Ended 2019 2019-20 2023-24 TOTAL as of Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and PROJECT COST TO PROJECT SOURCE OF FUNDS 12/31/2018 Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years COST COMPLETE INFRASTRUCTURE/OTHER J Implementation CDBG(1) 79 323,581 322,987 323,660 323,660 323,660 323,660 1,941,287 1,941,208 Bike Lane and Trail Program -Citywide AB 2766 179,353 50,000 100,000 100,000 216,955 144,575 790,883 790,883 BEYOND Grant 19,857 19,857 DIF (Open Space and Trails) 183,502 138,675 50,000 242,552 614,729 431,227 Unspecified* 269,133 632,873 902,006 902,006 Total 203,359 318,028 100,000 100,000 100,000 486,088 1,020,000 2,327,475 2,124,116 Bike Lane and Trail Program - Pump Track DIF (Open Space and Trails) 6,666 268,334 105,000 380,000 373,334 Bike Lane and Trail Program- Temecula Creek South AB2766 Side Trail 67,845 67,845 67,845 DIF (Open Space and Trails) 161,155 161,155 161,155 Measure S 571,000 571,000 571,000 Total 800,000 800,000 800,000 City Facilities Rehabilitation General Fund 1,576,183 173,817 1,750,000 173,817 DIF (Corporate Facilities) 250,000 250,000 Facilities Replacement Fund 143,664 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 1,643,664 1,500,000 Total 1,969,847 173,817 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 3,643,664 1,673,817 Citywide Drainage Master Plan Measure S 720,000 720,000 720,000 Citywide Financial System Upgrade Measure S 613,184 613,184 613,184 Technology Replacement 763,534 763,534 763,534 Total 1,376, 718 1,376,718 1,376,718 Citywide Streetlight Acquisition and Light Emitting Diode(LED) Retrofit General Fund 2,503,311 2,503,311 2,503,311 Measure S 4,700,000 800,000 5,500,000 5,500,000 Total 7,203,311 800,000 8,003,311 8,003,311 Citywide Surveillance Cameras DIF (Corporate Facilities) 549,048 653,039 1,202,087 653,039 DIF (Police Facilities) 566,998 146,716 713,714 146,716 Measure S 748.238 720.347 150.000 1.618.585 870 DIF (Quimby) 1,193,952 500,000 1,693,952 1,693,952 Measure S 500,000 1,600,000 2,100,000 2,100,000 Total 500,000 2,000,000 2,500,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 MSRC Grant(1) 141,000 141,000 141 Total 188,000 188,000 188,000 Expanded Recycled Water & Plant Material Conversion Project DWRGrant(1) 426,029 426,029 426,029 Measure S 142,010 142,010 142,010 Total 568,039 568,039 568,039 273 1]] .� iM n.n oF1 w.. c..W City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget PROJECT SUMMARY BY TYPE OF PROJECT Prior Years Actual Fiscal Year Expenditures Ended 2019 2019-20 2023-24 TOTAL PROJECT SOURCE OF FUNDS as of 12/31/2018 Carryover Budget Adopted Appropriation 2020-21 2021-22 Projected Projected 2022-23 Projected and PROJECT Projected Future Years COST COST TO COMPLETE Fiber Optic Communication System Upgrade HSIP(1) Measure S 40,209 Total 40,209 1,208,200 72,791 1,280,991 1,208,200 113,000 1,321,200 1,208,200 72,791 1,280,991 Fire Station 73 (Repayment to General Fund) $817,400 DIF (Fire Facilities) 283,131 232,055 154,944 105,761 26,978 26,809 829,678 546,547 Fire Station 73 - Gym/Garage Measure S 254,000 254,000 254,000 Fire Station 84 Training Room Renovation Measure S 666,750 666,750 666,750 History Museum Unspecified* 304,000 304,000 304,000 1-15/SR 79 South Interchange Enhanced Landscaping Measure S 44,493 396,857 47,133 446,200 934,683 890,190 Library Parking Phase II Unspecified* 2,952,867 2,952,867 2,952,867 Total 44,493 396,857 47,133 3,399,067 3,887,550 3,843,057 General Fund 37,628 37,628 DIF (Library Facilities) 765,904 1,496,022 2,261,926 1,496,022 DIF (Police Facilities) 10,346 39,654 50,000 39,654 Measure S 947,342 947,342 947,342 Total 813,878 2,483,018 3,296,896 2,483,018 Main Street Property Improvements General Fund 74,353 125,647 200,000 125,647 Margarita Recreation Center Capital Financing 6,405,000 6,405,000 6,405,000 DIF (Police Facilities) 15,634 121,366 137,000 121,366 Measure S 23,747 1,370,761 720,000 2,114,508 2,090,761 Total 39,381 7,897,127 720,000 8,656,508 8,617,127 Medians and Traffic Calming Improvements -Citywide DIF (Street Improvements) 40,000 40,000 Measure S 31,652 200,248 260,000 270,000 761,900 730,248 Reimbursements (TVUSD) (1) 25,000 25,000 25,000 Total 71,652 225,248 260,000 270,000 826,900 755,248 Murrieta Creek Improvements General Fund 135,858 135,858 Reimbursements(1) 55,798 285,129 449,000 144,649 934,576 878,778 Old Town Parking Structure General Fund 104,509 895,491 1,000,000 895,491 Pechanga Parkway Environmental Mitigation CFO (Wolf Creek) 782,933 268,073 1,051,006 268,073 Pedestrian Signal Equipment Upgrade - Citywide HSIP(1) 908,200 908,200 908,200 Measure S 38,000 38,000 38,000 Total 38,000 908,200 946,200 946,200 Public Safety Monument Unspecified* 30,000 30,000 30,000 274 1]] .� iM n.n oF1 w.. c..W PROJECT SUMMARY BY TYPE OF PROJECT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Prior Years Actual Fiscal Year Expenditures Ended 2019 2019-20 2023-24 TOTAL as of Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and PROJECT COST TO PROJECT SOURCE OF FUNDS 12/31/2018 Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years COST COMPLETE Santa Gertrudis Creek Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail AB2766 58,683 58,683 Extension and Interconnect BTA(1) 223,311 223,311 General Fund 78,920 78,920 DIF (Open Space and Trails) 219,526 169,547 389,073 169,547 Measure S 821,899 957,709 1,779,608 1,779,608 SB1 ATP Augmentation (2) 3,759,000 3,759,000 3,759,000 Total 580,440 4,750,446 957,709 6,288,595 5,708,155 Santa Gertrudis Creek Phase II- Margarita Under - Crossing Measure S 433,000 50,000 399,300 882,300 882,300 2019 ATP(SB1)(1) 1,502,000 1,502,000 1,502,000 Total 433,000 50,000 1,901,300 2,384,300 2,384,300 Sidewalks - Citywide General Fund 375,000 375,000 Measure S 15,573 334,427 658,596 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 3,008,596 2,993,023 Senate Bill821/RCTC 91,000 91,000 91,000 Total 390,573 334,427 749,596 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 3,474,596 3,084,023 Sidewalks - DLR Drive General Fund 442,077 442,077 442,077 Sidewalks - Old Town Boardwalk Enhancement CDBG(1) (2) 91,243 296,793 388,036 296,793 Measure S 100,226 459,774 164,527 724,527 624,301 Total 191,469 756,567 164,527 1,112,563 921,094 Temecula Elementary School (TES) Pool Renovation DIF (Parks & Recreation) 335,100 335,100 335,100 Utility Undergrounding - Citywide Measure S 89,061 155,314 244,375 155,314 TOTAL INFRASTRUCTURE/OTHERPROJECTS $ 7,741,973 $ 30,084,011 $ 11,755.388 $ 3,838,604 $ 10,463,788 $ 2,906,726 $ 2,315,118 $ 69,105,608 $ 61,363,63A 275 1]] .� iM n.n oF1 w.. c..W PROJECT SUMMARY BY TYPE OF PROJECT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Prior Years Actual Fiscal Year Expenditures Ended 2019 2019-20 2023-24 TOTAL as of Carryover Adopted 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 Projected and PROJECT COST TO PROJECT SOURCE OF FUNDS 12/31/2018 Budget Appropriation Projected Projected Projected Future Years COST COMPLETE a PARKS / RECREATION * M DIF (Parks & Recreation Measure S Community Services Master Plan Measure S 63,572 81,518 400,000 Total 63,572 481,518 276,200 145,090 81,518 545,090 481,518 276,200 276,200 Eagle Soar Splash Pad Control System Renovation Measure S 300,000 300,000 300,000 Flood Control Channel Reconstruction and Repair General Fund 446,912 203,372 650,284 203,372 Measure S 797,427 442,049 1,239,476 1,239,476 Unspecified* 4,830,000 4,830,000 4,830,000 Total 446,912 1,000,799 442,049 4,830,000 6,719,760 6,272,848 Parks Improvement Program General Fund 1,060,000 1,060,000 Measure S 274,581 125,419 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 1,650,000 1,375,419 DIF (Quimby) 250,000 250,000 Americans with Disability ACT(ADA) Improvements Measure S 39,094 308,706 780,000 1,127,800 1,088,706 Playground Equipment Enhancement and Safety Surfacing DIF (Parks & Recreation) 1,040,000 1,040,000 DIF (Police Facilities) 29,459 23,991 53,450 23,991 DIF (Quimby) 200,000 240,000 440,000 240,000 Measure S 258.438 919.211 500.000 500.000 500.000 500.000 500.000 3.677.649 3.419.211 Renovation Measure S 725,000 725,000 725,000 Ronald H Roberts Temecula Public Library Enhancement and Renovation Measure S 164,504 164,504 164,504 Sports Court Resurfacing Measure S 100,000 50,000 50,000 200,000 200,000 Conversion Measure S 250,000 280,000 530,000 530,000 TOTAL PARKS / RECREATION PROJECTS $ 3,662,056 $ 4,450,844 $ 2,716,553 $ 800,000 $ 750,000 $ 5,630,000 $ 750,000 $ 18,759,453 $ 15,097,397 SARDA Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds Series Affordable Housing 2017B 12,853,720 12,853,720 12,853,720 TOTAL SARDA PROJECTS 12,853,720 12,853,720 12,853,720 276 » City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 l n.H. fS-,�..C.11fa Annual Operating Budget FUTURE YEARS PROJECTS CIRCULATION Project Department Estimate* Cherry Street Extension Diaz Road to Jefferson Avenue Public Works 11,180,000 La Paz Street Widening from Ynez Road to Temecula Parkway Public Works 2,500,000 Nicolas Valley - Community Facilities District (Liefer Road) Public Works 4,088,508 Pauba Road Improvements - east of Margarita Road on the north side Public Works 130,000 Rainbow Canyon Road Widening from Pechanga Parkway to City Limit Public Works 8,000,000 Rancho California Road East of Meadows Parkway Public Works 470,000 Rancho Way Extension from Diaz to Margarita Road Public Works 28,337,000 Temecula Creek Crossing Public Works 16,777,300 Ynez Road Widening from Tierra Vista Road to Rancho Vista Road Public Works 580,000 TOTAL $ 72,062,808 INFRASTRUCTURE OTHER Project Department Estimate* Corporate Meeting and Event Space Community Services 625,000 Fire Station 92 and 95 Bay Door Replacement Fire Services 200,000 Pedestrian and Bicycle Bridge Overcrossing into Old Town Planning 1,890,000 Old Town Gymnasium Community Services 4,630,000 Southside Branch Library Community Services 6,640,000 Southside Recreation Center Community Services 4,500,000 TOTAL $ 18,485,000 PARKS and RECREATION Project Department Estimate* Ronald Reagan Sports Park North/South Fields Back Stops, Dugout, Community Services 857,000 and Parking Lot with Trash Enclosures Ronald Reagan Sports Park Upper Soccer Paving and Community Services 481,250 Materials/Equipment Storage Bays Sports Complex - Joint Use (Riverside County Flood Control District) Community Services 8,250,000 Vail Ranch Park Site D Community Services 1,843,000 Ynez Road and Overland Landscaping Community Services 200,000 TOTAL $ 11,631,250 *Estimates are planning level at the time the project was reviewed and they do not account for inflation and economic conditions 277 �t R T6-1d5om6ernC.Id-. W eCwntry PROJECTED REVENUE SUMMARY City Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Available Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Fund 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 Projected 2022- 2023-2024 Funds FUNDING SOURCE Balance * RevenueA Revenue Jft Revenue 2023 Revenue Revenue Available9 Assembly Bill 2766 $ 267,322 $ 133,576 $ 136,245 $ 138,967 $ 141,743 $ 144,575 $ 962,428 Capital Financing 6,405,000 $ 6,405,000 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) 943,361 323,660 323,660 323,660 323,660 $ 2,238,001 Facilities Replacement Fund 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 $ 1,500,000 General Fund 8,426,877 642,077 100,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 $ 11,168,954 Measure S 15,403,001 13,109,728 4,558,640 7,574,577 2,052,000 1,842,000 $ 44,539,946 Public Art 27,280 128,992 70,823 41,138 9,255 8,127 $ 285,615 Road Maintenance and Rehabilitation Account(RMRA) 1,105,403 1,873,331 1,918,154 1,956,517 1,995,647 2,034,777 $ 10,883,829 Technology Replacement 763,534 $ 763,534 Community Facilities Districts Roripaugh Community Facilities District #03-02 15,940,793 $ 15,940,793 Roripaugh Community Facilities District #16-01 6,585,898 $ 6,585,898 Wolf Creek Community Facilities District 268,073 $ 268,073 Development Impact Fees (DIF) Corporate Facilities - 307,416 210,033 141,377 50,110 44,103 $ 753,039 Fire Facilities 46,734 185,321 154,944 105,761 26,978 26,809 $ 546,547 Library Facilities 937,040 172,005 230,000 179,069 80,738 71,458 $ 1,670,310 Open Space and Trails 576,556 137,453 200,919 145,183 37,576 37,576 $ 1,135,263 Parks and Recreation 496,485 471,570 689,310 498,092 128,918 128,918 $ 2,413,293 Police Facilities 68,495 176,135 155,411 96,045 11,386 11,288 $ 518,760 Quimby 1,466,962 211,412 321,935 8,835 8,835 - $ 2,017,979 Street Improvements 2,103,717 3,902,741 1,864,075 1,008,261 84,909 78,111 $ 9,041,814 Traffic Signals 198,979 317,968 266,717 144,141 12,011 11,057 $ 950,873 Measure A Programs Measure A (Local Streets and Roads) 4,459,049 1,242,460 1,283,089 1,325,135 1,368,387 1,412,829 $ 11,090,949 Grants Department Water Resources Grant Prop 84 (DWR) 426,029 $ 426,029 Highway Bridge Program(HBP) 575,445 88,530 7,543,641 $ 8,207,616 Highway Safety Improvement Program(HSIP) 2,605,910 $ 2,605,910 Infrastructure For Rebuilding America (INFRA) 50,000,000 $ 50,000,000 Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC) 141,000 $ 141,000 SAFETEA-LU 931,360 $ 931,360 SB1 ATP Augmentation 4,430,000 1,502,000 $ 5,932,000 State Highway Operation Hrotection Nrogram & Minor Nrogram (SHOPP) 1,250,000 $ 1,250,000 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) 47,600,000 $ 47,600,000 Surface Transportation Program (STP) 1,810,302 $ 1,810,302 Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds Series 2017B 12,853,720 $ 12,853,720 Redevelopment Property Tax Trust Fund 750,000 $ 750,000 Reimbursements/Other Developer Contribution 934,129 144,649 $ 1,078,778 Lease Agreement 737,700 $ 737,700 Pechanga Tribe Contributions 4,225,519 $ 4,225,519 Rancho California Water District (RCWD) 518,322 $ 518,322 Riverside County 164,904 $ 164,904 Settlement Proceeds 500,000 $ 500,000 Shea Homes Reimbursement 92,510 $ 92,510 Senate Bills Senate Bill 621 1,426,783 $ 1,426,783 Senate Bill 821 223,300 $ 223,300 Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Community and Environmental Transportation Accountability Program (CETAP/RCTC) 681,514 $ 681,514 Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) 6,668,036 495,923 53,302,980 $ 60,466,939 TOTAL REVENUE $ 79,814,167 $ 51,003,700 $ 61,403,845 $ 74,528,322 $ 60,935,133 $ 6,619,937 $ 334,305,104 278 as the Heyt, pf 5aV[iem CAI..-i-a WY14 fiV-...: City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget ANNUAL OPERATING AND MAINTENANCE COSTS CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM PROJECT 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 Citywide Financial System Upgrade - Annual software maintenance/licensing Citywide Streetlight Acquisition and LED Retrofit - Anticipated savings from lower rate schedule and LED retrofit Citywide Surveillance Cameras - Annual operations and maintenance costs I-15/SR 79 South Interchange Enhanced Landscaping -Additionallandscape maintenance Margarita Recreation Center -Additional staffing, utilities, and facility charges Park Restrooms Renovations, Expansion and ADA Improvements - Additional custodial services for newly installed restrooms 66,934 66,934 66,934 66,934 - (600,000) (618,000) (636,540) (655,636) 160,000 260,000 260,000 260,000 260,000 - - 50,000 52,020 744,600 759,492 774,682 790,175 - 25,000 25,500 26,010 26,530 GRAND TOTAL $ 160,000 $ 496,534 $ 493,926 $ 541,086 $ 540,023 279 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DESCRIPTION OF REVENUE SOURCES Assembly Bill 2766 (AB 2766) State funds that are available to implement programs and projects that reduce air pollution from motor vehicles. Capital Financing Funding available through financing proceeds to be used for Capital Improvements. Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) The Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides funds through the Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) for local community development, housing activities, and public services. The primary objective of the CDBG Program is the development of viable communities by providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and expanded economic opportunities primarily focused on low- and moderate -income persons and neighborhoods. Community Facilities District (CFD) A tool that allows the City to construct desired and authorized public improvements with costs of the projects paid for by the benefitted properties within the boundaries of a designated area. The costs are then financed through the issuance of bonds payable over a period of years. Department of Water Resources (DWR) Proposition 84 Funding made available from the State of California Department of Water Resources funding from the Safe Drinking Water, Water Quality and Supply, Flood Control, River and Coastal Protection Bond Act of 2006. 2015 Proposition 84 Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM) Implementation Grant, California Public Resources Code Section 75026 of Divisions 26.5 of the California Water Code (CWC). Development Impact Fees (DIF) Fees generated by development applications to offset the effect of development to include infrastructure, fire protection, public facilities and services, libraries, roads, schools, parks, traffic signal mitigation and open space/public art. Fees are determined by the cost of the project at the time of application. Facilities Replacement Fund This Fund was established to accumulate resources necessary to replacement future Facilities systems, equipment and fixtures. General Fund City General Funds retained for capital improvement projects. Highway Safety Improvement Program The Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP), codified as Section 148 of Title 23, United States Code (23 U.S.0 §148), is a core federal -aid program to States for the purpose of achieving a significant reduction in fatalities and serious injuries on all public roads. Annual Operating Budget 280 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DESCRIPTION OF REVENUE SOURCES (continued) Highway Bridge Program This program is funded by Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and authorized by United States Code (USC) Title 23, Section 144. The purpose of the Program is to replace or rehabilitate public highway bridges over waterways, other topographical barriers, other highways, or railroads when the State and the Federal Highway Administration determine that a bridge is significantly important and is unsafe because of structural deficiencies, physical deterioration, or functional obsolescence. Infrastructure For Rebuilding America (INFRA) The INFRA program provides dedicated, discretionary funding for projects that address critical issues facing our nation's highways and bridges. Measure A (Local Streets and Roads) Riverside County's half -cent sales tax to fund transportation projects to improve local streets and roads, major highways, commuter rail, and public transit throughout Riverside County. Measure S Pursuant to Ordinance 16-06, on November 8, 2016, the people of Temecula approved a local 1% Transactions and Use Tax, effective on April 1, 2017, to maintain 9-1-1 emergency response times, prevent cuts to local paramedic, police, fire protection, school safety patrols, youth/after-school, senior, disabled services, improve freeway interchanges, reduce traffic and provide for other general services. Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC) The MSRC is the Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee, established under state law (AB 2766) whose sole mission is to fund projects that reduce air pollution from motor vehicles within the South Coast Air District in Southern California. Public Art Fund Public Artwork enhances the quality of life for individuals living and working in the Temecula. This fund was adopted by City Council for design, acquisition, installation, improvement, maintenance and insurance of public artwork displayed on City property; offering of performing arts programs on City property for the community; and art education programs on City property for the community (provided, however, that not more than five percent of the fund's annual budget shall be used for this purpose). Quimby The City's park -in -lieu or park development fee is assessed under provisions of the Subdivision Map Act which allows the City to require the dedication of land or the payment of a fee in lieu of land to be used for the purchase (or development) of park property. Reimbursements/Other Funding made available from other agencies or sources on a reimbursement, donation, and contribution basis. The actual agreement states the conditions of monies specific to a particular project. Annual Operating Budget 281 III City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DESCRIPTION OF REVENUE SOURCES (continued) Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient, Transportation Equity Act - Legacy for Users (SAFETEA—LU) Signed into law on August 10, 2005, and provides for highways, highway safety, and public transportation to improve safety, reduce traffic congestion, and other activities related to solving transportation problems. This new program takes off where STP, TEA-21, and ISTEA left off. Senate Bill 1(SB1)/Road Repair and Accountability Act (RMRA)/Active Transportation Program (ATP) The State of California imposes per gallon excise and sales taxes on fuel sales, as well as registration taxes on motor vehicles, for allocation to agencies for transportation purposes. In 2017, the State established the Road Repair and Accountability Act (RMRA) to allocate a greater share of additional monies for transportation purposes. Senate Bill 621 Represents a regional organization made up of tribal governments primarily within Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations (TASIN) member tribes contribute a percentage of their gaming revenues to the Indian Gaming Special Distribution Fund (SDF), as established by the State Legislature, to offset the impacts of Indian gaming on public services and infrastructure. Senate Bill 821 B 821, the Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program, is provided through the Transportation Development Act (TDA), funded through a % cent of the general sales tax collected statewide. The TDA provides two major sources of funding for public transportation: the Local Transportation Fund (LTF) and the State Transit Assistance (STA). The LTF provides funding for essential transit and commuter rail services, SB 821 and planning. Each year, two percent of the LTF revenue is made available for use on bicycle and pedestrian facility projects through the SB 821 program. State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) The State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) is the biennial five-year plan adopted by the California Transportation Commission (CTC) for future allocations of certain state transportation funds for state highway improvements, intercity rail, and regional highway and transit improvements. State law requires the Commission to update the STIP biennially, in even - numbered years, with each new STIP adding two new years to prior programming commitments. State Highway Operation Protection Program & Minor Program (SHOPP) State Highway System's program that funds repair and preservations, emergency repairs, safety improvements and some highway operational improvements. Surface Transportation Program (STP) Federal funds available for local agencies to improve the safety and efficiency of the local transportation system. Annual Operating Budget 282 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget DESCRIPTION OF REVENUE SOURCES (continued) Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds Series 2017A and 2017B As of January 31, 2012, the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Temecula has been dissolved and the City has elected to become the Successor Agency. The Successor Agency will be responsible for the winding down of the remaining activities of the dissolved Redevelopment Agency. These remaining activities include completing affordable housing and infrastructure projects that are funded with tax allocation bonds issued by the former redevelopment agency. The Series 2017A and 2017B Refunding Bonds were issued in 2017 to refinance 2002, 2006, 2007, 2010, and 2011 Tax Allocation Bonds to provide financing for low and moderate income housing projects. The outstanding bonds will be repaid in full in 2038. Monies to pay bond debt service is requested from the State and disbursed by the County from the Trust Fund established to accumulate tax increment generated by the former Temecula Redevelopment Agency area. Technology Replacement Fund This fund is used for the replacements of computers, system Software and all other Information Technology equipment. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Multi -jurisdictional development impact fee paid for by new development to provide the transportation infrastructure necessary to accommodate new development. WRCOG-BEYOND Framework Fund Program Local assistance funding program for Economic Development and Sustainability Projects. Annual Operating Budget 283 BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget Pages I. FINANCIAL STRATEGIC PLAN PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION .......................................... 287 A. Annual Operating Budget (AOB)...........................................................................................287 B. Balanced Budget....................................................................................................................288 C. Five Year Financial Forecast..................................................................................................288 D. Capital Improvement Program (CIP).....................................................................................289 II. FINANCIAL REPORTING....................................................................................................... 293 A. Annual Reporting...................................................................................................................293 B. Interim Reporting..................................................................................................................293 C. Budget Amendments.............................................................................................................293 D. Extended Annual Reporting..................................................................................................293 III. FUND BALANCE AND RESERVES......................................................................................... 294 A. Fund Balance Policy...............................................................................................................294 B. Reserve for Economic Uncertainty........................................................................................294 C. Secondary Reserve for Contingencies...................................................................................294 D. Future Capital Project Designations......................................................................................294 E. Other Designations and Reserves.........................................................................................295 F. Fund Balance Components....................................................................................................295 G. Hierarchy of Spending Fund Balance.....................................................................................296 H. Unassigned Fund Balance —General Fund............................................................................296 IV. TRANSACTIONS AND USE TAX FUNDING (MEASURE S).................................................... 298 AMeasure S Revenue...............................................................................................................298 B. Appropriation Priorities of Measure S Revenue....................................................................298 V. CONTINGENCY PLANNING.................................................................................................. 299 A. One Time Events....................................................................................................................299 B. Ongoing Fiscal Constraints....................................................................................................299 VI. STAFFING POLICY................................................................................................................ 300 A. Regular Staffing.....................................................................................................................300 B. Project Staffing......................................................................................................................300 C. Temporary Staffing................................................................................................................301 D. Work Hours...........................................................................................................................301 E. Overtime Management.........................................................................................................301 F. Independent Contractors......................................................................................................302 Annual Operating Budget 284 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VI. STAFFING POLICY (continued) Pages G. Productivity...........................................................................................................................302 H. Contracting for Services — Private Sector..............................................................................303 I. Contracting for Services — Government Service Contracts ................................................... 304 J. Contracting for Services — Regional Approach...................................................................... 305 K. Classification Plan Transition.................................................................................................305 L. Comprehensive Annual Leave Payout...................................................................................306 VII. ASSET MANAGEMENT AND REPLACEMENT (AMAR) POLICY ............................................ 307 A. AMAR Definition....................................................................................................................307 B. AMAR Process.......................................................................................................................307 C. AMAR Policy.......................................................................................................................... 308 D. AMAR Funding Strategy........................................................................................................308 E. Replacement Funds...............................................................................................................309 Vill. INVESTMENTS..................................................................................................................... 310 A. Introduction...........................................................................................................................310 B. Objectives.............................................................................................................................. 310 C. Scope..................................................................................................................................... 311 D. Investment Authority............................................................................................................ 311 E. Safekeeping of Securities......................................................................................................312 F. Reporting...............................................................................................................................313 G. Qualified Dealers...................................................................................................................313 H. Authorized Investments........................................................................................................313 I. Eligible Investments for Funds Held in Trust............................................................316 II. Ineligible Investments..............................................................................................316 J. Swapping of Securities..........................................................................................................316 K. Portfolio Adjustments...........................................................................................................317 L. Policy Review.........................................................................................................................317 M. Ethics and Conflict of Interest...............................................................................................317 IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT............................................................... 318 A. Capital Financing...................................................................................................................318 B. Debt Management................................................................................................................319 C. Debt Capacity........................................................................................................................ 321 Annual Operating Budget 285 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT (continued) Pages D. Independent Disclosure Counsel...........................................................................................321 E. Land -Based Financings..........................................................................................................321 F. Conduit Financings................................................................................................................324 G. Refinancings..........................................................................................................................325 H. Types of Debt That May be Issued........................................................................................ 325 I. Policy Goals Related to Planning Goals and Objectives........................................................326 J. Creation of Services Community Facilities Districts..............................................................327 X. INTERFUND TRANSFERS AND LOANS POLICY.................................................................... 331 A. Establishment of Various Funds............................................................................................331 B. Transfer Between Funds........................................................................................................331 C. Interfund Loans.....................................................................................................................331 XI. APPROPRIATIONS LIMITATION.......................................................................................... 332 A. Adopting a Resolution...........................................................................................................332 B. Supporting Documentation Available for Review.................................................................332 C. Calculating Appropriations....................................................................................................332 D. Review of User Fees and Charges.........................................................................................332 E. Support of Legislation or Initiatives......................................................................................332 F. Voter Approval to Amend Appropriation Limit.....................................................................332 XII. PENSION RATE STABILIZATION POLICY.............................................................................. 333 A. Establishment of an Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 115 Irrevocable Trust ................333 B. Funding of an Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 115 Irrevocable Trust ..........................333 XIII. SIGNATURE DELEGATION POLICY....................................................................................... 334 A. Delegation of City Manager Signature Authority.......................................................................334 B. Delegation of City Manager Settlement Authority....................................................................334 XV. EMERGENCY APPROPRIATION POLICY............................................................................... 335 Annual Operating Budget 286 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES I. FINANCIAL STRATEGIC PLAN PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION A. Annual Operating Budget (AOB) Through its Annual Operation Budget, the City will link resources with results by: 1. Identifying community needs for essential services that improve quality of life through strategic planning that: a. Organize the programs required to provide these essential services; b. Establish program policies and goals, which define the nature and level of program services required; C. Identify activities performed in delivering program services. 2. Proposing goals for improving the delivery of program services that: a. Identify and appropriate the resources required to perform program activities and accomplish program goals. b. Set objectives to measure Performance (progress) pertaining to: • Long term goals that align Council priorities with financial resources; • Output of program activities; • Accomplishment of program objectives; • Expenditure of program appropriations. 3. The AOB process encompasses the development, implementation, and evaluation of a plan for the provision of services for the upcoming fiscal year. The process includes political, managerial, planning, communication, and financial dimensions. The budget incorporates a long-term perspective, establishes linkages to broad organizational goals, and focuses budget decisions on desired results and outcomes. The AOB is formalized via the following process: a. A budget workshop is held with the City Council to receive Council direction and public comment, prior to budget preparation; b. Budget team updates policies and procedures for budget preparation, creates the budget process calendar, and prepares the current budget schedules for each department to use in preparing the new budget; C. A budget kickoff workshop is held with the City Manager, Department Directors, and Department Analysts to discuss the status of the current fiscal year budget, discuss the Five Year Financial Forecast, review the upcoming budget process calendar, discuss the impacts of the current economic conditions at the State and Federal levels, and discuss the essential principles and elements of the budget process; Annual Operating Budget 287 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES I. FINANCIAL STRATEGIC PLAN PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION (continued) d. Individual meetings are held with the budget team and each department to assist in the budget development process; e. The City Manager, in collaboration with the budget team, holds meetings with each department director (and analysts) to discuss their department budget request; f. A budget workshop is held with the City Council to receive public comment and to review the components of the proposed budget, prior to formal consideration for adoption; g. City Manager submits the proposed AOB and salary plan to the City Council at a public meeting for approval. B. Balanced Budget The City will maintain a balanced budget over the period of the Financial Strategic Plan. This means that: 1. Operating revenues must fully cover operating expenditures; 2. Ending fund balance must meet minimum policy levels. For the General Fund, this level has been established at 20% of operating expenditures for economic uncertainties and to support the City's credit worthiness, cash flow, and response to local disasters. C. Five Year Financial Forecast The City will prepare a five year financial forecast bi-annually to assist in long range planning and policy development. The five year forecast provides a tool to evaluate the ability of the City to fund proposed programs, operating and maintenance costs, capital expenditures, as well as operating costs related to future capital improvement projects. 1. Revenues are projected using a conservative approach, and are based on historical trends, stable residential development projections, internal analysis, and commercial growth that incorporates known development projects. Separate sets of assumptions are developed for major revenue types such as sales tax property tax, community development fees, transient occupancy taxes, and investment income; 2. Departmental expenditure projections are developed using anticipated cost of living increases for general administrative operating costs. Additional assumptions are incorporated for major expenditure categories such as public safety to ensure that commercial and residential growth projections are addressed to main current service levels. The five year capital improvement program is reviewed with the annual operating budget, and maintenance costs of each proposed project are identified and included in the forecast; Annual Operating Budget 288 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES I. FINANCIAL STRATEGIC PLAN PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION (continued) 3. The five-year forecast indicates whether projected revenue growth will support anticipated expenditures for current levels of service. However, as the City continues to grow, it is important to ensure that it can meet increasing demands, and be in a position to respond to possible changes in economic conditions. The five-year forecast is a dynamic tool that requires bi-annual update and review of its underlying assumptions to keep the City in a position of strong fiscal condition. D. Capital Improvement Program (CIP) 1. CIP Purpose - The purpose of the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) budget document is to serve as a planning tool, which coordinates the level ranking, financing, and scheduling of major projects undertaken by the City. All projects presented in the five-year CIP budget are carefully programmed to ensure the community's capital improvement needs are met both now and in the future. In addition, the projects provide additional opportunities and access to the City and improve the overall quality of life as identified in the Quality of Life Master Plan (QLMP). This document is dynamic and, consequently, must be revised annually to address changing needs, level rankings, and financial conditions. The City's goal in providing a CIP Budget is to develop a multi -year plan for capital improvement, update it annually, and follow through with all capital improvements in accordance with the plan. It also allows staff to budget operating and maintenance costs into the five year projection in order to determine the total cost of each project before it is undertaken. 2. CIP Development - This CIP budget document is developed by incorporating input from City Council and key management team members, based on community comments and feedback received throughout the year. This team then, through several workshops, identifies and evaluates community needs in the areas of roads/streets, bridges, public buildings, parks and recreation facilities, and redevelopment projects. Each proposed project is reviewed and discussed to ensure funding, timing, and necessity. A CIP City Council workshop is held to provide the City Council with an opportunity to review each project in detail, and to receive public comments concerning the five-year program. 3. CIP Proiects: $30,000 or More -The capital improvements presented in the budget are the City's major projects, which exceed $30,000 in cost, have long-term life spans, and are generally non -recurring. These projects include land and right of way acquisition, design, construction or rehabilitation of public buildings or facilities, public infrastructure design and construction, park design and construction, and redevelopment projects. Annual Operating Budget 289 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES I. FINANCIAL STRATEGIC PLAN PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION (continued) 4. Proiect Manager - Every CIP project will have a project manager who will prepare the project proposal, ensure that required phases are completed on schedule, authorize all project expenditures, ensure that all regulations and laws are observed, and periodically report project status. 5. Proiect Benefit - Projects must identify a benefit and reference a Core Value (QLMP) goal. 6. CIP Review Committee - In determining the relative merit of a proposed project, key management team members evaluate projects for feasibility, community enhancement, infrastructure and historic preservation, and safety. 7. CIP Levels - Projects in the CIP are scheduled in each of five fiscal years based on community needs, as determined by the City Council and availability of funding. Level rankings in each major category (Circulation, Infrastructure/Other, Parks and Recreation, and SARDA/Housing) are assigned in accordance with the following guidelines: LEVEL I: The project is urgent and must be completed as soon as feasible. Failure to address the project may impact the health, safety, or welfare of the community or have a potential significant impact on the financial well-being of the City. The project must be initiated or financial opportunity losses may result. b. LEVEL II: The project is important and addressing it is necessary. The project impacts safety, law enforcement, health, welfare, economic base, quality of life, and has been identified as a priority in the Quality of Life Master Plan. C. LEVEL III: The project will enhance quality of life and will provide a benefit to the community. Completion of the project will improve the community by providing cultural, recreational, and/or aesthetic value, or is deemed as a necessary improvement to a public facility. d. Future Years Projects: The project will be an improvement to the community, but does not necessarily need to be completed within a five year capital improvement program time frame. 8. CIP Administrative Costs - The administrative costs associated with managing CIP projects are estimated (generally as five to ten percent of estimated construction costs), and included in each project budget. 9. CIP Operations and Maintenance (O & M) - Future operations and maintenance costs that result from CIP projects are estimated and identified in the CIP project sheets. These incremental future operating costs are incorporated into the five year forecast. Annual Operating Budget 290 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES I. FINANCIAL STRATEGIC PLAN PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION (continued) 10. CIP Phases - The CIP will emphasize project planning, with projects progressing through at least two and up to ten of the following phases: a. Designate (Assigned). Appropriates funds based on projects designated for funding by the Council through adoption of the Financial Strategic Plan. b. Study. Concept design, site selection, feasibility analysis, schematic design, environmental determination, property appraisals, scheduling, grant application, grant approval, specification preparation for equipment purchases. C. Environmental Review. Compliance with CEQA, NEPA and other environmental studies, if necessary. d. Real Property Acquisitions. Property acquisition for projects, if necessary. e. Site Preparation. Demolition, hazardous materials abatements, other pre - construction work. f. Design. Final design, plan and specification preparation and construction cost estimation. g. Construction. Construction contracts. h. Construction Management. Contract project management and inspection, soils and material tests, other support services during construction. i. Equipment Acquisitions. Vehicles, heavy machinery, computers, office furnishings, other equipment items acquired and installed independently from construction contracts. 11. CIP Appropriation - The City's annual CIP appropriation for study, design, acquisition and/or construction is based on the projects designated by the Council through adoption of the Financial Strategic Plan. Adoption of the Financial Strategic Plan CIP appropriation does not automatically authorize funding for specific project phases. This authorization generally occurs only after the preceding project phase has been completed and approved by the Council and costs for the succeeding phases have been fully developed. If project costs at the time of bid award are less than the budgeted amount, the balance will be unappropriated and returned to fund balance or allocated to another project. If project costs at the time of bid award are greater than budget amounts, five basic options are available: a. Eliminate the project; b. Defer the project for consideration to the next Financial Strategic Plan period; Annual Operating Budget 291 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES I. FINANCIAL STRATEGIC PLAN PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION (continued) C. Rescope or change the phasing of the project to meet the existing budget; d. Transfer funding from another specified, lower level ranking project. e. Appropriate additional resources as necessary from fund balance. 12. CIP Budget Carryover - Project accounts, which have been appropriated, will not lapse until completion of the project phase. 13. Program Obiectives - Project phases will be listed as objectives in the program narratives of the programs, which manage the projects. 14. General Plan Consistency Review - All projects are evaluated by the City's Planning Commission to ensure consistency with the provisions of the City of Temecula General Plan, while considering the City's long-term vision as developed by the City Council. The proposed Circulation, Infrastructure, and Parks and Recreation projects are reviewed and approved by the Planning Commission, Public/Traffic Safety Commission, and the Parks and Recreation Commission. Annual Operating Budget 292 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES II. FINANCIAL REPORTING A. Annual Reporting The City will prepare annual financial statements as follows: 1. The City will contract for an annual audit by a qualified independent certified public accountant (or accounting firm). The City will strive for an unqualified auditors' opinion. 2. The City will use generally accepted accounting principles in preparing its annual financial statements, and will strive to meet the requirements of the GFOA's Award for Excellence in Financial Reporting program. 3. The City will issue audited financial statements within 180 days after year-end. B. Interim Reporting The City will prepare and issue timely interim reports on the City's fiscal status to the Council and staff. This includes: on-line access to the City's financial management system by City staff; monthly reports to program managers; formal quarterly reports to the Council and Department Directors; mid -year budget reviews; and interim annual reports. C. Budget Amendments The Council may amend or supplement the budget at any time after its adoption by majority vote of the Council members. The City Manager has the authority to make administrative adjustments to the budget as long as those changes will not have a significant policy impact nor affect budgeted year-end fund balances. D. Extended Annual Reporting The City will prepare extended annual reports as required by Federal and State requirements including, but not limited to: 1. State Controller Report 2. Street Reports Annual Operating Budget 293 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES III. FUND BALANCE AND RESERVES A. Fund Balance Policy Fund balance represents the accumulation of actual revenues and otherfinancing sources in excess of actual expenditures and other uses at year-end. In general terms, it represents the City's accumulated "savings" from year to year, as any fund balance realized at year-end is added to (or deducted from if expenditures exceeded revenues for that particular year) the previous year's fund balance. Fund balance is often referred to as "reserves." B. Reserve for Economic Uncertainty The City will maintain a minimum fund balance of at least 20% of operating expenditures in the General Fund, in order to adequately provide resources in the event of an unexpected draw on City finances. Eligible uses of these reserve funds include: • Expenditures due to local disasters/acts of nature • Loss of major revenue source(s) due to financial hardship or economic downturn • State -imposed take of local revenue/mandated payments • Significant unanticipated expenditures • Significant payout of Comprehensive Annual Leave for employees leaving City service C. Secondary Reserve for Contingencies In addition to the Reserve for Economic Uncertainty, the City will strive to maintain an operating reserve within the General Fund in the amount of 5% of General Fund operating expenditures. Use of these reserve funds shall be limited to: • Covering annual operating expenditures if revenue falls short of projections, creating an annual operating deficit. • Making one-time investments in Capital infrastructure that will create long-term operational savings to the General Fund, leverage available grant funds, or provide funding for projects that will create an economic benefit to the City. D. Future Capital Project Designations The Council may designate specific fund balance levels for future development of capital projects that it has determined to be in the best long-term interests of the City. Annual Operating Budget 294 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES III. FUND BALANCE AND RESERVES (continued) E. Other Designations and Reserves In addition to the designations noted above, fund balance levels will be sufficient to meet funding requirements for projects approved in prior years which are carried forward into the new year; debt service reserve requirements; reserves for encumbrances; and other reserves or designations required by contractual obligations, state law, or generally accepted accounting principles. F. Fund Balance Components This policy establishes the procedures for reporting unrestricted fund balance in the General Fund financial statements, as well as a fund balance expenditures hierarchy. Fund Balance commitments and assignments ensure that there will be adequate financial resources to protect the City against circumstances such as revenue shortfalls and unanticipated expenditures. The Policy also authorizes and directs the Director of Finance to prepare financial reports and categorize fund balance per Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 54, Fund Balance Reporting and Governmental Fund Type Definitions. There are five separate components of fund balance which identify the specific purposes for which amounts can be spent: (1) Non -expendable Fund Balance — inherently non - expendable; (2) Restricted Fund Balance — externally enforceable limitations on use; (3) Committed Fund Balance — self-imposed limitations on use; (4) Assigned Fund Balance — limitation resulting from intended use; (5) Unassigned Fund Balance — residual net resources. 1. Non -expendable Fund Balance - Amounts that cannot be spent because they are either (a) not in spendable form, such as prepaid items or inventories; or (b) legally required to be maintained intact, such as the principal portion of an endowment. 2. Restricted Fund Balance - Amounts for a specific purpose that are either (a) externally imposed by creditors (such as through debt covenants), grantors, contributors, other governments' regulations; or (b) imposed by law through constitutional provisions or enabling legislation. 3. Committed Fund Balance - Amounts authorized for specific purposes by a government's highest level of decision making authority (City Council). These committed amounts cannot be used for any other purpose unless the City Council removes or changes the specified use through the same formal action taken to establish the commitment. City Council action to commit fund balance needs to occur within the fiscal reporting period however, the amount can be determined Annual Operating Budget 295 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES III. FUND BALANCE AND RESERVES (continued) subsequently. The City's committed fund balance includes a reserve for economic uncertainty. It is City policy to maintain a reserve of 20% of Annual General Fund appropriations. Amounts are committed to finance any significant unanticipated revenue shortfalls, negative State budget impacts or impacts from natural disasters or other catastrophic events. 4. Assigned Fund Balance - Amounts that are constrained for specific purposes, but are neither restricted nor committed. For all governmental funds other than the General Fund, any remaining amounts not classified as non -expendable, restricted, or committed are considered assigned. For the General Fund, this policy delegates the authority to assign amounts to be used for specific purposes to the Finance Director in consultation with the City Manager for the purpose of reporting these amounts in annual financial statements. 5. Unassigned Fund Balance - Residual net resources of the General Fund in excess of what can be classified in one of the other four categories. G. Hierarchy of Spending Fund Balance Restricted fund balance should be spent first when an expenditure is incurred for which both restricted and unrestricted fund balance is available. When an expenditure is incurred for purposes where amounts in any of the unrestricted classifications of fund balance could be used, committed amounts are to be spent first, followed by assigned amounts and then unassigned amounts. H. Unassigned Fund Balance — General Fund At the end of each fiscal year, the Finance Department will report on the audited year- end financial results. In the event that actual General Fund revenues exceed expenditures and encumbrances, a year-end operating surplus shall be reported. Any year-end operating surplus which exceeds the levels required by the reserve policies, noted above, will be deemed as Unassigned Fund Balance, and shall be appropriated for one-time (non -recurring) expenditures in accordance with the following guidelines, subject to City Council approval. Ongoing, or recurring expenditures, are not appropriate uses of available Unassigned Fund Balance. 1. Public Safety equipment or non -recurring programs 2. Asset Management reserves 3. Capital improvement projects Annual Operating Budget 296 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES III. FUND BALANCE AND RESERVES (continued) 4. Reduction of unfunded liabilities related to CalPERS pension and Other Post - Employment Benefits (OPEB) 5. Reduction, or avoidance, of City debt IV. TRANSACTIONS AND USE TAX FUNDING (MEASURE S) A. Measure S Revenue Pursuant to Ordinance 16-06, on November 8, 2016, the people of Temecula approved a local 1% Transactions and Use Tax, effective on April 1, 2017, to maintain 9-1-1 emergency response times, prevent cuts to local paramedic, police, fire protection, school safety patrols, youth/after-school, senior, disabled services, improve freeway interchanges, reduce traffic and provide for other general services. B. Appropriation Priorities of Measure S Revenue In accordance with the approved ballot language related to Measure S, maintaining Public Safety services is the City's top priority, followed by the appropriate maintenance and replacement of City assets to ensure long-term viability of City operations. As surplus funds are available, the City Council may allocate Measure S funding to capital projects identified in the Capital Improvement Program as well as any associated general services. 1. Public Safety a. Within the Police Department, the City will strive to maintain a target staffing ratio of one sworn officer per 1,000 residents (1:1,000), as outlined in the City's General Plan. Upon receiving Population Estimate from the California Department of Finance, in May of each year, the Police staffing ratio shall be evaluated, and if the ratio falls below 1:1,000, the City Council may allocate available Measure S resources to meet the target staffing ratio. b. Desired Fire Department staffing levels include four persons per fire engine or fire truck (4-0 staffing). During the Annual Operating Budget process, the Fire staffing ratio shall be evaluated, and if the ratio falls below 4-0 staffing, the City Council may allocate available Measure S resources to meet the target staffing ratio. Annual Operating Budget 297 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IV. TRANSACTIONS AND USE TAX FUNDING (MEASURE S) (continued) 2. Asset Management/Investment In accordance with the Asset Management and Replacement (AMAR) Policy, noted in Section VI., the City strategically manages the life cycle and replacement of its assets; including capital infrastructure, City facilities and parks, fleet vehicles and equipment, and the City's technology and communication systems. Ensuring adequate reserves are set -aside for the future replacement of City -owned assets is critical to the long-term viability of the City's operations. The City's street and road network serves as the capital infrastructure for public transportation in and around the City. A Pavement Management Study is designed to evaluate the current condition of the road network, and establish a recommended level of investment necessary to properly maintain the condition of the street and road network. The City Council will strive to allocate an amount up to the recommended level of investment, as stated in the most recent Pavement Management Study, to the Capital Improvement Program — Pavement Rehabilitation Program, or other appropriate capital infrastructure projects designated for street and road network improvements. The City Council will strive to allocate an amount to be deposited into each asset replacement fund, based on the results of the specific asset management plan conducted periodically for each grouping of asset types (i.e. facilities, parks, vehicles and technology). 3. Capital Improvement Projects A Capital Improvement Project is defined as a major project, which exceeds $30,000 in cost, has a long-term life span, and is generally non -recurring. The City Council may allocate available Measure S resources to fund projects identified in the Capital Improvement Program. 4. General Services Operations and maintenance costs associated with City programs, administration and general services to the public are considered eligible appropriations of Measure S resources, so long as the abovementioned priorities are considered first. a. Operations and maintenance costs related to the addition of a new City facility, program or service funded by Measure S, shall have priority over existing City general services. Annual Operating Budget 298 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES V. CONTINGENCY PLANNING In response to adverse financial and economic conditions that could negatively impact the City's fiscal health, a Contingency Plan will provide for a measured response to potential fiscal challenges, as opposed to reactionary decision -making that could hinder the long-term financial solvency of the City. In accordance with Budget Policies 111.E and III.C, the City will strive to maintain reserves in the amount of 25% of General Fund operating expenditures. Eligible uses of these reserve funds are outlined in the aforementioned policy; however this Contingency Plan will address the hierarchy of utilizing reserve funds, in the event the City experiences significant or sudden fiscal constraints. The type of fiscal challenge will dictate the appropriate budgetary measure to implement in order to ensure solvency. If the fiscal constraint cannot be absorbed by annual budgetary savings, the following hierarchy shall be followed: A. One -Time Events In the event the City is faced with a non -recurring fiscal constraint, such as a State mandated payment or a natural disaster, the use of reserve funds is an appropriate mitigation. The Secondary Reserve for Contingencies shall be utilized first, and fully exhausted prior to utilizing the Economic Uncertainty Reserve. B. Ongoing Fiscal Constraints In the event the City experiences the loss of a major revenue source outside of the City's control (i.e. acts of legislation, corporate decisions and/or economic downturn), the City will need to adjust its operations in order to maintain a balanced budget. Circumstances may arise when the City is unable to react quick enough to offset a sudden loss in revenue, and will be required to utilize reserves to supplant the current Operating Budget. The Secondary Reserve for Contingencies shall be utilized first, and fully exhausted prior to utilizing the Economic Uncertainty Reserve. Continued use of reserve funds shall not exceed two budget cycles, to allow adequate time for the implementation of operational changes, while limiting the ongoing dependency on reserves. Implementation of Contingency Plan actions requires the majority approval of the City Council. Annual Operating Budget 299 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VI. STAFFING POLICY A. Regular Staffing 1. The budget will fully appropriate the resources needed for authorized regular staffing. 2. Regular full-time benefitted employees will represent the core work force and the preferred means of staffing ongoing, year-round program activities and services. The City will strive to provide competitive compensation and benefit schedules for its authorized regular work force. Each regular employee will: a. Fill an authorized regular position; b. Receive salary and benefits consistent with labor agreements or other City Council approved compensation plans. 3. To manage the growth of the regular work force and overall staffing costs, the City will follow these procedures: a. The Council will authorize all regular positions. b. The Human Resources Department will coordinate and approve the hiring of all regular employees. C. Supplement core staff with a balanced workforce consisting of part-time, contract, and independent contractors. d. All requests for additional regular positions will include evaluations of: • The necessity, term and expected results of the proposed activity; • Staffing and material costs including salary, benefits, equipment, uniforms, clerical support and facilities; • The ability of private industry to provide the proposed service; • Additional revenues or cost savings, which may be realized. e. Periodically, and before any request for additional regular positions, existing programs will be re-evaluated to determine if services can be provided with existing regular employees. f. The City will make every effort to conduct an internal recruitment to fill regular positions. The City will evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of conducting an internal recruitment versus an external recruitment on a case - by -case basis. B. Project Staffing 1. The hiring of project employees will not be used as an incremental method for expanding the City's regular work force. Annual Operating Budget 300 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VI. STAFFING POLICY (continued) 2. Project employees include all employees other than regular employees, temporary staffing, elected officials and volunteers. Project employees will generally augment regular City staffing as extra -help employees, seasonal employees, contract employees, interns and work-study assistants. 3. The City Manager and Department Directors will encourage the use of project employees to meet peak workload requirements, fill interim vacancies, and accomplish tasks where less than full-time, year-round staffing is required. Under this guideline, project employees will be hired for up to one year at a time in conjunction with the annual operating budget on an at -will basis. Moreover, project employee hours will generally not exceed 50% of a regular, full-time position (1,000 hours annually). There may be limited circumstances where the use of project employees on an ongoing basis in excess of this target may be appropriate due to unique programming or staffing requirements. However, any such exceptions must be approved by the City Manager based on the review and recommendation of the Human Resources Department. C. Temporary Staffing 1. Temporary Staffing agencies can be contacted only in the case of a short-term assignment such as sick leave, disability leave, maternity leave, etc. 2. The City will pay the Temporary Staffing Agency a fair base rate for the employee with a negotiated markup while the temporary employee is providing work for the City. D. Work Hours 1. Regular employee, project employee, and temporary employee work hours will be based on the needs of the City and the position. 2. Employee work hours may be flexed in an effort to minimize overtime. E. Overtime Management 1. Overtime should be used only when necessary and when other alternatives are not feasible or cost effective. 2. All overtime must be pre -authorized by a Department Director or delegated in accordance with existing policy. 3. Departmental operating budgets should reflect anticipated annual overtime costs and departments will regularly monitor overtime use and expenditures. Annual Operating Budget 301 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VI. STAFFING POLICY (continued) 4. When considering the addition of regular, project, or temporary staffing, the use of overtime as an alternative will be considered. The department will take into account: a. The duration that additional staff resources may be needed; b. The cost of overtime versus the cost of additional staff; C. The skills and abilities of current staff; d. Training costs associated with hiring additional staff; e. The impact of overtime on existing staff; f. The impact on quality of services. F. Independent Contractors Independent contractors are not City employees. They may be used in two situations: 1. Short-term, peak workload assignments to be accomplished using personnel contracted through an outside employment agency (OEA). In this situation, it is anticipated that City staff will closely monitor the work of OEA employees and minimal training will be required. However, they will always be considered the employees of the OEA and not the City. All placements through an OEA will be coordinated through the Human Resources Department and subject to the approval of the Human Resources Department. 2. Construction of public works projects and delivery of operating, maintenance or specialized professional services not routinely performed by City employees. Such services will be provided without close supervision by City staff, and the required methods, skills and equipment will generally be determined and provided by the contractor. Contract awards will be guided by the City's purchasing policies and procedures. G. Productivity The City will repeatedly monitor and review the City's methods of operation to ensure that services continue to be delivered in the most cost-effective manner possible. This review process encompasses a wide range of productivity issues, including: 1. Analyzing systems and procedures to identify and remove unnecessary review requirements. 2. Evaluating the ability of new technologies and related capital investments to improve productivity. 3. Developing the skills and abilities of all City employees. Annual Operating Budget 302 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VI. STAFFING POLICY (continued) 4. Developing and implementing appropriate methods of recognizing and rewarding exceptional employee performance. S. Evaluating the ability of the private sector to perform the same level of service at a lower cost. 6. Periodic formal reviews of operations on a systematic, ongoing basis. 7. Maintaining a decentralized approach in managing the City's support service functions. Although some level of centralization is necessary for review and control purposes, decentralization supports productivity by: a. Encouraging accountability by delegating responsibility to the lowest possible level; b. Stimulating creativity, innovation and individual initiative, C. Reducing the administrative costs of operation by eliminating unnecessary review procedures; d. Improving the ability of the organization to respond to changing needs, and identify and implement cost -saving programs; e. Assigning responsibility for effective operations and citizen responsiveness to the department. H. Contracting for Services — Private Sector 1. General Policy Guidelines a. Contracting with the private sector for the delivery of services may provide the City with a significant opportunity for cost containment and productivity enhancements. As such, the City is committed to using private sector resources in delivering municipal services as a key element in our continuing efforts to provide cost-effective programs. b. Private sector contracting approaches under this policy include construction projects, professional services, outside employment agencies and ongoing operating and maintenance services. C. In evaluating the costs of a private section contracts compared with in- house performance of the service, indirect, direct, and contract administration costs of the City will be identified and considered. d. Whenever private sector providers are available and can meet established service levels, they will be seriously considered as viable service delivery alternatives using the evaluation criteria outlined below. Annual Operating Budget 303 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VI. STAFFING POLICY (continued) e. For programs and activities currently provided by City employees, conversions to contract services will generally be made through attrition reassignment to absorption by the contractor. 2. Evaluation Criteria — Within the general policy guidelines stated above, the cost effectiveness of contract services in meeting established service levels will be determined on a case -by -case basis using the following criteria: a. Is a sufficient private sector market available to competitively deliver this service and assure a reasonable range of alternative service providers? b. Can the contract be effectively and efficiently administered? C. What are the consequences if the contractor fails to perform, and can the contract reasonably be written to compensate the City for any such damages? d. Can a private section contractor better respond to expansions, contractions or special requirements of the service? e. Can the work scope be sufficiently defined to ensure that competing proposals can be fairly and fully evaluated, as well as contractor's performed after bid award? f. Does the use of contract services provide us with an opportunity to redefine service levels? g. Will the contract limit our ability to deliver emergency or other high priority services? h. Overall, can the City successfully delegate the performance of the service but still retain accountability and responsibility for this delivery? Contracting for Services — Government Service Contracts 1. General Policy Guidelines: a. Contracting with other government entities for the delivery of services such as police and fire provides the City with significant opportunities for cost containment and productivity enhancements. The City utilizes government service contracts to deliver municipal services as a key element in the City's continuing efforts to provide cost-effective programs. Annual Operating Budget 304 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VI. STAFFING POLICY (continued) b. Police Contract Services — The City contracts with Riverside County Sheriff's Department for police services. Under this contract the City maintains a ratio of one (1) uniformed police officer for every one thousand (1,000) residents. The City will ensure that contracted staffing levels are compatible with the City population and needs. Contracting with the County facilitates an efficient, effective and affordable model of policing for the community. The police contract allows the City to partner with the County to leverage resources to reduce costs for supervision, administration, training, clerical support, vehicles and equipment. C. Fire Contract Services - The City contracts with the Riverside County Fire Department for all fire services. Contracting with the County facilitates an efficient, effective and affordable model of fire protection, disaster preparedness, fire prevention, and emergency operation services for the community. The fire contract allows the City to partner with the County to leverage resources to reduce costs for supervision, administration, training, clerical support, vehicles and equipment. J. Contracting for Services — Regional Approach 1. A regional approach to public services leverages economies of scale to improve outcomes and services to the citizens. Therefore, prior to entering into private or government service contracts, the City will require the completion of a systematic assessment to determine whether a regional approach to providing services is necessary. a. Animal Control Services - The City contracts with Animal Friends of the Valleys for animal control services and the County of Riverside (via the Southwest Community Financing Authority) for animal sheltering services. Contracting with multi -agencies for these services demonstrates a regional approach of leveraging resources to provide efficient services (at a reduced cost). K. Classification Plan Transition 1. On September 8, 2015, the Temecula City Council adopted a Side Letter to the 2013 Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Temecula and the General Employees of the City of Temecula, represented by Teamsters Local 911. The Side Letter outlined the implementation of the 2014 Classification Structure adopted by the City Council on March 25, 2014. Annual Operating Budget 305 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VI. STAFFING POLICY (continued) a. Effective July 1, 2015, the City will make all good faith attempts to fill all vacancies following the Reclassification Study/Finalized Reclassification Study Recommendations instead of a competitive process until all said recommendations are implemented. b. Employees filling vacancies and all newly created positions shall use the 2014 Classification Structure and Salary Schedule B. C. In the event a department does not have adequate salary savings to offset the cost associated with the implementation of the 2014 Classification Structure and Salary Schedule B for said vacancy or newly created position, the City Manager is authorized to transfer an amount equal to the funding shortfall from the General Fund Non -Departmental Account No. 001.199.999.5354 — Classification Plan Transition to the affected department. L. Comprehensive Annual Leave Time Payout 1. Upon an employee's separation from City service, the employee shall have the option to defer their official separation date to that which corresponds to the exhaustion of the employee's Comprehensive Annual Leave (CAL) balance. 2. When an employee vacates a position using paid time off (e.g. Comprehensive Annual Leave) for an extended period of time, the vacant position will be evaluated by the Department Director, and upon City Manager approval, the Department Director may fill the vacant position in order to continue operations without disruption to City services. In the event the department does not have adequate savings to offset the cost to fill the vacancy, the City Manager is authorized to transfer an amount equal to the funding shortfall from the General Fund Non -Departmental Account No. 001.199.999.5353 — Staffing Continuity Reserve to the affected department. Annual Operating Budget 306 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VII. ASSET MANAGEMENT AND REPLACEMENT (AMAR) POLICY A. AMAR Definition Asset Management and Replacement is the practice of strategically managing the life cycle of the City's capital infrastructure to achieve the greatest return on every tax dollar invested. The capital infrastructure's life -cycle includes how the asset is planned, designed, constructed, operated, maintained, replaced, and disposed. Capital infrastructure includes streets, roads, public facilities, parks and trails, and drainage facilities, as follows: 1. Streets and Roads - Assets related to the provision of transportation (e.g. pedestrian, bicycles, commercial vehicles, private vehicles, and public vehicles.) 2. Public Facilities - Building and land assets used for a diverse range of services including community services, recreation, accommodation, and municipal administration. 3. Parks and Trails - Assets which provide opportunities for organized and informal recreation activities (e.g. sports, exercise), provide aesthetic and cultural value to the community, and provide public spaces for social interaction. 4. Drainage Facilities - Assets which provide a measure of flooding protection to the community from storm water runoff and those assets which improve the water quality of storm water runoff going into main drains and waterways. B. AMAR Process As assets age, their performance (service provided) will deteriorate. Therefore, a process must be applied to determine when the ability of an asset to meet service standards deteriorates to an unacceptable level. This means considering all management options and strategies as part of the asset lifecycle, from planning to disposal. The objective of managing the assets in this manner is to look at long-term cost impacts when making asset management decisions. An effective process will be based on the following sequence: AMAR AMAR AMAR Policy Plan Operational Plans The AMAR Policy provides general direction and guidance for the AMAR Plan. The AMAR Plan provides more detailed direction and guidance for all major asset classes (Streets and Roads, Public Facilities, Parks and Trails, and Drainage Facilities). The AMAR Operational Plans cater for the delivery of specific asset management. Annual Operating Budget 307 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VII. ASSET MANAGEMENT AND REPLACEMENT (AMAR) POLICY (continued) The AMAR Plan is based on applicable management studies, best practices, and analysis and should be updated every five years. The actual replacement of assets via the AMAR Operational Plans is dependent on staff analysis and recommendation after a review of any intervening variables such as variations in service delivery demands, force majeure, and programming. C. AMAR Policy The purpose of the Asset Management and Replacement Policy (AMAR Policy) is to demonstrate the City's commitment to the responsible management of the City's capital infrastructure. The AMAR Policy ensures adequate provisions are made for the long-term replacement of the City's capital infrastructure by: 1. Incorporating appropriate asset management best practices to ensure that the City delivers the highest appropriate level of service through its assets to: a. Ensure service delivery needs form the basis of asset management; b. Incorporate a life -cycle approach to asset management. 2. Applying transparent and responsible financial management of City assets that: a. Integrate asset management with budgetary planning; b. Provide for present needs while protecting resources for future generations. 3. Meeting or surpassing legislative requirements for asset management. 4. Ensuring resources and operational capabilities are identified and responsibility for asset management is allocated. D. AMAR Funding Strategy 1. AMAR Fund Policy a. The funding strategy will be based on the following: • An evaluation of available funds in the General Fund, Special Reserve Funds, and the Internal Service Funds; • A comparison of available funds against the requirements of AMAR Plan (based on applicable management studies, best practices, and analysis); • Establishment of a separate AMAR Fund and Policy (e.g. designation, reservation) that best meets the needs of the City. b. When established, the drafting of the actual AMAR Fund Policy will be dependent on Council guidance and direction, and based on the analysis of the completed management studies. Annual Operating Budget 308 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VII. ASSET MANAGEMENT AND REPLACEMENT (AMAR) POLICY (continued) 2. The purpose of the Asset Management Fund is to: a. Accumulate earnings to provide a long-term funding source for replacement/rehabilitation of City infrastructure while preserving the principal balance of the Fund; b. Provide financial reserves to respond to natural disasters and other emergencies; C. Provide a source for internal loans and liquidity; d. Serve as collateral for City debt issues; e. Asset Management Fund assets may not be used for any purpose without approval of the City Council. E. Replacement Funds 1. Fund 310 — Vehicles and Equipment Fund has been established as an Internal Service Fund, for the purpose of accumulating the funds necessary to replace the City's fleet and major equipment. Annually, each department owning an eligible vehicle or piece of large equipment contributes an amount equivalent to the estimated cost to replace the item at the end of its useful life, as summarized in the Vehicle/Equipment Replacement Schedule. Eligible assets funded through the Vehicle/Equipment Replacement Schedule include vehicles and large equipment items that have a useful life longer than three years and cost in excess of $10,000. 2. Fund 325 — Technology Replacement Fund has been established as an Internal Service Fund, for the purpose of accumulating the funds necessary to replace the City's technology infrastructure (hardware and software). Annually, each department owning an eligible technology -related asset contributes an amount equivalent to the estimated cost to replace the item at the end of its useful life, as summarized in the Technology Replacement Schedule. Eligible assets funded through the Technology Replacement Schedule include those technology -related assets that have a useful life longer than three years and cost in excess of $3,000. Annual Operating Budget 309 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VIII. INVESTMENTS A. Introduction The intent of this Investment Policy is to establish the limits within which the City's Investment Program will be conducted. Investment goals and objectives are defined. Authorized investments and reporting requirements are identified. The monies entrusted to the City Treasurer will be referred to as the "Fund" throughout the remainder of this document. B. Objectives The investment policies and practices of the City of Temecula are based upon State law and prudent money management. The primary goals of these policies include: 1. To protect the principal monies entrusted to this office. Safety of principal is the foremost objective of the City of Temecula. Each investment transaction will seek to ensure that capital losses are avoided, whether from securities default, broker dealer default, or erosion of market value. The City will seek to preserve principal by mitigating the two types of risk (credit risk and market risk). Credit Risk - Defined as the risk of loss due to failure of the issuer of a security, will be mitigated by investing only with issuers whose financial strength and reputation can be verified to be the highest as rated by nationally known rating agencies, and by diversifying the investment portfolio so that the failure of any one issuer would not unduly harm the City's cash flow. b. Market Risk - The risk of market value fluctuations due to overall changes in the general level of interest rates, will be mitigated by (a) structuring the portfolio so that securities mature earlier than or concurrent with the timing of major cash outflows, thus eliminating the need to sell securities prior to their maturity; (b) prohibiting the use of leverage and margin accounts; and (c) prohibiting the taking of short positions —that is, selling securities which the City does not own. It is explicitly recognized herein, however, that in a diversified portfolio, occasional measured losses are inevitable, and must be considered within the context of the overall investment return. 2. To provide sufficient liquidity to meet normal operating and unexpected expenditures. The portfolio will be structured with sufficient liquidity to allow the City to meet expected cash requirements. This will be accomplished by structuring the portfolio so that securities mature concurrent with cash needs to meet anticipated demands. Since all possible cash demands cannot be anticipated, the portfolio will maintain a liquidity buffer and invest primarily in securities with active secondary and resale markets. Annual Operating Budget 310 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VIII. INVESTMENTS (continued) 3. To ensure compliance with all Federal, State, and Local laws governing the investment of monies under the control of the City Treasurer. The legal basis for the City's investment activities is the City of Temecula Municipal Code, Chapter 3.04, Revenue and Finance, Fiscal Provisions Generally and Government Code Sections 5922, 16429.1, 53600 to 53609, and 53630 to 53686, which include parameters for authorized investments, report of investments and investment authority. 4. To generate a maximum amount of investment income within the parameters of prudent risk management and consistent with the above policies. The City's investment portfolio will be designed to attain a market -average rate of return through economic cycles. The market -average rate of return is defined as the average return on three-month U.S. Treasury bills. Whenever possible, and consistent with risk limitations and prudent investment principles, the Treasurer will seek to augment returns above the market average rate of return. The policy will also address risk management because it is such an integral part of the investment policy. To concentrate only on maximizing return would be dangerous. Therefore, policy issues will be directed to: 1) limiting the Fund's exposure to each issue and issuer of debt, and 2) determining a minimum credit requirement that firms must have in order to hold City money. C. Scope This investment policy applies to all funds under the control of the City Treasurer, including but not limited to the general fund, special revenue funds, debt service funds, capital improvement funds, trust funds and bond proceeds in the custody of the Treasurer and any other funds under his/her control. California Government Code Section 53601(I) permits money from bond proceeds, obligations under a lease, installment sales or other agreements to be invested in any security that meets the statutory provisions governing the issuance of the bond or other agreements made by the issuing agency. Furthermore, California Government Code Section 5922(d) provides that notwithstanding any other provision of law, proceeds of bonds and any moneys set aside and pledged to secure payment of the bonds or certain other contracts specified in Section 5922, may be invested in securities or obligations described in the ordinance, resolution, indenture, agreement, or other instrument providing for the issuance of the bonds or the contract. D. Investment Authority The City of Temecula Municipal Code delegates to the City Treasurer the authority to invest and reinvest moneys of the city, to sell or exchange securities, and to deposit Annual Operating Budget 311 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VIII. INVESTMENTS (continued) City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget them and provide for their safekeeping. The City Treasurer is responsible for daily management of the investment program, including: 1. Establishing procedures for operation consistent with the investment policy; 2. Approving daily investment transactions; 3. Developing projections of the City's cash requirements for operating needs; 4. Reviewing the liquidity position of the investment portfolio; 5. Ensuring that the City's cash position is consistent with operating requirements; 6. Preparing appropriate investment reports; 7. Developing, implementing and monitoring controls over investments; 8. Developing record keeping for investment transactions. The City Treasurer may delegate investment authorityto qualified and competent officials and City employees such as the Revenue Manager. All persons authorized to make investment decisions on behalf of the City are trustees of the public funds and therefore fiduciaries subject to the following prudent investor standard as defined in California Government Code Section 53600.3: When investing, reinvesting, purchasing, acquiring, exchanging, selling, or managing public funds, a trustee will act with care, skill, prudence, and diligence under the circumstances then prevailing, including, but not limited to, the general economic conditions and the anticipated needs of the agency, that a prudent person acting in a like capacity and familiarity with those matters would use in the conduct of funds of a like character and with like aims, to safeguard the principal and maintain the liquidity needs of the agency. Within the limitations of this section and considering individual investments as part of an overall strategy, investments may be acquired as authorized by law. E. Safekeeping of Securities To protect against potential losses by collapse of individual securities dealers, all securities owned by the City, including collateral on repurchase agreements, will be held in safekeeping by a third party bank trust department, acting as agent for the City under the terms of a custody agreement executed by the bank and by the City. All securities will be received and delivered using standard delivery versus payment procedures (i.e., the City's safekeeping agent will only release payment for a security after the security has been properly delivered). This section is intended to comply with Government Code Sections 53601 and 53608. Annual Operating Budget 312 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VIII. INVESTMENTS (continued) F. Reporting City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget The City Treasurer will render a monthly report to the City Manager and City Council showing the type of investment, issuing institution, selling institution, date of maturity, par and dollar amount of deposit, current market value for all securities, return on the City's investment portfolio expressed as an annual percentage rate, yield to maturity, cash flow information demonstrating that the City can meet its upcoming financial obligations, and such data as may be required by the City Council. The report will also state its relationship to this statement of investment policy, as directed under the Code. The Treasurer will at least annually submit a recommended updated Investment Policy to be reviewed and approved by the City Council. The City's investment reporting policy meets or exceeds the requirements of Section 53646 of the California Government Code. G. Qualified Dealers The City will transact investments only with banks, savings and loans, state -licensed investment security broker -dealers, the State of California Local Agency Investment Fund, or brokerage firms designated as primary government dealers by, and regularly reporting to, the New York Federal Reserve Bank. Investment staff will investigate dealers who wish to do business with the City in order to determine if they are adequately capitalized, market securities appropriate to the City's needs, and are recommended by managers of portfolios similar to the City's. The City's Broker/Dealer Questionnaire will be used in this investigation. The City will, at least annually, send a copy of the current investment policy to all dealers approved to do business with the City. Confirmation of receipt of this policy will be considered as evidence that the dealer understands the City's investment policies, and intends to show the City only appropriate investments. H. Authorized Investments Investments will be made in the context of the "prudent investor" rule, which states: Investments will be made with judgment and care, under circumstances then prevailing, which persons of prudence, discretion, and intelligence exercise in the management of their own affairs, not for speculation, but for investment, considering the probable safety of their capital as well as the probable income to be derived. The City is further governed by the California Government Code, Sections 5922, 16429.1, and 53600 et seq. Within the context of these limitations, the following investments are authorized, as further limited herein: Annual Operating Budget 313 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VIII. INVESTMENTS (continued) City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget 1. United States Treasury Bills. Bonds. and Notes. or those for which the full faith and credit of the United States are pledged for payment of principal and interest. There is no limitation as to the percentage of the portfolio that can be invested in this category. Maturity is not to exceed the projected dates of the City's cash needs or five years, whichever is less. 2. Obligations issued by the Federal Farm Credit Bank System (FFCB), the Federal Home Loan Bank Board (FHLB), the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (FHLMC), the Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA), and other United States agency obligations with maturities of five years or less. Although there is no percentage limitation on the dollar amount that can be invested in these issues, the "prudent investor" rule will apply for a single agency name. Maturity is not to exceed the projected dates of the City's cash needs or five years, whichever is less. 3. Bills of exchange or time drafts drawn on and accepted by a commercial bank, otherwise known as banker's acceptances. Banker's acceptances purchased may not exceed 180 days to maturity or 40% of the market value of the portfolio. No more than 10% of the market value of the portfolio may be invested in banker's acceptances issued by any one bank. 4. Commercial aaaer rankine of the highest letter and number ratine by a nationall recognized statistical rating organization (NRSRO), and issued by a domestic corporation having assets in excess of $500,000,000 and having an "A-1" or better rating on its long-term debentures as provided by a NRSRO. Purchases of eligible commercial paper may not exceed 15% of the market value of the portfolio. No more than 10% of the market value of the portfolio may be invested in commercial paper issued by any one corporation. The City may invest in no more than 10% of a single corporation. The City may invest in no more than 10% of a single corporation's commercial paper. Maturity is not to exceed 180 days. 5. Negotiable certificates of deposit issued by nationally or state -chartered banks or State or Federal savings and loan associations. Negotiable certificates of deposit (NCDs) differ from other certificates of deposit by their deposit liquidity. They are issued against funds deposited for specified periods of time and earn specified or variable rates of interest. NCDs are traded actively in secondary markets. When feasible, an independent trading service will be used as part of the evaluation process. Issuers must be rated "B" or better by Thomson Bank Watch or equivalent rating service, or rated A-1 for deposits by Standard & Poors, or P-1 for deposits by Moodys or comparably rated by a national rating agency. Transactions in NCDs will not collectively exceed 30% of the total portfolio in effect immediately after any such investment is made. Annual Operating Budget 314 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VIII. INVESTMENTS (continued) City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget 6. Repurchase Agreements. The City may invest in repurchase agreements with banks and dealers with which the City has entered into a master repurchase agreement which specifies terms and conditions of repurchase agreements. Transactions will be limited to the primary dealers and the top banking institutions according to the rating agency based on liquidity, profitability, and financial strength. The maturity of repurchase agreements will not exceed thirty days. The market value of securities used as collateral for repurchase agreements will be monitored daily by the investment staff and will not be allowed to fall below 102% of the value of the repurchase agreement plus the value of collateral in excess of the value of the repurchase agreement. In order to conform with provisions of the Federal Bankruptcy Code which provide for the liquidation of securities held as collateral for repurchase agreements, the only securities acceptable as collateral will be certificates of deposit, eligible bankers' acceptances, or securities that are direct obligations of, or that are fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by, the United States or any agency of the United States. No more than 50% of the portfolio may be invested in repurchase agreements, and a "perfected security interest" will always be maintained in the securities subject to a repurchase agreement. 7. Local Agency Investment Fund. The City may invest in the Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) established by the State Treasurer for the benefit of local agencies up to the maximum permitted by State law. 8. Time Deposits. As to the deposits of non -surplus funds, the City may invest in non- negotiable time deposits collateralized in accordance with the California Government Code (including, but not limited to, entering into a contract with the depository institution pursuant to California Government Code Section 53649) in those banks and savings and loan associations that meet the requirements for investment in negotiable certificates of deposit. Since time deposits are not liquid, no more than 15% of the portfolio may be invested in this category. The depository institution should have been in existence for at least five years. The City may waive the first $100,000 of collateral security for such deposits if the institution is insured pursuant to federal law. In order to secure the uninsured portions of such deposits, an institution will maintain at least 10% in excess of the total amount deposited. Real estate mortgages may not be accepted as collateral. The maximum term for deposits will be one year. In general, the depository institution must have a minimum 6% net worth to assets ratio or the minimum ratio established by the Comptroller of the Currency. The depository institution's operation must have been profitable during their last reporting period. Annual Operating Budget 315 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VIII. INVESTMENTS (continued) City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget 9. Money Market Funds. The City may invest in money market funds that invest solely in U.S. Treasuries, obligations of the U.S. Treasury, and repurchase agreements relating to such treasury obligations. To be eligible, the money market fund must have attained the highest ranking available as evaluated by a nationally recognized rating service and retained an investment advisor with not less than five years' experience and that is registered with the SEC, and which advisor has assets under management in excess of $500 million. Except as otherwise noted, this list of authorized investments is intended to apply to the investment of all operating and surplus funds. The investment of bond proceeds will be governed by the permitted investments as specified in the official statement for each bond issue. I. Eligible Investments for Funds Held in Trust Pursuant to Budget and Fiscal Policy XII.B., the City may participate in an Internal Revenue Code Section 115 Irrevocable Trust, under which a third party administers the investments of the Trust. Investments of the funds held in the Trust shall be made in accordance with Government Code Section 53609 - Eligible securities for investment of funds held by local agency pursuant to deferred compensation plans, which states "Notwithstanding the provisions of this chapter or any other provisions of this code, funds held by a local agency pursuant to a written agreement between the agency and employees of the agency to defer a portion of the compensation otherwise receivable by the agency's employees and pursuant to a plan for such deferral as adopted by the governing body of the agency, may be invested in the types of investments set forth in Sections 53601 and 53602 of this code, and may additionally be invested in corporate stocks, bonds, and securities, mutual funds, savings and loan accounts, credit union accounts, life insurance policies, annuities, mortgages, deeds of trust, or other security interests in real or personal property. Nothing herein shall be construed to permit any type of investment prohibited by the Constitution. Deferred compensation funds are public pension or retirement funds for the purposes of Section 17 of Article XVI of the Constitution." J. Ineligible Investments Investments not described herein, including, but not limited to, reverse repurchase agreements, mutual funds (other than money market funds), zero coupon bonds, inverse floaters, mortgage -derived securities, common stocks and corporate notes and bonds are prohibited from use in the City's investment portfolio. K. Swapping of Securities A swap is the movement from one security to another and may be done for a variety of reasons, such as to increase yield, lengthen or shorten maturities, to take a profit, or to Annual Operating Budget 316 Alk Q The Heart of southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES VIII. INVESTMENTS (continued) City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget increase investment quality. The purchase transaction and the sale transaction must each be recorded separately and any losses or gains on the sale must be recorded. L. Portfolio Adjustments Should an investment percentage -of -portfolio limitation be exceeded due to an incident such as fluctuation in portfolio size, the affected securities may be held to maturity to avoid losses. When no loss is indicated, the Treasurer will consider reconstructing the portfolio basing his or her decision, in part, on the expected length of time the portfolio will be unbalanced. M. Policy Review This investment policy will be reviewed at least annually to ensure its consistency with the overall objectives of preservation of principal, liquidity, and return, and its relevance to current law and financial and economic trends. The City Council will be responsible for maintaining guidance over this investment policy to ensure that the City can adapt readily to changing market conditions, and will approve any modification to the investment policy prior to implementation. N. Ethics and Conflict of Interest Officers and employees involved in the investment process will refrain from personal business activity that conflicts with the proper execution of the investment program or impairs their ability to make impartial investment decisions. In addition, no funds will be invested in negotiable certificates of deposit issued by, or non-negotiable time deposits under contract with a State or Federal credit union if a member of the City Council or any person with investment decision making authority in the administrative office, manager's office, budget office, auditor -controller's office, or treasurer's office of the City also serves on the board of directors, or any committee appointed by the board of directors, or the credit committee or the supervisory committee of the State or Federal credit union issuing the negotiable certificates of deposit or in which the non-negotiable time deposit is proposed to be deposited. Additionally, officers and staff involved in the investment of public funds are required to annually file a Fair Political Practices Commission Statement of Economic Interest form. Annual Operating Budget 317 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget A. Capital Financing 1. The City will consider the use of debt financing only for one-time capital improvement projects and only under the following circumstances: a. When the project's useful life will exceed the term of the financing; b. When project revenues or specific resources will be sufficient to service the long-term debt. 2. The City will integrate debt issuances with the objectives of the Capital Improvement Program and will incorporate such integration in the formulation of the City's Financial Strategic Plan. 3. Debt financing will not be considered appropriate for any recurring purpose such as current operating and maintenance expenditures. The issuance of short-term instruments such as revenue, tax or bond anticipation notes is excluded from this limitation. (See Investment Policy) 4. Capital improvements will be financed primarily through user fees, service charges, assessments, special taxes or developer agreements when benefits can be specifically attributed to users of the facility. Accordingly, development impact fees should be created and implemented at levels sufficient to ensure that new development pays its fair share of the cost of constructing necessary community facilities. 5. Transportation related impact fees are a major funding source in financing transportation system improvements. However, revenues from these fees are subject to significant fluctuation based on the rate of new development. Accordingly, the following guidelines will be followed in designing and building projects funded with transportation impact fees: a. The availability of transportation impact fees in funding a specific project will be analyzed on a case -by -case basis as plans and specification or contract awards are submitted for City Manager or Council approval. b. If adequate funds are not available at that time, the Council will make one of two determinations: • Defer the project until funds are available; • Based on the high -priority of the project, advance funds from the General Fund, which will be reimbursed as soon as funds become available. Repayment of General Fund advances will be the first use of transportation impact fee funds when they become available. Annual Operating Budget 318 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget 6. The City will use the following criteria to evaluate pay-as-you-go versus long-term financing in funding capital improvements: a. Factors Favoring Pay -As -You -Go Financing: • Current revenues and adequate fund balances are available or project phasing can be accomplished; • Existing debt levels adversely affect the City's credit rating; • Market conditions are unstable or present difficulties in marketing. b. Factors Favoring Long Term Financing: • Revenues available for debt service are deemed sufficient and reliable so that long-term financings can be marketed with investment grade credit ratings; • The project securing the financing is of the type, which will support an investment grade credit rating; • Market conditions present favorable interest rates and demand for City financings; • A project is mandated by State or Federal requirements, and resources are insufficient or unavailable; • The project is immediately required to meet or relieve capacity needs and current resources are insufficient or unavailable. B. Debt Management 1. The City will not obligate the General Fund to secure long-term financings except when marketability can be significantly enhanced. 2. An internal feasibility analysis will be prepared for each long-term financing which analyzes the impact on current and future budgets for debt service and operations. This analysis will also address the reliability of revenues to support debt service. 3. The City will generally conduct financings on a competitive basis. However, negotiated financings may be used due to market volatility or the use of an unusual or complex financing or security structure. Annual Operating Budget 319 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget 4. The City will seek an investment grade rating (Baa/BBB or greater) on any direct debt and will seek credit enhancement such as letters of credit or insurance when necessary for marketing purposes, availability and cost-effectiveness. 5. The City will monitor all forms of debt annually coincident with the City's Financial Strategic Plan preparation and review process and report concerns and remedies, if needed, to the Council. 6. The City will diligently monitor its compliance with bond covenants, including but not limited to any Federal tax compliance requirements with respect to any tax- exempt debt obligations, and ensure its adherence to applicable regulations. 7. The City will maintain good, ongoing communications with bond rating agencies about its financial condition. The City will follow a policy of full disclosure on every financial report and bond prospectus (Official Statement). 8. The City will periodically review the requirements of, and will remain in compliance with, any continuing disclosure undertakings, particularly under Rule 15c2-12 promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 with respect to debt issues_ 9. The City will diligently monitor the use of proceeds from its debt issues, to ensure that the proceeds will be directed to the intended use. The City will maintain records of the intended use of the proceeds when the debt was originally issued (by keeping related documents, such as the Official Statements, tax certificates, as applicable) and the use of the proceeds at the time they are expended. Such records shall be retained so long as the debt issue (and any subsequent debt issue which refunded the debt) remains outstanding and for three years following the final maturity or redemption. The City shall consult legal counsel regarding the use of proceeds that is a change from the original intended purpose. 10. So long as required by California Government Code Section 8855(k), the City shall file annual report(s) to the California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission ("CDIAC") in accordance with CDIAC's requirements on a timely basis. The City shall retain a copy of each such annual report. 11. In connection with each debt issue, the City will file or cause Bond Counsel or another applicable member of the financing team to file on behalf of the City, a report of proposed issuance and a report of final sale, as required by California Government Code Section 8855(i) and (j). Annual Operating Budget 320 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT C. Debt Capacity City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget 1. General Purpose Debt Capacity. The City will carefully monitor its levels of general-purpose debt. Because our general-purpose debt capacity is limited, it is important that we only use general-purpose debt financing for high -priority projects where we cannot reasonably use other financing methods for two key reasons: a. Funds borrowed for a project today are not available to fund other projects tomorrow; b. Funds committed for debt repayment today are not available to fund operations in the future. In evaluating debt capacity, general-purpose annual debt service payments should generally not exceed 10% of General Fund revenues; and in no case should they exceed 15%. Further, direct debt will not exceed 2% of assessed valuation; and no more than 60% of capital improvement outlays will be funded from long-term financings. D. Independent Disclosure Counsel For any public offering debt issue, the City will retain independent disclosure counsel to assist with the preparation of the official statement or any other similar offering document and the continuing disclosure agreement. The roles of bond counsel and disclosure counsel may be served by the same firm, based on the City's determination on a case -by -case basis. E. Land -Based Financings 1. Public Purpose. There will be a clearly articulated public purpose in forming an assessment or special tax district in financing public infrastructure improvements. This should include a finding by the Council as to why this form of financing is preferred over other funding options such as impact fees, reimbursement agreements or direct developer responsibility for the improvements. 2. Eligible Improvements. Except as otherwise determined by the Council when proceedings for district formation are commenced, preference in financing public improvements through a special tax district will be given for those public improvements that help achieve clearly identified community facility and infrastructure goals in accordance with adopted facility and infrastructure plans as set forth in key policy documents such as the General Plan, Specific Plan, Facility or Infrastructure Master Plans, or Capital Improvement Plan. Annual Operating Budget 321 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget Such improvements include study, design, construction and/or acquisition of: a. Public safety facilities; b. Major transportation system improvements, such as freeway interchanges; bridges; intersection improvements; construction of new or widened arterial or collector streets (including related landscaping and lighting); sidewalks and other pedestrian paths; transit facilities; and bike paths; C. Storm drainage, creek protection and flood protection improvements; d. Parks, trails, community centers and other recreational facilities; e. Open space; f. Cultural and social service facilities; g. Other governmental facilities and improvements such as offices, information technology systems and telecommunication systems. 3. Active Role. Even though land -based financings may be a limited obligation of the City, we will play an active role in managing the district. This means that the City will select and retain the financing team, including the financial advisor, bond counsel, trustee, appraiser, disclosure counsel, assessment engineer, special tax consultant and underwriter, as appropriate. Any costs incurred by the City in retaining these services will generally be the responsibility of the property owners or developer, and will be advanced via a deposit when an application is filed; or will be paid on a contingency fee basis from the proceeds from the bonds. 4. Credit Quality. When a developer requests a district, the City will carefully evaluate the applicant's financial plan and ability to carry the project, including the payment of assessments and special taxes during build -out. This may include detailed background, credit and lender checks, and the preparation of independent appraisal reports and market absorption studies. For districts where one property owner accounts for more than 25% of the annual debt service obligation, a letter of credit further securing the financing may be required. 5. Reserve Fund. A reserve fund should be established in the lesser amount of: the maximum annual debt services; 125% of the annual average debt service; or 10% of the bond proceeds. Annual Operating Budget 322 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget 6. Value -to -Debt Ratios. The minimum value -to -debt ratio should generally be 4:1. This means the value of the property in the district, with the public improvements, should be at least four times the amount of the assessment or special tax debt. In special circumstances, after conferring and receiving the concurrence of the City's financial advisor and bond counsel that a lower value - to -debt ratio is financially prudent under the circumstances; the City may consider allowing a value -to -debt ratio of 3:1. The Council should make special findings in this case. 7. Appraisal Methodology. Determination of value of property in the district will be based upon the full case value as shown on the ad valorem assessment roll or upon an appraisal by an independent Member Appraisal Institute (MAI). The definitions, standards and assumptions to be used for appraisals will be determined by the City on a case -by -case basis, with input from City consultants and district applicants, and by reference to relevant materials and information promulgated by the State of California, including the Appraisal Standards for Land Secured Financings prepared by the California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission. 8. Capitalized Interest During Construction. Decisions to capitalize interest will be made on a case -by -case basis, with the intent that if allowed, it should improve the credit quality of the bonds and reduce borrowing costs, benefiting both current and future property owners. 9. Maximum Burden. Annual assessments (or special taxes in the case of Mello - Roos or similar districts) should generally not exceed 1% of the sales price of the property; and total property taxes, special assessments and special taxes payments collected on the tax roll should generally not exceed 2%. 10. Benefit Apportionment. Assessments and special taxes will be apportioned according to a formula that is clear, understandable, equitable and reasonably related to the benefit received by, or burden attributed to, each parcel with respect to its financed improvement. Any annual escalation factor should generally not exceed 2%. 11. Special Tax District Administration. In the case of Mello -Roos or similar special tax districts, the total maximum annual tax should not exceed 110% of annual debt service. The rate and method of apportionment should include a back-up tax in the event of significant changes from the initial development plan, and should include procedures for prepayments. 12. Foreclosure Covenants. In managing administrative costs, the City will establish minimum delinquency amounts per owner, and for the district as a whole, on a case -by -case basis before initiating foreclosure proceedings. Annual Operating Budget 323 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget 13. Disclosure to Bondholders. In general, each property owner who accounts for more than 10% of the annual debt service or bonded indebtedness must provide ongoing disclosure information annually as described under SEC Rule 15(c)-12. 14. Disclosure to Prospective Purchasers. Full disclosure about outstanding balances and annual payments should be made by the seller to prospective buyers at the time that the buyer bids on the property. It should not be deferred to after the buyer has made the decision to purchase. When appropriate, applicants or property owners may be required to provide the City with a disclosure plan. F. Conduit Financings 1. The City will consider requests for conduit financing on a case -by -case basis using the following criteria: a. The City's bond counsel will review the terms of the financing, and render an opinion that there will be no liability to the City in issuing the bonds on behalf of the applicant; b. There is a clearly articulated public purpose in providing the conduit financing; C. The applicant is capable of achieving this public purpose. 2. This means that the review of requests for conduit financing will generally be a two-step process: a. First asking the Council if they are interested in considering the request, and establishing the ground rules for evaluating it; b. And then returning with the results of this evaluation, and recommending approval of appropriate financing documents if warranted. This two-step approach ensures that the issues are clear for both the City and applicant, and that key policy questions are answered. 3. The work scope necessary to address these issues will vary from request to request, and will have to be determined on a case -by -case basis. Additionally, the City should generally be fully reimbursed for our costs in evaluating the request; however, this should also be determined on a case -by -case basis. Annual Operating Budget 324 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget G. Refinancings 1. General Guidelines. Periodic reviews of all outstanding debt will be undertaken to determine refinancing opportunities. Refinancings will be considered (within Federal tax law constraints) under the following conditions: a. There is a net economic benefit; b. It is needed to modernize covenants that are adversely affecting the City's financial position or operations; C. The City wants to reduce the principal outstanding in order to achieve future debt service savings, and it has available working capital to do so from other sources. 2. Standards for Economic Savings. In general, refinancing for economic savings will be undertaken whenever net present value savings of at least five percent (5%) of the refunded debt can be achieved. a. Refinancings that produce net present value savings of less than five percent will be considered on a case -by -case basis, provided that the present value savings are at least three percent (3%) of the refunded debt. b. Refinancings with savings of less than three percent (3%), or with negative savings, will not be considered unless there is a compelling public policy objective. H. Types of Debt That May be Issued 1. To implement the financing (or refinancing) objectives, the City will consider the issuance of generally accepted types of debt, including: a. Revenue Bonds — limited -liability obligations tied to a specific enterprise or special fund revenue stream where the projects financed clearly benefit or relate to the enterprise or are otherwise permissible uses of the special revenue; b. Special Assessment/Special Tax Bonds — limited liability obligations secured by special assessments or special taxes as described above under "Land -Based Financings"; Annual Operating Budget 325 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget C. General Fund Suaaorted Lease Revenue Bonds or Certificates of Participation — generally involves a lease arrangement between the City and a joint powers authority (or another entity), whereby bonds are issued by the authority for the financing of the project, and the City agrees to make lease payments in sufficient amounts to secure debt service payments on the bonds. d. General Obligation Bonds — bonds secured by a dedicated property tax override (i.e., a propertytax in excess of the 1% basic ad valorem property tax rate) that will be issued only after voter approval pursuant to the State Constitution and other applicable laws. e. Tax Increment Bonds — bonds secured by a portion of ad valorem property tax that are allocated to a successor agency (to a former redevelopment agency) or another entity formed pursuant by law (such as an enhanced infrastructure financing district or a community revitalization infrastructure district). The successor agency will consider issuance of bonds for refunding purposes. The City has not yet formed any enhanced infrastructure financing district, community revitalization infrastructure district or any similar entity, and will undertake applicable legal and feasibility analysis at the time of consideration of the formation of any such entity. f. Conduit Financing Bonds — bonds as described above under "Conduit Financings," for which debt service will be secured by the applicant's payments and the role of the City (or the City affiliated entity) will be limited to be the conduit issuer, without financial liability. 2. The above list is not exhaustive. The City may from time to time consider other types of debt to accommodate its financing and refinancing objectives. Policy Goals Related to Planning Goals and Objectives 1. It is a policy goal of the City to protect taxpayers and constituents by utilizing conservative financing methods and techniques so as to obtain the highest practical credit ratings (if applicable) and the lowest practical borrowing costs. 2. The City is committed to financial planning, maintaining appropriate reserves levels and employing prudent practices in governance, management and budget administration, including debt issuance and management. Annual Operating Budget 326 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget 3. The City w ill comply with applicable State and Federal law as it pertains to the maximum term of debt and the procedures for levying and imposing any related taxes, assessments, rates and charges. J. Creation of Services Community Facilities Districts 1. Introduction a. It is the City's goal to support new development projects that address public need and provide a public benefit. In consideration of these projects, the City desires to ensure that the provision of both general services and public safety services are addressed. b. The City shall require developments that propose an increase in a higher density residential use than what is currently allowed by the General Plan or Zoning Code to form, or annex into, a Community Facilities District (CFD) pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982, as amended, for the purposes of providing municipal services and public safety services. C. The City shall make the final determination as to which public financing mechanism, if any, shall be used to assist in the funding of a service. The City may confer with the applicant to learn of any unique circumstances before making its final determination. 2. Eligible Expenses a. All City and any consultant costs incurred in evaluating applications requesting the establishment of CFDs shall be paid by the applicant by advance deposit increments, or as otherwise agreed upon in writing by the City. The City shall not incur any non -reimbursable expense for processing such applications. Expenses not chargeable to the District shall be borne by the applicant. b. In general, the services to be financed by a public services CFD are those identified in the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act which are provided by the City including: Police protection services, including put not limited to, criminal justice services. Annual Operating Budget 327 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget ii. Fire protection and suppression services, and ambulance and paramedic services. iii. Provision of municipal services including, but not limited to, parks and park maintenance, street maintenance, facility maintenance, parkway maintenance, recreation funding, library services, open space, flood and storm protection services, and operation of museums and cultural facilities. iv. Other services as may be permitted pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act as it may be amended from time to time. 3. Selection of Consultants a. The City shall select and solely manage, coordinate, and direct the work of the special tax consultant, assessment engineer, financial advisor, special district administrator, and other professionals and consultants it deems appropriate in relation to the formation of, or annexation into, a Services CFD. 4. Fiscal Impact Analysis (FIA) a. The City shall enter into an agreement with a third party consultant to conduct a fiscal impact analysis that analyzes the cost of the provision of services to the proposed development. i. The applicant shall be responsible for incurring all costs of the FIA and pay a deposit in advance, or as otherwise agreed upon, in writing, by the City. ii. The FIA shall utilize the final project description, as provided by the applicant, for analysis. The project description must also match that description used for the necessary California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) analysis. iii. The FIA shall utilize the most current adopted budget data, to be provided by the City, to develop the projected cost of services relative to the proposed development. The most current available data regarding CPI and other inflators, contract increases, expenditure and revenue trends, and future known legislation affecting the City's budget shall be used. Annual Operating Budget 328 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget iv. The FIA shall maintain a 1:1,000 police officer ratio, as the population of the City continues to increase. V. If the FIA is completed more than one year prior to the completion of the entitlement process, the FIA shall be updated to reflect the most recent budget data. vi. If a significant change in in the City's fiscal environment occurs between the finalization of the FIA and the completion of the entitlement process, the City may require an updated FIA to be completed. 5. Rate and Method of Apportionment a. The findings of the FIA will be utilized in the determination of the rate and method of apportionment (RMA) for the CFD, as calculated by a third party special tax consultant, after the proposed development has received its entitlements. b. The RMA should provide for an annual increase in the maximum special tax. C. For residential components of development projects, the projected ad valorem tax and other direct and overlapping debt for the proposed CFD shall not exceed 2.0% of the anticipated initial sales price to the ultimate home buyer, per City policy. Any deviations from the foregoing will not be permitted unless specifically approved by the City Council. d. The term of the Services CFD shall be in perpetuity. e. The City will consider the apportionment of assessments to those properties that are found by the assessment engineer to be benefited by the municipal services provided. The assessment engineer will review the services provided to each parcel in order to comply with the requirements of Proposition 218 and applicable State statutes. f. The rate and method of special taxes will be structured in such a manner as to result in a fair and reasonable taxing structure. The City and its special tax consultant will consider input from the proponent of the development project, but the City will make the final determination. Annual Operating Budget 329 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget 6. Deposit/Reimbursement Agreement a. As stipulated in Section 13.1 of this policy, all City and any consultant costs incurred in evaluating applications requesting the establishment of CFDs shall be paid by the applicant by advance deposit increments, or as otherwise agreed upon in writing by the City. b. The City and the applicant shall enter into a Deposit/Reimbursement Agreement that stipulates the terms of payment for the costs in conducting proceedings for the formation of the Services Community Facility District. C. The Finance Director may draw upon the deposits to pay costs including, but not limited to: fees and expenses of any consultants employed in connection with the formation or annexation of the CFD; the costs of publication of notices; appraisal or other studies determined necessary; and reasonable charges for City staff time. 7. Conditions for Project Approval for New Projects a. Effective upon adoption of this policy, the City shall require all developments that propose an increase in a higher density residential use than what is currently allowed by the General Plan or Zoning Code to form or annex into a CFD pursuant to the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982, as amended, for the purposes of providing general municipal services and public safety services, forthe purpose of offsetting the cost of providing said services to new residents. Determination of an eligible CFD will be made at the discretion of the City. If an eligible CFD does not exist, a new services CFD formation will be required. It is the City's goal to provide a consistent level of service to all City residents. b. The City may choose to enter into a Development Agreement with the applicant, requiring the development to form, or annex into, the Services CFD. C. If no Development Agreement is entered into between the City and the applicant, a condition of approval will be placed upon the project during the entitlement phase, stipulating that prior to the approval of any map, it will be required that the development form, or annex into, a Services CFD. Annual Operating Budget 330 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES IX. CAPITAL FINANCING AND DEBT MANAGEMENT City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget The City, in conjunction with its financial advisors, shall determine whether the aggregate cost of public services, allowable under statute, shall equal an amount that renders the formation of a District economically both cost-effective and efficient. The City will work, on a case by case basis, to determine the appropriate tax rate to be levied for proposed projects, in conjunction with a Services CFD applying for the development of affordable housing, as defined by the California Health and Safety Code. X. INTERFUND TRANSFERS AND LOANS POLICY A. Establishment of Various Funds The City has established various funds to account for revenues whose use should be restricted to certain activities. Accordingly, each fund exists as a separate financing entity from other funds, with its own revenue sources, expenditures and fund equity B. Transfer Between Funds Any transfers between funds for operating purposes are set forth in the budget. These operating transfers, under which financial resources are transferred from one fund to another, are distinctly different from interfund borrowings, which are usually made for temporary cash flow reasons, and are not intended to result in a transfer of financial resources. In summary, interfund transfers result in a change in fund equity; interfund borrowings do not, as the intent is to repay the loan in the near term. C. Interfund Loans Interfund loans may be appropriate whenever the loan is expected to be repaid within the immediate future. The most common use of interfund loans is for grant programs, where costs are incurred before drawdowns are initiated and received. Receipt of funds is typically received shortly after the request for funds has been made. Annual Operating Budget 331 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES XI. APPROPRIATIONS LIMITATION A. Adopting a Resolution City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget The Council will annually adopt a resolution establishing the City's appropriations limit calculated in accordance with Article XIII-B of the Constitution of the State of California, Section 7900 of the State of California Government Code, and any other voter approved amendments or state legislation that affect the City's appropriations limit. B. Supporting Documentation Available for Review The supporting documentation used in calculating the City's appropriations limit and projected appropriations subject to the limit will be available for public and Council review at least fifteen days before Council consideration of a resolution to adopt an appropriations limit. The Council will generally consider this resolution in connection with final approval of the budget. C. Calculating Appropriations The City will strive to develop revenue sources, both new and existing, which are considered non -tax proceeds, in calculating its appropriations subject to limitation. D. Review of User Fees and Charges The City will annually review user fees and charges and report to the Council the amount of program subsidy, if any, that is being provided by the General Fund. An annual inflator is automatically calculated each year based on changes in the Consumer Price Index. E. Support of Legislation or Initiatives The City will actively support legislation or initiatives sponsored or approved by League of California Cities which would modify Article XIII-B of the Constitution in a manner which would allow the City to retain projected tax revenues resulting from growth in the local economy for use as determined by the Council. F. Voter Approval to Amend Appropriation Limit The City will seek voter approval to amend its appropriation limit at such time that tax proceeds are in excess of allowable limits. Annual Operating Budget 332 �Alk JA a The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES XII. PENSION RATE STABILIZATION POLICY City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget A. Establishment of an Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 115 Irrevocable Trust The City contracts with the California Public Employees Retirement System (CaIPERS) to provide pension benefits to its employees. The pension is funded with a combination of employer and employee contributions. To mitigate the volatility in the employer contribution rates, the City has established a Section 115 Trust to prefund its pension obligations. Assets from the Trust are restricted for the payment of pension obligations. B. Funding of an Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 115 Irrevocable Trust The primary benefit of a Section 115 Trust is the flexibility of investment options available to the Trust that cities are prohibited from utilizing. The broader investment options have the ability to generate higher yields and investment earnings, thereby increasing the assets held in trust. To establish the Section 115 Trust, a one-time contribution of $8 million will be deposited as seed funding during Fiscal Year 2017-18. Effective Fiscal Year 2018-19 and every year thereafter until amended by Council; 1. At a minimum, an amount equivalent to 26% of Total Payroll may be deposited into the Section 115 Trust in July for the ensuing fiscal year, so long as the City has adequate cash flow for operations. 2. Thirty percent (30%) of the Operating Budget Surplus within the General Fund may be deposited into the Section 115 Trust, up to a maximum contribution of $2 million per year. The Operating Budget Surplus is defined as the excess amount over the budgeted Revenue over Expenditures calculation. 3. Additional Trust contributions may be programmed through the Annual Operating Budget process each year, as approved by Council. Annual pension liability payments to CaIPERS shall be made from the proceeds of the Section 115 Trust, so long as adequate proceeds are available in the Section 115 Trust. XIII. SIGNATURE DELEGATION POLICY A. Delegation of City Manager Signature Authority on Contracts and Agreements In accordance with the Budget Resolution Section 1.E-F., the City Manager may authorize expenditures of funds in the amounts up to sixty thousand dollars ($60,000). Any expenditures in excess of $60,000 requires City Council action. Annual Operating Budget 333 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES XIII. SIGNATURE DELEGATION POLICY A. Delegation of City Manager Signature Authority, continued City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget With regard to contracts and agreements, the City Manager hereby delegates his signature authority, up to $60,000 as follows: 1. Temecula Community Service District contracts and agreements may be approved by the Director of Community Services for the following contract types: a. Entertainment, Performance and Event Agreements 2. Public Works contracts and agreements may be approved by the Director of Public Works for the following contract types: a. Maintenance Agreements b. Minor Construction Agreements 3. "Approved As To Form" approval on all agreements, with the exception of those noted below, may be approved by the Purchasing Manager, up to $8,000. All contracts and agreements in excess of $8,000, must be Approved As To Form by the City Attorney, or his/her designee. a. Successor Agency Agreements b. Housing Authority Agreements c. Preservation of Cultural Resource Agreements d. Leases e. Licenses Agreements f. Settlement Agreements B. Delegation of City Manager Settlement Authority In accordance with the Budget Resolution Section 1.G., the City Manager, in consultation with the City Attorney, is authorized to settle personal injury and property damage lawsuits and enter into settlement agreements on behalf of the City, Temecula Community Services District, and the Successor Agency to the Temecula Redevelopment Agency where the amount of the settlement does not exceed twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000). 1. For all Personal Injury and Property Claim settlements, the City Manager hereby delegates his signature authority to the Risk Manager to negotiate settlements up to $8,000. Annual Operating Budget 334 Alk Q The Heart of Southern California Wine Country BUDGET AND FISCAL POLICIES City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2018-19 Annual Operating Budget XV. EMERGENCY APPROPRIATION POLICY In the event of an emergency resulting from acts of nature or other unforeseen activity, the City Manager is authorized to appropriate budgetary funds for the emergency purchase of goods and services to address such emergency. In the event the emergency requires a significant Public Works response, an emergency exemption to the Public Works bidding requirements must be approved by the City Council via an Emergency Exemption Resolution. Annual Operating Budget 335 The Neart of Swth— CaElornia Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget SUMMARY OF CHANGES IN AUTHORIZED POSITIONS, PERSONNEL AND BENEFIT COSTS The City has established a policy that focuses on streamlining processes and enhancing efficiencies in order to maintain essential public services to the community. This is accomplished by annual reviews of the organizational structure of each department to address the level of service needs of the department consistent with the City's Quality of Life Master Plan. Total authorized Full Time Equivalent (FTE) positions total 176.45 authorized positions, which reflects an increase of 4.75 positions compared to the prior year. Two of the authorized positions (Office Specialist and Community Services Manager) are associated with the Margarita Recreation Center (former YMCA facility) and will remain unfunded until the facility has been rehabilitated. Changes from Prior Year A total of 4.75 new positions have been added to the 2019-20 Schedule of Authorized Positions: • 0.75 Office Aide III (City Manager Department) • 1.0 Office Specialist II (Public Works Department) • 1.0 IT Technician -Media (Information Technology Department) • 1.0 Management Aide I (TCSD — Human Services Department) • 1.0 Park Ranger I (TCSD — Park Rangers Department) The City Manager Office Aide III position is a part-time, benefitted position. This position will provide support to the City Manager's office by performing a variety of clerical duties and support functions. The Public Works Office Specialist II position will provide administrative support for the CIP engineering staff by performing a full range of general clerical support functions. The Information Technology IT Media Technician will provide media services support which will enable the Media Services Division to meet the demand for their services which include video production, management of public access television, maintenance of audiovisual equipment and the management of the City website and social media accounts. The Community Services Management Aide I position will provide support for the growth and success of inclusive services in Human Services Division as well as provide support to the Senior Center Division. The Community Services Park Ranger I position will provide professional and technical assistance to the public so that they may enjoy and safely use City parks and recreation facilities. This position will increase the coverage areas throughout the City and expand daily patrol at City facilities. Pursuant to Section 1.D. of the Resolution of the City Council of the City of Temecula Adopting the Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget and Establishing Controls on Changes in Appropriations, the City Manager is authorized to make changes to the Schedule of Authorized Positions. Employee Salaries Pursuant to Section 10 of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the City of Temecula and Teamsters Local 911, employee wages are subject to a cost of living adjustment (COLA), 2019. As a result Annual Operating Budget 336 The Neart of Swth— CaElornia Wine Country City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget of the increase in the Consumer Price Index, the COLA will be 3% which will be provided to all eligible employees on July 1, 2019. The estimated annual cost of the COLA is $426,210. Pursuant to Section 47.3 of the MOU, a Reclassification Request Process is available to represented employees whose work has fundamentally changed due to a department reorganization, changes to staffing levels, introduction of new programs or services, and/or reallocations of work and internal reporting relationships. Per this section of the MOU, employees may request an evaluation of their job duties by an independent consultant, to determine the proper job classification for the work performed. This Reclassification Request Process is also available to employees covered under the Management Compensation Plan (MCP), as outlined in Section 31.3. In accordance with the aforementioned provisions of the MOU and MCP, a total of 6 employees received reclassifications, effective July 1, 2019. A total of three Represented employees and three Management employees, at a total cost of $37,179 for Fiscal Year 2019-20. Employee Benefits The City contributes to the California Public Employees Retirement System (CaIPERS), a multiple -employer public employee defined benefit pension plan for all authorized employees and temporary employees who work more than 1,000 hours per year, or who have previously been part of CAPERS pension program. CAPERS provides retirement and disability benefits, annual cost of living adjustments, and death benefits to plan members and beneficiaries. CalPERS acts as a common investment and administrative agent for participating public entities within the State of California. Benefit provisions and all other requirements are established by the State statute and City ordinance, with the City providing benefits based on a "2.7% at 55" formula for current employees hired prior to September 11, 2011 (Tier 1). There is a "2.0% at 60" formula for employees hired after September 11, 2011(Tier 2). For employees hired afterJanuary 1, 2013, who were not previously in the CAPERS system (or a reciprocal California pension system), a "2% at 62" formula as defined by the Public Employees' Pension Reform Act of 2013 (PEPRA) is provided. The City pays a contribution on behalf of authorized employees; (5% for Tier 1 and 4% for Tier 2 employees), in addition to the required actuarially determined employer contribution rate. The annual cost of CalPERS pension for Authorized personnel for Fiscal Year 2019-20 is estimated to be $4,525,430. The City provides a Section 125 Flexible Benefits Plan for all authorized employees. The total monthly cafeteria allotment is $1,200 from which employees can purchase health, dental, life, and disability insurance benefits. Also included in this Plan are options for medical and dependent care reimbursement, deferred compensation, or a "cash back" option. The cafeteria allotment is also provided to eligible retirees as part of the City's retiree health plan. As part of the MOU and MCP agreements, in addition to the cafeteria allotment, the City provides employees a $400 per month contribution to a Health Flex Contribution account to be used for medical, dental or vision premiums, or directed to a Healthcare Flexible Spending Account. Any unused amount not utilized for these purposes will be forfeited. The annual cost of the cafeteria benefit plan for Fiscal Year 2019-20 is estimated to be $3,378,942. Annual Operating Budget 337 R irw 5w 1. C.dUw­ SCHEDULE OF AUTHORIZED POSITIONS As of July 1, 2019 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget FY2019-20 Number of Positions Salary Schedule Bargaining Unit* Exempt/ Non - Exempt Monthly Salary Minimum Maximum CITY COUNCIL Councilmember 5.0 600 800 N/A E City Council Subtotal: CITY MANAGER Assistant City Manager Assistant to the City Manager City Manager Executive Assistant Office Aide III City Manager Subtotal: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Administrative Assistant (Confidential) Economic Development Manager Management Aide III Management Analyst Senior Management Analyst Economic Development Subtotal: CITY CLERK Administrative Assistant Director of Legislative Affairs/City Clerk Management Aide III Office Specialist II Records Manager Records Technician City Clerk Subtotal: HUMAN RESOURCES Human Resources Manager 1.0 12,850 18,157 Exec E 1.0 9,276 13,107 MCP E 1.0 N/A 19,892 Contract E 1.0 4,444 6,279 MCP E 0.75 4.75 1.0 2,921 3,739 3,832 5,415 Rep MCP NE NE 1.0 7,651 10,810 MCP E 0.5 3,832 4,905 Rep NE 1.0 5,689 8,038 MCP E 1.0 4.5 1.0 6,279 8,872 3,832 4,905 MCP Rep E NE 1.0 10,547 14,902 Exec E 1.0 3,832 4,905 Rep NE 1.0 3,304 4,230 Rep NE 1.0 5,831 8,239 MCP E 1.0 6 1.0 3,387 4,336 7,651 10,810 Rep MCP NE E Human Resources Technician I (Confidential) 1.0 4,444 6,279 MCP NE Senior Management Analyst 1.0 6,279 8,872 MCP E Senior Office Specialist Confidential 1.0 3,647 5,154 MCP NE Human Resources Subtotal: 4.0 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Risk Manager 1.0 7,651 10,810 MCP E Emergency Management Subtotal: 1.0 338 R irw 5w 1. C.dUw­ SCHEDULE OF AUTHORIZED POSITIONS As of July 1, 2019 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget FY2019-20 Number of Positions Salary Schedule Bargaining Unit* Exempt/ Non - Exempt Monthly Salary Minimum Maximum FINANCE Accountant I (Confidential) 1.0 5,831 8,239 MCP NE Accounting Assistant 2.0 4,127 5,283 Rep NE Accounting Assistant - Cashier 1.0 4,127 5,283 Rep NE Accounting Technician 1 1.0 4,555 5,831 Rep NE Accounting Technician II 1.0 4,786 6,126 Rep NE Business License Technician 1.0 4,555 5,831 Rep NE Director of Finance 1.0 11,357 16,048 Exec E Fiscal Services Manager 2.0 7,651 10,810 MCP E Payroll Coordinator (Confidential) 1.0 4,555 6,436 MCP NE Purchasing Manager Senior Management Analyst 1.0 6,436 9,094 MCP E 1.0 6,279 8,872 MCP E ENEFFinance Subtotal: 3.0 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Administrative Assistant 0.5 3,832 4,905 Rep NE Assistant Director Information Technology/Support Svcs 1.0 9,094 12,850 MCP E Director of Information Technology/Support Svcs 1.0 10,547 14,902 Exec E Information Technology Manager 1.0 8,239 11,641 MCP E Information Technology Specialist 1 1.0 5,283 6,762 Rep NE Information Technology Specialist II 1.0 5,550 7,104 Rep NE Information Technology Supervisor 2.0 6,762 8,656 Rep NE Information Technology Technician 1 1.0 4,555 5,831 Rep NE Senior Information Technology Specialist 3.0 6,126 7,842 Rep NE Support Services Office Specialist II - AM Office Specialist II - PM Support Services Supervisor Support Services Technician 0.6 3,304 4,230 Rep NE 0.6 3,304 4,230 Rep NE 1.0 4,026 5,154 Rep NE 0.5 1 3,304 4,230 Rep NE Information Technology Subtotal: 14.2 339 R irw 5w 1. C.dUw­ SCHEDULE OF AUTHORIZED POSITIONS As of July 1, 2019 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget FY2019-20 Number of Positions Salary Schedule Bargaining Unit* Exempt/ Non - Exempt Monthly Salary Minimum Maximum COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Administrative Assistant 1.0 3,832 4,905 Rep NE Director of Community Development 1.0 11,357 16,048 Exec E Principal Management Analyst 1.0 6,931 9,794 MCP E SARDA/CDBG/Service Level D Assistant Planner 0.25 5,283 6,762 Rep NE Associate Planner II 0.6 6,436 8,239 Rep NE Senior Planner 0.4 7,104 10,038 MCP E Planning Assistant Planner 1.75 5,283 6,762 Rep NE Associate Planner 1 2.0 5,831 7,464 Rep NE Associate Planner 11 0.4 6,436 8,239 Rep NE Community Development Technician 1 2.0 4,230 5,415 Rep NE Community Development Technician 11 2.0 4,669 5,977 Rep NE Office Specialist 11 0.5 3,304 4,230 Rep NE Planning Technician 1.0 4,786 6,126 Rep NE Principal Planner 1.0 7,842 11,080 MCP E Senior Planner 0.6 7,104 10,038 MCP E Building and Safety/Code Enforcement Building Inspector 1 1.0 5,415 6,931 Rep NE Building Inspector II 3.0 5,977 7,651 Rep NE Building Official 1.0 9,555 13,500 MCP E Code Enforcement Officer 1 1.0 4,444 5,689 Rep NE Code Enforcement Officer 11 1.0 4,905 6,279 Rep NE Community Development Processing Supervisor 1.0 5,689 7,282 Rep NE Office Specialist 11 0.5 3,304 4,230 Rep NE Senior Building Inspector 1.0 6,597 8,445 Rep NE Senior Code Enforcement Officer Senior Office Specialist 1.0 5,415 6,931 Rep NE 2.0 3,647 4,669 Rep NE Community Development Subtotal: 28. PUBLIC WORKS Administrative Assistant Director of Public Works Principal Management Analyst CIP Administration Associate Civil Engineer Associate Engineer II 1.0 3,832 4,905 Rep NE 1.0 12,231 17,282 Exec E 1.0 6,931 9,794 MCP E 2.0 7,651 9,794 Rep E 3.0 7,282 9,322 Rep E Office Specialist 11 1.0 3,304 4,230 Rep E Principal Civil Engineer 1.0 9,555 13,500 MCP E Public Works Inspector 11 1.0 4,905 6,279 Rep E Senior Civil Engineer 2.0 8,404 11,875 MCP E Senior Public Works Inspector (Y-Rate) 1.0 5,585 7,150 Rep NE Land Development Associate Civil Engineer 2.0 7,651 9,794 Rep E Associate Engineer 1 1.0 6,597 8,445 Rep NE Associate Engineer II 2.0 7,282 9,322 Rep E Office Specialist 11 1.0 3,304 4,230 Rep NE 340 R irw 5w 1. C.dUw­ SCHEDULE OF AUTHORIZED POSITIONS As of July 1, 2019 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget FY2019-20 Number of Positions Salary Schedule Bargaining Unit* Exempt/ Non - Exempt Monthly Salary Minimum Maximum Principal Civil Engineer (Underfill as Senior Civil Engineer) 1.0 9,555 13,500 MCP Rep E NE Public Works Inspector II 1.0 4,905 6,279 Senior Public Works Inspector 1.0 5,415 6,931 Rep NE Traffic Assistant Engineer II 1.0 5,977 7,651 Rep NE Associate Civil Engineer 1.0 7,651 9,794 Rep E Associate Engineer II 1.0 7,282 9,322 Rep E Senior Office Specialist 1.0 3,647 4,669 Rep NE Senior Signal Technician 1.0 6,436 8,239 Rep NE Signal Technician 1 1.0 5,550 7,104 Rep NE Maintenance (Streets, Facilities, Parks) Custodian 1 1.0 2,581 3,304 Rep NE Custodian II (Y-Rate) 1.0 2,861 3,662 Rep NE Field Supervisor - Facilities 1.0 5,415 6,931 Rep NE Landscape Inspector II 1.0 5,154 6,597 Rep NE Lead Maintenance Worker 5.0 4,555 5,831 Rep NE Lead Maintenance Worker - Facilities 2.0 4,905 6,279 Rep NE Maintenance Manager 1.0 7,842 11,080 MCP E Maintenance Supervisor 2.0 6,436 9,094 MCP E Maintenance Supervisor - Landscape 1.0 6,931 9,794 MCP E Maintenance Worker 1 Maintenance Worker I - Facilities Maintenance Worker II Management Assistant Office Specialist II Senior Landscape Inspector Senior Office Specialist 3.0 3,739 4,786 Rep NE 2.0 4,026 5,154 Rep NE 3.0 4,127 5,283 Rep NE 1.0 4,230 5,977 Rep NE 1.0 3,304 4,230 Rep NE 1.0 5,689 7,282 Rep NE 1.0 3,647 4,669 Re NE ff Public Works Subtotal: 56.0 341 R irw 5w 1. C.dUw­ SCHEDULE OF AUTHORIZED POSITIONS As of July 1, 2019 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget FY2019-20 Number of Positions Salary Schedule Bargaining Unit* Exempt/ Non - Exempt Monthly Salary Minimum Maximum FIRE Administrative Assistant 1.0 3,832 4,905 Rep NE Community Development Technician 1 Community Development Technician II Fire Ins ector 1 Fire Subtotal: COMMUNITY SERVICES Aquatics Supervisor II Community Services Assistant Community Services Coordinator 1 1.0 4,230 5,415 Rep NE 1.0 4,669 5,977 Rep NE 1.0 4 1.0 6,279 8,038 5,415 6,931 Rep Rep NE NE 1.0 3,387 4,336 Rep NE 1.0 4,336 5,550 Rep NE Community Services Manager ** 9.0 7,104 10,038 MCP E Community Services Superintendent 2.0 7,842 11,080 MCP E Community Services Supervisor 1 2.0 5,028 6,436 Rep NE Community Services Supervisor II 1.0 5,283 6,762 Rep NE Director of Community Services 1.0 11,357 16,048 Exec E Management Aide 1 2.0 3,145 4,026 Rep NE Management Aide II 4.0 3,472 4,444 Rep NE Management Aide III 2.0 3,832 4,905 Rep NE Office Specialist 1 ** 1.0 3,145 4,026 Rep NE Office Specialist II 1.0 3,304 4,230 Rep NE Park Ranger 1 2.0 4,026 5,154 Rep NE Park Ranger 11 1.0 4,444 5,689 Rep NE Senior Administrative Assistant 1.0 4,230 5,415 Rep NE Senior Management Analyst Senior Recreation Leader Theater Technical Assistant Theater Technical Coordinator I 1.0 6,279 8,872 MCP E 1.0 2,849 3,647 Rep NE 1.0 3,387 4,336 Rep NE 1.0 4,555 5,831 Re NE Community Services Subtotal: 36.0Ell Total By Department Positions City Council 5.0 City Manager 4.75 Economic Development 4.5 City Clerk 6.0 Human Resources 4.0 Emergency Management 1.0 Finance 13.0 Information Technology 14.2 Community Development 28.0 Public Works 56.0 Fire 4.0 Community Services 36.0 Positions:Total of Authorized * Bargaining Units: Rep = Represented MCP = Management/Confidential Exec = Executive ** Unfunded Positions include: (1) Office Specialist / (TCSD), and (1) Community Services Manager The two TCSD positions are associated with the Margarita Recreation Center and will remain unfunded until the facility has been rehabilitated and is open for operation. 342 City of Temecula r{i�Gts Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget SCHEDULE OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATED POSITIONS Adopted Unfunded Current Unfunded Proposed Unfunded 2017-18 2017-18 Changes 2018-19 2018-19 Changes 2019-20 2019-20 GENERAL FUND CITY COUNCIL Council Members 5.00 - 5.00 - 5.00 - CITY MANAGER City Manager 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 Assistant City Manager 0.75 0.75 0.05 0.80 Assistant to the City Manger - - 1.00 1.00 Executive Assistant 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 Office Aide III - - 0.75 0.75 Risk Manager - - 0.05 0.05 Senior Management Analyst 1.00 1.00 (1.00) - 3.75 - 3.75 0.85 4.60 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Administrative Assistant (Confidential) 0.90 0.10 1.00 - 1.00 Assistant City Manager - - - 0.10 0.10 Economic Development Analyst I - - - - Economic Development Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 Management Aide III - 0.50 0.50 0.50 Management Analyst - Economic Dev. 2.90 (1.90) 1.00 1.00 Senior Management Analyst 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 (0.30) 4.50 0.10 4.60 3.80 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Fiscal Services Manager - - - - - Risk Manager 0.40 0.30 0.70 (0.45) 0.25 0.40 0.30 0.70 (0.45) 0.25 HUMAN RESOURCES Administrative Assistant (Confidential) 0.10 (0.10) - - Assistant City Manager 0.25 0.25 (0.20) 0.05 Human Resources Manager 0.90 0.90 (0.10) 0.80 Human Resources Technician 1 1.00 1.00 1.00 Office Specialist (Confidential) - - - - Risk Manager 0.10 0.10 0.40 0.50 Senior Management Analyst 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 Senior Office Specialist (Confidential) 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 (0.10) 4.25 0.10 4.35 4.35 CITY CLERK Administrative Assistant 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 Director of Legislative Affairs/City Clerk 1.00 1.00 1.00 Management Aide III 1.00 1.00 1.00 Office Specialist - - - Office Specialist 11 1.00 1.00 1.00 Records Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 Records Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 343 City of Temecula Fiscal Year 2019-20 Annual Operating Budget SCHEDULE OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATED POSITIONS FINANCE Administrative Assistant Accountant I (Confidential) Accounting Assistant Accounting Assistant - Cashier Accounting Manager Accounting Specialist Accounting Technician I Accounting Technician 11 Business License Technician Director of Finance Fiscal Services Manager Payroll Coordinator (Confidential) Purchasing Manager Revenue Manager Senior Management Analyst COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT - PLANNING Administrative Assistant Assistant Planner Associate Planner I Associate Planner II Community Dev. Processing Supervisor Community Deve